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South Haven housing estate stalls with tied vote on site plan | Local News

By Site plan

For the second time in two weeks, a proposal to allow an affordable housing development in South Haven ended in a tie vote, jeopardizing the project’s ability to move past the drawing board stage.

Chicago-based Habitat Co. has spent the past year finalizing plans to build a 144-unit apartment and townhouse development on 5.74 acres of property once occupied by the former factory. ‘Overton.

The South Haven Planning Commission blocked a 4-4 vote on February 16 to recommend Planned Unit Development (PUD) approval for the project. The tie vote put the matter before the city council to decide.

However, last Monday city council members were split 3-3 (with one member absent) on setting up a public hearing on March 7 for the project, meaning the proposal will not go ahead at this stage.

Council members who voted against the proposal expressed concern about the number of proposed housing units, the proximity of the proposed buildings to sidewalks and the company’s request to forego paying for an impact study environment for the site.






The rendering shows what the first phase of the SoHAVEN apartment complex could look like. Phase one apartments would face Elkenburg Street and Indiana Avenue in South Haven.



“We have planners split on approving this, City Council split, it’s too important for us to come to a conclusion at this point,” Mayor Scott Smith said.

Smith, however, said the city isn’t ready to drop Habitat’s proposal.

“The staff will come back to them and let them know of our concerns,” he said. “We still have some concerns, but not enough information. We hope this will be done at a later date. »

Several other board members have also expressed interest in continuing to work with Habitat Co.

“I hope we can find a way to move forward with Overton’s development,” said Board Member Wendi Onuki. “The community needs affordable housing. I look forward to finding solutions.

Council member George Sleeper expressed similar thoughts.

“Hopefully we can get through this,” he said. “There are a lot of good things with this development.”

A study and a waiver

Sleeper, who voted against the proposal, said his biggest concern was the developer’s waiver request for performing an EIS.

Environmental Impact Studies analyze the impact a proposed development would have on a municipality’s utility systems, fire, police, school services, solid waste disposal, soil, air , groundwater, floodplains, wetlands, noise levels and additional traffic.

Habitat officials said the city, which owns the Overton property, already has much of this information, and conducting a study on its own would cost up to $20,000 and take about two months.

They had hoped city council approval of the project would allow them to apply for tax credits from the Michigan Housing Development Authority by April 1 to help fund the first phase of the project.

In reviewing Habitat’s request for the EIA exemption, city staff agreed that the information was already available.

“The city council acquired this property through a tax foreclosure in 2015, obtained environmental due diligence reports, prepared and implemented an environmental protection plan, demolished an abandoned factory on the site and examined the impacts of a large development on the site. since the 2018 master planning process and developer’s RFP,” Deputy City Manager Griffin Graham wrote in a memo to the planning commission earlier this month.

However, Sleeper and several other dissenting board members believe Habitat should still undertake the study itself since the company is offering to develop the site.

“I don’t see any benefit to forgoing EIS,” Sleeper said. “It’s important to make sure the proposal fits in (for the surrounding neighborhood).”

Board to review strip mall site plan and land use zoning change

By Site plan

The Rio Rancho Board of Directors is scheduled to hold two development-related public hearings during its regular meeting beginning at 6 p.m. Thursday at City Hall.

According to the agenda, a public hearing concerns a site plan for an acre and a half of land on Grande Boulevard, behind Latitudes. According to the plan, a strip mall would be built for professional and medical offices, stores or restaurants at 2340 Grande.

The second public hearing involves a request to change the land use zoning of two lots on Golf Course Road from low-density single-family residence to neighborhood commercial, according to the agenda. The lots consist of just under an acre of land between them.

The lots are located at 2211 and 2215 Golf Course, on the west side of the road.

Empty commercial land is to the south, behind medium-density residential lots to the west and developed neighborhood commercial land to the north, according to a map included in the city information. The land directly across from the golf course is vacant and zoned for low density single family housing.

The information does not specify which companies could occupy the land if the rezoning is approved. In local shopping districts, the municipal code allows:

  • Retail stores, except gas stations;
  • Repair shops for small items such as televisions, radios and keys;
  • Boutiques, such as photography, pet shops, tailoring, dry cleaning and similar trades;
  • Banks and offices;
  • places of worship;
  • Restaurants without drive-thru counters;
  • Bakeries;
  • Parks, green spaces and public facilities;
  • day care centers;
  • Funeral homes;
  • Unlicensed fraternal organizations and nonprofit service groups;
  • Medical, veterinary and professional offices;
  • Public services; and
  • Housing, as a secondary use.

Owners may also apply for permits for these uses:

  • temporary storage;
  • Schools;
  • Self-service storage and vehicle storage;
  • Commercial buildings; and
  • Research and development offices, provided that the activities are not a nuisance or a danger to the neighborhood.

Members of the public can attend the meeting in person or watch it live at rrnm.gov/2303/Watch-and-Download-City-Meetings. The agenda is at the same URL.

People can contribute in person, by email at [email protected] or via Zoom. Information for joining the Zoom meeting can be found on the website above.

Planners accept Union Green site plan with ZBA hurdles to clear | News

By Site plan

HARBERT — A revised site plan for the proposed Union Green development was approved despite complications from new zoning rules for the Union Pier area at the February 9 Chikaming Township Planning Commission meeting.

A Union Pier overlay district that went into effect November 2, 2021 was not in place when planners gave initial site plan approval in July 2021, and the fate of a major feature of the revised site plan of Union Green presented to planners on Feb. 9 that appears to conflict with the new rules could end up being decided by the township’s Zoning Board of Appeals.

Planners approved the Union Green site plan by a 4-1 vote on February 9 with the following stipulations – that the developer go to the Zoning Appeal Board to seek a waiver reducing a requirement under the District of superimposed zoning that the front half of the first floor structures in the Union Pier Corridor portion of the neighborhood be set aside for commercial purposes; amend the site plan to remove two parking spaces adjacent to a “home/work” retail space and conform to a 10 foot front setback requirement for buildings; and that an updated site plan be provided to the township authorities.

“This is the first time we’ve had this ordinance in front of us, we’re testing it,” Planning Commission Chairman John Chipman said. “We’re testing it with a sitemap that was actually approved under a different order.”

In June 2021, Brad Rottschafer began the process of obtaining township approval to build the Union Green development on a 1.05 acre site (the former home of Riviera Gardens) located at the corner of Red Highway Arrow and Goodwin Avenue.

Following an Aug. 4 public hearing on the Union Green site plan, planners requested additional information on factors such as open space requirements and parking. On September 1, the Planning Commission also requested responses regarding driveway safety requirements to eliminate dead ends, reduce density and increase open space, and the submission of an impact assessment.

Suzanne Schulz of Progressive AE presented a revised sitemap designed to meet September 1 requests at the February 9 meeting.

Highlights of the new site plan include a reduction in the number of residential units from 20 to 18, with the two proposed former buildings along the Red Arrow Freeway being consolidated into one. An earlier site plan indicated that the housing sites would range in size from 2,100 to 8,000 square feet.

“Grass block pavers” were also added to the plan in the northwest portion of the property near a repositioned swimming pool to allow access for emergency responders; additional green space for a more park-like feel; and a screened waste corral area.

Schulz said the townhouses along Goodwin will be three stories while the carriage house along Red Arrow will be two stories, adding that “very high quality materials” will be used. She said the relationship between the buildings and the sidewalk is designed to be “walkable” and “village-like.”

She said a traffic impact study (based on the design of 20 units) predicted about 20 new morning rush hour trips on weekdays and 23 new afternoon rush hour trips in week.

In July 2021, the area in question was zoned CU Union Pier Mixed Use, and multi-family residential development was permitted with special land use approval.

On Feb. 9, Chikaming Zoning Administrator Kelly Largent said the proposed development is no longer a special land use in the Union Pier Overlay Zoning District (which regulates zoning in parts of Chikaming and New Buffalo Township from Union Pier) which came into effect in November. 2. 2021.

“You will now find that this is an authorized use,” Largent said.

But later in the meeting, a section of Union Pier’s zoning rules regarding the “uses” of first floors became an issue.

The latest site plan for Union Green calls for the first floors of all but the living/working facility to be residential.

But the wording of the ordinance for the “Union Pier Corridor” area states, “Residences may be permitted in the back 50% of the ground, but the front 50% must be for commercial use.”

It also reads: “The commercial first floor will span the full width of the building’s frontage as seen from the adjacent public street.”

The first floors of the “Union Pier Village” district (the downtown area) must be used for commercial purposes only.

Planning Commission member Grace Rappe said it looks like the building along the Red Arrow Freeway will need to be redesigned.

But Schulz said she thought there was some question as to whether the order was intended to require advertisements on the entire facade of a building along the Red Arrow Freeway in the “corridor” area.

“From an economic viability perspective, and ensuring there are not more vacancies along the Red Arrow Freeway, it would not seem logical to require commercial space on the ground floor. Most communities that had this requirement are now repealing them and changing them from what they used to be because they have an overabundance of vacant commercial space,” she said.

Planning Commission Chairman John Chipman said the intention to have separate village corridors and districts in the Overlay District was to concentrate commercial entities in the central part of Union Pier, adding that he thinks Schulz is right to call the rules confusing.

“The reality is you’re not going to have storefronts all the way down the hall,” he said, adding that no order is perfect and “we’re going to work on it.”

Rappe later said, “The zoning ordinance, clear or unclear, is all we have at the moment. And there are things here that are written that are clearly not part of this development proposal.

Planner Andy Brown noted that a site plan has already been approved and the developer has been asked to make changes such as creating more visual security at the corner of Red Arrow and Goodwin, and they did.

“They did the things we asked for that were reasonable, which would make their sitemap even more appealing,” he said.

There has been debate over whether anything with the density of the Union Green project could ever be developed under the current zoning, Rappe said nine three-bedroom units per property was now the limit.

Following the Planning Commission’s 4-1 decision and a series of public comments, Rappe (who voted the only “no”) announced his intention to resign from the Planning Commission, calling the decision of requesting waivers from the ZBA instead of following what it called “absolutely horrible” proper procedures.

Those who spoke about the Union Green issue during public comments included:

Suzanne Koenigsberg, who said driving across the Red Arrow Freeway, a street at 45 miles per hour without lights, doesn’t seem like a safe bet. She also wondered if there would be enough parking for everyone likely to be in a short-term rental community.

Karen Doughty said she doesn’t think the proposed development is a good use of space. She also said it looks like the big trees that need to be felled will be replaced by 34 “twigs”.

Jim Harper said he thought the development was far too dense. Harper said the impact on already small and crowded public beaches worries him.

Fran Wersells asked “Why is there nothing green in Union Green, why is there no mention of using eco-friendly materials, solar panels, heaps of compost?”

Babe Paukstys said the traffic studies were done on weekdays while “our problems are on the weekends”. She said with up to a dozen people potentially in each of the 18 units, there aren’t enough parking spaces and sending them onto the Red Arrow Freeway isn’t safe. She also questioned the affordability of the units.

Nick Martinski said he thought township officials seemed more focused on representing the interests of the builder than township residents. “You’ve already approved it, and now you’re going to receive public comments. So our comments mean nothing.

Pijus Stoncius asked how the township fire department would arrive at a fire on the third floor.

Koenigsberg concluded the public comment session by saying “We don’t want that here.”

Also on February 9, the Planning Commission approved a site plan for a proposed Barndogg cafe in an existing structure near the corner of Wintergreen and Red Arrow Highway at Union Pier on the condition of obtaining a ZBA waiver involving permission public parking located less than 600 feet across the Red Arrow Freeway to alleviate the limited number of parking spaces available at the existing site, as well as to address concerns raised regarding front yard parking, removal of trash cans and widening of entry and exit points.

And planners heard from Joseph Reed, who said the planned concert hall for Harbert Community Park was progressing through a somewhat closed process by the park board without a proper master plan reviewed by the planning commission.

Athol Daily News – Uma gets approval for modified sitemap to accommodate expansion

By Site plan

ATHOL – At its meeting on Wednesday February 2, the Athol Community Planning and Development Board approved a site plan amendment for Uma Cultivation’s operation at 706 Petersham Road. The original site plan, approved by the board of directors in December 2020, called for the construction of a 10,000 square foot building to house offices, manufacturing spaces, storage spaces and a 6 000 square feet for growing marijuana.

However, as planning for the project progressed, Uma officials determined that the original building they had proposed would be insufficient to meet the needs of the business and sought board approval. to double the size of the proposed structure to 20,000 square feet.

A public hearing on the proposal opened in November last year, with follow-up at monthly council meetings in December and January. The hearing closed on January 5, but no decision on the amended plan was made at the time. Time was given to council members to weigh any proposed conditions they might want to attach to the amended plan and to allow for a review of the site plan by the council’s engineering consultant, Tighe & Bond.

Ahead of last week’s vote, Athol planning and development director Eric Smith told the council: “This is now a major site plan process due to the fact that they offer 20,000 square feet. This triggered a major review. Their intentions are to eventually reach 50,000 square feet, which means they will have to come back in the future, and this will be an additional site plan topic for the council.

The amended site plan, he said, included everything the council had wanted to see, adding that no waivers had been requested by Uma.

“As soon as you issue a decision tonight,” Smith said, “you will issue a decision within the 45-day period since the hearing closed. A conclusion for includes a summary of the process, all official comments from the city , and we wanted to put in there that the ConCom (Conservation Commission) had no problem with the location as there are no wetlands on the site, which is all that would fall under their jurisdiction.

He noted that in carrying out the peer review, Tighe & Bond found that “everything that needed to be resolved had been resolved”, adding only that the engineering company had suggestions for conditions to be added. to the amended permit.

“Council may, in the course of the vote,” Smith continued, “find that – with all conditions – the proposal does not adversely affect the health, safety and welfare of residents of the city, and that have a positive impact on the local economy. So it’s part of your decision.

Smith said the conditions included in the site plan approved by council in December 2020 will be included in the amended site plan, “any further changes will have to come back to council, either for special permit approval or for approval of the site plan for the future building.”

This, he explained, means that Uma will have to come back to the board for any proposals to expand the building beyond the 20,000 square foot scope of the currently proposed project.

Even with a doubling in size of the original building, Smith said, “They agreed to have the maximum (crop) canopy at 6,000 square feet for six months of odor-free operations,” before returning to the board of directors with any request for canopy expansion.

Another condition for approval of the amended site plan was proposed by council member Marc Morgan.

“If they were to increase the number of employees,” Smith explained, “it would trigger a review of their septic system, and the council should be notified of this process. They still have to go through Title 5 approval. They have the location approved by the board of health, but they have to go through Title 5 if they need to make any changes.

Uma encountered a small glitch on the way to approving the modified sitemap. The company, in anticipation of expanding the size of the original building, felled a number of trees on its property without first informing the municipal authorities of its intention to do so. Neighbors feared the action would increase stormwater runoff from the property, which would lead to erosion of the hillside that overlooks Petersham Road. However, a site inspection revealed that while the trees were being felled, stumps were left in place, reducing the likelihood of increased runoff.

Although the move was determined to violate the spirit of Uma’s special permit, it did not constitute an actual violation of the permit conditions and no penalties were issued against the company.

The Board of Directors’ vote to approve the amended site plan was unanimous.

Greg Vine can be contacted at [email protected]

City Council Grants Preliminary Site Plan Approval for 5-Story Building on Osborn Avenue

By Site plan

Riverhead City Council on Tuesday granted preliminary site plan approval to the five-story mixed-use development building at 205 Osborn Avenue at the corner of Court Street, bringing the project closer to the revitalization of the distressed area with “transit- oriented development.

Council members voted unanimously to complete preliminary review of the proposed $19.6 million development, which would include 37 market-priced rental apartments – 24 one-bedroom units, 10 two-bedroom units bedrooms and three studios with ground-floor offices in the 41,867-square-foot, 50-foot-tall building. Construction also requires surface parking on the approximately half-acre site. Board members made no comment during the vote.

The development was the first proposed since the city adopted the Railroad Avenue Urban Renewal Area overlay district and transit-oriented development plan more than a year ago. The city council moved the project forward in September by assuming the project’s lead agency under the state’s Environmental Quality Review Act and determining that the project will have no environmental impacts. significant negative environmental effects.

The development is the second in Riverhead Town from Huntington-based G2D Group, which is also currently constructing a mark-to-market apartment building on West Main Street.

Over the past few months, the Osborn Avenue project has been reviewed by various boards and committees. The Zoning Appeal Board granted six of the nine zoning variances requested by the proponent for the project. The city demanded that the “volume” of the building be reduced by moving back the fifth floor of the building. An amended site plan is also intended to alleviate potential traffic congestion on Court Street.

The city held a public hearing on the site plan on Dec. 7, with some residents and organizations, including the Riverhead Free Library, raising concerns about the building’s impact on surrounding properties as well as the quality and the water supply. Others, including prominent downtown business leaders, have expressed support for the project.

According to the resolution granting preliminary site plan approval, the building will need to meet certain requirements before the Riverhead Water District will provide domestic water and fire protection to the site, including the installation of a new 4 inch domestic water service extended from existing. water main on Court Street; a new 6-inch water fire sprinkler service; a developer-funded upgrade to the existing iron water main along Osborn Avenue; and the replacement of two existing fire hydrants near the property.

The developers are also seeking financial assistance from the Industrial Development Agency, including an increased property tax abatement over 10 years, as well as a mortgage tax and sales/use tax exemption. The promoters said the project “would not be financially feasible” without IDA assistance.

City council did not discuss public comments or any elements of the project after the hearing in a public business session ahead of Tuesday’s meeting.

GD2 CEO Greg DeRosa said estimated apartment rents in the building would be around $2,000 for a two-bedroom apartment, around $2,000 for a one-bedroom apartment, and around $1,600 for a a studio.

Note to editors: A paragraph detailing information on the development that must meet certain requirements to be served by the Riverhead Water District has been added after the original publication.

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Layout plan for proposed warehouses in Berryville pending | Winchester star

By Site plan

BERRYVILLE — A developer’s project to build three 60,000 square foot commercial warehouses along Jack Enders Boulevard is on hold.

On Wednesday evening, the Berryville Area Development Authority (BADA) postponed review of a site plan for the second time. LGV Group LLC requested the deferral as it strives to meet Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) expectations.

As specified by an agreement between the localities, BADA advises the Clarke County Board of Supervisors and the Berryville City Council on land use issues involving an area targeted for possible annexation to the city.

The warehouses would be built on 12½ acres adjacent to Clarke County Business Park. The property is already zoned for business park uses.

Following a public hearing in early December, the authority initially postponed consideration of the site plan application because full details of how the warehouses would affect their surroundings were not yet available.

During the hearing, some residents of the nearby Berryville Glen subdivision expressed concerns that large trucks serving the warehouses could cause traffic and safety issues.

BADA continued the hearing until February 23, when it now aims to review the site plan.

“Hopefully everything will be ready by then,” said Berryville Community Development Manager Christy Dunkle, a BADA staff member.

Sterling-based LGV operates a business on nearby Station Road where metal windows and doors are made. The company aims to use one of the warehouses for assembly and storage and rent the other two.

LGV received initial feedback from DEQ on the warehouse layout earlier this month. The department requested more geotechnical testing, and it was done, property manager Lara Dunlap said in a recent letter to the authority.

Geotechnics refers to a component of civil engineering concerned with the materials of the earth, such as rocks and soil.

A DEQ representative “assured that they would have a formal review of the revised site plan (incorporating all geotechnical recommendations) completed by early February,” Dunlap wrote.

LGV is looking for tenants for the two warehouses it will not be using. Dunkle said she doesn’t know the status of that effort.

The development of the Gordon House site in the face of opposition

By Site development

A city committee voted against a rezoning request to allow the construction of a condominium on the former site of a historic house.

The plan called for the construction of a four-storey condo at 514 Wellington Crescent, on the site of the former Gordon House.

This structure was built in 1909 and demolished in November 2020. At the time, neighborhood residents and heritage groups opposed the demolition.

The new 24,000-square-foot structure that the developers plan to replace it with would include eight units and underground parking.

Planning, real estate and development staff have recommended approval of the zoning change, but the proposal faces opposition due to building height, tree removal and related issues. to parking and access to the driveway.

A Heritage Conservation District (HCD) application for the neighborhood is also pending. If approved, new requirements could be placed on the development to ensure that the character and appearance of the neighborhood is maintained.

A public hearing on the development before the downtown community committee brought together the property owner, area residents and heritage advocates.

The committee rejected the zoning change request as it stands. The motion will now be considered by council.

Kitty Hawk Planning Board Reviews Setbacks, Lot Coverage, and Retail Sitemap – The Coastland Times

By Site plan

At its last meeting in 2021 on December 16, the Kitty Hawk Planning Council reconsidered a proposed zoning change, reduced the setback distance for some commercial lots, changed the definition of lot coverage, and considered a retail business development site map.

Due to the absence of members, an earlier recommendation vote on a proposal to allow multi-family dwellings with a maximum density of 14 housing units per acre as a special use in planned commercial developments (PCD) s ‘is a tie at 2-2. City council sent him back for another review and recommendation ahead of a public hearing scheduled for January 10.

According to Planning and Inspections Director Rob Testerman, PCDs are intended to provide developers with design flexibility and greater land use efficiency. Currently, multi-family dwellings are permitted with a maximum density of 10 dwellings per acre in Districts BC-1 and BC-2.

The requirement with the current demand for at least five contiguous acres with no less than 500 feet of total road frontage on US Highway 158 or NC Highway 12 limits the demand to three areas: Home Depot and part of the Beachwoods Resort development. , the new 7 -11 and Promenade Sports Nautiques.

Commenting in favor of the change, real estate agent Eddie Goodrich explained that there would be no changes to the lot coverage, height requirements or decrease in parking and that the overall intention is to achieve a similar development goal in a different way.

“It’s more like two times 15 is 30 versus three times 10 is 30,” Goodrich suggested. “Same number of people, just a different way of doing it,” adding that units per acre really doesn’t mean much, it just allows smaller units to be allowed in the same box.

During discussion of the request, Testerman stressed that the number of rooms and permitted occupants would be governed by the Department of Health.

At the end of the discussion, the vote of approval failed with only two for and three against.

The next item on the agenda was a request to reduce the setback for commercial lots adjacent to any dedicated open space or recreational area of ​​an adjacent residential development.

Testerman explained that examples of where the change would apply include the commercial lands up to the Sea Scape Golf Course and, since it is a recreation area, the Harbor Bay Playground.

In support of the request, Ralph D. Calfee stated that the number of eligible sites is rather limited and that in these areas the buffer zone of adjacent residential uses is actually larger than expected, creating an unnecessary restriction for these. development of commercial sites.

The motion to approve this request was carried with a 5-0 approval vote.

A change to the definition of land cover was also passed with unanimous support, which will exempt 500 square feet of pool area from land cover calculations.

Currently, lot coverage – a measure of developed land use – includes areas covered by buildings, parking lots, driveways, roads, sidewalks, decks, and any concrete areas. or asphalt.

Testerman explained that in most cases there is a gap of a few inches between the top of the pool water and the adjacent level of the pool deck, allowing the pools to serve as a catch basin for some of the rainwater. And, while the current code could be interpreted to allow it to decree that swimming pools are exempt, incorporating the wording into the city code removes any subjectivity and will ensure consistency going forward.

Testerman also said that for stormwater clearance purposes, the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality did not count pool areas in the lot coverage.

Returning to the last item on the night’s agenda, a review of the sitemap of a retail business development drew concerning comments from a few neighboring residents.

The proposed plans provide for the improvement of a vacant lot at 5201 North Croatan Highway between Ambrose Furniture and Outer Banks Furniture. A 7,500 square foot two-story commercial building with a maximum height of 28 feet, both within the permitted height and land coverage requirements, will have access to Byrd Street. There is currently no plan to connect Byrd Street to US 158 and terminals are available to prevent through traffic.

While there have been comments from local residents that the development will cause flooding to their properties, during discussions it was pointed out that the property to be developed does not flood them and in fact collects some of the land. excess water from higher up the street which flows into this property.

Michael W. Strader Jr., director of engineering at Quible and Associates at Kitty Hawk, said he was aware of the flooding issues associated with the development of the property. He went on to say that the property is a bowl, but that there would be no runoff to other properties and some of the landscaping and engineering on the property would actually exceed the standards. state stormwater retention requirements.

At the end of the discussion, it was highlighted that the proposed development plans meet all applicable guidelines and a motion to approve the site plan received a 5-0 vote.

Each of the items on the evening’s agenda will be considered by the municipal council, which is not bound by the votes of the town planning council.

READ MORE NEWS HERE.

Easdales faces decision delay on £100m ex-IBM Greenock site development

By Site development

A PLANNING decision on a proposed £100million transformation of the former IBM site in Greenock has been postponed after the procedures followed by council officials were branded ‘incompetent’.

Inverclyde Planning Council yesterday voted 5-4 to carry out a visit to the Spango Valley site and demand a further briefing from council building officials about the candidacy of bus magnate businessmen Sandy and James Easdale , as reported by the Greenock Telegraph.

The decision came after a proposal by Councilman Councilor Jim McEleny to lift a council officer’s cap on new homes on the 270 to 420 site was rejected by Chief Legal Officer Jim Kerr.

A bid by developers for permission in principle for 450 homes has been deemed excessive by planning bosses because it exceeds the current limit for the entire Spango Valley site by 30 – only part of which is owned by the Easdale brothers.

FORMER IBM SPANGO VALLEY SITE

Cllr McEleny was told his motion was ‘incompetent’ with the Local Development Plan (LDP) and would render the other part of the site unviable for development by its owners, who opposed the Easdales’ request.

Mr McEleny argued that capping the app at 270 homes would ‘kill it like a stone’, as Sandy Easdale has publicly said in the Telegraph last month that the site would remain “derelict” with such a reduction in the number of properties.

Councilor McEleny – who described the development proposal as ‘exciting’ – said: ‘The fact is that the process followed by council officers has been incompetent.

“They should have reviewed the application for 450 homes outside the LDP and recommended denial and proceeded to a public hearing.

“It should have been both options.”

Chief legal officer Mr Kerr said changing a planning condition from 270 to 420 homes would be a ‘significant departure’ from the LDP, adding: ‘I don’t think we can go back.

HeraldScotland: Councilor Jim McElenyCouncilor Jim McEleny

Councilor McEleny retorted: “‘I don’t think’ is not a sufficient legal ground.

“We should give this candidacy every chance of succeeding and not put an end to it.”

Mr Jamieson replied: ‘The economic viability of the site is not a material planning consideration.’

The Easdales – who worked with delivery partner Advance Construction – have filed masterplans for a major development of 450 new homes, business space, a pub/restaurant and a ‘park and ride’ facility in the former IBM Halt station.

In a statement released last month, the Easdales said: “We have worked positively with council officials since the bid was submitted and understood that the officials were supportive of our bid.

“Therefore, it was surprising to read in the local media that council officials were now recommending that there be a 40 per cent reduction in the number of houses – as that was something they had specifically told us not to wouldn’t happen.”

Councilor Innes Nelson offered a site visit and another briefing of the elected members by council officers.

HeraldScotland: Spango Valley and former IBM site, Greenock.Spango Valley and former IBM site, Greenock.

Cllr Jim Clocherty proposed approval of the application as recommended by officials for 270 homes.

He said: “The frustration for me is that there is no master plan for the whole site.

“I know it’s not the applicant’s fault, but if we go for all the houses on offer, the other part of the site wouldn’t be viable, and that’s not LDP compliant.”

Organizer David Wilson asked if members approved the proposal with the recommendation of 270 homes, if the developers could appeal.

Mr Jamieson said: ‘It is within the gift of every applicant to appeal any decision of the planning council and it would be the Scottish Ministers who would consider the application.’

Councilors David Wilson, John Crowther, Jim McEleny, Robert Moran and Innes Nelson voted for a site visit and additional briefing before deciding on the application.

Councilors Jim Clocherty, Gerry Dorrian, Drew McKenzie and Ciano Rebecchi voted to approve the application with the recommendation of 270 new homes.

Bryan City Council asks staff to explain site development review process before approving new subdivision rezoning – WTAW

By Site development
Image of the Town of Bryan showing the location of the land that was rezoned during the City Council meeting on December 14, 2021.

Bryan City Council’s approval to rezone the land on the northwest side of town is just the first step for developers looking to build 300 new homes.

At the December board meeting, City Manager Kean Register was among the staff who explained the developer’s role in the site’s development review process.

This is after neighboring homeowners expressed concerns about increased traffic and possible flooding.

Deputy Director of Planning and Development Services Martin Zimmerman said the Planning and Zoning Commission (P&Z) will be seeking public comments following the site review process.

Zimmerman says after the staff review, P&Z will hold another public hearing before considering final action.

Developers who want to build homes generally north of the intersection of Sandy Point and Hilton Road plan to build a retention pond and they would be responsible for extending the water and sewer lines.

Click HERE to read and download background information from the Bryan City Council meeting on December 14, 2021.

Click HERE to read and download the ordinance that has been adopted.

Click below for comments from Kean Register and Martin Zimmerman.


Gloversville Planning Board approves site plan for $ 20 million project

By Site plan

Ken Kearney, owner of the Kearney Reality Group, discusses the site plan for the Glove City Lofts artist housing project at 52 Church Street in front of the Gloversville Planning Council on the night of Tuesday, December 7, 2021.

GLOVERSVILLE – The Gloversville Planning Council has approved the Kearney Realty Group’s 75-unit, 75-unit “Glove City Lofts” site plan at 51 Church Street as a result of ‘a public hearing Tuesday evening.

Tanyalynnette Grimes, President and CEO of Micropolis Development Group, was the only person to speak at the public hearing. She asked if the Glove City lofts, if built, would be used for “low-rental housing” or “Section 8” housing.

“Are there any clarifications [of the income levels of the prospective tenants of the building] in the site plans, since it is in a superimposed historic district, and with regard to the businesses of the city center? ” she asked.

Fulton County planner Sean Geraghty, who advises the planning council, said Kearney’s site plan request included clarification of the income requirements of potential tenants.

“If you want to come and review the application, you are more than welcome to do so. You can do it here in town or I have a copy at the county planning department, ”Geraghty said. “Generally speaking, public hearings are not question-and-answer sessions. This really is an opportunity for the public to tell the Planning Board something they don’t know about the application, but yes the applicants have been very thorough in explaining the types of tenants they will have in the application. these buildings and how they will qualify.

Ken Kearney, owner of the Kearney Realty Group, said his company would claim about $ 1.1 million in income-tested federal housing tax credits granted by the New York State Office for Homes and Community Renewal (HCR) to build the Glove City Lofts Complex.

Kearney explained the income rules required by the federal tax credit program used to help fund the project in October. He said he expects one-bedroom income-based apartments to cost around $ 665 in rent per month, while two-bedroom income-based apartments will cost around $ 775. He said “middle income” units will have higher rents, perhaps up to 20% more. He said the federal tax credit program doesn’t want any of the tenants to pay more than 30% of their income for rent.

After the public hearing, Kearney’s developer Parkview Development & Construction asked Gloversville town planning council to waive the city’s six-month requirement to begin construction after site plan approval , and to extend it to 18 months, in order to give the company enough time to obtain the financing necessary for the construction of the complex without having to come back several times to the town planning council for extensions.

The planning council consensus agreed to the extension of the deadline and the president of the planning council, Geoffrey Peck, requested that the 18-month deadline be entered in the minutes.

Following the hearing, Kearney said Glove City Lofts now had all of the local approvals it needed to build the project, including the correct zoning.

In July, it was revealed at a planning council meeting that the 3-acre lot at 51 Church Street had been zoned from commercial to a parcel zoned for manufacturing in 2015. The zoning issue presented a problem. potential for the major project, but city officials have since discovered that the zoning was changed in 2018.

Peck said the zoning change in 2018 did not go in the normal way, with the joint council bypassing the review by the city’s planning council.
“They just didn’t go through all the procedures,” Geraghty added.

“We made a note in the minutes of last month’s meeting [in November] this [the rezoning of 51 Church St.] had not been presented to the Planning Council under standard procedure, but the statute of limitations had expired, so it had become law, ”Peck said.

The Glove City Lofts project also requested $ 1 million as part of Gloversville’s request for the $ 10 million downtown revitalization initiative in 2021. On Tuesday evening, Kearney said he hoped Gloversville would win the DRI competition for the Mohawk Valley, which he says will be announced soon.

“If the DRI materializes, if the city succeeds, the other two [apartment building projects from my company that received DRI funding in other cities] in the Mohawk Valley, Oneonta and Rome… they were both priority projects in these [successful] DRI plans, ”Kearney said. “[Those DRI grant awards] brought these projects to the top for consideration by UNHCR [for the federal tax credits]. It is hope here.

Kearney has said in the past that the project in Gloversville could be delayed for a year if Gloversville does not receive the DRI, but on Tuesday night he said he believed he would win it.

“I have never been more optimistic about a DRI plan than with this one,” he said.

Rezoning, approved site plan for Ashwaubenon gas station

By Site plan

By Kevin Boneske
Editor-in-chief


ASHWAUBENON – The rezoning of three Sports & Entertainment plots at B-3 Community Business to build a 5,200 square foot Holiday convenience store at the southwest corner of South Ashland Avenue and Mike McCarthy Way was approved on Tuesday, October 26 by the Village council.

Community Development Director Aaron Schuette said he would not have been in favor of rezoning the property if it had been located elsewhere in the Sports & Entertainment District.

“However, looking at the surrounding land uses – its location against South Ashland Avenue, the railroad, the surrounding land uses – it makes sense for this specific location (to rezone the property) to B-3 to facilitate the redevelopment of this property, ”he said.

Schuette said the project with an eight-dispenser fuel island and an accessory car wash would demolish an existing dilapidated warehouse.

“It’s going to clean up this site quite significantly,” he said.

Schuette said the overall village plan identifies commercial uses as permitted in this area.

He said the site would not have diesel pumps for semi-trailers, which was a concern of a neighboring landowner who raised during the public hearing the possibility of traffic jams in the area.

“It can have a diesel pump for diesel vehicles, but there won’t be pumps for semi-trailers,” Schuette said.

The council also approved a site plan for the project.

Schuette said two of the existing driveway access points on Mike McCarthy Way will be used for the convenience store, with a third driveway access point on South Ashland near the southern property line at approximately 200 feet south of the intersection with Mike McCarthy Way.

Jim Goeppner, director of real estate development for Holiday, said the two curbs along Mike McCarthy Way are designed to create the best flow of traffic for vehicles entering and exiting the property.

Exterior finishes requested in the site plan include stone-look paneling near the base extending to the corners of the buildings, a window system and a fiber cement wall panel system with concealed fasteners.

The conditions of approval for rezoning do not include any sale of products outside, with the exception of propane.

Village president Mary Kardoskee said she was happy other possible items for sale, such as bags of salt and firewood, were not left outside as the site is located at the main entrance to the Ashwaubenon Sports and Entertainment District.

Administrator Gary Paul said he was happy to see Holiday convenience store moving there.

“Overall I think it’s a good plan,” he said. “Everything is better than what currently exists. “

Dawsonville Planning Commission approves site plan for townhouse community

By Site plan

During the November 8 meeting of the Dawsonville Planning Commission, the commission approved the site plan for a townhouse community project to be built on Maple Street in Dawsonville.

According to the information package included with the application, Cook Communities has requested approval of a site plan for an attached single-family home located at 362 Maple Street. Gainesville attorney Jane Range spoke during the meeting with members of the planning committee on behalf of the plaintiff, explaining that the company is seeking permission to build 31 townhouses on the plot of ground.

“The property is zoned into the multi-family neighborhood and the townhouses are a permitted use in the neighborhood and they are seeking permission for 31 homes,” Range said. “Basically, approval of the site plan is all that was needed as it is already zoned with townhouses. ”

Range presented the site plan to the Planning Commission, explaining that the proposed development would be a single-entry road with a cul-de-sac, retention pond and the 31 townhouses. The proposed townhouses as presented at the meeting would be 1,600 square feet, three bedrooms, two and a half bathrooms and would meet the minimum requirements for the neighborhood.

She added that the designs of the proposed units have been changed in the current plan from previous ones to add more differentiation between the units, rather than all looking the same.

“The only problem that arose during the staff review was to do a bit of modulation up front and try to add more bricks.” The units are somewhat staggered so they don’t not form a single large line across the entire forehead – some [are] with shutters, some without shutters, slatted boards, straight boards and others with a window on the third floor to change the exterior appearance.

Anna Toblinski, Planning Commissioner of Station 4, asked the applicant if there will be a fence along the dividing lines of the proposed development. Keith Cook, the owner of Cook Communities, said his company typically adds a vegetated buffer zone all around their developments with staggered tree lines.

Station 3 Planning Commissioner Sandy Sawyer asked Cook if the development would have an association of owners. Cook responded that the development would have an HOA and all yards would be professionally landscaped.

During the presentation of the proposed development, the Director of Planning and Zoning, David Picklesimer, questioned the applicant regarding several conditions included in the zoning of the parcel, including the requirement that the development be identified as ” active adult community ”.

“They will be required to incorporate the verb for this community of active adult life; it will also have to be part of the alliances, ”said Picklesimer. “It’s R3 zoning with the zoning condition for active adult life and other conditions as well; the interior of houses should meet certain requirements.

Toblinski added that another of the conditions was that 20 percent of units must meet accessibility requirements for people with disabilities. Cook said that while his business typically has a few units that are accessible to people with disabilities, they generally leave it up to the owner to customize when they move in.

According to the notes of the urban planning director in the information file included with the request, “the R6 zoning has been approved with the following conditions: dedicate an additional right-of-way, the agreements must identify the project as an active adult, widen the road Of Maple Street South’s two-foot paved traffic, twenty percent of units must meet accessibility requirements for people with disabilities.

Picklesimer informed the Planning Commission that while the currently proposed units do not meet the stipulations set out in the zoning approval, the issue on the table at Monday’s meeting is only to approve the site plan, which only includes the layout of the lot and the configuration of the street. . For this reason, he said that the planning commission could take steps to approve or deny the site plan and that the applicant could work either to meet the conditions set out in the current zoning or to request a rezoning of the property. in order to allow different directives.

Range and Cook told commissioners they would work with Picklesimer to work out the details of how to meet the zoning requirements.

“We’ll go ahead and work with David again to see what we need to do about the active adult and if that will work and if we need any other zoning changes,” Range said.

The Planning Commission voted unanimously to approve the site plan for the proposed development. The application is expected to go to Dawsonville City Council with a public hearing on December 8, and council is expected to approve or deny the development on December 20.

Planning Commission will vote on the site plan for the condos on the lake on Tuesday | News, Sports, Jobs

By Site plan

MARQUETTE – The Town of Marquette Planning Commission is about to vote on a proposed site plan for the construction of eight condominiums at the corner of Lakeshore Boulevard and Hawley Street.

The point, which does not require the approval of the Marquette municipal commission or a public hearing, is the main event on the agenda for Tuesday night’s town planning committee meeting, which is scheduled for 6 p.m. hours at the town hall.

The proposed site plan includes 96 residential units spread across the eight four-story buildings, new parking lots, site grading, landscaping and site improvements, according to planning commission documents. The exact location of the proposed development is 2401 Lakeshore Blvd., just north of BioLife across Hawley Street. The property is currently zoned as a multi-family residential.

The property is currently owned by Islander Beach and Tennis Club LLC, and the listed architect is Progressive AE, based in Grand Rapids.

The group first submitted a site plan in 2020, but withdrew its request at that time from the Planning Commission for consideration. They submitted amended plans for review on October 12.

According to city documents, the proposed development would impact 1.24 acres of wetlands, which would be required by the Michigan Department of the Environment, Great Lakes and Energy to be replaced by 2.29. acres of man-made wetlands created by the developer.

Islander Beach and Tennis Club LLC entered into a land agreement with the city in 2019 that allowed the city to acquire a 0.13 acre parcel that was “Necessary for the relocation of Lakeshore Boulevard”, as well as the 0.2 acre parcel needed for the Hawley Street stormwater management project, according to a previous Journal article. The club ceded the two plots to the city. In exchange for the land, the agreement allowed the club to prepare the plot at 2401 Lakeshore Blvd. for further sale and development.

Whether or not the site plan conforms to the city’s land use planning code and site plan review standards described in Sec. 54.1402 (E).

If the town planning commission finds that the site plan is compliant and votes to approve the plan, development can continue without the approval of the municipal commission.

The public is welcome to attend Tuesday’s meeting at Town Hall. Two public comment sessions will take place, one for agenda items and another for non-agenda items.

To download and view Tuesday’s planning committee agenda, visit https://marquette.novusagenda.com/Agendapublic/DisplayAgendaPDF.ashx?MeetingID=2315.

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Set of audience on the site plan of a five-story building next to the library and historical museum

By Site plan

A public hearing on the site plan application for a five-story, 50-foot-high mixed-use building at the corner of Osborn Avenue and Court Street will be held on December 7 at 2:05 p.m.

The G2D Group of Huntington proposal currently includes 37 rental apartments on the second through fifth floors, downstairs office / conference rooms, a rooftop terrace for use by building residents and related improvements. site such as parking, lighting, landscaping and drainage. systems.

The developer has requested nine waivers from the Zoning Appeal Board, seeking relief from the zoning code requirements for minimum front, side and back yards, off-street parking setbacks, minimum parking space size , the size of the vegetation buffer zone and parking lot planting requirements and some lighting requirements.

The half-acre site is located in the recently adopted Railroad Avenue Urban Renewal Overlay District.

A public hearing on August 26 before the ZBA drew opposition from neighboring landowners – the Suffolk County Historical Society and the Riverhead Free Library – and members of the community.

On September 23, the ZBA granted six of the nine requested exemptions, denying requests for “upward lighting” in violation of the city’s “dark sky” code, exterior lighting more than 16 feet above the ground. ground and minimum size relief of parking spaces for all spaces. The applicant requested that all stalls be 9 by 20 feet instead of the required 10 by 20 feet. The panel allowed for a combination of 15 full-size stalls (10 by 20 feet) and 20 compact car-sized stalls (8 by 16 feet).

The deviations sought would not result in a draft tat disproportionate to the size of the property, the ZBA determined. “The building is significantly below the maximum coverage allowed by the code,” the board said in its decision.

The deviations will not result in an “unwanted change in neighborhood” and “to the extent that the deviations will contribute to a change in the character of surrounding properties or the neighborhood, the change is a change for which the city has expressly communicated a desire. and an intention by adopting their strategic plan and overlay zoning for the Railway Avenue Urban Renewal Zone, ”said the ZBA’s decision.

“The variation in demand will not have a negative impact on the physical or environmental conditions of the neighborhood / district, as the current neighborhood is dilapidated and unwelcoming,” the board wrote. “In fact, adding this building and its uses will improve the neighborhood. ”

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Four cannabis companies receive special land use and site plan approval

By Site plan

Township of Monroe Logo

Four proposed marijuana businesses received special land use and site plan approval on Wednesday in a special public hearing by the Township of Monroe Charter Planning Commission.

The commission unanimously agreed to grant special land use and site plan approval to Anna Sloan, LLC and Telkaif, LLC for their marijuana producer project at 15600 South Telegraph Road; TC MI Ann Arbor 2, LLC and the marijuana supply hub offered by Party Stop Inc. at 1118 South Telegraph Road; the supply center offered by UM1, LLC and Monroe Premier Plaza Inc. at 14750 LaPlaisance Road; and the Adult Supply Center and Retailer offered by Brian Toma and Cepo, LLC at 15530 South Telegraph Road.

Consideration of the special approval of a land use / site plan for a marijuana supply center and adult retailer to be located at 1510 W. 7th Street, which was made payable to day of the special hearing, was filed until the December meeting of the commission, at the request of the owners of the proposed business.

Wednesday’s hearing was held at 5 p.m. because the commission expected it to last a long time, as happened in several of its recent meetings regarding potential cannabis companies. . But only a handful of residents attended the session, and only a few took turns on the podium to urge the commission to reject the proposals.

Mary Straub said she was “totally opposed … to each (any of these companies)”

“The Township of Monroe is a small township, why are (these companies) coming together in our township? Straub asked. “The town of Monroe doesn’t want it, Frenchtown doesn’t want it, Erie doesn’t want it; what attracts these people to our municipality? We don’t need it, we don’t want it, and that would be detrimental to the way of life of our community. “

Marjorie Cramer expressed concern about the potential odors that could be produced by these facilities.

“If you’ve ever smelled any of these things, they smell like a skunk,” she said. “We don’t want that smell in our town. If this is approved and the odors are not controlled, my question is, what kind of control will this commune have… for everyone? “

Kim Fortner, zoning officer for the township, said the township nuisance ordinance will be how it controls any potential odor issues among marijuana businesses.

“The nuisance ordinance is written quite vague, basically if it interferes with a reasonable person’s right to tranquility, we consider it to be contrary to the ordinance,” said Fortner. “The odor control plan that these establishments have given states that there will be no odor outside the buildings, so if you smell anything let us know and we can enforce the ordinance on them. nuisances … “

Regional vice president of local farm finance company GreenStone Farm Credit Services, Erin DuBois, submitted a letter to the planning committee opposing the five proposals that were considered on Wednesday. GreenStone has a branch at 15615 S. Telegraph Rd.

“… This special land use stands in stark contrast to the current physical environment of the region’s business objectives,” DuBois wrote. “The general nature of this area as it has evolved is far removed from any form of medical or retail establishment related to marijuana and other related recreational products. Creating a special zoning for a medical or recreational marijuana supply center would expand a use that is not normally seen in that area, or does it match the description of what the owners have valued with their major investments in that area? from the community of Monroe … “

Commissioner John Manor reminded residents that the Planning Commission is “very restricted” on how it reviews proposals, as it must view them strictly in terms of whether businesses “operate within the framework of our zoning and our ordinances as they exist “.

“We are not allowed to make personal or emotional decisions as to whether or not to approve them,” Manor said. “We’re here to determine if they’re legally within the ordinances and zoning limits that we currently have for our township. We appreciate where many of you are coming from, but frankly we’re very limited as to whether we approve or not approve these, with regard to the recommendations of the planning (of the township) (department) and of the engineers …

“The city council of elected officials that you elect can absolutely make arbitrary decisions, vote yes or no on things without having to cite a legal precedent as to why they do it. However, in a commission, we are bound by the rules and regulations. , and the zoning that we have this. “

Representatives from three of the four companies that received approval on Wednesday spoke at the public hearing, with all three saying they would comply with all recommendations, ordinances and other regulations set out by the township.

Greg Van Wynn, director of asset management and acquisitions for TC MI, said odor control is a top priority for his company as it seeks to establish a supply hub for medical marijuana.

“We will make it compulsory within our establishment not to let any odor come out of our establishment,” he said. “… The building will be completely under a slight negative pressure, so no smell will be able to leave our establishment. We take this opportunity very seriously, we are here to be a positive addition to this community and to be part of the business community here in Monroe Township. Personally, I will take this as a task for me to get involved with the other operators and licensees in this unit, to create a guild to see where we can come together to make positive investments with our time and energy and efforts in the community.

“We can’t wait to move forward.”

Neither Brian Toma nor any other representative of Cepo, LLC spoke or appeared to be present when their application was reviewed and ultimately approved. Manor has requested that a letter or email be sent to the entity asking them to do their utmost to be present and on time at any future hearing or meeting regarding the proposed business.

This article originally appeared on The Monroe News: Four cannabis companies receive special land use and site plan approval

Chelsea Square final site plan set to be presented to Sylvan Township Council

By Site plan

The project for an 81-unit apartment complex called Chelsea Square is moving forward in the planning process with the Township of Sylvan.

A public hearing was held at the Township Planning Commission meeting on September 23 on the final site plan for the multi-family residential apartment complex. The developer has received recommended approval.

The final site plan will now need to be submitted to City Council for an official decision.

At the Township Board of Directors meeting on October 5, Sylvan Township Supervisor Kathleen Kennedy said the final site plan had been approved by the Planning Commission and the lawyer was currently working on a development agreement for review by the township board of directors.

There is no timeline for the final board review yet, but Kennedy said she expects it to be an upcoming board meeting of the canton.

According to the township staff report on the project, the site plan provides for 81 units of multi-family apartments at market price. The zoning of this new project will use two plots as a multi-family residence according to a consent judgment filed in December 2016.

The report states that the developer’s description indicates that the project is proposed to be built in a single phase and includes the construction of 17 buildings that will have access from Pielemeir Drive, which is a public road. The development would have public services provided by the Sylvan Township water and sewer system, and would also have an internal private road network unless accepted by the Washtenaw County Road Commission. The apartments will be owned and managed by Group 10 Development.

The development is proposed to be located on 16 acres of land. It is expected that there will be 37,800 square feet of open space while each apartment unit is expected to be approximately 1,300 to 1,500 square feet.

The city will study a site plan for the development of a gas station | News

By Site plan

Athens city council is due to take a final vote on a site plan for a large development on US 175 West that will include a gas station, convenience store and quick service restaurant with drive-thru.

Director of Development Services Audrey Sloan said the project has been delayed but is on track to be completed in 2022.

The meeting is set for 5:30 p.m. on Monday at the Athens Partnership Center.

The site plan submitted by Winters Oil Partners includes a modification of the entrances to US 175, with the one to the southeast becoming a double entrance to accommodate the gas station and any business that may be built on the side closest to the sea. loop 7. A stipulation added to the plan is that signage be posted on the property offering overnight parking.

Sloan said the drive-through restaurant should be a Sonic.

A public hearing and a vote on the site plan took place during the Town Planning and Zoning Commission meeting on September 10 before being sent to City Council.

The development is located just after the intersection of Highway 175 West with Loop 7. Coming from the direction of Eustace, it will offer motorists their first opportunity to refuel before entering Athens. Those who ride Loop 7 can refuel or grab a bite to eat without driving into the main part of town.

The parking lot will be large enough to allow 18-wheel trucks to park and refuel.

Winters Oil Partners, was founded in 1972 and is based in Corsica, with developments in several locations in the region.

In February 2020, the city council approved a dish for the development of Athens. The dish included 3.3 acres

being annexed to the city and 14.35 acres already within its limits. The property has been zoned for planned development.

Planners OK Healthy Living Campus site map for central Batavia | Top story

By Site plan

BATAVIA – The site plan for a $ 30 million healthy living downtown campus has the blessing of the city’s planning and development committee, but not unanimously.

The committee approved the 3-1 site plan tonight, with committee member David Beatty voting against. Ed Flynn, Rebecca Cohen and John Ognibene voted for it. The project, a partnership of the YMCA and Rochester-Regional Health-United Memorial Medical Center, will include a new state-of-the-art wellness center, indoor pool, group exercise studios and a gymnasium with a walking / running track. indoor foot, teaching kitchen, indoor play area, youth areas, lounge and meeting rooms. The partnership with UMMC will provide primary care, behavioral health services / crisis intervention, integration of telemedicine, cancer prevention services, chronic disease support services and education services , all in the same establishment. The facility would include a 69,420 square foot two-story building to house the YMCA with medical offices. The site is located at 211 and 213 East Main St., 1-9 Wiard St. and is part of 211 1/2 East Main Rear.

“We didn’t add any additional walls or trees or anything like that,” said project manager David Ciurzynski of Ciurzynski Consulting, LLC. After the meeting, Ciurzynski said his company made sure there were enough bushes and trees along the west and south sides of GO ART! as a buffer.

During the meeting, the committee received a letter from GO ART! in which GO ART! Executive director Gregory Hallock referred to a landscaping plan, Beatty said. The plan came from architectural, engineering and planning firm Clark Patterson Lee.

“It would be nice if the committee actually saw this plan. “I’ve never seen this shot,” Beatty said. “This is a plan that was presented to Mr. Hallock. I understand he has a different landscaping plan and a different parking plan.

Ciurzynski said this plan is much more elaborate than his company’s one.

“We are not going forward with this for budgetary reasons,” he said. “The plan you have is the plan we are moving forward with. What we’ve shown is within our budget and what we can do, and has proper buffering on the back (of GO ART!). While I understand that he (Hallock) may desire something more, it is technically not his property. We have to be the best possible neighbors, but we also have to manage our budget. “

When asked if what Hallock saw of Clark Patterson Lee was an initial plan, Ciurzynski replied that they had discussed a bunch of concepts, but nothing that was really a plan.

“We never came up with this plan because we looked at the concepts and priced it and it just wasn’t doable,” Ciurzynski said.

In a public hearing at the previous Planning and Development Committee meeting on August 17, residents raised concerns about access to the campus through Summit Street. The committee recommended removing the entrance / exit from Summit Street.

Tonight Ciurzynski said access from that street has been removed from the sitemap.

“Now that we have the sitemap (approval) there is speed to come,” he said after the meeting. Ciurzynski hopes to have the construction documents completed later this fall and start demolishing Cary Hall before the end of 2021. The goal is to begin construction in earnest in the spring of 2022.

“It’s going to take about 20 months to get it all through – a little over a year and a half, minimum,” he said.

Traffic will arrive on Bank Street, head towards Washington Avenue. When traffic leaves campus, it will exit onto Washington Avenue and then either Bank Street or Summit Street back to Main Street, he said.

As for voting against approving the sitemap, Beatty said project developers are missing an opportunity to better develop the entire site.

“The parking lots in general … they are a bit outdated in a way. We have a changing society and changing demographics. People drive less, ”he said. “I think it’s a key building going up here in Batavia, a key building on Main Street. I think they’re missing out on an opportunity to really develop what they call a campus. You still have a building and a parking lot. I think it could have been a lot more, if they had thought of the whole site.

Beatty said GO ART! was a critical component and those responsible for the project compromised with GO ART !, but did not go far enough.

The committee also noted this evening that the project would not have a significant negative impact on the environment.

Ulster City Council approves conditional site plan for Kingston-Ulster Airport – Daily Freeman

By Site plan

CITY OF ULSTER, NY – City Council members have approved a conditional site plan that moves the helicopter take-off site at Kingston-Ulster Airport from adjacent to the facility hangars to an area close to the national highway 199.

The approval came unanimously on Thursday, September 16. Supervisor James Quigley said use will be limited to non-commercial operations.

“The approval of the special permit is based on the fact that the heliport is only used for (…)” If the heliport begins commercial operations, (a) a new application for the site plan and a special permit application must be submitted. “

Concerns over commercial use were raised at a public hearing last month, with several residents objecting to the use because they expect there will be additional air traffic near the subdivision. Adjacent Whittier.

Geoffrey Ring, chairman of the planning board and tenant of the airport, previously said the new platform will move helicopters about half a mile farther from the populated area than the originally proposed location.

Other requirements under the special use permit include prohibiting the heliport from reducing the size or use of the airport, providing the city building inspector with documented flight paths for helicopter traffic and providing a storm water report on the installation of a drainage system if required.

Kingston Airport was bought in February by former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, a resident of Rhinebeck, who submitted the special use permit application to resolve long-standing approval issues regarding the runway helicopter under the previous owner.

Work on the helicopter landing site at Kingston Ulster Airport was completed in 2018, according to a certificate of occupancy from the city. It included the airstrip and the aircraft hangars. This work was carried out by Saugerties-based Bridgeview Helicopter, a tenant from the previous owner, but ultimately the work and use ended up being part of a legal battle that was not resolved until Schmidt’s group took over.

Airport manager Todd Coggeshall said there were typically five helicopter takeoffs or landings per week with additional traffic about every two months from State Police and National Guard during routine visits.

Griffindell subdivision site plan refused – clemmonscourier

By Site plan

Clemmons Council Responds to Senate Proposal on Bill 105

By Jim Buice
For Clemmons courier

A major preliminary subdivision presented for Griffindell, an 18-lot, 9.7-acre single-family development project off Idols Road that was filed in late June after receiving mixed reviews from Clemmons Village Council, has resurfaced at the Monday night meeting but failed to get the votes to continue.

Points of contention for Zoning File C-21-001 included a request by applicant staff to install curbs and gutters as well as provide direct access from the subdivision to Idols Road. At the time, Greg Garrett, an engineer representing the plaintiff, said the addition of an access road to Idols Road was a “break in business” but that he could work with the sidewalk part and gutter of the dead end.

At Monday night’s meeting, he reiterated that he was still unwilling to build a road to Idols Road, but would make sidewalks and gutters.

“I took all of your comments to heart and have worked ever since to try to figure it out,” said Garrett, who has looked at other alternatives, such as building townhouses to help remove stormwater. . “We’ve done everything we can, but we can’t go to Idols Road. “

The final vote to reject the sitemap was 3-2 with board members Scott Binkley and Chris Wrights opposing.

“I understand the concerns that the developer will only have one way in and out,” Wrights said. “The problem I’m having is that we don’t have an ordinance that requires it to have a second route of entry or exit due to the scale of its development. We have approved much larger developments with one entry and one exit. My biggest thing is just to be consistent in our decisions.

City Councilor Michelle Barson said her vote was not entirely based on secondary access, and Mayor John Wait said he had been “inundated with emails” opposed to the project.

On another agenda item, Wes Kimbrell, stormwater engineer, spoke about knowledge of Senate Bill 105 and how it “places restrictions and regulations on local governments and what they are allowed to do and apply against development in the future ”.

“The more people who oppose this, the better it will go. I urge everyone to go and see Senate Bill 105.

Kimbrell said Clemmons “took a significant step forward in our ordinances by becoming one of the state’s strictest stormwater groups for development, and we did so in an effort to protect our citizens.” and that this bill would essentially eliminate the village stormwater program, with the exception of the part on water quality.

“If this bill goes into effect, we’re going to have flooding everywhere,” City Councilor Mary Cameron said, to which Kimbrell agreed.

Mayor John Wait said he was frustrated with the state government systematically trying to dismantle the power of local governments.

“I’m really fed up with the General Assembly thinking they can come and make whatever rules they want and enforce them across the state in every municipality instead of letting the people who actually live there make the decisions.” “, did he declare. “This is completely ridiculous.”

Clemmons has made stormwater a top priority with a long list of capital improvement projects on the books and committing most of the $ 6.6 million in funding from the US bailout fund to fix what has become a growing problem.

At the meeting, it was decided that the village would connect with other local municipalities and discuss developing a joint resolution and that council members Barson and Mike Rogers would head a committee to represent Clemmons in this matter. and other questions.

“I hope our citizens see that our battles aren’t just about developers,” City Councilor Mike Rogers said. “It’s with our own state legislature and even sometimes our own county commissioners.”

In other highlights from Monday night’s meeting, the board:

• During the public comment portion of the meeting, six residents opposed Forsyth County’s proposal to build a 50,000 square foot multi-purpose agricultural events center at Tanglewood Park. The council suggested that residents also make these comments to Forsyth County Commissioners and complete the online survey.

• Order approved 2021-15 Grant Ordinance to replace the Special Revenue Order for US bailout funds. Buffkin said that due to the census, the village will receive total funding of $ 6.6 million (instead of the original projection of $ 6.1 million) and that the first allocation of $ 3.3 million was received last month.

• I heard from Buffkin that the village has a sewer agreement with Parr Investments, but it is still in draft form at the moment. Parr received approval in the spring for a multi-family project, The Lake at Belmont, on Lewisville-Clemmons Road. Buffkin added that the Public Utilities Commission is ready to proceed when Clemmons receives an official check from Parr.

• Discussion with town planner Nasser Rahimzadeh on setting up an ad hoc committee to review parking lot parameters, including landscaping, and review processes for subdivisions, including the idea of ​​developing an ordinance on connectivity.

• Call for a public hearing for a zoning map change for real estate owned by Gateway West Apartments LLC from RS-40 (residential, single-family) to RM-18-S (residential, multi-family – special) at 2070 Lewisville-Clemmons Road of a 5.88 acre property (Zoning Docket C-240). Rahimzadeh said the Planning Council unanimously recommended the denial at last week’s meeting.

• Call for a public hearing for an amendment to the zoning map of real estate owned by 2020 MOJO LLC from PB-S (pedestrian business – special) to PB-S (pedestrian business – special) of a property containing 1,351 acres ( Zoning file C-243). Rahimzadeh said the Planning Council unanimously recommended approval at last week’s meeting.

• Call for a public hearing for an amendment to the zoning map to modify several sections of Chapter C of the Environmental Ordinance of the Unified Development Ordinances in order to strengthen the requirements for stormwater for health, public welfare and safety (Zoning Docket C-UDO-85).

Rahimzadeh said the Planning Council recommended approval by 6 to 1 at last week’s meeting.

• Adopted resolution 2021-R-11 after receiving a voluntary annexation petition to allow the clerk and attorney to work together to investigate the certificate of sufficiency for Mid-Atlantic Commercial Properties LLC’s claim for William Lindsay Vogler Jr. and Robert A Vogler, Milo & White Investments LLC (Cary White), Impulse Energy II LLC (Stanley L. Forester, Director) and Impulse Energy II LLC, covering 35.20 acres. Council will then convene a public hearing at the next meeting.

• I heard from Shannon Ford in the Marketing / Communications report that the Farmers Market continues to have an average of around 300 customers, despite the heat and the late summer vacation, every Saturday morning at the Jerry Long YMCA. In the events to come, another movie night in the village is scheduled for Saturday September 18, when “Night at the Museum” will be presented at the Y at sunset. The Dirty Dozen & Clemmons Bash is scheduled for Saturday September 25 at the Y, with registrations still open. And the Monster Dash & Goblin Hop will take place on Sunday, October 24 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Village Point Greenway. Ford said she was working on a revamped format for project listings on the village’s website.

• Approved the disposal of old files according to the retention schedule.

• Approval of the unsealing of the closed-door minutes of the board meetings from October 28, 2019 to August 23, 2021

Planners Call for Changes to Healthy Living Campus Site Plan | Top story

By Site plan

BATAVIA – There will be another site plan change for Rochester Regional Health-United Memorial Medical Center and YMCA Healthy Living Campus ahead of city planning and development committee approval – removal of one entrance and an exit from Summit Street.

Project leaders will return at the next committee meeting, scheduled for September 21. The committee’s recommendation to remove the entrance / exit came on Tuesday after residents of Summit Street shared their concerns during a public hearing on the project.

“Those of us who live here are well aware of the heavy use of the street and understand that good access to and from our hospital is vital for Batavia and the rest of Genesee County,” said resident Richard Beatty. “The same goes for the YMCA. The project itself is just something we absolutely need in the city and I want to see it move forward.

Plans for the $ 30 million Healthy Living Campus – a collaboration between the YMCA and Rochester Regional Health-United Memorial Medical Center – include a new state-of-the-art wellness center, indoor pool, group and a gymnasium with indoor walking / running track, educational kitchen, indoor play area, youth areas, lounge and meeting rooms. The partnership with UMMC will provide primary care, behavioral health services / crisis intervention, integration of telemedicine, cancer prevention services, chronic disease support services and education services , all in the same establishment. The proposed new facility would include a 69,420 square foot two-story building to house the YMCA with medical offices, off-street parking and a new access point from Summit Street. The building would be located at 211 and 213 East Main St., 1-9 Wiard St. and part of 211 1/2 East Main Rear.

Beatty said he was against the Summit Street alley leading to campus.

“Our street has no other commercial lanes … Creating more traffic is not what we need here,” he said. “With the two-house entrance to St. Joseph’s School, another driveway would cause additional traffic and congestion, as well as more noise and more congestion. “

Residents Brian and Joan McCabe submitted a letter which was read by committee chair Duane Preston. They said in the letter that they were concerned about water runoff, lighting, traffic, noise, vehicle emissions and foot traffic.

Project manager David Ciurzynski of Ciurzynski Consulting, LLC said that with the parking lot redesign on Wiard Street, they would add drainage to the property to address some of these issues.

“Our analysis shows that we need to add drainage along Wiard Street… We’ll have to talk to the city about how we’re going to do this.”

Another letter came from resident Ellen Larson, who said runoff from snowmelt water was a threat to basements on both sides. With excessive traffic, vehicles may be backed up at least until 9 or 11 Summit St., waiting for the light to change.

“In addition, we have considerable bicycle and pedestrian traffic coming from many directions,” she wrote.

The planning and development committee asked if access to the Summit Street campus could be postponed for a year or two to see how things go. Ciurzynski said it was of concern to put the alley from Summit Street to campus on the back burner.

“By getting all the traffic out on Washington Avenue, what’s going to happen is people tend to turn right because it’s easy. They’re going to turn right, then turn right onto Summit Street, ”he said. “Now you put the traffic all the way down half of Summit Street, as opposed to that at the end of Summit Street and get everyone out on Main Street as quickly as possible. “

The other recommendation is that developers work with GO ART! concerning the court between GO ART! and the Office of Aging.

Earlier, Leslie Moma, a resident of Summit Street and member of GO ART! Board of Trustees, spoke about efforts to transform the yard into a more social space through a partnership with the Office for the Aging.

“It will allow GO ART! to provide different kinds of educational and social functions in this space, ”she said. “Our intention is to ensure that the parking provided for this space does not interfere with the yard and activities in the yard.

Moma said the board’s plans for using the yard include small concerts, public art receptions, weddings, and other events that can generate money for GO ART!

“If parking is present all the way to the corner of GO ART !, it means that headlights, noise, exhaust fumes, things of that nature that are an integral part of vehicle ownership will interfere with that space of the vehicle. court, ”she said. noted.

“The problem is that there are six spaces close to GO ART! This is where the problem comes in. The cars which circulate there, their lights will shine on all kinds of activities which take place in the courtyard of GO ART! David Beatty, Board Member, said: He asked Ciurzynski if eliminating six of the planned parking spaces on the west side of the new building near GO ART would be a possibility.

“You would keep everything else in your parking lot. You eliminate those six spaces. Your car park is always as it is now. You move further away from the activities of GO ART! by eliminating the six spaces.

Ciurzynski had suggested putting up a fence. Beatty suggested the landscaping would work, without the need for a fence.

“We have designed and redesigned several times. I would really like to stop the bleeding from my design budget, ”he said. “I’d rather spend time and effort developing the landscaping there rather than losing those six spots. We really believe that it is important for the operation of our establishment to have these places available not only for our customers …

Ciurzynski said those responsible for the project contacted GO ART! to try to develop a solution.

“We would like to continue working with them and come up with a plan before we eliminate anything,” he said. He said that creating a stamp would solve the problem of the headlights shining on GO ART! activities in the yard.

Ciurzynski said the parking plan on the west side of the new building provides for 25 spaces, including spaces for people with disabilities or less mobile than others.

“We have a strip of land there that would buffer this area to try to shelter as much light as possible,” he said.

Commission Approves Germantown Industrial Park Site Plan | Business

By Site plan

GERMANTOWN – The Planning Commission this week approved a site plan for Capstone 41, a new industrial park development off Holy Hill Road, so the plan to add nearly 800,000 square feet of retail space industry in the village can continue.

The Planning Commission on Monday evening approved the site plan with certain conditions, as well as several other elements required for the project which will span 52.5 acres on the south side of Holy Hill Road, between Interstate 41 and Goldendale Road. .

The site plan approved this week only covers the first phase of the project, which includes site improvements, utility works and a 203,580 square foot industrial building. This building will be built on speculation, so the companies that will end up using the space are not yet known.

The second phase, for which the developer is planning two additional buildings that will bring the entire site to a total of approximately 785,400 square feet of building space, will require separate site plan approval when the time comes.

The Plan Commission approved the site plan with a list of conditions on which approval is contingent, such as Capstone Quadrangle must adjust the lighting plan so that lights do not exceed 25 feet, and additional landscaping must be scheduled for scouting around the site. At the committee meeting, another condition was added by amendment that Capstone must add additional details to building entrances, such as awnings.

“I’m fine with the rest of the building, just dress up the entrances a bit,” said Planning Commissioner David Baum.

In previous discussions of the Capstone 41 project — it’s been in the planning stages in Germantown for months — some concerns have been raised about the building’s planned appearance. Recent community feedback on Germantown’s planning efforts has indicated that residents dislike the monotonous colors and united appearance of buildings and prefer more interesting details in the design of the development.

“What we’re doing with the exterior of the building is pretty much anything you can do with precast panels,” said Mike Faber of Capstone Quadrangle. Since the previous discussion, the developer has added texture, adjusted colors, and added joints and details to the exterior design of the building.

During the public hearing for the Capstone Quadrangle project, the village administrator, Jan Miller, spoke out against the conditional use permit requested by the developer to encroach on the site’s wetland setbacks. Miller said she would never support wetland encroachment or setbacks because water and natural areas are a vital resource for Germantown.

Village planner Jeff Retzlaff noted that the wetland itself will not be affected; some grading will be changed in the setback area to allow for development, and Capstone Quadrangle will undertake mitigation measures by planting the site to compensate for the changes.

“There’s no proposed impact on actual wetlands… There’s just a 25-foot wetland encroachment and 75-foot setbacks on waterways,” Retzlaff said.

“Native plantations are being established in these areas and some additional plantations in other places,” he added.

The encroachment permit has been approved.

The 52.5 acres planned for Capstone 41 are being rezoned to allow limited industrial use, such as light manufacturing, assembly, warehouse, distribution or e-commerce, which was also cleared by the Planning Commission this week.

“It’s consistent with the zoning of the property that surrounds it,” Retzlaff said.

The commission also approved a certified survey map to divide this parcel into two lots for development and a weir, to be used for stormwater retention. The first lot of 13.5 acres will be used for the phase one building.

Macomb Township Planning Commission reviews Pitchford Park site plan – Macomb Daily

By Site plan

The Pitchford Park development in Macomb Township could reach a major milestone on August 3 at 6:30 p.m. when it is presented to the Macomb Township Planning Commission.

The Macomb Township Planning Commission meets in person at Macomb Town Hall, 54111 Broughton Road, Macomb Township. The August 3 meeting is scheduled to start at 6:30 p.m.

On April 14, the Macomb Township Board authorized Supervisor Frank Viviano to sign a real estate donation agreement and closing documents between the township and Kay Arrowhead LLC, representing donors Pamela Pitchford and her husband Joe “Kay” Kowalczyk.

Through the donation, the township has acquired over 14 acres for the park property, which is vacant. The donation agreement stated that the donor wanted the land to be used to create a township park and stipulated that the name Pitchford Park be prominently displayed at the entrance to the park. A plaque will also be prominently displayed in the park, acknowledging the dedication to the donor’s family members.

The land for the future Pitchford Park is located on Romeo Plank Road, between 22 Mile Road and 23 Mile Road. On April 19, Viviano said the property was valued at $675,000.

During discussions following an initial public hearing on the township’s draft budget for the 2021-22 fiscal year on May 26, Treasurer Leon Drolet said the township would fund the development of Pitchford Park using the sale of surplus properties from the canton.

On July 30, Viviano said the site plan for Pitchford Park included pickleball courts, a walking path, a dog park and other amenities.

“We’re trying to look at the whole project and make sure we’re doing it in a smart way that minimizes costs,” Viviano said, adding that the township is in the process of selling some inventory properties.

Although the township also has other properties designated for parks, working to develop Pitchford is the top priority, according to Viviano.

“All of our energies are on Pitchford Park. The township has had many plans over the years to do various projects, and for one reason or another they haven’t done it,” Viviano said, adding that the township is dedicated to focusing on Pitchford Park until until it is finished.

Viviano said if the planning commission approves the site plan, it could be discussed at a future board meeting.

“No board action is required at this stage until we approve the offers,” Viviano said.

Macomb Township Parks and Recreation Manager Salvatore DiCaro said that at present Anderson, Eckstein and Westrick Inc. has only been contracted for the design phase of Pitchford Park.

“I will meet with full-time elected officials to determine who else would be involved with the future of the other parks,” DiCaro said.

As for when development of the park in Pitchford might begin, Viviano said that given the current construction climate and the difficulty in finding available contractors, it’s hard to be certain.

“The way construction is going in Southeast Michigan, it’s almost impossible to predict anymore,” Viviano said.

DiCaro said the township could potentially start work on Pitchford this year.

“We’re still hoping we can start by the end of the year, but it’s probably more realistic that we start next spring,” DiCaro said.

The township has also been working on plans for its current parks. On April 28, the Macomb Township Board of Directors approved a request for a contract to improve Waldenburg Park. This included replacing the bridge promenade and improving drainage along the middle branch of the Clinton River. The contract was awarded to LJ Construction for $344,655. The project was originally scheduled to start on June 1 and end on August 15.

“Due to July weather, we now expect to complete this project by the end of August,” DiCaro said.

The new bridge promenade was expected to have a life expectancy of over 20 years. Waldenburg Park is located on the north side of 21 Mile Road, east of Romeo Plank Road. It is a landscaped park of approximately 17 acres. Waldenburg Park opened in 2002 as the first developed park space in Macomb Township. Its amenities include a picnic pavilion, basketball court, walking path, restrooms, and a children’s playscape accessible under the Americans with Disabilities Act. On July 30, Viviano said there had been repairs to the surface of the community playground and improvements around that surface, such as benches.

On July 30, Viviano said the township also took a closer look at Macomb Corners Park, located at 19449 25 Mile Road in Macomb Township. He said there are plans to potentially repurpose parts of the skate area. Any developments, improvements, or changes to existing parks will be determined in future meetings, according to DiCaro.

“I’m meeting with full-time, engineering and planning elected officials to figure out what we’ll do next,” DiCaro said. “It’s at the very beginning of the talks.”

Site plan approved for mixed use building in Uptown Westerville

By Site plan

A vacant structure at 32 W. College Ave. is about to be demolished and replaced with a three story mixed-use building with retail or commercial on the first floor and apartments on the second and third floors.

The Westerville Planning Commission approved on July 28 a site plan for a proposed 12,483 square foot, 0.17 acre building in the Uptown neighborhood of plaintiff Randall Woodings of Kontogiannis & Associates, Columbus.

Voting yes were Paul Johnson, chairman; Craig Treneff, Brian Schaefer, Kristine Robbins, Dave Samuelson and Kimberly Sharp. Steven Munger was absent from the meeting.

A public hearing was held regarding the redevelopment, but no one commented.

Members of the Commission also did not comment on the request, as it had been discussed at a previous meeting. The project is now going to the Uptown Review Board for action; Action by Westerville City Council, including sale of property; an application for an engineering permit; and an application for a building permit.

A report from Bassem Bitar, the planning director for Westerville, said the plaintiff signed a contract to purchase and redevelop the Uptown plot, which is owned by the city.

He said city staff have recommended approval of the application, while acknowledging that off-site improvements and access easements will need to be finalized.

The intention is to demolish the existing structure and build the new three-story mixed-use building, according to Bitar.

According to the proposed plans, the first floor would be dedicated for commercial or commercial use, while the second and third floors would house a total of four residential units.

The first floor area would be 3,253 square feet, including a lobby, elevator, staircase and other fixtures associated with upper floors, and approximately 2,670 square feet for retail / commercial use.

The space for the upper floors would be larger at 4,615 square feet on each floor as they would extend beyond the footprint of the first floor on the north side of the building, allowing for parking spaces below, according to a report to the city.

The building would be of brick veneer with a height of approximately 37 feet.

The proposed site plan also includes some off-site improvements, such as an outdoor seating area along the front of College Avenue as well as a six-foot-wide sidewalk along the east side of the building.

The staff report indicates that the existing structure was built as a residence in the early 1900s and converted to commercial use on the first floor, possibly in the 1970s.

More recently it housed a bookstore called The Book Harbor with an apartment on the second floor.

The city acquired the vacant building in 2014 to allow for its future redevelopment in a way that aligns with the parking and lane system improvements recommended in the Uptown plan.

Earlier this year, Woodings submitted concept review requests to the Uptown Review Board and the Planning Commission and received a favorable response.

In the minutes of a March 24 planning workshop, Treneff said he was very supportive of the redevelopment and noted that the city was looking to reuse this site.

He said it was an exceptional proposition.

Robbins said she understood it would be too expensive to try to renovate and use the house in its current state.

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Quicklee Site Plan Approved by Batavia Planning Committee | Featured Story

By Site plan

BATAVIA – Developers of a proposed Quicklee’s convenience store and gas station have approval from the city’s planning and development committee to proceed, following approval of a site plan and a special use permit.

Quicklee’s, which is based in Livingston County, wants to change the use of the former 3,771 square foot Bob Evans Restaurant, 204 Oak St.

The project includes the construction of a four-pump service station island with canopy and underground fuel storage tanks. The convenience store with retail fuel will use 2,771 square feet and the restaurant with drive-thru will use the remaining 1,000 square feet. The committee approved the site plan and permit at its Tuesday evening meeting.

Planning and Development Committee Chairman Duane Preston said Wednesday the committee received an updated traffic study on Tuesday that addressed their concerns about the line of vehicles at the drive-thru at the Tim Hortons proposed for the site. . The state Department of Transportation has recommended that there be enough room to accommodate the expected line of vehicles at the drive-thru.

“The DOT recommended that the traffic study be complete. Our concern was the Tim Horton’s drive-thru queue (range of vehicles) and they recommended that would be fine,” he said .

Preston said the committee had been concerned in the past that traffic problems could arise when Dunkin’ and Tim Hortons opened.

“At our last meeting, we wanted a traffic study confirming that there would be enough room for the queue.

“Assessment of drive-thru queues during the morning rush hour showed that there is significant storage space to accommodate the traffic frequenting the proposed cafe,” Preston read from information provided by SRF Associates. , who carried out the traffic study.

“It was updated in June 2021. It was a brand new study,” Preston said. “It was based on the recommendations they had made on the previous traffic study for the previous month.”

Vehicles will be able to enter Quicklee’s through Noonan Drive and return through Noonan Drive,

New traffic generated by the project is expected to be 79 vehicles entering and 71 exiting Quicklee’s during weekday morning rush hours, and 53 entering and 55 exiting vehicles during evening rush hours.

“You’re going to see a little more traffic. You are going to see 79 more cars than before,” he said today. “It’s going to be a little busier…compared to people sitting in a sit-down restaurant (Bob Evans).

Preston said that at this point Quicklee’s is free to move forward with the project.

“They said they were still in negotiations with Tim Hortons on the building. They may need to come back to us for a sign-up when they find out if they are using Tim Hortons,” he said. “At this time, they have not confirmed their relationship with Tim Hortons.”

The committee does not want to see the former Bob Evans remain empty.

“It’s a wonderful location for Thruway traffic. It’s a nice project. We love people leaving the Thruway and spending money on gas and coffee. This is great for additional gasoline tax revenue.

The committee took no action regarding the preliminary review of the YNCA/UMMC Healthy Living Campus site plan. The plan would entail the removal of three buildings. The proposed new facility will include the construction of a two-story, 69,420 square foot building that will house a YMCA, medical offices, off-street parking, a new access point from Summit Street and numerous upgrades. day on the construction site and landscaping. throughout the complex.

“This was presented to us in the form of a site plan review proposal. They want to go straight to SEQR (State Environmental Quality Review), but we had a few other issues that we wanted to see smoothed out through the process. We wanted to soften the look of Main St. between GO ART! and the new Y,” Preston said. “The old plan called for additional parking in this area. We’d like to see it softened up with more green spaces…a small park-like setting. They’re going back to see if by eliminating a handful of parking spaces, that’s going to significantly hamper the parking situation. It shouldn’t be, but they have to have a certain number of parking spaces. They’re going to have to see what they can pack to stay within the code.

Preston said the committee will have to hold a public hearing into the proposed Summit Street entrance. The hearing is scheduled for the next meeting, August 17 at 6 p.m. in the council chambers.

“A lot depends on the Summit Street entrance and green space,” he said.

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Old amendment to the Topgolf site plan directed to the planning committee

By Site plan

KINGSTOWNE, VA – Now that Kingstowne Topgolf and adjacent Ruby Tuesday are closed, planning for the site’s future is underway. The Fairfax County Planning Commission will consider a comprehensive plan amendment after a revised residential plan has been proposed.

Several development concepts have been presented since 2016 for the site, located on South Van Dorn Street opposite the Kingstowne Towne Center. The site previously hosted the first US Topgolf site as well as a Ruby Tuesday, both closed. In 2015, the Board of Supervisors authorized the review of a plan amendment with residential uses of up to approximately 275 residential units and 20,000 square feet of retail.

The last concept proposed in April 2021 targets residential use but no longer offers commercial uses. The plan includes 164 townhouses and 44 stacked townhouses with a density of approximately 12 housing units per acre with affordable housing premiums. This is triple the current density forecast in the overall plan, 3 to 4 housing units per acre. The plan would fully consolidate the two plots of land that hosted Topgolf and Ruby Tuesday.

The latest proposal changes course from the previous proposals, which had residential and commercial uses. The first development proposal in 2016 called for 49 townhouses, a 137,000-square-foot multi-family building, and 70,000 square feet of retail. However, community and county staff were concerned about the viability of the retail business so close to central Kingstowne Towne, as well as compatibility with the surrounding community, traffic issues and stormwater management. Another obstacle was the separate ownership of Topgolf and Ruby Tuesday, and a consolidation agreement could not be reached at that time.

The previous proposal in 2019 called for 70 townhouses, 142 back-to-back townhouses, and 20,000 square feet of retail space designed as a food hall. The proposed density was a density of 12.47 housing units per acre, including affordable housing premiums. However, concerns regarding impacts on traffic, compatibility and stormwater management remained.

The action of the Planning Commission focuses on recommending a comprehensive plan for these plots of land. A rezoning request and final layout plan are under review by the county based on the new April 2021 proposal.

If the full plan recommendation changes from the current density of 3-4 units per acre, the townhouse development concept presented in April 2021 can be considered. The revised plan amendment would allow 10 housing units per acre plus affordable housing density bonuses under several conditions. The recommended plan change states that the density “may be appropriate if the development creates a high quality, pedestrian-friendly living environment with a distinct sense of place. “

The other conditions for modifying the revised plan would be as follows:

  • Residential units should be age restricted or designed to accommodate different ages and abilities
  • Shared use bath for pedestrians and cyclists at least 10 feet wide along the east side of South Van Dorn Street
  • Mitigation of transportation impacts on South Van Dorn Street and surrounding intersections. Explore a second entry and exit option. If mitigation measures are not possible, reduced intensity should be considered.
  • Healthy mature trees existing in buffer zones should be preserved. Buffer zones and adjacent open areas should receive additional evergreen, deciduous, and understory vegetation as appropriate.

The town planning commission will hold a public hearing on Wednesday July 14 at 7:30 p.m. The public hearing of the supervisory board should take place on Tuesday September 14 at 4 p.m.

Casino Reinvestment Development Authority Approves Mini-Golf Course Site Plan | Local news

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Casino Reinvestment Development Authority vice chairman Richard Tolson, left, chairman Robert Mulcahy, executive director Matt Doherty and chairman of the Casino Control Commission James Plousis at a meeting in 2019.


Press archives


Your boat and beach report for June 15



ATLANTIC CITY – The Casino Reinvestment Development Authority on Tuesday approved the final site plan for a new mini-golf course near the boardwalk.

North Beach’s 18-hole mini-golf course will be located at 120 Euclid Ave. and will include two levels, bicycle rental and a pedestrian bridge leading to the promenade.

Nick Intrieri, co-owner of North Beach Mini Golf LLC, said there is no set date for construction to begin, but the company aims to start work in September so that it can be open for summer 2022.

The project was approved for a derogation of use as well as derogations from the existing regulations on setbacks, parking and signage.

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ATLANTIC CITY – A little over a year after having been the scene of looting and vandalism …

During the meeting, several members of the public expressed their enthusiasm for the project.

“I want to express the residents’ support for this project,” said Libbie Wills, President of the First Ward Civic Association. “So many times in the past we’ve talked about bringing family attractions to Atlantic City, and that’s it. It is a project for all age groups.

During a public hearing on May 20, more than 10 members of the public, both local and regional, declared themselves in favor of minigolf, said Lance Landgraf, director of development and development of the CRDA.

Venice town planning council to review site plan for rehabilitation hospital

By Site plan

VENICE – The Venice Town Planning Commission will examine the site and the development plan of a offer a rehabilitation hospital with 42 beds which would be operated by Post Acute Medical, just south of the new Sarasota Memorial Hospital Venice campus.

The proposed five-acre campus would house a 48,600 square foot facility and include a therapeutic garden. The entrance would be off Curry Lane, which is on the east side of Pinebrook Road, just south of the Sarasota Memorial Hospital Venice Campus

The proposed PAM rehabilitation hospital in Venice would be the first of its kind opened in the state of Florida by Post Acute Medical in Enola, Pa.

This rendering shows a patient wing of the Post-Acute Medical Rehabilitation Hospital Project.

Post Acute also operates the PAM Specialty Hospital in Sarasota at 6150 Edgelake Drive, Sarasota, north of Bee Ridge Road and east of Interstate 75.

The inauguration of the rehabilitation hospital is slated for the third quarter of this year and completion is expected by the end of 2022.

The Venice facility would also offer outpatient rehabilitation services.

In other news:Experts urge residents to prepare for start of storm season

And:Sarasota County Law Enforcement Attends Suicide Prevention Workshop

Sarasota Memorial’s 365,000-square-foot full-service hospital is slated to open by the end of this calendar year, with construction slated for late 2022.

The proposed rehabilitation hospital is immediately east of a medical complex project which would be located on an adjacent 10 acre property owned by Casto Southeast Realty.

At least two other medical office buildings are targeted for separate plots in Sarasota County, on the north side of Laurel Road, west of the hospital.

This rendering shows the ambulance entrance to the Post Acute Medical Rehabilitation Hospital Project.

The planning committee meets at 1:30 p.m. in the City Council Chamber of Venice City Hall, 401 W. Venice Ave., Venice.

The public hearing on the site and the development plan is the first item on the agenda, after approval of the minutes.

Some members of the town planning committee can participate via Zoom.

The meeting will also be simultaneously broadcast live on the City’s website and via Zoom.

You can listen to the meeting by phone by dialing 1-929-205-6099 and when the meeting ID is requested, enter 856 0118 4333 then press the # key.

It can be viewed online at https://venice.legistar.com/Calendar.aspx. Click on “In progress” on the far right of the Town Planning Commission meeting on that date.

Public comment can be provided in writing to [email protected] or by regular mail to City Clerk Lori Stelzer, 401 W. Venice Avenue, Venice, FL 34285.

Provide your full name and home address and, if you are a city business owner, provide the business name and address.

All comments received by noon on June 1 will be distributed to Planning Committee members and appropriate staff prior to the start of the meeting.

For Zoom, the meeting link https://us02web.zoom.us/w/85601184333 or on a Zoom application with the ID 856 0118 4333.

To request a virtual speaking, you must complete the Request to speak form, available at the address http://venicefl.formstack.com/forms/requesttospeak.

You must complete all required information or the form cannot be submitted.

Those in attendance in person can fill out a speaker card at the meeting, though the city still encourages virtual participation due to COVID-19 social distancing.

For more information or for assistance with questions for public comment, contact Lori Stelzer, City Clerk, [email protected] or 941-882-7390. For questions about connecting to the meeting: Christophe St. Luce, Chief Information Officer, [email protected] or 941-882-7425.

Earle Kimel primarily covers southern Sarasota County for the Herald-Tribune and can be contacted at [email protected] Support local journalism with a digital subscription to the Herald-Tribune.

Site plan approval delayed for townhouse development in Brighton

By Site plan

April 30, 2021

By Jon King / [email protected]

A public hearing has been delayed over a plan to demolish an abandoned school in Brighton and replace it with a townhouse development.

On Monday, the City of Brighton Planning Commission was due to consider a site plan approval for the project which would be called West Village of Brighton. It would also rezone the 10.5-acre property from R-1, or single-family residential, to a planned unit development, or PUD. SR Jacobson Development Corp. of Bingham Farms wants to build 140 townhouses on the site of the former Lindbom School at 1010 State St., between N. 6th and N. 7th streets.

However, Michael Caruso, Brighton’s community development manager, told WHMI that the developer had yet to receive the results of an extensive traffic survey of the area from an independent engineering firm. It was therefore decided to postpone the public hearing and the review until the study was completed. has received. In fact, Caruso says Monday’s meeting will be canceled because the only other item on the agenda, a request to expand the site plan for The Canopy Lounge on St. Paul Street will also be moved to an order of the future day.

Receiving site plan approval would be a necessary step towards a deal to purchase the plot on the northwest side of town. The municipal council will also have to give its consent. Once completed, the developer plans to demolish the old school building in September and then begin construction immediately.

West Village of Brighton is just the latest plan for the site since the school closed in 2010. A company owned by Fenton area developer Pat Battaglia bought the school for $1.45million to schools in the Brighton area in 2015 with a proposal to open a charter school at the building, but the BAS board was reluctant to sponsor the school. Battaglia then proposed a senior housing complex and later senior housing and an assisted living facility for the site, but funding for both projects failed.

Robertson Bros. of Bloomfield Hills had also proposed single-family homes on the land, but abandoned those plans due to underground trichlorethylene contamination caused by a former manufacturing site near N. Fifth Street.

SR Jacobson Development says they plan to fix this by not including basements in townhouses so they don’t approach the contamination zone 14 feet below ground. In addition, they will be connected to the city’s water supply, avoiding groundwater problems while vapor barriers will be installed to prevent air contamination.

Snoqualmie plant site development enters environmental impact public comment period

By Site development

On Monday April 27, 2020, the town of Snoqualmie made public the long-awaited environmental impact study project (DEIE) for the major development project of the plant site.

The DEIS was prepared by the owner and developer of a 261 acre Planned Commercial / Industrial Site (PCI). The site is located within the city limits of Snoqualmie and is owned by Snoqualmie Mill Ventures LLC. Before the land was sold about 10 years ago, it was the site of a Weyerhaeuser sawmill for almost 100 years. The adjacent Mill Pond / Lake Borst is not part of the planned development. It still belongs to Weyerhaeuser.

About two-thirds of the plant site is expected to be kept in open space, including natural areas, trails, habitat, and flood storage. The developed zone would be done in three stages: planning zone 1, planning zone 2 then planning zone 3, with less certainty in the later stages. The phased project is expected to take place over the next 10 to 15 years.

According to DEIS, “Planning Zone 1 would be developed for a mix of employment, retail and residential activities, organized in a pedestrianized village center adjacent to a“ main street ”. About 160
housing units are offered on the second and upper floors of mixed-use buildings… Apartments would be for rent, at market rates, and would be a mix of one and two bedroom units, of medium size approximately 835 square feet.

Map of the 3 planning zones of the plant site development project in stages. Planning zone 1 would occur first.

If Snoqualmie Mill’s vision comes true, the preferred concept for the area will be wine-related uses, including wine production, wine tasting and other wine-related uses, restaurants, event spaces and the lodging.

The developer of the mill site, Tom Sroufe, said several wineries have already expressed interest in the potential development, but explained that they will need to reassess that interest once the economic impacts of the coronavirus crisis are undermined. .

Plant 1 Site Layout Conceptual Design – Main Street Perspective

Read our previous article on the planned development of the factory site HERE.

It has been three years since Snoqualmie Mill Ventures submitted an application for a development master plan for municipal staff review. Since then, the promoter has prepared the draft environmental impact study. The purpose of DEIS is to identify all impacts (traffic, water, environment, pollutants, sights, archeology, noise, etc.) caused by development and to present plans to mitigate negative impacts.

[Note: That 2017 master plan application contained a controversial component – a large, outdoor amphitheater in Planning Area 1 – which according to Sroufe has been removed from the preferred Mill Site re-development option contained in the DEIS. The amphitheater component, though, is still included in an alternative re-development option in the DEIS (required by the SEPA Act) and is located in Planning Area 3.]

Some examples of mitigation proposals contained in the DEIS [for phase 1] include the restructuring of part of Millpond Road; the addition of a traffic light at the intersection of Fisher Creek and Snoqualmie Drive; treatment of water flowing from impermeable surfaces and entering the Snoqualmie River; a bottomless culvert under the realigned portion of SE Mill Pond Road to allow passage of flood water, small mammals, carnivores and amphibians; clean-up and remediation of inherited contamination in planning zones 2 and 3 where these contaminants have been located. [These a just a few examples of many contained within the large DEIS document]

The development of DEIS took three years [in part] due to the fact that the site was previously a sawmill and therefore presents environmental and contamination issues; its location adjacent to the Snoqualmie River; and the size and duration of the proposed development. The DEIS itself is almost 3,000 pages (including appendices) for the large and complicated site.

Plant site developer and North Bend resident Tom Sroufe said DEIS has taken a long time because he takes it seriously. He explained that they wanted to be thorough, not to be surprised by anything. They asked the hired consultants to complete the DEIS to address the impacts in advance.

The first version of DEIS was presented to the Town of Snoqualmie about a year ago. The city consultants then provided feedback and further work was done to develop the detailed document.

Sroufe commented, “We have done our best to identify any impact on the community and believe that there is no significant negative impact that cannot be mitigated. “

Snoqualmie Town Community Development Director Mark Hofman explained the project has now entered a legally required audience [and state agency] comment period, which will last 45 days.

Hofman said the goal now is to have as many eyes as possible on the document to generate as many feedback as possible, which will make the EIS even stronger to fully mitigate negative impacts.

Once the public comment period has ended, Mill Site Ventures will then be required to respond to each comment provided.

According to the Town of Snoqualmie lawyer, Bob Sterbank, the town will also assess the comments received, make any changes it deems appropriate to the various chapters of the DEIS and appendices, and prepare an additional chapter or addendum that will include the responses. comments related to factual corrections. or when the City determines that the comment (s) do not warrant a further response.

The City then publishes the final environmental impact study (FEIS). This FEIS will accompany the draft commercial / industrial plan (PCI plan) when it is submitted to the town planning commission for a public hearing. The planning commission will then make a recommendation to the municipal council as to the approval / acceptance of the PCI plan and the FEIS. A developer agreement should also be drawn up between the two parties if / when the project progresses.

Written commentary on the DEIS taken until June 11: the review and comment period has been extended from 30 to 45 days for this draft environmental impact statement. Written comments can be submitted until June 11, 2020 and addressed to Mark Hofman, SEPA Manager, Town of Snoqualmie, PO Box 987, Snoqualmie, WA 98065. Comments can also be emailed to [email protected] or [email protected]

Oral commentary taken on May 20 at 4 p.m.: Due to the ongoing COVID-19 emergency and stay-at-home orders statewide, the city will be taking oral comments in a remote online meeting rather than in person. The meeting is scheduled for May 20, 2020 at 4 p.m. The city said information on the calls would be provided at a later date and posted on the city’s website calendar. [To be notified directly about the meeting information, sign up for Notify Me and choose “Mill DEIS”]

Through a city-state press release, “approval of the environmental impact study project would not in itself authorize any physical construction on the site. If approved, Snoqualmie Mill Ventures will need to submit an application to physically develop the property.

If this request were approved, the site would be redeveloped over a period of approximately 10 to 15 years.

For more information, visit the Development Project page of the plant website.

Conceptual image of the western perspective of the main street sector of the factory site

Ladue City Council Approves Site Development Plan for Former Schneithorst Restaurant | Local company

By Site development





The familiar exterior of the German themed restaurant which faced Lindbergh Boulevard on Thursday, January 30, 2020 at the Schneithorst Restaurant and Bar where customers could look at the various items available at an online auction at the closed restaurant. Photo by JB Forbes, [email protected]


JB Forbes


By Mary Shapiro Post-dispatch special

LADIE – The former Schneithorst restaurant on South Lindbergh Boulevard and Clayton Road is said to be renovated for commercial and office uses under a plan approved by city officials on Tuesday.

Schneithorst Development Co. wants to renovate the two-story building and add 7,400 feet of retail space to the old restaurant, which closed in December after having been in operation since 1956.

Allen Roehrig, of Mainline Group Architecture Inc., represented the developer at a public hearing on Tuesday. He said the second-story patio would be closed to become additional retail space, adding a new two-story section to the north end of the restaurant building.

The building footprint will be increased by 2,006 square feet.

There is a proposal to build a new second story on a one story section adjacent to the loading dock, and additional small sections would be added to connect the new areas to existing ones, he said.

Further renovations will take place in the main and lower levels of the structure, he said, although much of the building’s existing shopping area remains the same.

Council Approves Bluegrass Apartments Site Development Plan – Shelby County Reporter

By Site development

By EMILY SPARACINO / Editor-in-chief

MONTEVALLO – A real estate developer got the approval he needed from Montevallo City Council on February 10 to begin construction of a new apartment complex on a property at the southwest corner of Overland Road and Shoshone Drive.

Following a public hearing, council approved by 4 votes to 2 the site development plan of developer Paul Widman for Bluegrass Apartments, a 46-unit multi-family complex.

In November, council approved Widman’s request, on behalf of owner Brenda Zigarelli, for a special district modified for the property in November.

The Planning and Zoning Board reviewed and recommended approval of the site’s development plan in January, according to Shelby County Development Services Department Sharman Brooks. With a building permit in place, city council approval was required for construction to begin.

Brooks said the plan meets all the requirements of the city’s zoning ordinance and has the approval of the city’s engineer.

As for density, the three-16-unit construction plan will bring the development to its maximum capacity, Brooks said.

Councilors Rusty Nix and Arthur Herbert voted against the site’s development plan.

Herbert said the potential impact of the development on nearby property values ​​was his main concern.

The Bluegrass development since last year has been the subject of numerous comments and questions from residents, many of whom have voiced concerns about property values, increased traffic and drainage issues. water in the area.

Widman said the idea that the complex would cause nearby property values ​​to decrease was “extremely subjective.”

Council did not approve an application by Chris Reebals, on behalf of property owner Montevallo Cottages LLC, to change the zoning district from Special District R-2 to Special District R-4 for the construction of a multi-family housing community. off Alabama 25 near Shelby County 19 (Enon Road).

The proposed community would include units designed for “rent” townhouses.

Brooks said the Planning and Zoning Board reviewed the request and recommended that it not be approved due to the increase in density inconsistent with the surrounding area and the overall plan.

The Montevallo Cottages affair died for lack of motion.

The council considered but did not act on a request from Ammersee Lakes developer Tom Bagley to split the cost of repaving roads in the first and second sector of the subdivision this year to allow construction of the third sector. .