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Owen Sound approves site plan for former gas station

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The site plan for the construction of a new shopping center on long-vacant land at Owen Sound’s “southern gateway” has been approved by council.

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On Monday, council voted 7 to 2 in favor of the site plan for the property at the southwest corner of 10and East Street and 9and Avenue East, which once housed a gas station, but has been vacant since 2005. The plans for the property at 889 10and St. E. includes an approximately 4,300 square foot mall containing three retail units, including a drive-thru restaurant.

Sarj Mehat, part of the owners’ team, 1948654 Ontario Inc., said Tuesday he doesn’t yet know when construction will begin, but hopes it will be this year.

“I am happy that it has been approved and I hope we can move on to the next stage of its construction now,” Mehat said.

He said he will have to consult with tenants and contractors before finalizing a timetable on when work will start.

“With COVID in the air, the world has changed and it’s not as easy as it used to be,” Mehat said. “The intentions are good, the property will be developed and it’s only a matter of time.”

Mehat said he could not yet disclose who the tenants of the property will be.

With the approval of the site plan, council directed staff to introduce a by-law to authorize the mayor and clerk to sign a site plan agreement, service agreement and any other items required to implement site plan approval.

The property has the Travelodge to the north on 10and Street East while Tim Hortons is east across 9and East Ave. The property adjoins residential homes to the west and south.

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In addition to the building, the property’s proposed site plan also includes 13 drive-thru waiting spaces, a 26-space parking lot, and two new right-hand and right-hand-only entrances from 10and East Street and 9and East Ave. The median out of 10and East Street must be extended to prevent illegal left turns into the property. There are plans for site maintenance, retaining walls and landscaping, according to a report in junior planner Jacklyn Iezzi’s Monday diary.

Because the property is in the area designated in the city’s official plan as the southern gateway to Owen Sound, the development requires “a high standard of urban design,” Iezzi’s report explains. The property is zoned Commercial Artery (C4).

Among the features incorporated into the site plan and landscape plan in support of this designation are the orientation of the building to the intersection “to create an attractive street edge”, with parking at the rear and to the side, wrought iron and masonry fencing consistent with the harbor and downtown areas and outdoor lighting along building facades, the report details.

A drawing of a proposed development for a vacant property at 889 10th St. E. On Monday, March 14, 2022, the Owen Sound City Council approved a site plan for the property which includes three commercial units, including a restaurant with drive-thru.
A drawing of a proposed development for a vacant property at 889 10th St. E. On Monday, March 14, 2022, the Owen Sound City Council approved a site plan for the property which includes three commercial units, including a restaurant with drive-thru. Photo provided

Landscaping is proposed and includes a mix of deciduous trees, coniferous and deciduous shrubs and perennials. It is also proposed to retain three existing trees along the west lot line.

Due to adjacent residential properties, an acoustic fence must be constructed along the west lot line, while the drive-thru is to be closed between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. Retaining walls should be constructed along the south and west rear area of ​​the property.

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On Thursday, some councilors raised concerns about the proposed development, including the high-traffic location, the frequency of collisions at the intersection and vehicle idling in the drive-thru.

Com. Scott Greig said he had significant concerns about the type of development.

“I thought it would be a great place for something like four or five story multi-residential housing, as we all know, which this community desperately needs,” said Greig, who also raised concerns about shortages. of labor and “another drive-thru only reduces the viability of existing alternative businesses.

Com. Carol Merton raised concerns about ‘information gaps’ regarding collisions at the intersection and an emissions assessment ‘particularly with a drive-thru’.

Community Services Director Pam Coulter said at Monday’s council meeting that a transportation impact study had been submitted, reviewed by city technical staff, and the findings were deemed acceptable. A noise study was also carried out. In 2010, the city’s comprehensive zoning ordinance was updated to prohibit new drive-thrus in the then downtown area, but drive-thru is permitted in other commercial areas both in the city’s official plan and zoning regulations, Coulter explained.

Many other councilors have spoken out in favor of the development, including Coun. Richard Thomas, who said it’s good to see a development coming up for a brownfield property in a high visibility location.

“Lately around this table, the idea has crept more and more into discussions that we should be telling developers what to develop in Owen Sound,” Thomas said. “I don’t see that as the board’s role.”

Deputy Mayor Brian O’Leary expressed support for the proposal, which meets all development standards and is consistent with the official plan and zoning by-law.

O’Leary said that in the past developers had been unwilling to work in the city because of the “board getting in the way”.

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03/11/2022 | Site Plan Approved for Berlin Activity Depot Expansion

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Site Plan Approved for Berlin Activity Depot Expansion

BERLIN — The Berlin Planning Commission has approved a site plan for an extension and addition to the Berlin Activity Repository. On Wednesday, the commission approved plans to upgrade Berlin’s business depot on Old Ocean City Boulevard. The project, which will be done in phases, will begin with an addition to the side of the building…

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Work on the Highway 50 bridge will include lane closures

Work on the Highway 50 bridge will include lane closures

OCEAN CITY — The State Highway Administration of the Maryland Department of Transportation will perform routine inspections of the Route 50 bridge next week. Officials say inspections will begin Monday, March 14, weather permitting, with crews working from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily on the bridge. The work should be completed by 5:00 p.m. on Friday…

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OAR to headline new beach festival

OAR to headline new beach festival

OCEAN CITY — After months of speculation and anticipation, more details have emerged about the proposed major three-day music festival in Inlet in September, which includes Maryland-based OAR as a lead player. Last August, Director of Tourism and Business Development, Tom Perlozzo, and C3 Presents Founder and Promoter, Tim Sweetwood, pitched the idea of ​​a…

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Townhouse project moves forward in Berlin

Townhouse project moves forward in Berlin

BERLIN — Plans for a new townhouse development on Old Ocean City Boulevard are moving forward after discussions with the city’s planning commission. The Berlin Planning Commission voted 6-0 on Wednesday to provide a favorable recommendation for a text amendment that would allow fee simple townhouse developments in Berlin. “It’s just another way to grow…

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Donut Development LLC receives approval for rezoning and site plan

By Site plan

RINCON — Rejoice, pumpkin spice lovers!

During Monday’s regular Rincon City Council meeting, Donut Development LLC owner Jay Andrews said a Dunkin’ store is set to open on 12th Street this fall.

Andrews appeared before council to seek approval of a site plan for commercial space with three units, including Dunkin’. Jersey Mike’s Subs and T-Mobile are ready for others.

The inclusion of T-Mobile necessitated a rezoning (office commercial to general commercial). After agreeing to a rezoning, which came before the site plan was given the go-ahead, council peppered Andrews with a few questions.

Councilor Reese Browher asked, “Mr. Andrews, what is the timeline for this project? »

Browher, joking lightly, said he gets more questions about Dunkin’ and Jersey Mike’s Subs than about any other topic.

“There’s a lot of anticipation for it to be open,” he said.

Andrews responded confidently.

“We’re looking at around seven months,” he said.

Councilman Patrick Kirkland asked Andrews about the traffic of customers who use Dunkin’s drive-thru.

“They’ll come into 12th Street, then they’ll turn left from 12th Street at the back of the development, and they’ll come into the drive-thru – what we call stacking – and people will come into line . . said Andrews.

Kirkland expressed additional concern after Andrews’ response.

“…there is an average stacking required and this site actually has (space for) two more cars than the average for Dunkin’ in terms of stacking,” Andrews continued. “We feel like we’ve accommodated that too much.”

Andrews added an interesting tidbit.

“Seventy-three percent of Dunkin’s patronage is done before 10:30 a.m.,” he said.

After council approved the site plan, Mayor Ken Lee joked with Andrews.

“It’s a great tactic to be called Donut Development,” he said. “We cannot refuse a donut development. I don’t know how that would work.

Earlier in the meeting, the board approved a site plan for a 5,098 square foot extension to Wal-Mart for online pickup.

Planning committee approves site plan for three-storey, 26-unit building on Manominee Street

By Site plan

At its February 16 meeting, the Huntsville Planning Committee approved the site plan for a proposed three-story apartment building, which would contain 26 apartments.

The building would be located on a 4,583.6 m² plot at 50 Manominee Street. The parcel of land has 64m of frontage on an unopened right-of-way and future collector road (Cliff Avenue) and 66m on Manominee Street, planner Kelsea Shadlock told the committee.

“The property rises from Manominee Street and is currently vacant and forested. The surrounding land uses are: commercial uses to the east and south, low density residential to the north, and high density residential on the adjoining property to west,” she added.

Planning staff recommended that the site plan be approved, pending conditions such as a D4 landfill assessment and any recommended mitigation measures implemented.

A traffic impact summary was provided to assess road capacity following the proposed development and concluded that the existing road infrastructure is able to accommodate the development.

According to the Shadlock staff report, “the report author explained that it was possible to provide a pedestrian connection from Manominee Street to Cliff Avenue (and to formalize what appears to be an informal pedestrian connection via the swale In their review, they determined that further assessment would be required to formalize this connection given the elevation differential between Manominee Street and Cliff Avenue and to ensure that a connection would meet the requirements of She added that “the investigation of this connection should be further investigated by the requester in consultation with city operations and protective services personnel.”

Councilor Jonathan Wiebe asked who would be responsible for paying for the connection.

Matthew May, who was before the committee representing the application, said he thought it would be the municipality’s obligation rather than the developer’s.

“Often when we have developments, requests that come to us, we actually ask the requestor to provide, where they can, links – whether it’s trails, stairs or whatever, sidewalks or whatever, to make it part of the development. And that’s something we traditionally do,” said committee chair Councilor Nancy Alcock.

May replied that the matter could be discussed, “but I guess for me it’s not on private property. You know, it’s not on our property…”

Wiebe and Alcock continued discussions regarding the addition of a pedestrian link and liability or partial liability of the developer.

Huntsville Mayor Karin Terzino told the committee that while pedestrian connectivity is important, she reminded the committee that the area being discussed was not identified in the city’s sidewalk master plan. “To impose liability on a claimant who wants to build there, as a condition of the construction, I think is a bit unfair,” she said.

Following a question from Councilor Dan Armour, May indicated that the apartments would be rented at market price. He said it would be mostly one-bedroom units, with around four two-bedroom apartments.

You can find the staff report here.

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Large Center Road Self-Storage Site Plan Adopted

By Site plan

Adelaide Metcalfe Council has approved the Site Plan Control and Development Agreement for a large self-storage site at 28708 Center Road on the west side of the Commercial Corridor near Strathroy.

The agreement for A to Z Storage Ltd has become complicated with ongoing negotiations for a municipal services agreement with the municipality of Strathroy-Caradoc. After a closed session of council to discuss negotiations, council voted unanimously on February 7 to direct the mayor to send a letter to the Municipality of Strathroy-Caradoc regarding service agreement negotiations at this day.

Council also unanimously approved the storage site agreement which states that if there are municipal services available for water and sewer, they must connect; otherwise it will be local maintenance.

“What we’re trying to do is enable and encourage development on Center Road while we work through this service agreement discussion with our service provider there (Strathroy-Caradoc),” said CAO Morgan Calvert.

here (Strathroy-Caradoc).

The CAO staff report states that the property measures 1.32 hectares (3.26 acres) with a frontage of 96.6 metres. In the plans, five long rectangular buildings: a run along the center is to be built later, and four taller buildings running perpendicular to the center behind it would be first.

In the site servicing plan, there are also numerous proposed storage vaults of 819 cubic meters drawn into the south side of the property.

A to Z Storage now has one year to complete the project.

Planners accept Union Green site plan with ZBA hurdles to clear | News

By Site plan

HARBERT — A revised site plan for the proposed Union Green development was approved despite complications from new zoning rules for the Union Pier area at the February 9 Chikaming Township Planning Commission meeting.

A Union Pier overlay district that went into effect November 2, 2021 was not in place when planners gave initial site plan approval in July 2021, and the fate of a major feature of the revised site plan of Union Green presented to planners on Feb. 9 that appears to conflict with the new rules could end up being decided by the township’s Zoning Board of Appeals.

Planners approved the Union Green site plan by a 4-1 vote on February 9 with the following stipulations – that the developer go to the Zoning Appeal Board to seek a waiver reducing a requirement under the District of superimposed zoning that the front half of the first floor structures in the Union Pier Corridor portion of the neighborhood be set aside for commercial purposes; amend the site plan to remove two parking spaces adjacent to a “home/work” retail space and conform to a 10 foot front setback requirement for buildings; and that an updated site plan be provided to the township authorities.

“This is the first time we’ve had this ordinance in front of us, we’re testing it,” Planning Commission Chairman John Chipman said. “We’re testing it with a sitemap that was actually approved under a different order.”

In June 2021, Brad Rottschafer began the process of obtaining township approval to build the Union Green development on a 1.05 acre site (the former home of Riviera Gardens) located at the corner of Red Highway Arrow and Goodwin Avenue.

Following an Aug. 4 public hearing on the Union Green site plan, planners requested additional information on factors such as open space requirements and parking. On September 1, the Planning Commission also requested responses regarding driveway safety requirements to eliminate dead ends, reduce density and increase open space, and the submission of an impact assessment.

Suzanne Schulz of Progressive AE presented a revised sitemap designed to meet September 1 requests at the February 9 meeting.

Highlights of the new site plan include a reduction in the number of residential units from 20 to 18, with the two proposed former buildings along the Red Arrow Freeway being consolidated into one. An earlier site plan indicated that the housing sites would range in size from 2,100 to 8,000 square feet.

“Grass block pavers” were also added to the plan in the northwest portion of the property near a repositioned swimming pool to allow access for emergency responders; additional green space for a more park-like feel; and a screened waste corral area.

Schulz said the townhouses along Goodwin will be three stories while the carriage house along Red Arrow will be two stories, adding that “very high quality materials” will be used. She said the relationship between the buildings and the sidewalk is designed to be “walkable” and “village-like.”

She said a traffic impact study (based on the design of 20 units) predicted about 20 new morning rush hour trips on weekdays and 23 new afternoon rush hour trips in week.

In July 2021, the area in question was zoned CU Union Pier Mixed Use, and multi-family residential development was permitted with special land use approval.

On Feb. 9, Chikaming Zoning Administrator Kelly Largent said the proposed development is no longer a special land use in the Union Pier Overlay Zoning District (which regulates zoning in parts of Chikaming and New Buffalo Township from Union Pier) which came into effect in November. 2. 2021.

“You will now find that this is an authorized use,” Largent said.

But later in the meeting, a section of Union Pier’s zoning rules regarding the “uses” of first floors became an issue.

The latest site plan for Union Green calls for the first floors of all but the living/working facility to be residential.

But the wording of the ordinance for the “Union Pier Corridor” area states, “Residences may be permitted in the back 50% of the ground, but the front 50% must be for commercial use.”

It also reads: “The commercial first floor will span the full width of the building’s frontage as seen from the adjacent public street.”

The first floors of the “Union Pier Village” district (the downtown area) must be used for commercial purposes only.

Planning Commission member Grace Rappe said it looks like the building along the Red Arrow Freeway will need to be redesigned.

But Schulz said she thought there was some question as to whether the order was intended to require advertisements on the entire facade of a building along the Red Arrow Freeway in the “corridor” area.

“From an economic viability perspective, and ensuring there are not more vacancies along the Red Arrow Freeway, it would not seem logical to require commercial space on the ground floor. Most communities that had this requirement are now repealing them and changing them from what they used to be because they have an overabundance of vacant commercial space,” she said.

Planning Commission Chairman John Chipman said the intention to have separate village corridors and districts in the Overlay District was to concentrate commercial entities in the central part of Union Pier, adding that he thinks Schulz is right to call the rules confusing.

“The reality is you’re not going to have storefronts all the way down the hall,” he said, adding that no order is perfect and “we’re going to work on it.”

Rappe later said, “The zoning ordinance, clear or unclear, is all we have at the moment. And there are things here that are written that are clearly not part of this development proposal.

Planner Andy Brown noted that a site plan has already been approved and the developer has been asked to make changes such as creating more visual security at the corner of Red Arrow and Goodwin, and they did.

“They did the things we asked for that were reasonable, which would make their sitemap even more appealing,” he said.

There has been debate over whether anything with the density of the Union Green project could ever be developed under the current zoning, Rappe said nine three-bedroom units per property was now the limit.

Following the Planning Commission’s 4-1 decision and a series of public comments, Rappe (who voted the only “no”) announced his intention to resign from the Planning Commission, calling the decision of requesting waivers from the ZBA instead of following what it called “absolutely horrible” proper procedures.

Those who spoke about the Union Green issue during public comments included:

Suzanne Koenigsberg, who said driving across the Red Arrow Freeway, a street at 45 miles per hour without lights, doesn’t seem like a safe bet. She also wondered if there would be enough parking for everyone likely to be in a short-term rental community.

Karen Doughty said she doesn’t think the proposed development is a good use of space. She also said it looks like the big trees that need to be felled will be replaced by 34 “twigs”.

Jim Harper said he thought the development was far too dense. Harper said the impact on already small and crowded public beaches worries him.

Fran Wersells asked “Why is there nothing green in Union Green, why is there no mention of using eco-friendly materials, solar panels, heaps of compost?”

Babe Paukstys said the traffic studies were done on weekdays while “our problems are on the weekends”. She said with up to a dozen people potentially in each of the 18 units, there aren’t enough parking spaces and sending them onto the Red Arrow Freeway isn’t safe. She also questioned the affordability of the units.

Nick Martinski said he thought township officials seemed more focused on representing the interests of the builder than township residents. “You’ve already approved it, and now you’re going to receive public comments. So our comments mean nothing.

Pijus Stoncius asked how the township fire department would arrive at a fire on the third floor.

Koenigsberg concluded the public comment session by saying “We don’t want that here.”

Also on February 9, the Planning Commission approved a site plan for a proposed Barndogg cafe in an existing structure near the corner of Wintergreen and Red Arrow Highway at Union Pier on the condition of obtaining a ZBA waiver involving permission public parking located less than 600 feet across the Red Arrow Freeway to alleviate the limited number of parking spaces available at the existing site, as well as to address concerns raised regarding front yard parking, removal of trash cans and widening of entry and exit points.

And planners heard from Joseph Reed, who said the planned concert hall for Harbert Community Park was progressing through a somewhat closed process by the park board without a proper master plan reviewed by the planning commission.

Milton processing plant project continues as commissioners approve site analysis

By Site analysis

Commissioners have approved a site survey for a 100-acre area near the Blackwater River to build RIBS for the next sewage treatment plant.

The item, which went through the no objection consent agenda, would allow Santa Rosa to deed the land to the City of Milton with the survey necessary for the viability of the RIBS.

It is a follow-up step after commissioners previously approved a geotechnical analysis of county lands between Blackwater River and the Santa Rosa Correctional Facility, paving the way for a much-needed new sewage treatment plant to Milton.

“Without a factory coming online soon, saying yes to other businesses will be more difficult,” Milton City Manager Randy Jorgenson said during a May 2021 commission meeting. “In fact, this will be impossible.”

The June 2021 commissioners’ decision to fund a geotechnical analysis of the sewage treatment plant continues to be pushed back, with citizens asking for the plant to be located elsewhere.

“There’s a massive failure opportunity there,” Milton resident Jerry Couey said at the Feb. 7 meeting, “and it’s a straight shot down the river.”

According to Jorgenson, Milton City Council is the only body authorized to decide the location of the plant, which he says was decided more than a decade ago..

“The location of the sewage treatment plant on city land is a decision that must be made by city council,” he said. “This decision was first made 14 years ago in 2008.”

The current plan for the processing facility is to await completion of the RIBS site analysis to determine the next steps in the process.

Solon Council Approves Revised Site Plan for Aged Housing Complex Addition

By Site plan

SOLON, Ohio — City Council has approved a revised site plan for an addition to the Vitalia active adult community in Solon.

Vitalia, located at 6050 Kruse Drive, offers independent living, assisted living, and memory care units. It was developed by Solon-based Omni Senior Living.

The 11,934 square foot expansion, located adjacent to Omni Senior Living’s existing headquarters at 33095 Bainbridge Road, will house 30 additional residential units.

On Monday (February 7), council approved the site plan, 6-1, along with nine deviations that were recommended for approval by the city’s Planning Commission.

The commission had recommended approval of the project subject to both the applicant’s agreement with the site plan submitted by the city’s planning department showing the location of a potential 10-foot-wide pathway and compliance with the guidelines of the city’s engineering department.

Ward 5 Vice Mayor and Councilwoman Nancy Meany cast the dissenting vote on the site plan and also voted “no” on a front yard setback.

Meany noted that the project was originally presented to council in October 2020. She also voted “no” to this site plan when council approved it 6-1.

“My problem with that – and it’s the same ongoing problem – is that I think it’s an overdevelopment of the site,” she said. “I think trying to squeeze another building over there is just too much.”

Meany said this proposed addition is a different plan than the one submitted by Omni and approved by the board in October 2020.

“The original building was going to be sort of parallel to where Omni’s headquarters is,” she said. “Now it’s more horizontal, and that even worries me a bit more.”

Meany said she was “super supportive” of the original construction of the senior housing complex, which opened in September 2020.

“I think it’s filled so much of a need in the city, providing an absolutely beautiful place for older people to go and reside,” she said. “I am delighted that it has really succeeded.

“But I just feel like it’s too much on this site.”

Solon Vice Mayor and Ward 5 Councilman Nancy Meany voices her objections to a revised site plan for an addition to Vitalia Active Adult Community in Solon at the city council meeting Monday, February 7. (Ed Wittenberg, special for cleveland.com)

Gary Biales, vice president of development for Omni Senior Living, submitted an application to the city in December for the revised addition, including site and parking changes.

Ward 3 Councilman Jeremy Zelwin asked Biales what had changed from the original site plan.

“I changed the location of the building,” Biales said.

Biales then explained by showing an architectural rendering of the previously approved plan, compared to that of the revised plan.

“The (original) addition was the same 30 units – same height, same architecture,” he said. “But there was a catwalk on the second floor.

“The reason it was on the second floor is because firefighters need year-round access. That made it really difficult. Part of it was outdoors, and we didn’t didn’t like it so we came back and changed it.

The revised plan — with the same square footage as the previous one — includes a hallway in the middle that connects to the existing building, Biales said.

“So there’s no walking outside,” he said. “That’s the difference.”

Zelwin asked, “How about the number of parking spaces compared to the original plan?”

“Even though it was reconfigured, we actually added spaces from our original plan,” Biales said.

Zelwin then asked Biales why Omni didn’t start earlier, after the board approved the original plan 16 months ago.

“I don’t want to endorse this and wait another year,” Zelwin said. “We don’t want to keep endorsing these deviations and moving forward with this and then you don’t fulfill your promise.”

Biales said part of the reason for the delay was the coronavirus pandemic.

“It was not the right time to innovate, get loans and everything else,” he said. “And while we were in that period, we kept analyzing that and saying, ‘It’s just too far for people to have to walk in open space.

“It just didn’t make sense in a lot of cases. This building now shows that it is only an extension of our existing building.

As for Omni’s timeline, Biales said his goal is to begin work on the site in May and then begin construction in August.

“So we’re looking at opening in April next year,” he said.

Omni has developed seven other Vitalia senior living communities in the Cleveland/Akron area, according to its website, omniseniorliving.com.

Modified salary grids

Separately, the board amended an order approved in December that established wage grids and wage increases of up to 2% this year for full-time and part-time employees not covered by a collective agreement.

The amended order offers these employees a wage increase of up to 2.25% – the same level the board approved for employees covered by the collective agreement. The increase is retroactive to January 1.

“It’s about getting our non-union employees to get the same wage increases as our CBA employees,” Meany said.

Zelwin noted that the impact of this 0.25% increase on the city’s general fund budget will be $50,000 this year.

“We think we can absorb that or use part of the budget contingency fund to pay for salary increases to match collective agreements,” he said.

The board also approved a collective bargaining agreement with the Ohio Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association for city corrections officers.

The three-year contract runs until December 31, 2024. The union agreed to a ‘fair adjustment’ in pay this year and pay increases of 2.25% next year and 2.5 % in 2024.

It’s similar to the three-year contracts the board approved Jan. 18 with the police department’s sergeants, lieutenants and patrolmen.

Learn more about the Sorrow Solon Sun.

Athol Daily News – Uma gets approval for modified sitemap to accommodate expansion

By Site plan

ATHOL – At its meeting on Wednesday February 2, the Athol Community Planning and Development Board approved a site plan amendment for Uma Cultivation’s operation at 706 Petersham Road. The original site plan, approved by the board of directors in December 2020, called for the construction of a 10,000 square foot building to house offices, manufacturing spaces, storage spaces and a 6 000 square feet for growing marijuana.

However, as planning for the project progressed, Uma officials determined that the original building they had proposed would be insufficient to meet the needs of the business and sought board approval. to double the size of the proposed structure to 20,000 square feet.

A public hearing on the proposal opened in November last year, with follow-up at monthly council meetings in December and January. The hearing closed on January 5, but no decision on the amended plan was made at the time. Time was given to council members to weigh any proposed conditions they might want to attach to the amended plan and to allow for a review of the site plan by the council’s engineering consultant, Tighe & Bond.

Ahead of last week’s vote, Athol planning and development director Eric Smith told the council: “This is now a major site plan process due to the fact that they offer 20,000 square feet. This triggered a major review. Their intentions are to eventually reach 50,000 square feet, which means they will have to come back in the future, and this will be an additional site plan topic for the council.

The amended site plan, he said, included everything the council had wanted to see, adding that no waivers had been requested by Uma.

“As soon as you issue a decision tonight,” Smith said, “you will issue a decision within the 45-day period since the hearing closed. A conclusion for includes a summary of the process, all official comments from the city , and we wanted to put in there that the ConCom (Conservation Commission) had no problem with the location as there are no wetlands on the site, which is all that would fall under their jurisdiction.

He noted that in carrying out the peer review, Tighe & Bond found that “everything that needed to be resolved had been resolved”, adding only that the engineering company had suggestions for conditions to be added. to the amended permit.

“Council may, in the course of the vote,” Smith continued, “find that – with all conditions – the proposal does not adversely affect the health, safety and welfare of residents of the city, and that have a positive impact on the local economy. So it’s part of your decision.

Smith said the conditions included in the site plan approved by council in December 2020 will be included in the amended site plan, “any further changes will have to come back to council, either for special permit approval or for approval of the site plan for the future building.”

This, he explained, means that Uma will have to come back to the board for any proposals to expand the building beyond the 20,000 square foot scope of the currently proposed project.

Even with a doubling in size of the original building, Smith said, “They agreed to have the maximum (crop) canopy at 6,000 square feet for six months of odor-free operations,” before returning to the board of directors with any request for canopy expansion.

Another condition for approval of the amended site plan was proposed by council member Marc Morgan.

“If they were to increase the number of employees,” Smith explained, “it would trigger a review of their septic system, and the council should be notified of this process. They still have to go through Title 5 approval. They have the location approved by the board of health, but they have to go through Title 5 if they need to make any changes.

Uma encountered a small glitch on the way to approving the modified sitemap. The company, in anticipation of expanding the size of the original building, felled a number of trees on its property without first informing the municipal authorities of its intention to do so. Neighbors feared the action would increase stormwater runoff from the property, which would lead to erosion of the hillside that overlooks Petersham Road. However, a site inspection revealed that while the trees were being felled, stumps were left in place, reducing the likelihood of increased runoff.

Although the move was determined to violate the spirit of Uma’s special permit, it did not constitute an actual violation of the permit conditions and no penalties were issued against the company.

The Board of Directors’ vote to approve the amended site plan was unanimous.

Greg Vine can be contacted at [email protected]

Southlake City Council approves site plan for new industrial warehouses

By Site plan

The 23.6 acre site will contain three warehouses. (Courtesy of the Town of Southlake)

Southlake City Council has unanimously approved a site plan for a warehouse and office building project to be called Mustang Business Court.

The development would be built near Mustang Court and Ira E. Woods Avenue on 26.3 acres zoned industrial. Plans call for three warehouses totaling nearly 331,000 square feet of space, according to city documents.

The applicant, Jason Bengert of Brookfield Properties, presented the project at the February 1 council meeting.

Some residents expressed concern about potential road safety issues during public comments.

City Attorney Allen Taylor said the city’s consulting engineer has reviewed the area’s traffic system and believes it is within an acceptable range for this type of facility.

Ken Baker, director of planning and development services, also said city staff are reviewing the traffic study and are in communication with the City of Grapevine, which controls traffic lights in the area, to create safer traffic conditions.

The applicant also received a waiver of the city’s tree preservation ordinance, which requires that a minimum of 60% of the trees on the site be preserved. The approved deviation allowed the applicant to reduce it to 27.6% partly due to the poor condition of the trees, according to discussions. As part of the development, more than 900 new trees will be planted on the property, according to documents.

Sitemap for New West Bend OK’d Car Wash | Washington County Business News

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WEST BEND – The property at 2110 W. Washington St., immediately west of Pizza Ranch, is set to become a Tommy’s Express car wash as the Plan Commission unanimously approved the site plan for the land to redevelop.

The commission on Tuesday approved a site plan and certified survey map submitted by Steve Kilian Jr. for the property at 2110 W. Washington St.

The certified survey map was to adjust the lot line between the subject property where the car wash will be located and the neighboring Pizza Ranch lot to the east.

“Essentially this lot line is being moved east to expand this west lot,” said city business and development planner James Reinke.

The Plan Commission then took over the site plan for the redevelopment of 2110 W. Washington St. and approved it after a brief discussion.

According to site plan documents, the current building will be removed from the site and a new 4,552 square foot building will be constructed. The site plan showed four parking spaces for general activity and 12 vacuum spaces for parking customers to vacuum their vehicles.

The commissioners had several questions about the plan’s impact on traffic patterns. City Engineer Max Marechal said for vehicles entering and exiting, staff asked the developer to include markings and signage to ensure the vehicle is not blocking the lanes. He also briefly touched on the possibility of vehicles backing up while waiting for the car wash on peak days, as the 1.13-acre site limits vehicle traffic.

“We might see a queue on Washington Street,” Marechal said, though he noted that would likely be an exception to normal.

Kilian said the plan took into account a potentially large number. Of the three car wash lanes, only one is a traditional in-person payment lane; the other two lanes are handled by a phone app or license plate recognition, to work automatically and quickly for member business customers.

“We’re able to stack 27 cars before we’re on Washington Street,” Kilian said.

The commission also briefly discussed parking at the nearby Pizza Ranch. While the certified survey map moved the lane of the lot to Pizza Ranch, the site plan included a decrease in that business’s parking area and adjustments to the remaining space.

“Originally, there were 100 parking spaces at the Pizza Ranch. That’s down to 85 parking spaces,” Reinke said.

He said commission staff were not concerned about the decline in parking. He said that for the company’s normal and peak traffic, 85 booths should be enough.

In other matters, the commission also approved an amendment to the conditional use license for the miniature golf business at 601 E. Paradise Drive. The amendment added liquor sales and seasonal Christmas tree sales to the permit, while allowing hours to run until 11 p.m. daily, rather than closing at 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday.

According to information in the meeting package, the consumption of alcohol will not be permitted in the batting cage area, or on the mini-golf course itself.

MPC approves site plan for apartment complex | Local News

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The Glynn County Planning Commission on Tuesday approved a site plan for a 272-unit apartment complex between Cate Road and I-95.

Called Vintage Brunswick, the project is being developed by Ridge Enterprises, Inc. and Georgia Land Group, Inc. The recently clearcut property is visible from I-95 near exit 38, where the freeway intersects Golden Isles Parkway.

Plans approved on Tuesday call for 272 apartments in 10 buildings served by 512 parking spaces. The site plan also includes a pavilion at the entrance to the complex.

Primary access to the resort will be via Capital Square Drive, which runs from Venture Drive to Perry Lane Road and terminates between La Quinta Inn & Suites and the Waffle House. The developer proposes to extend Capital Square Drive south towards the development site, which abuts the Sandalwood neighborhood.

Plans include an access road between the complex and South Teakwood Court in the adjacent neighborhood, but county planner Maurice Postal said the road would be for emergency vehicles only.

Final approval of the site plan would be contingent on the county’s Department of Community Development approving separate building applications for the Capital Square Drive extension.

Richard Strickland, a member of the MPC, did not see how the roads around the complex could accommodate the new traffic in their current configurations.

“How are you going to handle the traffic putting 272 units out there?” Traffic is already bad on Perry Lane Road,” Strickland said.

Wesley Franks of Roberts Civil Engineering spoke on behalf of the developers.

Franks said the developer was conducting a traffic study to determine how best to manage traffic. One option is to build a new road between Golden Isles Primary School and the neighborhood on East Street to allow direct access to Cate Road. New turning lanes and traffic lights on Perry Lane Road and Cate Road could also be offered as solutions, he said.

Strickland was still unconvinced that this option would be enough to solve traffic problems in the area.

“The only way it will work is if they perry Lane (road) to four lanes,” Strickland said.

He was prepared to approve the plan if the commission’s motion for approval included a condition that the developer be required to complete and submit the traffic plan to the county.

“We’re going to request a traffic study with every phase of (this project) that comes along,” Postal said.

The MPC unanimously approved the site plan on the condition that the Capital Square Drive extension application be approved and the developer be required to submit the traffic plan prior to construction.

MPC members also voted unanimously to approve a 7,200 square foot office and retail building on the corner of Alpine Court and Gateway Center Boulevard, behind Cheddars Scratch Kitchen.

A concept plan indicated that the building would feature construction similar to that of the Monkey Wrench bicycle shop on St. Simons Island.

Franks, who also represented the commercial building’s developer, said his clients were not ready to reveal which business or businesses might occupy the building.

In other business, the MPC has approved an application to rezon a property on the corner of Nix Lane and Granville Nix Lane to allow the construction of four duplexes and a site plan for a commercial warehouse at 128 Peek Road.

The final action item on the commission’s agenda was an amendment to the zoning ordinance to clarify how the county measures the height of buildings in a floodplain.

This would effectively reduce the maximum building height in the Resort Residential Zone, RR, on St. Simons Island from 45 feet to 35 feet. All RR zoned properties are on or immediately adjacent to Ocean Boulevard at the south end of the island.

Commissioners voted unanimously to recommend that the Glynn County Commission reject the amendment due to concerns over whether the amendment would allow buildings destroyed by natural causes to be rebuilt to previous specifications.

The amendment was initiated by Glynn County Commissioner Cap Fendig, who represents St. Simons Island, as a way to reduce potential residential density on the island. Population growth on the island causes major traffic jams that quickly become a public safety issue.

Planning officer Stefanie Lief said the county isn’t sure how many properties will be affected by the zoning change.

MPC member Missy Neu asked how many buildings in the area were taller than 35 feet, which Lief did not know.

County Attorney Aaron Mumford said all buildings taller than 35 feet would be classified as “lawful nonconforming” structures.

“‘Grandfathering-in’ is another term for legal non-compliance,” Mumford said.

Neu said she was supportive of the new restrictions, but also worried that owners of non-compliant buildings could not rebuild to previous specifications if they were lost to an “act of God”, such as fire. Mumford said those concerns have been addressed in changes to previous orders and may be addressed in this one.

As he applauded what Fendig was trying to do, Strickland said he felt like it was a short-term, short-term approach.

“It’s not a band-aid approach,” Fendig said. “It’s something I ran to approach density on the island with a methodical approach. It’s one of many things I’ve studied for many years.

“There are a variety of ways to curb growth on the island so we can enjoy the quality of life.”

He also hopes that new regulations, among others that he plans to introduce to restrict the number of “bedrooms” in a residential building, will also slow the growth of short-term rentals on the island, which he says will contribute significantly to the circulation problem.

“I think it’s a great first step,” Fendig said.

While she doesn’t oppose it in principle, Neu would have liked the amendment to be part of the larger zoning overhaul the county is engaged in with consultant TSW Design.

MPC member Bill Edgy moved a motion to approve the amendment as is, which failed 2-4. Edgy and MPC member Bo Clark voted in favor while Neu, Strickland, chairwoman Sherrye Gibbs and MPC member Darrell Dawson voted against.

A motion to deny passed 4-2, with Clark and Edgy voting against the motion and the other committee members voting in favor.

Consolidated Restaurant and Nursing Facility Receive Site Plan Approval in the Netherlands

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HOLLAND – Two new developments are progressing in South Holland.

The first, a mixed-use development that will serve as the new home of the Grand King Buffet and the Shanghai Grill and Bar, received its third site plan approval from the Holland Planning Commission on Tuesday, January 11.

Following:Shanghai Grill moves across the street to a mixed-use development

Following:Goog’s Pub announces it will return to Holland in a mixed-use development

The mixed-use development on 32nd Street will include a restaurant and banquet space, as well as residential apartments.

The 421 E 32nd St. site plan had previously been approved in 2019 and then again in 2020 after developers reduced the number of residential units. The latest iteration of the plan outlines a step-by-step process, with one building constructed in 2022 and another if finances permit.

The building planned for this year includes a 13,500 square foot restaurant and banquet center, as well as four apartments totaling approximately 5,500 square feet. In 2019, developers told the planning commission that the restaurant would consolidate the Grand King Buffet and Shanghai Grill and Bar, replacing existing locations at 661 E 24th St. and 442 E 32nd St.

The project applicant owns the two restaurants. Shanghai Grill and Bar opened in 2015, offering take-out and lunch and dinner options, including sushi.

The approximately 3-acre lot sits at the corner of 32nd Street and Hastings Avenue, a few lots from a similar mixed-use development at the old Goog’s Pub.

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The second phase will feature a mix of retail and apartment space in a 15,000 square foot addition. The plan is significantly larger than the 14,000 square foot total at 667 Hastings Ave. – where Goog’s Pub will reopen in a downsized space. This building will include nine residential apartments and a grocery and beverage market, in addition to the restaurant.

The Avenue at Holland, a planned retirement home for 16th Street, received unanimous site plan approval on Tuesday, January 11 from the Holland Planning Commission.

Commissioners also approved a site plan for a nursing home at 897 E. 16th St. The one-story facility, titled The Avenue at Holland, will have 100 patient rooms, two courtyards and a daycare on site for employees.

Construction on the 84,725 square foot facility is expected to begin in 2022, and the developers hope to open in late summer 2023.

— Contact journalist Cassandra Lybrink at [email protected]. Follow her on Instagram @BizHolland.

Consolidated Restaurant and Nursing Facility Receives Holland Site Plan Approval

By Site plan

The owner of the Grand King Buffet and Shanghai Bar and Grill plans to consolidate the restaurants into a new mixed-use development on 32nd Street.

HOLLAND – Two new developments are progressing in South Holland.

The first, a mixed-use development that will serve as the new home of the Grand King Buffet and the Shanghai Grill and Bar, received its third site plan approval from the Holland Planning Commission on Tuesday, January 11.

Following: Shanghai Grill moves across the street to a mixed-use development

Following: Goog’s Pub announces it will return to Holland in a mixed-use development

The mixed-use development on 32nd Street will include a restaurant and banquet space, as well as residential apartments.

The mixed-use development on 32nd Street will include a restaurant and banquet space, as well as residential apartments.

The 421 E 32nd St. site plan had previously been approved in 2019 and then again in 2020 after developers reduced the number of residential units. The latest iteration of the plan outlines a step-by-step process, with one building constructed in 2022 and another if finances permit.

The building planned for this year includes a 13,500 square foot restaurant and banquet center, as well as four apartments totaling approximately 5,500 square feet. In 2019, developers told the planning commission that the restaurant would consolidate the Grand King Buffet and Shanghai Grill and Bar, replacing existing locations at 661 E 24th St. and 442 E 32nd St.

The project applicant owns the two restaurants. Shanghai Grill and Bar opened in 2015, offering take-out and lunch and dinner options, including sushi.

The approximately 3-acre lot sits at the corner of 32nd Street and Hastings Avenue, a few lots from a similar mixed-use development at the old Goog’s Pub.

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The second phase will feature a mix of retail and apartment space in a 15,000 square foot addition. The plan is significantly larger than the 14,000 square foot total at 667 Hastings Ave. – where Goog’s Pub will reopen in a downsized space. This building will include nine residential apartments and a grocery and beverage market, in addition to the restaurant.

The Avenue at Holland, a planned retirement home for 16th Street, received unanimous site plan approval on Tuesday, January 11 from the Holland Planning Commission.

The Avenue at Holland, a planned retirement home for 16th Street, received unanimous site plan approval on Tuesday, January 11 from the Holland Planning Commission.

Commissioners also approved a site plan for a nursing home at 897 E. 16th St. The one-story facility, titled The Avenue at Holland, will have 100 patient rooms, two courtyards and a daycare on site for employees.

Construction on the 84,725 square foot facility is expected to begin in 2022, and the developers hope to open in late summer 2023.

— Contact journalist Cassandra Lybrink at [email protected] Follow her on Instagram @BizHolland.

This article originally appeared on The Holland Sentinel: Consolidated Restaurant and Nursing Facility Receive Site Plan Approval in the Netherlands

Bruce County EMS Headquarters Plan in Port Elgin Gets Site Plan Approval

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Bruce County has approved a site plan for a new nine-bay Emergency Medical Services (EMS) headquarters to be constructed adjacent to the Bruce County Public Library building at the corner of Concession 10 and from MacKenzie Road. in Port Elgin.

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Saugeen Shores Town Planning Supervisor Jay Pausner told councilor meeting via Zoom on January 10 that approval of the site plan is contingent on a minor exemption request from Bruce County which will be heard on January 17. the Zoning By-law of the Town of Saugeen Shores. The county wants to increase the width of the lane from 10 meters to 18.5 meters and build three lanes that would not be permitted without a minor exemption.

Com. Dave Myette said the proposed EMS building is a “beautiful looking” development that will add to the first responder center in the area and possibly foster relationships with the nearby Saugeen Shores Police Department.

Mayor Luke Charbonneau said that not only will the new facility be located in Saugeen Shores, but it will also become the headquarters of Bruce County EMS.

“It is a really positive development for the Town of Saugeen Shores to have our Bruce County EMS senior management now located in Saugeen Shores…” said Charbonneau, adding that in addition to the employment benefits, this also makes Saugeen Shores “a bit of a hub” for EMS services in the region.

Last year, as plans for the new EMS HQ were underway, Bruce County Council accepted a recommendation from its Paramedic Services Committee to extend the two-year lease for its current building in the Green Street in Port Elgin. According to EMS staff, the 33-year-old rodent-infected building is overcrowded and unable to handle the length of the new ambulances.

The Bruce County website states that the Bruce County Paramedic Service employs approximately 100 full-time and part-time paramedics and operates a fleet of 15 vehicles – 12 ambulances and three supervision units stationed in six communities in County of Bruce – Walkerton, Chesley, Kincardine, Port Elgin, Wiarton and Tobermory – who are deployed when and where needed.

This vacant site, owned by Bruce County, at the southwest corner of Concession 10 and MacKenzie Road. in Port Elgin, will house the proposed Bruce County EMS headquarters, valued at $ 4 million. [Town of Saugeen Shores]

Sitemap and Service Agreement for Cedar Crescent Village

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Within three months, developers of the Village of Cedar Crescent development must apply for planning permission for phase one of its multi-million dollar project on land in the waterfront town of Port Elgin, otherwise the city ​​could terminate or suspend an agreement that has just been approved by the councilors and force the developer to resubmit the plans and drawings for approval.

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Councilors for the town of Saugeen Shores approved site works, servicing agreements and lease amendments, and viewed new renderings – the third iteration – of Cedar Crescent Village (CCV) during a virtual committee of the entire meeting on January 10.

The CCV plan is very different from what council approved in principle two years ago – it’s smaller, moved farther from the beach and doesn’t include a banquet hall, volleyball courts or staffed tourist office.

The phased development on the former mini-golf, train station and flea market grounds includes the Whitefish Grille with a rooftop terrace, pavilion, two-story market, restrooms and commercial tenants, including an ice cream shop.

Planning supervisor Jay Pausner noted that the developers had not yet approved the terms of the report which were presented to councilors as staff recommendations. He said CCV’s target opening is August 2023.

Architect Grant Diemert’s latest renderings – which aimed for “coastal architecture” – show buildings in sandy white with pre-finished panels and slatted wood siding and metal siding and roofs.

The design misses the mark for Coun. Cheryl who said the City needs to ensure the project supports the overall character of the design.

“This is a legacy project and I think we need to get this design right…” Grace said, explaining her opposition to site works and the maintenance agreement.

Grace said the proposed design is not in keeping with the coastal character and vision she believes most residents of Saugeen Shores want.

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“I believe we can have growth and development without sacrificing what makes Saugeen Shores a special and beloved destination, whether for tourists or for those who want to make our town their forever home,” said Grace.

Grace also expressed concern over references to “Carney Lane retail outlets” and a reference to the carnival atmosphere in an architectural brief submitted by the developer.

She said the brief indicates that the vision presented by the group of community representatives should ideally “express the freedom and hedonistic temptations of carnival, as well as the stability and organizational structure of seaside Georgian Revival architecture.”

“I believe the majority of residents don’t want a carnival beach-side atmosphere like the references in the report to the Santa Monica Pier and locations in Florida, Grand Bend or Sauble Beach,” said Grace, adding that she hoped the developers would “submit a different design that reflects what citizens have been asking for from the start.

Grace said her vision resembled the Cobble Beach Golf development north of Owen Sound with its features of cedar shingles, gabled windows and soft colors reminiscent of Nantucket.

Deputy Mayor Don Matheson called it a ‘great’ design that has been scaled down and will modernize Port Elgin’s main beach

Deputy Vice Mayor Mike Myatt said he lost sleep over the development and he urges homeowners who will lose their view of the lake. He added that it would take a long time to mend a divided community, but the development would clean up the “eye sore” of Port Elgin’s waterfront.

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“It was a heartbreaking decision…I think once this is built we will have quite a successful development on our beachfront…” Myatt said.

Mayor Luke Charbonneau recognized the difficulty of defining the aesthetics of a private project on the public domain, because to some extent it is a matter of taste and public consultation.

Charbonneau noted the evolution of the design since it was first presented in 2019, calling it “radically” different from the bricks of the first design to an intermediate design and now the third major iteration to try to integrate the vision.

“I’m happy with the design. I know this will satisfy some and not satisfy others, but I’m confident it’s being done for good reason and solid justification and I’m absolutely confident it will be a nice set up on the main beach that will provide in the end the amenities that I’ve been hearing for so long that people want to see at the main beach…” said Charbonneau.

Staff said the City is responsible for providing parking outside areas leased to CCV, work that will be done in 2022-23. As the site will be a destination of choice, the City wants quality landscaping.

Pausner said CCV will pay a $150,000 “taxation” or contribution to the city to help pay for some of the future landscaping, pedestrian connectivity and active transportation on adjacent city lands.

The councilors voted 6 to 2 in favor of the works and site servicing agreement.
With advice. Grace, counselor. Matt Carr voted against approval. He had not responded to a request for comment within the time limits.

Architects renderings show the latest conceptual design for the village of Cedar Crescent on the Port Elgin waterfront.  City councilors approved site works and the servicing plan on January 10 for private development on City-owned land. [Diermert Architect Inc.]
Architects renderings show the latest conceptual design for the village of Cedar Crescent on the Port Elgin waterfront. City councilors approved site works and the servicing plan on January 10 for private development on City-owned land. [Diermert Architect Inc.]

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Worcester Planning Board approves site plan for redevelopment of the former Boys Club in Lincoln Square

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WORCESTER – The planning council on Wednesday evening approved a site plan for the redevelopment of the old Boys Club building in Lincoln Square.

The unanimous vote clears the way for WinnDevelopment Co. to begin work on the restoration of the downtown historic landmark and the construction of an innovative addition that will be placed on a “podium” above the Johnson Tunnel.

Michael V. O’Brien, former city manager and executive vice president of Winn, said the goal is to start construction by the end of 2022 or early 2023.

John J. Spillane, an attorney representing Winn at the site plan review hearing on Wednesday, said the proposed adaptive reuse of the building would result in 80 residential apartments for the city’s over-55s; 16 apartments will be built in the old Boys Club structure, while 64 apartments – a combination of studios and one and two bedroom units – will be built in the new structure, which will be built next to the old building. on an abandoned section of Rue Prescott. A two-story glass structure will connect the two buildings. The new addition is what makes the project financially viable, he said.

What Winn presented to the planning council on Wednesday was slightly smaller than those responsible for the concept of around 95 units announced earlier this year. But Spillane said the project will retain an affordability component; he said it will be 85% affordable for residents with incomes ranging from 30% of the region’s median income to 60% of the region’s median income. The remaining 15% of the units will be offered at market rates.

O’Brien said he was proud of the project’s partnership with Preservation Worcester, and said the grand old building will be renovated with a sensitivity to historic preservation. He said the public spaces in the old building would be available for community use, and he said Winn would improve and maintain the World War I memorial in front of the building.

WORCESTER - The planning council on Wednesday approved plans to redevelop the former Lincoln Square Boys' Club into senior apartments and to build a new addition on an abandoned section of Prescott Street.

Richard Whitehouse of VHB, an engineer on the project, said the podium construction for the new addition will be based primarily on concrete columns that will straddle the walls of the Johnson Tunnel. The original feature of the city center will remain a city street, but will be narrowed slightly due to protective barriers that will be needed to protect the columns, Whitehouse said.

Stephen S. Rolle, deputy city development director, said the city was delighted that the project was starting to move forward – he said it was an important building in an important location that connects several different areas. He said the addition makes smart use of space that would otherwise be wasted, and he said the new building “doesn’t try to pretend to be the old building – it stands out.”

There were some minor concerns about traffic and the location of sidewalks, but Planning Council members said they were happy to finally see affordable senior housing arrive downtown and see the old building come back to life.

Earlier this year, the company agreed to pay the city $ 100,000 for “air rights” on Prescott Street and the tunnel.

Winn purchased the over 90-year-old, 48,000-square-foot property from the city in 2019 for $ 300,000, and initially planned to lease the building to a school for highly functional autistic students.

Lumber business owners seek to remove seven lots from existing site plan

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MOVED: Site improvement plans at the Tuckerton Lumber Co. location in Surf City include relocating storage media and divesting seven lots from its site plan. (Photo by Ryan Morrill)

Counsel for the new owners of Tuckerton Lumber Co. said his clients’ plans to divest seven lots from the current site plan and relocate storage shelves are the only land use changes planned at the site. of Surf City, located on both sides of Long Beach Boulevard. in the district.

Tom Coleman, a lawyer with Raymond, Coleman and Heinhold based in Moorestown, outlined the plans in a November 9 letter accompanying a request to the Surf City Land Use Board to change the current sitemap.

“The purpose of this modified preliminary and final site plan request is to remove Block 5, Lots 8, 10, 11 and 12, and Block 12, Lots 14 and 16, from the conditions of site plan approvals. granted in 1991 and 1993 ”, according to Coleman’s letter.

Those six lots, along with Block 12, Lot 23 will no longer be used by the Tuckerton Lumber Co., he said in the letter.

The company will operate from block 12, lots 18, 20 and 22 and block 19, according to the application filed by Coleman.

In the summary of the request, Coleman stated that the amended site plan request was a requirement of the temporary occupancy certificate issued in conjunction with his client’s acquisition of the property from Tuckerton Lumber Co. and a letter of June from Kevin Quinlan, counsel for the council, indicating that the document was necessary to remove the lots which are no longer part of the use of the company.

When an application is submitted, the land use board clerk reviews it to ensure administrative compliance before forwarding it to the engineer and council attorney for review. During his examination of the file, Frank Little, borough engineer, judged it “technically incomplete”.

In a Dec. 8 letter to Quinlan and Board Secretary Christine Hannemann, Little noted that the lots removed from the sitemap “support commercial use by providing employees with parking, equipment storage and office space and no information was provided to the board as to the intentions for the use or future development of the plots listed above and no details were provided to support the continued use of the business. “

Little has requested, at a minimum, the applicant to amend the plans and the application to identify all prior approved uses on the site map, as outlined in previous resolutions and approved site plans, according to his letter.

Coleman could not be reached for further comment at press time.

The lots proposed for divestiture are part of two earlier approvals by previous land use boards, one from 1991 and the other from January 1993, according to a June letter from Quinlan to Coleman.

In his letter, Quinlan noted that the conditions for the approval of the 1991 site plan were specifically incorporated in the January 1993 resolution granting a special-reason exemption for Lot 14, Block 12, referring to ” a substantial portion of the lot in question has been used in conjunction with the Applicant’s lumber business for over 40 years.

Tuckerton Lumber Co. was sold to new owners after an amended list attracted buyers who would keep the historic business open. Investment group TLC Land Holding LLC and new store operators Tom Dwier and Keli Lynch took ownership in July.

The Surf City building and grounds at 200 Long Beach Blvd. and the Railroad Avenue company in Tuckerton that predated it since 1932 were both included in the multi-million dollar purchase. They will both be kept in business, “as usual,” with a view of possible additions “to the next level” and “no plans for anything residential,” the new owners said at the time of the sale. .

– Gina G. Scala

[email protected]

Marina Village site plan obtains approval from Suisun Planning Commission

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SUISUN CITY – The Planning Commission on Tuesday approved the site plan and the architectural review request by a 4-0 vote for the construction of 160 apartments at the southeast corner of Marina Boulevard and Buena Vista Avenue.

There are two positions to be filled within the commission.

The Marina Village Apartments project is described as a 100% affordable housing development.

It will provide affordable rental housing reserved for households earning 30 to 70% of the region’s median income.

The development will include nine three-storey garden-style residential buildings, a community building and a laundry room.

The majority of public commentators were concerned about how the development would affect traffic in this area. Many motorists take Buena Vista Avenue to Marina Boulevard to access Highway 12.

During commuting and school hours, traffic may flow onto Buena Vista and Railroad Avenue.

The main access to the site will be located next to the management office, along the western edge of the site, linked to Boulevard Marina by an alley on the right only.

Secondary access to the site will be located at the northeast corner of the development, connecting to Buena Vista Avenue through a new driveway. An eastbound right-hand turn pocket is included in the proposed driveway on Buena Vista Avenue.

“Marina Boulevard already has a lot of traffic,” said George Guynn. “It will get more severe with 160 units and maybe three to four cars per unit.”

He suggested the city focus more on business development than housing.

Marina Village is the first project to be considered under the city’s new Good Neighbor Policy, designed to ensure that procedures in place are reasonably calculated to ensure that the premises remain calm, safe and clean. and the surrounding area.

“This project is only good for developers,” said Steve Olry. “I’d rather live next to a juvenile detention center (than this project). “

A traffic study found that the average vehicle delay on Marina Boulevard at Buena Vista Avenue is expected to exceed conditions by 5 seconds or more.

It offered two options for improvement:

• Maintain control of stops in all directions and add a pocket of northbound right turns.
• Build a traffic light.

Donna LeBlanc was concerned that there were only three designated waste areas. This was the number recommended by the services of the Republic.

Marina Village is a Solano affordable housing project that will be funded by federal and state funds, said Don Harris of Solano Affordable Housing.

“This is not a Section 8 project,” said Harris. “The income limits are checked every year. “

Learn more about the project on www.solanohousing.org.

Hartford Commission Approves Taphouse Site Plan | Business

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HARTFORD – The Planning Commission on Monday approved the site plan for the Rubi Falls Taphouse.

HARTFORD – The Common Council last week approved a developer agreement with YUMI Enterprises, paving the way for a faucet in the basement of the Millstream building.

The commission unanimously approved the site plan, which provided for the space of the outdoor patio which will be part of the tap room. The Rubi Falls Taphouse is located in the basement of the Millstream Building at 120 N. Main St.

City planner Justin Drew told the commission it’s about 800 square feet of space, where the business will have seating, umbrellas, and a bar with riverside seating.

“Because this affects the overall appearance of the building, it must be submitted to the Planning Commission,” said Drew.

“The staff think this looks very appropriate and will be very inviting,” he said.

The outdoor area of ​​the beer garden will be used for live music on weekends, depending on the sitemap application, as well as seating in general. The site plan also included a fence along the east side of the outdoor rest area and a raised planter to the east of the fence, near the river.

According to the commission’s discussions, the name Rubi Falls comes from the Rubicon River, in reference to the river and the falls adjacent to the new venture. A company representative at the meeting said that name is the one they are currently working with, but it is not yet officially finalized.

Rubi Falls Taphouse had a conditional use permit approved by the Planning Commission in November. Late last month, the joint council also approved a developer agreement for the property, under which the developer can receive up to $ 126,109 over five years from the city to help with the project.

Funding will come from the company’s own taxes, which the city will reimburse. The arrangement is feasible because the Millstream Building, where the business will be built, is in a supplementary tax financial district.

In a TID, the new tax increase created from a new development or redevelopment is fed back into the district in various ways, rather than being collected by tax jurisdictions.

With those items already approved, the site plan was the last step required for the faucet to continue development, according to Drew.

DDRB approves sitemap for One Riverside – The Resident Community News Group, Inc.

By Site plan

The Jacksonville Downtown Development Review Board has approved the site plan for the One Riverside development. The 18.84-acre mixed-use development will be on the former Times-Union Building site.

Fuqua Development’s plans include a grocery store, retail stores, a restaurant accessible from the Riverwalk, 271 initial residential units, and a parking garage. He also diverts and lights McCoy’s Creek and builds a public park between the creek and the CSX railroad. The width of the stream will also decrease from 40 feet to 80 feet.

The estimated cost of the project is approximately $ 182.2 million.

Ease of public access to the park and Riverwalk has been a key requirement of the DDRB and the Downtown Investment Authority. The park will also be accessible from the Riverwalk.

The project is expected to be built in two phases with a second residential complex after the stream diversion. The plans include several pedestrian and public art areas.

The pedestrian-friendly planning is in conjunction with the construction of the Jacksonville Emerald Trail.

DDRB board member Matt Brockelman said he believes the sitemap is a good balance of combining what’s desired with what’s practical.

“Sometimes it’s a little too easy for us to get stuck in the weeds,” he said. “I think we hit a pretty good balance. I don’t think we can stress enough the importance of this project for the riparian activation effort.

Council members asked for some minor adjustments to make sure the pedestrian areas and walkways were wide enough for what should be a lot of traffic.

Fuqua spokesperson Cyndy Trimmer said that wouldn’t be a problem and that they wanted to make One Riverside as pedestrian-friendly as possible.

The project includes approximately $ 31.5 million in incentives offered by the city. This bill is currently in the hands of the municipal council. If everything is approved, the grand opening could take place early next year after the old Times-Union building was demolished in April. The second phase could start around 2025.

By Kevin J. Meerschaert
News from the resident community

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Site map of the City OKs pharmacy, commercial use of the land in the north

By Site plan

Mayor Gregg Hull shows the US and city flags of Rio Rancho. . Martinez, a Rio Ranchoan, asked Hull to send the flags and then presented them at the Rio Rancho board meeting on Thursday. Photo by Argen Duncan.

Rio Rancho board members approved a site plan for a prep pharmacy and opened land near the intersection of North and Unser boulevards for retail during their meeting Thursday night at the ‘city Hall.

They approved the site plan and the land use change unanimously, with Councilor Jeremy Lenentine absent and Mayor Gregg Hull therefore voting.

For the land use zoning change, the 2.2 acres in question are along Northern Boulevard just east of Unser Boulevard with Eric Road being the eastern boundary.

The lots to the immediate south, east and west are undeveloped R-1 lots, lower density single-family residential zoning, according to a city map. A mid-density single-family housing neighborhood and commercial development with a Walgreens pharmacy and Speedway gas station are across from north to north.

Entrepreneur and developer Dawn Davide said she has built homes nearby and invested in the area.

“And hopefully we can bring some development to this area which was never going to be a residential development anyway,” she said.

In their request to change the area, she and her business partner Linda DeFillippo said the change would bring more commerce to the city, while still allowing the busy intersection to remain consistent with existing businesses.

Sharon Alire, a resident of the neighborhood across the North, opposed the change of area.

“Heavy traffic is already a hindrance, and there are so many accidents just below this space where there is no left turn in our neighborhood,” she wrote in a comment letter. . “Adding more traffic to the retail space will only increase the traffic there.”

She was the only member of the audience to comment.

As for the site map, this is a new larger location for the Olive Tree Compounding Pharmacy at 1713 Wellspring Ave. It consists of three buildings, totaling approximately 7,600 square feet, with 46 parking spaces and five bicycle spaces on just over an acre of land.

The pharmacy, one of the few pharmacies in the state, according to architect Doug Heller, now has a smaller, rented location on Westside and Unser Boulevard. Heller said the larger building at the new site will have two tenants and the third building will be built in the future if the landlord finds the right tenant.

He said the pharmacy owner and Itsa Italian Ice owner, who were planning to go to the neighboring lot, agreed that they would have a common entrance to Itsa’s property. City Councilor Paul Wymer wanted approval of the site plan to be made conditional on this agreement being delivered in writing to the city.

The governing body approved this amendment and the plan.

In another case, the governing body approved the American Rescue Plan Act’s $ 360,000 set aside for a home repair program.

“We have an aging housing stock in Rio Rancho,” City Manager Matt Geisel said, adding that homes built in the 1960s often need repairs and many people have a fixed income.

The program would be administered by a nonprofit Homewise and would provide up to $ 25,000 per home in forgivable loans to homeowners with incomes equal to or less than 80% of the region’s median income. Geisel said the income limit would mean $ 38,000 for a household of one and $ 54,000 for a household of four, for example.

Deputy City Manager Peter Wells said the city will monitor Homewise’s use of the money and jointly develop a communications plan to let as many people as possible know about the opportunity.

If this effort is successful, Geisel said, he hopes to secure more funds and expand the program.

City Emergency Management Special Projects Coordinator Rose Martinez, left, accepts Region 6 Community Wide Readiness Award from Federal Emergency Management Agency from Zach Wachter, right , local preparedness coordinator with the New Mexico Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Martinez and the city’s volunteer community emergency response team won the honor for their work during the pandemic, managing COVID testing and vaccination sites, delivering meals to the elderly and those confined to home and manufacturing over 6,000 face masks for frontline workers. Mayor Gregg Hull holds up another plaque in the back. Martinez and CERT were selected from teams from five states. Photo of Argen Marie Duncan.


Rezoning, approved site plan for Ashwaubenon gas station

By Site plan

By Kevin Boneske
Editor-in-chief


ASHWAUBENON – The rezoning of three Sports & Entertainment plots at B-3 Community Business to build a 5,200 square foot Holiday convenience store at the southwest corner of South Ashland Avenue and Mike McCarthy Way was approved on Tuesday, October 26 by the Village council.

Community Development Director Aaron Schuette said he would not have been in favor of rezoning the property if it had been located elsewhere in the Sports & Entertainment District.

“However, looking at the surrounding land uses – its location against South Ashland Avenue, the railroad, the surrounding land uses – it makes sense for this specific location (to rezone the property) to B-3 to facilitate the redevelopment of this property, ”he said.

Schuette said the project with an eight-dispenser fuel island and an accessory car wash would demolish an existing dilapidated warehouse.

“It’s going to clean up this site quite significantly,” he said.

Schuette said the overall village plan identifies commercial uses as permitted in this area.

He said the site would not have diesel pumps for semi-trailers, which was a concern of a neighboring landowner who raised during the public hearing the possibility of traffic jams in the area.

“It can have a diesel pump for diesel vehicles, but there won’t be pumps for semi-trailers,” Schuette said.

The council also approved a site plan for the project.

Schuette said two of the existing driveway access points on Mike McCarthy Way will be used for the convenience store, with a third driveway access point on South Ashland near the southern property line at approximately 200 feet south of the intersection with Mike McCarthy Way.

Jim Goeppner, director of real estate development for Holiday, said the two curbs along Mike McCarthy Way are designed to create the best flow of traffic for vehicles entering and exiting the property.

Exterior finishes requested in the site plan include stone-look paneling near the base extending to the corners of the buildings, a window system and a fiber cement wall panel system with concealed fasteners.

The conditions of approval for rezoning do not include any sale of products outside, with the exception of propane.

Village president Mary Kardoskee said she was happy other possible items for sale, such as bags of salt and firewood, were not left outside as the site is located at the main entrance to the Ashwaubenon Sports and Entertainment District.

Administrator Gary Paul said he was happy to see Holiday convenience store moving there.

“Overall I think it’s a good plan,” he said. “Everything is better than what currently exists. “

Dawsonville Planning Commission approves site plan for townhouse community

By Site plan

During the November 8 meeting of the Dawsonville Planning Commission, the commission approved the site plan for a townhouse community project to be built on Maple Street in Dawsonville.

According to the information package included with the application, Cook Communities has requested approval of a site plan for an attached single-family home located at 362 Maple Street. Gainesville attorney Jane Range spoke during the meeting with members of the planning committee on behalf of the plaintiff, explaining that the company is seeking permission to build 31 townhouses on the plot of ground.

“The property is zoned into the multi-family neighborhood and the townhouses are a permitted use in the neighborhood and they are seeking permission for 31 homes,” Range said. “Basically, approval of the site plan is all that was needed as it is already zoned with townhouses. ”

Range presented the site plan to the Planning Commission, explaining that the proposed development would be a single-entry road with a cul-de-sac, retention pond and the 31 townhouses. The proposed townhouses as presented at the meeting would be 1,600 square feet, three bedrooms, two and a half bathrooms and would meet the minimum requirements for the neighborhood.

She added that the designs of the proposed units have been changed in the current plan from previous ones to add more differentiation between the units, rather than all looking the same.

“The only problem that arose during the staff review was to do a bit of modulation up front and try to add more bricks.” The units are somewhat staggered so they don’t not form a single large line across the entire forehead – some [are] with shutters, some without shutters, slatted boards, straight boards and others with a window on the third floor to change the exterior appearance.

Anna Toblinski, Planning Commissioner of Station 4, asked the applicant if there will be a fence along the dividing lines of the proposed development. Keith Cook, the owner of Cook Communities, said his company typically adds a vegetated buffer zone all around their developments with staggered tree lines.

Station 3 Planning Commissioner Sandy Sawyer asked Cook if the development would have an association of owners. Cook responded that the development would have an HOA and all yards would be professionally landscaped.

During the presentation of the proposed development, the Director of Planning and Zoning, David Picklesimer, questioned the applicant regarding several conditions included in the zoning of the parcel, including the requirement that the development be identified as ” active adult community ”.

“They will be required to incorporate the verb for this community of active adult life; it will also have to be part of the alliances, ”said Picklesimer. “It’s R3 zoning with the zoning condition for active adult life and other conditions as well; the interior of houses should meet certain requirements.

Toblinski added that another of the conditions was that 20 percent of units must meet accessibility requirements for people with disabilities. Cook said that while his business typically has a few units that are accessible to people with disabilities, they generally leave it up to the owner to customize when they move in.

According to the notes of the urban planning director in the information file included with the request, “the R6 zoning has been approved with the following conditions: dedicate an additional right-of-way, the agreements must identify the project as an active adult, widen the road Of Maple Street South’s two-foot paved traffic, twenty percent of units must meet accessibility requirements for people with disabilities.

Picklesimer informed the Planning Commission that while the currently proposed units do not meet the stipulations set out in the zoning approval, the issue on the table at Monday’s meeting is only to approve the site plan, which only includes the layout of the lot and the configuration of the street. . For this reason, he said that the planning commission could take steps to approve or deny the site plan and that the applicant could work either to meet the conditions set out in the current zoning or to request a rezoning of the property. in order to allow different directives.

Range and Cook told commissioners they would work with Picklesimer to work out the details of how to meet the zoning requirements.

“We’ll go ahead and work with David again to see what we need to do about the active adult and if that will work and if we need any other zoning changes,” Range said.

The Planning Commission voted unanimously to approve the site plan for the proposed development. The application is expected to go to Dawsonville City Council with a public hearing on December 8, and council is expected to approve or deny the development on December 20.

Site map approved for the project anchored by the national steakhouse chain

By Site plan

West Des Moines City Council this week approved the site plan for a development that will include a Ruth’s Chris Steak House. Architectural rendering by BSB Design

A development proposal that will include a popular national steakhouse lifted a key hurdle this week when West Des Moines City Council approved the project’s site plan.



The developer of the CRG Residential project, located in Carmel, Indiana, plans to construct a mixed-use building that will be anchored by Ruth’s Chris Steak House, a chain of New Orleans-based steakhouses. The restaurant will occupy 15,000 square feet in the four-story building that will be located on the southwest corner of Jordan Creek Parkway and Ashworth Road, according to city documents.



The building, with a brick and fiber cement exterior, will include an additional 8,000 square feet of commercial space and 199 multi-family residential units, according to city documents. Multi-family units and commercial space will wrap around a multi-level parking structure.



Development costs are estimated between 20 and 30 million dollars.



City officials are working with CRG Residential to finalize a development deal that could include an economic development grant of up to $ 2.3 million, according to a city document. The agreement could also include a breakdown of who will be responsible for infrastructure improvements.



According to information provided to the board, items that could be part of the deal include:

  • The city is paying for and building improvements to 76th Street between Ashworth Road and just north of Aspen Drive. The city would install traffic lights at Ashworth and 76th Street.
  • The developer ensures that sidewalks around the development are installed, a private east-west street between Jordan Creek Parkway and 76th Street is constructed, and a regional underground detention pond is developed for the project site and the 76th area. Street. The city would reimburse the developer for the cost of the work.
  • The developer initiated the process of installing streetlights around the development and ensured that a power line along Ashworth Road between 76th Street and Jordan Creek Parkway was buried. The work would be carried out by MidAmerican Energy Co. and the city would reimburse the associated costs.



Work on the project site is unlikely to begin for several weeks, according to city officials. The promoter is not yet the owner of the property. Once the land is acquired, documents must be completed to link the properties together. In addition, architectural plans need to be revised, a process that can take up to four weeks.



Once development of the site begins, construction could take up to 18 months.

Site plan approved for project anchored by national steakhouse chain

By Site plan

The West Des Moines City Council this week approved the site plan for a development that will include a Ruth’s Chris Steak House. Architectural rendering by BSB Design

A proposed development that will include a popular national steakhouse cleared a key hurdle this week when the West Des Moines City Council approved the site plan for the project.



Project developer CRG Residential, located in Carmel, Indiana, plans to construct a mixed-use building that will be anchored by Ruth’s Chris Steak House, a steakhouse chain based in New Orleans. The restaurant will occupy 15,000 square feet of space in the four-story building that will be located on the southwest corner of Jordan Creek Parkway and Ashworth Road, according to city documents.



The building, with a brick and fiber cement board exterior, will include an additional 8,000 square feet of commercial space and 199 multi-family residential units, according to city documents. Multi-family units and commercial space will wrap around a multi-level parking structure.



Development costs are estimated at $20-30 million.



City officials are working with CRG Residential to finalize a development agreement that could include an economic development grant of up to $2.3 million, according to a city document. The agreement could also include a breakdown of who will be responsible for infrastructure improvements.



Based on information provided to the board, items that could be part of the deal include:

  • The city is paying and building improvements to 76th Street between Ashworth Road and just north of Aspen Drive. The city would install traffic lights at Ashworth and 76th Street.
  • With the developer ensuring sidewalks around the development are installed, an east-west private street between Jordan Creek Parkway and 76th Street is constructed, and a regional underground retention pond is developed for the project site and the area of ​​the 76th street. The city would reimburse the developer for the cost of the work.
  • The developer initiating the process of installing streetlights around the development and ensuring that a power line along Ashworth Road between 76th Street and Jordan Creek Parkway is placed underground. The work would be done by MidAmerican Energy Co. and the city would reimburse the associated costs.



Work on the project site likely won’t begin for several weeks, according to city officials. The promoter does not yet own the property. Once the land is acquired, documents must be completed to bind the properties together. In addition, architectural plans must be revised, a process that can take up to four weeks.



Once site development begins, construction could take up to 18 months.

Planning Commission Approves Site Plan for Pearl Street Housing | News, Sports, Jobs

By Site plan

Garrett Neese / Daily Mining Gazette Houghton City Manager Eric Waara gives an update to the Planning Commission while President Tom Merz listens.

HOUGHTON – The Houghton Planning Commission approved the site plan review for a new apartment complex on Pearl Street at its meeting on Tuesday.

The new complex is located in a recently rezoned area from R-3 to R-4, which allows for more dense development and allows for tighter setbacks and less parking space.

Intended for students, the new complex will have 120 parking spaces for 153 beds, more than the 76.5 required by the R-4. To encourage students not to bring their own cars, the resort will either offer a carpool service or charge students extra for parking, project architect Barry Polzin said.

“Maybe you’re not going to have all the students, but you’re going to have a few more that say ‘OK I don’t need a car, I’m just going to leave it there'” he said. “… This is happening all over the world, so you might as well do it here too.” “

For bike racks, which have the same required number of 76.5, it will offer 180. Polzin said the space could also include a dedicated area in the garage for recycling.

About 23.3% of the site will be developed, above the 20% requirement, Waara said.

In an email, Planning Commission member Kristine Bradof suggested replacing non-native plants listed in landscaping with comparable native plants that would provide value to pollinators and birds. The Wild Ones Keweenaw Chapter, a local landscaping group, offered to help select the plants, Bradof wrote.

Polzin said the stormwater management plans took into account the sidewalk design changes that will accompany the College Avenue construction project. TL Rentals applied for a stormwater permit in April, but has yet to get approval from the Michigan Department of Transportation. The predominant problem would be runoff from the roofs, Polzin said.

“In fact, it might flow by gravity … a pump might be the easiest way to do it, but we haven’t entered details on that yet.” he said. “We are awaiting confirmation of how much will take.”

The commission approved the site plan, subject to the project receiving permits from MDOT. The vote was 5-0, with Jen Julien, a member of the Planning Committee, abstaining due to possession of a property nearby.

In another action, the commission:

– Heard by Waara, the town was sued by the company that owns the Econo Foods property. The lawsuit concerns the new Kentucky Fried Chicken which is slated to open next year on an outdoor plot in front of the Evangel Community Church building. At a sitemap review hearing in July, a landowner lawyer argued that KFC’s proposal violated an agreement with ShopKo, which was previously on the Evangel site.

– I learned from Waara that the city was looking for a new signpost for the fire station on Sharon Avenue last week, which it said violated several city ordinances. Waara said he and code enforcement officer Jeff Jepsen spent 10 hours between them reviewing the history of the sign, which is on city property. The Michigan Department of Transportation will also review the paper records on the sign, which falls under its definition of a billboard.

“We want to make sure we have all the facts before contacting the dealer, so that we can do it once and do it right” he said.

– Discussed the city’s master plan, which is due to be revised in 2023. President Tom Merz recommended continuing previous practices by asking subcommittees to review different chapters in public meetings before holding open houses . The Commission also discussed how to obtain public comments on the questions to be asked in the survey that will be sent out before the completion of the master plan.

The commission also discussed the advisability of developing a subzone plan for the city center.

Polzin suggested that a cart such as the one the city had considered would be unnecessary, as the city has most of the information it would need. Waara said a cart would be more useful in determining the fate of a particular site, but less so for the city center in general. Vice President Bill Leder asked if the blueprint subcommittee formed earlier this year should continue, as the pace of the review would not allow it to pursue its goal of updating two chapters at a time.

“Everyone will be involved, and those of us who were on the committee will obviously have comments based on our discussions.” he said. “But it’s hard for me to see the need for this committee to continue with this.

– I heard an update from Waara on repairs to the Lakeshore Center, where part of the wharf collapsed. The city, Michigan Technological University and the National Park Service will meet to discuss a long-term solution. Michigan Tech conducted an R / C underwater survey of Dee Stadium and Ranger Pier.

“Fortunately, there was nothing scary” he said.

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Council greenlights site master plan for new Civic Hospital

By Site plan

The goal is to commission the $2.8 billion facility by 2028.

Content of the article

City Council approved a site master plan for The Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic Campus, another hurdle now cleared in the hospital’s quest to get the $2.8 billion facility operational for 2028.

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By then, the current Civic on Carling Avenue will be over a century behind its opening date. Hospital officials and affiliates have emphasized the need and benefits of a contemporary, state-of-the-art regional hospital, and there appears to be little disagreement in this regard.

But the journey to Civic 2.0 has not been smooth, with controversy over site selection in the rear-view mirror, some lingering dissatisfaction over elements of the hospital plan, and debates to come over exactly how to link the hospital to the city’s light rail transit system. , and other aspects of the site.

City staff recommended approval of the master plan, concluding that it demonstrated that transportation, parking, LRT access, cycling and pedestrian infrastructure, built heritage and other matters “have been carefully considered and designed”. Some components will still need to be fine-tuned, staff said, as the hospital submits site plan control requests to implement the various phases of the project (the master plan outlines 10 extending to 2048).

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Staff will have delegated authority to approve such requests unless a ward councilor decides to revoke it, planner Sean Moore explained Wednesday. That said, staff have already committed to presenting the site plan control application for the hospital parking garage – part of the first phase of development – ​​to the planning committee for approval.

Council voted 19-4 Wednesday in favor of the master plan, with councilors Jeff Leiper, Shawn Menard, Rawlson King and Catherine McKenney opposing it.

“I think as a city we need to ask for better in this case,” Menard said, sharing his belief that the plan falls short when it comes to SLR integration and parking plans and that there are better alternative designs for the site footprint that would reduce the loss of trees and green space and improve the transit experience.

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Stephen Willis, the city’s general manager of planning, infrastructure and economic development, said the hospital’s architects carried out several iterations of the site layout, taking into account considerations such as the distance needed from to a railway line to avoid interference with medical instruments, geotechnical problems and protection. of trees currently on the site.

“Our staff regularly challenged them, as did the (National Capital Commission) staff, about their setup, and they presented this as the best arrangement for the needs of health care delivery in establishment,” Willis said.

For his part, Mayor Jim Watson refuted nearly every argument against the hospital’s current plan: the significant cost and other hurdles associated with burying the planned parking lot; TOH’s commitments to green and public spaces, tree preservation, and replanting five trees for every tree felled; the need for on-site parking for hospital users; and plan provisions for direct and weather-protected LRT connectivity, transport monitoring and a transport demand management plan.

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“I believe that after 14 years of planning, we are finally in a position to move this file forward and help bring this new world-class hospital to Ottawa,” said Mr. Watson. He told his fellow board members “there are municipalities across Ontario that would be happy to receive these coveted and scarce health care funds to build a hospital in their community.”

Ahead of the Planning Committee’s vote on the site’s master plan earlier this month, Joanne Read, TOH’s Executive Vice President and Chief Planning and Development Officer, was asked what would happen next. it was not immediately approved.

Ms. Read said she thought the project’s construction and completion timelines would be in jeopardy and was also concerned that TOH was the only one “knocking on the province’s door” over funding.

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Committee members tempered their approval of the site’s master plan by asking staff to work with TOH on elements of cycling infrastructure, tree planting and a substantial reduction in surface parking.

Regional Councilor Leiper also obtained approval to require certain conditions of a neighborhood traffic study and that the TOH fund recommended mitigation efforts based on this study.

Staff were also tasked with ensuring that the internal road network proposed for the new Civic could accommodate local transit services and that site lighting met certain conditions.

All board members, including Watson, approved a board proposal. Riley Brockington will ask Watson to write to federal cabinet ministers, new MP for Ottawa Center Yasir Naqvi and National Capital Commission Board Chair calling for federal legislation to ensure long-term land protection remains of the Central Experimental Farm and a new master plan for the farm.

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Naqvi pledged during the election campaign to introduce a law to protect the farm in perpetuity.

Paul Saurette, a member of the Dows Lake Residents Association’s special committee on the new hospital, called the committee members’ motions “very genuine and constructive attempts at problem solving” and said the association is looking forward to it. to partner with the city and the hospital for, for example, the planned neighborhood traffic study.

Karen Wright, president of the Civic Hospital Neighborhood Association, shared a similar mindset on Wednesday and said her association would remain engaged with any upcoming site plans. Already, she and other community association officials have met with the hospital to go over details of planned parking.

The site plan control app will be available on the city’s website in the coming weeks, according to Moore, the planner, and residents will have an opportunity to provide feedback.

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Site plan approved for Mission BBQ, new building in Ashwaubenon

By Site plan

By Kevin Boneske
Editor-in-chief


ASHWAUBENON – A site plan to redevelop the southwest corner of South Oneida Street and Cormier Road with two new buildings was approved earlier this month by the of the village Site plan review committee.

Community Development Director Aaron Schuette said the plan for the property owned by ENDF3DK calls for the demolition of existing buildings on the site of the former Huntington Bank and Oreck Vacuum / Big & Tall Clothiers to build a Mission BBQ restaurant from 3,678 square feet on the corner and a one or two unit 6,057 square foot rental property on the south.

“(There are) no plans or no tenant reservations at this time (for the south building),” he said. “They have the interest of other retailers, but nothing has been confirmed yet.”

Schuette said the number of access points will be reduced to two, with an entry / exit fee on Oneida Street, which will be connected to a drive-thru for the south building, with full access to the property off Cormier Road.

“Drive-thru is consistent with the other drive-thru we currently have on Oneida Street, where drive-thru loops around the front and is allowed under our code,” he said. .

Schuette said the exterior materials for both buildings will consist of a mixture of brick, wood and an exterior insulation finish system.

He said the green space for the site will decrease from 9.4% to 16.7%, while a 6-foot opaque fence will be located on the south side of Mission BBQ to filter the smoker and the staging area.

Townhouses at Aldon Station

The committee also approved a site plan for 16 two-story single-family townhouses without a lot line in the Aldon Station subdivision, on the former Schneider trucking site along South Broadway.

Schuette said the townhouses are in groups of four, each having an individual entrance, patio / balcony, an attached two-stall garage, basement, two to three bedrooms and bathrooms.

“It will be a good change or an addition to the housing stock in the village,” he said.

Schuette said the debugging zones built across the street and the right-of-way will provide overflow parking.

Ryan Radue of Radue Homes, who is behind the development, said work will begin soon on the townhouses and one of the condominiums.

The village secured the old Schneider property by purchasing two plots of over 20 acres for $ 1.25 million.

He made a deal with Radue Homes for the company to buy lots in the development until 2026.

The agreement provides for the purchase of 38 duplex lots, 16 townhouse lots and five condominium building lots.

The lots Radue Homes will pay vary in terms of cost under the agreement, ranging from $ 20,000 for the cheapest duplex lot to $ 450,000 for a waterfront condominium lot.

Bay Bank Awning

Bay Bank at 2555 Packerland Dr. has received committee approval for a new glass roof covering the main entrance to the bank.
Schuette said the existing canopy will be removed and replaced with the new one.

He said the new canopy requires committee approval as it is a commercial building with a required building permit.

Silverthorne Approves Final Site Plan for Angler Mountain Vistas Development

By Site plan
One of the Angler Mountain Vistas single family home models is shown in a render. The development received final site plan approval from Silverthorne City Council at its September 22 meeting.
Silverthorne City Council / Courtesy Rendering

The Angler Mountain Vistas in Silverthorne received approval of the final site plan from Silverthorne City Council on Wednesday, September 22. The long-awaited development will soon bring 17 new homes to market price in town.

Single-family homes were offered by Tim Crane with Compass Homes and Blake Shutler with Summit Homes Construction. The new community will be located just south of Angler Mountain Ranch on Angler Mountain Ranch Road South.

There are four types of buildings included in the project plan, each intended to accommodate different conditions and levels on the site. In an earlier discussion with the Summit Daily News, Silverthorne’s planning chief Lina Lesmes said the development would likely go vertical this fall if it received final approval.



According to the city council agenda, the original 35.81-acre parcel on which these homes were proposed constitutes the Angler Mountain Vistas Subdivision. The 17 houses will be built on two land suitable for conversion. Another leaflet was dedicated to the town of Silverthorne as an open public space.

City planner Caitlin Jacobshagen told the meeting that they will be ground-floor homes, meaning there will be multiple single-family homes located on individual lots.



Applicants began installing the infrastructure on-site after receiving preliminary approval in April, but the group needed the final approved site plan to start applying for building permits.

The applicant plans to partially pave Angler Mountain Ranch South Road, the primary access road to the development site, and will dedicate the road to the town as a right-of-way. The site also contains a private road, Fly Caster Lane, which will be maintained by the Homeowners Association and will provide access to six of the buildings. Several trails also provide pedestrian access to the site.

Council member Mike Spry raised concerns over the city’s right-of-way allocation, noting that it simply means the city has another road to maintain and clear. He asked what the compromise was for something like this.

Jacobshagen said the developer paid for all of the initial construction and paving of the road. Deputy general manager Mark Leidal said he would also offer a 1% property transfer fee that would go to the city’s general fund, which should offset the additional costs incurred by the city in providing services to the residential area. .

Bobby Craig, with Arapahoe Architects, said the changes between the preliminary site plan and the final plan were mostly architectural.

“The biggest architectural change was the dressing of the facades of the street,” said Craig.

Craig said the change came after receiving comments from city staff and the planning commission. They added porches to the sides of all companionway units – 14 of the 17 homes. Craig said they also improved the architectural materials to keep them consistent with a “mountain-modern” theme.

“I can’t believe we’re sort of at the end of this,” Silverthorne Mayor Ann-Marie Sandquist said at the meeting. The city has been working with the developers on the planning of this project since 2009.

Kevin Berg, of Summit Homes Construction, the general development contractor, said they would not comment further on the project.

Planners OK Healthy Living Campus site map for central Batavia | Top story

By Site plan

BATAVIA – The site plan for a $ 30 million healthy living downtown campus has the blessing of the city’s planning and development committee, but not unanimously.

The committee approved the 3-1 site plan tonight, with committee member David Beatty voting against. Ed Flynn, Rebecca Cohen and John Ognibene voted for it. The project, a partnership of the YMCA and Rochester-Regional Health-United Memorial Medical Center, will include a new state-of-the-art wellness center, indoor pool, group exercise studios and a gymnasium with a walking / running track. indoor foot, teaching kitchen, indoor play area, youth areas, lounge and meeting rooms. The partnership with UMMC will provide primary care, behavioral health services / crisis intervention, integration of telemedicine, cancer prevention services, chronic disease support services and education services , all in the same establishment. The facility would include a 69,420 square foot two-story building to house the YMCA with medical offices. The site is located at 211 and 213 East Main St., 1-9 Wiard St. and is part of 211 1/2 East Main Rear.

“We didn’t add any additional walls or trees or anything like that,” said project manager David Ciurzynski of Ciurzynski Consulting, LLC. After the meeting, Ciurzynski said his company made sure there were enough bushes and trees along the west and south sides of GO ART! as a buffer.

During the meeting, the committee received a letter from GO ART! in which GO ART! Executive director Gregory Hallock referred to a landscaping plan, Beatty said. The plan came from architectural, engineering and planning firm Clark Patterson Lee.

“It would be nice if the committee actually saw this plan. “I’ve never seen this shot,” Beatty said. “This is a plan that was presented to Mr. Hallock. I understand he has a different landscaping plan and a different parking plan.

Ciurzynski said this plan is much more elaborate than his company’s one.

“We are not going forward with this for budgetary reasons,” he said. “The plan you have is the plan we are moving forward with. What we’ve shown is within our budget and what we can do, and has proper buffering on the back (of GO ART!). While I understand that he (Hallock) may desire something more, it is technically not his property. We have to be the best possible neighbors, but we also have to manage our budget. “

When asked if what Hallock saw of Clark Patterson Lee was an initial plan, Ciurzynski replied that they had discussed a bunch of concepts, but nothing that was really a plan.

“We never came up with this plan because we looked at the concepts and priced it and it just wasn’t doable,” Ciurzynski said.

In a public hearing at the previous Planning and Development Committee meeting on August 17, residents raised concerns about access to the campus through Summit Street. The committee recommended removing the entrance / exit from Summit Street.

Tonight Ciurzynski said access from that street has been removed from the sitemap.

“Now that we have the sitemap (approval) there is speed to come,” he said after the meeting. Ciurzynski hopes to have the construction documents completed later this fall and start demolishing Cary Hall before the end of 2021. The goal is to begin construction in earnest in the spring of 2022.

“It’s going to take about 20 months to get it all through – a little over a year and a half, minimum,” he said.

Traffic will arrive on Bank Street, head towards Washington Avenue. When traffic leaves campus, it will exit onto Washington Avenue and then either Bank Street or Summit Street back to Main Street, he said.

As for voting against approving the sitemap, Beatty said project developers are missing an opportunity to better develop the entire site.

“The parking lots in general … they are a bit outdated in a way. We have a changing society and changing demographics. People drive less, ”he said. “I think it’s a key building going up here in Batavia, a key building on Main Street. I think they’re missing out on an opportunity to really develop what they call a campus. You still have a building and a parking lot. I think it could have been a lot more, if they had thought of the whole site.

Beatty said GO ART! was a critical component and those responsible for the project compromised with GO ART !, but did not go far enough.

The committee also noted this evening that the project would not have a significant negative impact on the environment.

Glenwood Springs City Council Approves Site Plan for Mountain View Flats Apartments in West Glenwood

By Site plan

Construction could begin soon on a 40-unit apartment complex in West Glenwood, after Glenwood Springs City Council approved Thursday of the developer’s site plan.

During the regular board meeting, RealAmerica LLC presented plans for the installation of Mountain View Flats, located at 51537 US Highway 6 near Discount Tire.

The facility is expected to consist of a single apartment building with staggered three and four story sections, a pet spa with a dog wash station, short and long term bicycle parking, and bicycle storage. interior.



The site plan included 63 parking spaces. That’s five parking spaces less, or 7%, of the city’s development code requirement of 1.7 parking spaces per unit, said Hannah Klausman, the city’s deputy director of economic and community development. . Developers, however, can request a parking reduction of up to 30% in exchange for offers for amenities such as outdoor bicycle parking, Klausman said.

Development plans include 14 one-bedroom apartments and 26 two-bedroom apartments. RealAmerica is expected to provide eight of the apartments as restricted resident-occupied units that meet the city’s requirements for affordable housing in new developments.



Following a council decision in March, restrictions on inclusive housing deeds require that a certain percentage of offered units be priced at affordable rates dictated by a formula based on the region’s median income. Deed-restricted units must be occupied by residents of Glenwood Springs whose residence and work status are verified by the city.

“For the first time in a long list of apartment developments, the developer is showcasing a number of two-bedroom apartments,” Board Member Paula Stepp said expressing support for the sitemap. “It’s a place where families can settle. “

West Glenwood resident Karleen Clark said she was against the development.

“The entire plan is out of date, so it doesn’t mean much to us,” said Clark, expressing concern over reduced parking and increased traffic at West Glenwood. “The people of West Glenwood do not feel safe. We keep saying we have a need for housing, but why does that outweigh the need for security of the people who currently live here? “

Board member Ingrid Wussow brought forward a motion to approve the sitemap provided the developer follows best practices set out by the development industry for building the facility for energy efficiency, and the board member Steve Davis seconded the motion. Council approved the site plan 5-1, with Mayor Jonathan Godes voting against and Mayor Pro Tem Charlie Willman absent.

Journalist Ike Fredregill can be reached at 970-384-9154 or by email at [email protected]

Lox Council Approves Groves Town Center Site Plan

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On Tuesday August 17, Loxahatchee Groves City Council approved site plan changes for the 4.6-acre downtown portion of the 90-acre downtown Groves project, located at the north corner -est of Southern Blvd. and Road B provided that the horse trailer parking lot is moved to another location.

The approval was for the construction of Groves Town Center Drive off Southern Blvd. east of the Aldi grocery store at a roundabout that will have extensions to the east, north and west across the site. The site plan includes stormwater drainage, wastewater and other infrastructure for the entire site.

“As part of this approval, we need to get site plan approval for the downtown site plan, and that’s why we’re here tonight,” said Taylor Parker, engineer in charge of the project. . “We are asking for an equestrian car park which will be fenced. “

The applicant also proposes a network of sidewalks to wrap around the pod to provide connectivity.

“The main lift station is in the north central boundary of the site,” Parker said. “This lifting station will be used for the overall development of the main PUD for the sewer service.”

She also presented a conceptual landscaping plan to be included in the first phase of construction.

City Councilor Phillis Maniglia said the developer-built equestrian trail still presented some dangers. Parker said the owners were working with a landscaper to clean up the trail.

Maniglia also asked about the previously approved equestrian bridge connecting the development to other trails in the city.

“As for the bridge, it is part of the first phase of construction. It has already been designed by a pre-fabricated bridge company and is in the approval process, ”Parker said.

The portion of the sewage lift station that is above ground will be on land 30 feet by 40 feet with a 40 foot long, 7 foot utility easement leading to it. It will serve all users in development.

Mayor Robert Shorr opposed horse parking and a ski lift station in what he understood to be a public meeting space.

“I’m not at all excited about it,” Shorr said. “I look back towards the original center with a large open space [for] public service, and now it’s just been boxed. Who came up with the idea of ​​the horse caravan parking lot? It serves such a narrow range of people, and it’s right in the middle of traffic. “

Parker said the idea came from the developer’s meetings with city advisory boards and staff.

Shorr said he didn’t like the idea of ​​a sewage lift station located in an area intended for outdoor public enjoyment.

Parker said the location of the lift station is ideal for efficient gravity drainage of any buildings it will serve.

“This is the most central location that would provide adequate flow and drop for all individual pod users,” she said.

City manager Jamie Titcomb said the idea for an equestrian parking lot in this area came from the Roads, Equestrian Sports, Trails and Greenways Advisory Committee as the equestrian bridge would lead to a start of the trail.

“The layout of the parking lot has been designed,” Titcomb said. “It flowed with the overall engineering of it all. Keep in mind that the city has never seen a lifting station on the central nacelle. This is a new element.

Parker said the developer believes there is a need for an equestrian parking area.

“The reason it was placed there is that the crossing point, which is in the main PUD, is adjacent to this location,” she said. “This is where the entrance is.”

Shorr said he would like to approve the infrastructure plan so as not to delay the project and suggested moving the horse parking lot to another location on the site.

After more discussion, Deputy Mayor Laura Danowski brought forward a motion to approve the site’s infrastructure plan, adding a condition for trailer parking to be moved and brought back to the council at another location, which won 5- 0.

Whole Foods Site Plan Gets PZC Approval in South Windsor | Windsor South

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SOUTH WINDSOR – The Planning and Zoning Commission on Tuesday approved construction plans for the planned Whole Foods building at Evergreen Walk.

At the regular meeting, committee members unanimously approved the site plan for the 50,000 square foot building, which will replace two existing buildings, the current sites of Old Navy and Sakura Garden, an area of ​​53,000 square feet. The new building will consist of two units: a 40,000 square foot unit for Whole Foods and a 10,000 square foot retail space that will be available for lease.

PZC President Bart Pacekonis said he was somewhat concerned with empty retail space, recalling a similar space attached to the old Highland Market that was not in use.

“I see your group as being more active in finding tenants, and I hope we don’t make the same mistake and have that horror for 10, 15 years,” Pacekonis said.

Karen Johnson, project planner for Charter Realty, the management company of Evergreen Walk, said the company had seen an increase in rental activity since the Whole Foods announcement and was not concerned by the vacancy of the retail space.

“We are confident it will be hired shortly,” Johnson said.

The construction of Whole Foods is part of a larger initiative by Charter Realty to revitalize the property as a shopping destination for South Windsor and surrounding towns. These plans, described in a document released by the company, detail efforts to lease retail locations to various companies, though the document conceals their names.

An undeveloped 5,680 square foot lot by the former Moe’s is to be leased to a “national burger chain” and a “national track and field brand” expects to lease 5,715 square feet of space. Other storefronts have letters of intent for businesses to rent, but details have not been announced.

David Gagnon, a civil engineer at Langan Engineering, said the hope is to have Whole Foods accessible via the sidewalk of Evergreen Crossing, a nearby retirement community, which would also help connect it to the rest of Evergreen Walk.

Stephen Wagner, a member of PZC, said he was excited about the development of Evergreen Walk and satisfied with the way Charter Realty had handled it.

“It’s great to see that there is a long term plan to keep this place going and keeping it alive,” Wagner said.

PZC Alternate Member Megan Powell said that while she was not present throughout the entire application process, the company did a good job with the Whole Foods sitemap, except for minor concerns. .

“I think special care was taken throughout the process,” said Powell.

PZC member Michael LeBlanc said he liked the mural planned for the back of the building, but wanted to make sure it was easy to touch up if needed.

“The only problem is they’re hard to maintain,” LeBlanc said.

Pacekonis said he was also concerned about the upkeep of the mural, as well as what could happen in the distant future.

“I’m also worried that at some point this mural might want to be replaced with advertising,” Pacekonis said.

The commission finally agreed to make the approval of the request conditional on no advertising being able to replace the mural.

Mayor Andrew Paterna said he believes the new Whole Foods will be great for Evergreen Walk and presents plenty of additional development opportunities.

“This shows that South Windsor is still in a great position to attract economic development,” Paterna said.

Commission Approves Germantown Industrial Park Site Plan | Business

By Site plan

GERMANTOWN – The Planning Commission this week approved a site plan for Capstone 41, a new industrial park development off Holy Hill Road, so the plan to add nearly 800,000 square feet of retail space industry in the village can continue.

The Planning Commission on Monday evening approved the site plan with certain conditions, as well as several other elements required for the project which will span 52.5 acres on the south side of Holy Hill Road, between Interstate 41 and Goldendale Road. .

The site plan approved this week only covers the first phase of the project, which includes site improvements, utility works and a 203,580 square foot industrial building. This building will be built on speculation, so the companies that will end up using the space are not yet known.

The second phase, for which the developer is planning two additional buildings that will bring the entire site to a total of approximately 785,400 square feet of building space, will require separate site plan approval when the time comes.

The Plan Commission approved the site plan with a list of conditions on which approval is contingent, such as Capstone Quadrangle must adjust the lighting plan so that lights do not exceed 25 feet, and additional landscaping must be scheduled for scouting around the site. At the committee meeting, another condition was added by amendment that Capstone must add additional details to building entrances, such as awnings.

“I’m fine with the rest of the building, just dress up the entrances a bit,” said Planning Commissioner David Baum.

In previous discussions of the Capstone 41 project — it’s been in the planning stages in Germantown for months — some concerns have been raised about the building’s planned appearance. Recent community feedback on Germantown’s planning efforts has indicated that residents dislike the monotonous colors and united appearance of buildings and prefer more interesting details in the design of the development.

“What we’re doing with the exterior of the building is pretty much anything you can do with precast panels,” said Mike Faber of Capstone Quadrangle. Since the previous discussion, the developer has added texture, adjusted colors, and added joints and details to the exterior design of the building.

During the public hearing for the Capstone Quadrangle project, the village administrator, Jan Miller, spoke out against the conditional use permit requested by the developer to encroach on the site’s wetland setbacks. Miller said she would never support wetland encroachment or setbacks because water and natural areas are a vital resource for Germantown.

Village planner Jeff Retzlaff noted that the wetland itself will not be affected; some grading will be changed in the setback area to allow for development, and Capstone Quadrangle will undertake mitigation measures by planting the site to compensate for the changes.

“There’s no proposed impact on actual wetlands… There’s just a 25-foot wetland encroachment and 75-foot setbacks on waterways,” Retzlaff said.

“Native plantations are being established in these areas and some additional plantations in other places,” he added.

The encroachment permit has been approved.

The 52.5 acres planned for Capstone 41 are being rezoned to allow limited industrial use, such as light manufacturing, assembly, warehouse, distribution or e-commerce, which was also cleared by the Planning Commission this week.

“It’s consistent with the zoning of the property that surrounds it,” Retzlaff said.

The commission also approved a certified survey map to divide this parcel into two lots for development and a weir, to be used for stormwater retention. The first lot of 13.5 acres will be used for the phase one building.

Oxford Commons-Entertainment Block Gets Sitemap Approval

By Site plan
The rendering of the design shows the future Oxford Commons-Entertainment Block. The site plan was approved on Monday. Image via Oxford Planning Department

The Oxford Planning Commission on Monday approved Phase 2 of the Oxford Commons-Entertainment Block, which will include two restaurants with outdoor dining and an outdoor stage.

The development is northeast of the intersection of Sisk Avenue and Commonwealth Boulevard. Last year, the commission approved Phase 1 of the mixed-use retail and entertainment area which began with a two-story building with retail and office space.

The Blackburn group is the developer.

The commission also approved a waiver to exceed the maximum allowable height of the retaining wall in a front yard. The maximum height is 4 feet and the developer requested a 5 foot 9 inch wall since the stage and the outdoor space are below street level.

The plan provides for 272 parking spaces; however, the sitemap shows 218 spaces. The developer made an agreement with a nearby church to be able to use the church’s parking space when needed.

The commission approved the site plan but included a condition requiring that the agreement with the church be submitted in writing to the planning department and be part of the site plan.

David Blackburn, president of the Blackburn Group, previously told Hottytoddy.com that he expects restaurants with a music scene and outdoor seating to be open in the spring or summer of 2022.


Plan Commission approves site plan for farm and fleet | Business

By Site plan

The planning committee met last week and approved the site plan for the Blains’ arrival at 1771 Wisconsin Ave. The existing Shopko building will be renovated and used for the new store, but several additions and adjustments are planned.

“The proposed building modifications include three small building additions totaling 11,050 square feet, a 3,820 square foot double-track passage through the canopy and modifications to the east facade,” wrote community development director Jessica Wolff. in a report to the committee.

Additions are planned at the customer’s main entrance, another on the north side for the new auto service center and small engine repair area, and the third addition will be for additional storage space next to the docks. existing loading, also on the north side of buildings.

According to village information from Blain’s site plan submission, the company is also planning a 66,000 square foot gated outdoor retail space. The outdoor sales area will have an 8 foot aluminum fence on three sides and a 16 foot solid vinyl fence on one side where there will be 12 foot high pallet racks. The exterior sales area will have an automatic gate to allow entry and exit of approaching vehicles, according to village reports on the site map.

Wolff wrote in his Plan Commission report that the village had contracted a traffic impact study, which resulted in recommendations to extend the turn lanes at the entrances. Traffic analysis also recommended that the area be more guarded and that an additional traffic light with turn control may be required if further developments occur on adjacent properties.

“There will be a new driveway from Highland Drive in the outdoor sales area near the loading docks for deliveries only,” according to village documents.

The floor plan of the interior of the building showed that most of the space will be redeveloped for public retail areas, with about a quarter of the floor area running along the facade of the building and the northeast side designated for warehousing and store function.

Outside the building, the site plan showed the finish of the parking lot in front of the Shopko to the southeast, and the small parking lot to the northeast of the building was repaved and converted into a fenced outdoor sales area. The outdoor sales area would include a drive-thru path for customers.

There were also five conditional use permit applications for Blain’s new farm and fleet approved by the Planning Commission last week. The permits were for inside sales and service; drive-thru and in-vehicle sales; maintenance and repair of vehicles and small engines; automotive related sales; and accessory enclosed outdoor storage.

According to company information, Blain plans to begin construction on the site this fall and to open the new farm and fleet in the fall of 2022. Once open, hours are scheduled from 8 am to 8 pm. Monday to Saturday and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday.

The plan further stated that there would be two shifts per day, with up to 45 people per shift. Blain’s estimates the maximum number of customers in a day at 6,000, based on Black Friday estimates.

SELLERSBURG NEWS: Wendy’s sitemap approved; Funds Sought for Town Center | News

By Site plan

SELLERSBURG – The Sellersburg Planning Commission last month approved a site plan for the construction of a Wendy’s restaurant on the corner of Camp Run Road and County Road 311.

The fast food chain could be open by the end of the year, and its addition marks a milestone for the city of Clark County.

“This will be the first project built in the city’s new Gateway Overlay District under the recently passed Unified Development Ordinance,” said Charlie Smith, City Manager of Sellersburg.

The city is moving forward with several aspects of its comprehensive Sellersburg 2040 plan. In its bid for the state’s Regional Economic Acceleration and Development Initiative, or READI, Sellersburg is requesting $ 7.7 million to its downtown district.

The money would be used for the properties and rights-of-way needed to develop road connections, utilities and stormwater improvements.

“In 2021, the city launched the impactful regional initiative to attract retail users, medical offices, professionals and various housing options to the downtown district,” Sellersburg officials wrote in the grant application. .

They discussed the construction of Camp Run Road and the goal of developing the Interstate 65 Exit 9 and Ind. 60 into a “one stop destination for southern Indiana”.

“The planned addition of daytime professional businesses balanced by mixed-use housing creates the opportunity for a unique live work and play neighborhood unlike anything else in Southern Indiana.” , wrote those responsible in the application. “Unique zoning codes focus on connectivity while improved architectural standards set this neighborhood apart from projects commonly seen in traditional southern Indiana shopping districts over the past 50 years.”

Other governments and organizations in southern Indiana are seeking READI funds of which $ 50 million could be allocated to the region.

Sellersburg is also seeking $ 16.6 million through the National Water Infrastructure Fund for sewage, stormwater and water improvements.

For existing businesses, the city is pursuing a subsidy program for the improvement of facades and signs.






Charlie smith


“The goal is to support growth and investment within the community and to help businesses make improvements under the recently adopted updated zoning codes,” Smith said.

“Examples of potential projects include exterior painting or repairs, landscaping, general exterior improvements and rehabilitation, signage and awnings. “

The Sellersburg Redevelopment Commission was expected to consider approving the program this week. If it passes the commission, Sellersburg City Council will be asked to provide funding for the remainder of this year and 2022.

Councilor Terry Langford, who is also a member of the commission, is the sponsor of the proposal.

“The board is open to the program and thrilled to receive the official request from RDC,” Smith said.

Planning and Zoning Commission Approves Site Plan for Rockwall Downtown Lofts Development – Blue Ribbon News

By Site plan
Location of the proposed development site, rockwall.com

ROCKWALL, TX – July 28, 2021 – Last night the Rockwall Planning and Zoning Commission approved the site plan in a 6-1 vote for Unit 263 Rockwall Town Center Loft Development at the corner of SH-66 and Alamo Road near Downtown Square. The property is across from the Rockwall Police Department.

The proposed layout will consist of 170 one-bedroom units, 86 two-bedroom units and seven three-bedroom units, averaging 850 square feet. The developer is also providing designated secure parking for Rockwall Police and will provide a dedicated right-turn lane along SH-66 as well as a deceleration lane along South Alamo Road. Amenities include a resort pool at the center of the property, a resort style fitness center on two levels, and secure gate parking with camera surveillance for residents. A sky lounge on the fourth floor on the south side of the property will overlook the lake.



P&Z Commission Chairman Eric Chodun had the only vote against approving the site plan, saying he did not believe the development met the stipulations of urban residential land use on which the property is. zoned.

“I don’t think urban residential is defined to cover this type of development,” Chodun said. “I have a problem with this, and I think the community supports my opinion on this. I think what’s in the best interest of the community is to deny it.

According to Rockwall City Planning Director Ryan Miller, urban residential land use was adopted for the Central Business District (CBD) with two stipulations:

  1. Urban Residential includes residential developments that at least partially face streets, public sidewalks or a common open space, or that are located above retail offices or service uses.
  2. The Urban Residential ground floor should have direct access to a sidewalk via a stoop or landing, and the majority of parking lots should be located in a structure.

Miller said the forms-based code has remained unchanged since its enactment and including until the time the applicant submitted their proposal for the development of Rockwall Downtown Lofts in 2018.

Despite the fact that many residents spoke out against the development during the open forum session of the meeting, the majority of the P&Z committee members voted in favor as the development meets all the requirements of the forms-based code. from the city center and conforms to the terrain. conditions of use described in the UDC (Unified Development Code) of the city.



“It’s extremely difficult when you watch and listen and understand where everyone is coming from,” said Jerry Welch, vice chairman of the P&Z Commission. “One of the reminders is that this is the first step, this is a sitemap, so there is still a lot of work to do and a lot of approvals to impose. I counted 27 required standards, and each standard has been verified to be compliant. This is a technical body, and there are some things that we can apply and that we cannot apply.

Tony Austin, the developer of the proposed apartment, raised residents’ concerns at the meeting.

“I can sense their concerns. I am also a resident of this community, I love this community. I think this project is going to be extremely beneficial for our community. I wouldn’t do it if I didn’t think it was right. We have worked very hard on this project over the past two years with the city to meet all the requirements. We have tried to be very sensitive to all the concerns of the city. I apologize for not being able to satisfy everyone, but I have no doubts this is the right project at the right time for the Town of Rockwall, ”said Austin.

“At the end of the day, I’m trying to do what’s right as long as the city has agreed to as long as it aligns with the laws and rules we have in place here,” Commissioner Sedric Thomas said. . “This project is consistent with everything. It is a difficult situation for all of us.

Click on here to see the entire meeting.

Blue Ribbon News staff report.


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Quicklee Site Plan Approved by Batavia Planning Committee | Featured Story

By Site plan

BATAVIA – Developers of a proposed Quicklee’s convenience store and gas station have approval from the city’s planning and development committee to proceed, following approval of a site plan and a special use permit.

Quicklee’s, which is based in Livingston County, wants to change the use of the former 3,771 square foot Bob Evans Restaurant, 204 Oak St.

The project includes the construction of a four-pump service station island with canopy and underground fuel storage tanks. The convenience store with retail fuel will use 2,771 square feet and the restaurant with drive-thru will use the remaining 1,000 square feet. The committee approved the site plan and permit at its Tuesday evening meeting.

Planning and Development Committee Chairman Duane Preston said Wednesday the committee received an updated traffic study on Tuesday that addressed their concerns about the line of vehicles at the drive-thru at the Tim Hortons proposed for the site. . The state Department of Transportation has recommended that there be enough room to accommodate the expected line of vehicles at the drive-thru.

“The DOT recommended that the traffic study be complete. Our concern was the Tim Horton’s drive-thru queue (range of vehicles) and they recommended that would be fine,” he said .

Preston said the committee had been concerned in the past that traffic problems could arise when Dunkin’ and Tim Hortons opened.

“At our last meeting, we wanted a traffic study confirming that there would be enough room for the queue.

“Assessment of drive-thru queues during the morning rush hour showed that there is significant storage space to accommodate the traffic frequenting the proposed cafe,” Preston read from information provided by SRF Associates. , who carried out the traffic study.

“It was updated in June 2021. It was a brand new study,” Preston said. “It was based on the recommendations they had made on the previous traffic study for the previous month.”

Vehicles will be able to enter Quicklee’s through Noonan Drive and return through Noonan Drive,

New traffic generated by the project is expected to be 79 vehicles entering and 71 exiting Quicklee’s during weekday morning rush hours, and 53 entering and 55 exiting vehicles during evening rush hours.

“You’re going to see a little more traffic. You are going to see 79 more cars than before,” he said today. “It’s going to be a little busier…compared to people sitting in a sit-down restaurant (Bob Evans).

Preston said that at this point Quicklee’s is free to move forward with the project.

“They said they were still in negotiations with Tim Hortons on the building. They may need to come back to us for a sign-up when they find out if they are using Tim Hortons,” he said. “At this time, they have not confirmed their relationship with Tim Hortons.”

The committee does not want to see the former Bob Evans remain empty.

“It’s a wonderful location for Thruway traffic. It’s a nice project. We love people leaving the Thruway and spending money on gas and coffee. This is great for additional gasoline tax revenue.

The committee took no action regarding the preliminary review of the YNCA/UMMC Healthy Living Campus site plan. The plan would entail the removal of three buildings. The proposed new facility will include the construction of a two-story, 69,420 square foot building that will house a YMCA, medical offices, off-street parking, a new access point from Summit Street and numerous upgrades. day on the construction site and landscaping. throughout the complex.

“This was presented to us in the form of a site plan review proposal. They want to go straight to SEQR (State Environmental Quality Review), but we had a few other issues that we wanted to see smoothed out through the process. We wanted to soften the look of Main St. between GO ART! and the new Y,” Preston said. “The old plan called for additional parking in this area. We’d like to see it softened up with more green spaces…a small park-like setting. They’re going back to see if by eliminating a handful of parking spaces, that’s going to significantly hamper the parking situation. It shouldn’t be, but they have to have a certain number of parking spaces. They’re going to have to see what they can pack to stay within the code.

Preston said the committee will have to hold a public hearing into the proposed Summit Street entrance. The hearing is scheduled for the next meeting, August 17 at 6 p.m. in the council chambers.

“A lot depends on the Summit Street entrance and green space,” he said.

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City Council approves Fareway site plan; Beaverdale store opens in 2022

By Site plan

The construction of a Fareway Meat Market at 2716 Beaver Ave. in Des Moines is slated to begin this year after city council approved the site plan today. Architectural rendering by Simonson & Associates Architects LLC

A proposal to build a Fareway meat market in the Beaverdale neighborhood of Des Moines overcame a final hurdle today when city council approved the development site plan, reversing the plan and the zoning commission’s denial plan.



“We saw the excitement [for the development] just explode in Beaverdale, ”said board member Bill Gray, who represents the area. “It’s exciting to see the work being done to get something [the neighborhood] it will be a great magnet for businesses in Beaverdale.



The project, proposed at 2716 Beaver Ave., has been controversial since it became public that the Boone-based grocery chain planned to raze a house at 2723 41st Place to allow more parking for the store and improve traffic flow.



The parking lot includes a driveway on 41st Place and Urbandale Avenue. Neighbors were bitter about having more traffic on residential street at 41st Place. The zoning commission rejected the plan earlier this spring. But after Fareway made changes, the plan was approved by the board.



In June, the zoning commission rejected Fareway’s design of the 7,800 square foot building planned for the southwest corner of Beaver and Urbandale avenues where a vacant bank branch building currently sits. It was proposed that the store have only one entrance instead of at least two as required by city zoning standards. Additionally, concerns were raised that the building was incompatible with other commercial buildings in the Beaverdale area.



Fareway, after his officials met with those in town, agreed to replace the non-transparent spandrel glass windows with ornamental red bricks to better “accommodate the vibe of the” Beaverdale “neighborhood. according to a letter to the town of Fareway. He also added raised windows to the sides of the building that face Beaver and Urbandale avenues.



The grocer also made changes to the store entrance, giving it a more urban look, according to the letter.



However, the grocer was adamant that he would not add another entrance to the building due to safety and liability concerns. Additionally, “another entry is reducing our operational footprint, as we would have to cut commercial layouts, and further diminish the functionality of an already difficult development site,” wrote Koby Pritchard, attorney and property manager for Fareway, in the letter to the city.



The board, in a 6-0 vote today, approved the site plan and building design for the store. Mayor Frank Cownie was absent.



After the meeting, Garrett Piklapp, executive vice president of Fareway, said the grocer has been planning to build a store in the Beaverdale neighborhood for more than a decade.



“We worked on a lot of issues and the process did exactly what it was supposed to do – provide full transparency to the neighborhood and give people a chance to have their say,” he said.



Piklapp said the old bank will be demolished in the coming weeks. Construction of the store will begin once the debris has been removed from the site, he said.



According to the letter to the Town of Pritchard, construction materials have been ordered for the project, bids awarded and contractors planned.



The new store is slated to open in 2022, Piklapp said.

Hornell approves site plan for new Alstom manufacturing building

By Site plan

HORNELL – Bill Norton’s nephew, an Air Force first sergeant, was in town this weekend to visit the Hornell branch of the family.

Norton took him on a tour of town to keep abreast of the latest happenings after years of absence, and his nephew was struck by all the changes around Hornell – a new hospital, new housing developments, redeveloped buildings and new construction projects.

The tour finally took a turn through Shawmut Drive, where the stage is set for another great addition to Maple Town.

Earlier in the week, Hornell’s planning council and the town’s planning and development committee both unanimously approved the site plans for Alstom’s new car shell manufacturing building to be located in the Shawmut Industrial Park.

“He said, ‘This place is booming. I can’t believe the changes around here, ”recalls Norton. “‘This will put Hornell on the map.'”

Norton is a member of the Hornell Planning Board which approved Alstom’s site plan following a presentation attended by the company as well as the design and engineering offices involved in the project.

Construction of a new 135,000 square foot railcar manufacturing plant is planned at 3 Shawmut Park Dr., just north of the current Alstom 2 plant. Alstom expands presence in Hornell after company wins a contract with Metra to supply rail cars for the Chicago metro area. . Alstom officially received the initial order of $ 769 million for the first 200 cars in March with options for another 300. In total, the contract could total up to $ 1.8 billion.

Norton said the only concern raised by the Planning Council was the transport of the large shells through city streets as they are moved from one Hornell factory to another during the manufacturing process. The board of directors has been assured that transport will take place during off-peak hours. Planning is also underway to cut down some trees along the road and deal with utilities or public infrastructure that may need to be relocated to allow transportation.

“I felt a lot better after hearing their plan,” Norton said. “I don’t see Alstom doing anything to disturb people.”

The Town Planning Council and the Town Planning and Development Committee both got their first glimpse of a rendering of the building. The new facility will include 105,000 square feet of manufacturing space, 18,000 square feet of warehouse space and 12,000 square feet of office space.

Metra’s effort is expected to create approximately 250 new skilled manufacturing jobs at the Hornell plant and help preserve another 400 positions at Hornell.

“This is a very important step in helping to make this project a reality and bring 250 more jobs to Hornell,” said Mayor John Buckley of the approvals. “It is an exciting time for Alstom and the Hornell community.

When construction of the building is completed, the road will be redone and a new sidewalk will be installed allowing better pedestrian access to Shawmut Park.

“Looking at the plan, the aesthetics of the building are almost the same as the other buildings in the main factory,” Norton said. “It will make the area neat. I think it will make this whole area look better and hopefully get people back to work.

“A lot of people come down to Shawmut Park and take the trail there. It will improve this neighborhood and be really good for the city.

Chris Potter can be contacted at [email protected] or on Twitter @ ChrisPotter413. To get unlimited access to the latest news, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Sanctuary Pointe Site Plan Amendment Sparks Debate Before Monument Trustees Grant Approval | The gallery

By Site plan

MONUMENT • Land originally zoned for a church site at Sanctuary Pointe became the subject of debate when a potential for 12 new residential lots was proposed instead.

At a May 3 hearing, the board considered an order to approve a Fourth Amendment to the Planned Sanctuary Pointe Phase 1 Development Site Plan and the First Amendment to the Development Sketch Plan.

The plan’s proposed site involved 5.11 acres north of Baptist Road and west of Fox Run Regional Park which was originally approved in 2006 to be the site of a church. However, the diocese no longer needs a church there, city planner Debbie Flynn said. Classic Development applied for the site plan amendment hoping to create 12 lots for single family homes.

The amendment would increase the density of Sanctuary Pointe development from 600 to 612 lots.

Neighborhood meetings between Classic Development and NES Inc. and current residents of Sanctuary Pointe were held in January and February. During these meetings, 15 lots were initially proposed, but the development was quickly changed to 12 after hearing residents’ concerns about lot size. According to those involved, the developer reduced the proposed number of adjacent lots to the boundary of the parcel, allowing them to look like adjacent lots.

The Landmarks Planning Commission approved the amendment in April after also hearing residents’ concerns.

Andrea Barlow of NES Inc. was on hand to further discuss aspects of the amendment, during which she noted that the increased traffic from the 12 lots would be significantly less than what would have been created by having a church on the site.

Several current residents of Sanctuary Pointe were present (and online) at the meeting to voice their objection to the ordinance. Again, some were concerned that the 12 lots would not match the size of adjacent lots. Some owners have expressed the situation as a “bait and switch” from what they were told by their sales representative when buying a house in the development.

It should be noted that this plot is offered by Classic Development, while Vantage Homes and Saddletree Homes have also sold products in adjacent lots.

One owner expressed concern that too many trees had to be felled to accommodate the lots and that the density on the lot along Baptist Road at the entrance to Sanctuary Pointe would be unsightly. Additionally, a pathway that residents use to access their mailboxes would need to be removed for the proposed lots.

Barlow said there would still be a substantial buffer of around 180 feet from Baptist Road.

Loren Moreland, vice president of classic development and project manager who also resides in Sanctuary Pointe, also spoke to the board about the concerns. He noted that many residents were not there to witness what Classic Development needed to do to get the existing lots in the development approved. Even then, he said, the developer couldn’t get everything it wanted.

“We’ve invested $70 million in infrastructure on this,” Moreland said. “It’s a huge risk. …I would say this is the highest quality community, perhaps, in Monument.

Moreland said the required grading on the parcel for eight homes would be the same for 12. Trail Residents Fear Lost was never part of the site plan, but rather created by TriView Metropolitan District, which manages services for water and sewer development, to spruce up some of its sewer line infrastructure, Moreland said.

Administrator Jim Romanello said that although the trail cannot be recovered because it was never part of the site plan, he was not comfortable voting on the ordinances after hearing the issues that surrounded him.

Trustee Laurie Clark said she sees no reason to deny approval of the ordinance because it falls within the guidelines required by the city. “I see nothing more than [Classic] can concede something other than what they already have,” she said. “At this point, our concern is whether they meet the required legal guidelines, and I am of the opinion that they do.”

Trustee Ron Stephens said while he agreed the ordinance meets the legal criteria, he would like to see any documentation from residents of Classic Development sales representatives making hints or guarantees about the future of the plot. He said Classic should not be held liable for anything Vanguard or Saddle Tree sales reps might have promised.

Moreland said members of the Classic sales team remained consistent throughout development and never made such hints. “These are not fun conversations,” he said. “It’s the part of my job that I don’t like.”

Moreland continued, “Do I think this is responsible land use? Absoutely. We did everything right – and as a landowner, what more could we do? We are not trying to blind people. We are not trying to bait and trade. These 12 grounds are 10 times more responsible than a church.

Mayor Don Wilson said while he understands the concerns expressed by community members, he believes the developer has come a long way to make adjustments to accommodate them.

“I think it’s reached a point where nobody’s going to be entirely happy,” Wilson said.

Clark moved to approve the order, which was approved 5-2. Stephens and Mayor Pro Tem Kelly Elliott voted against.

Planning board approves site plan for 13-storey Canal District development in Worcester, near Polar Park

By Site plan

WORCESTER – The Planning Council on Wednesday approved a site plan for a 13-storey mixed-use development in the Canal District.

Council and some residents had concerns about the size and scale of the proposed project, but overall members were happy with the approach to housing density and attention to detail in d other areas of design and architecture.

Gold Block Real Estate LLC seeks to demolish existing buildings – with demolition beginning earlier Wednesday – and build a 13-story, 380,580-square-foot mixed-use building, with 318 “residential units,” approximately 29,000 square feet of retail or restaurant space, and 152-space parking .

Following:40 years after Mick Jagger and the Stones, the Worcester nightclub is demolished

Retail and office space on the building’s first two floors is expected to include a candle-lit bowling alley as well as “360 degrees” of retail and dining space around the development, the director of Gold Block, Thomas Keane, to the Planning Board.

The proposed development is along Green Street. It will essentially replace the block between Plymouth and Gold streets and will overlook Polar Park.

Stephen Rolle, deputy director of city development, said the car park includes six disabled parking spaces and four electric vehicle charging stations, with capacity to expand as demand increases.

Rolle said the development will include a large locked bicycle storage room for more than 100 bikes and replicate bicycle parking spaces along the streetscape. He said the building will incorporate green roofs to absorb stormwater runoff and will feature outdoor amenities on the third and 10th floors.

Rolle said access to the parking lot would be from Gold Street and the building would be set back from the street to allow for wider sidewalks.

Rolle said the proposed building is about 163 feet tall, which is similar to other downtown buildings in that zoning district. The Bancroft on Franklin Street, he pointed out, is about 140 feet tall.

The project’s architect, Joseph Stromer, said the main objective of the project was to meet the demand for housing in the area. He said the development creates a “real opportunity for live work” and strengthens the city’s urban core. He said it is conveniently located near bus routes and a short walk to Union Station. It is pedestrian and transit-oriented, Stromer said.

The developers submitted this rendering to the city.

Stromer said the idea for the design was to visually divide the large building into three smaller buildings to give pedestrians a sense that it fit into the scale of the neighborhood.

But a few residents who called, as well as a few council members, expressed concerns about the size.

Resident Nathan Sabo said his primary concern is that the 13-story building, along with other planned developments along the Green Street corridor, will effectively isolate Polar Park from the rest of the Canal District.

“It would hardly be visible,” Sabo said.

Sabo said he also had concerns about the construction and staging and its impact on the neighborhood, and said there was no outreach to residents about the project prior to Wednesday’s meeting.

In written evidence submitted to the Planning Board, Julie Dowen of the Worcester Heritage Society strongly opposed the site plan as presented. She wrote that while the former building at Sir Morgan’s Cove was not on the state’s official register of historic buildings, its heritage and significance in Worcester’s history should not and cannot be ignored.

“The WHS urges the Worcester Planning Board and the developers of this hugely expansive project to recognize its historic value, other than taking its name, ironically, and to find a significant role in the preservation of the building and its integration into the design, notwithstanding the fact that the design as it is out of step with the character of the neighborhood and would tower over all other structures on Green Street,” Dowen wrote.

Allen Fletcher, a Canal District resident and business owner, wrote to the board that while he liked the mixed-use approach, he thought the building was too big and thought there should be enough of parking spaces included to cover all units.

Council members said they understood the public’s concerns about the size and scale of the project, but council chairman Albert LaValley noted that in the zoning district where the proposed project is located, nothing limits the size or height of the building.

Members expressed satisfaction with the green roofs, bicycle parking and electric vehicle charging stations. Board member Ellie Gilmore said she was actually pleased to see a less than one-to-one ratio of parking spaces to people. She said she actually would have liked to see less vehicle parking.

“If we’re trying to create a dense, walkable neighborhood, having personal vehicles hurts that,” Gilmore said.

Gilmore said she was disappointed to hear residents report a lack of public engagement.

Board member Edward Moynihan made a commitment to the developers that the renders would not change significantly throughout the life of the project. Board member Paul DePalo said he thinks the scale of the project is big and should be the way the city should think about creating density in neighborhoods like the Canal District. He said he recognizes that any project can have negative consequences, but he thinks this proposal would be great for the city.

Four of the properties that are part of the new plan that was presented to the Planning Board on Wednesday were part of a deal that allowed the city to offload properties it had taken through eminent domain as part of the construction project from Polar Park. The properties at 85 Green St., 2 Plymouth St., 5 Gold St., and 7 Gold St. were ultimately not needed as part of the ballpark. The city, through the Worcester Redevelopment Authority, reached an agreement to sell the properties to Churchill James for $3 million – the amount the city paid.

According to the Secretary of State’s Corporate Database, Gold Block is managed by Harry DiLeo, Keane and Christopher Archambault. Keane and DiLeo also manage Churchill James.

The proceeds were allocated to an initial reserve fund to repay stadium project obligations.

Due to its proximity to the ballpark, the new project, if approved and constructed, will be included in the District Improvement Funding Area created to fund construction of the ballpark. The additional increase in tax revenue generated from private development in the neighborhood will be used to cover debt service on the bonds sold to fund construction of the 10,000-seat ballpark.

• The Planning Board also approved its first special permit for an independent adult marijuana testing lab on Wednesday.

The council on Wednesday approved the special permit for the facility at 41 Fremont St. and approved a parking plan across the street at 32 Delaware St. for Legacy Foundation Group. No marijuana will be sold or grown on site; it will serve as a test facility for other retailers to ensure quality control, Legacy’s Tye Thaden told the board.

Landmarks Planning Commission Approves Site Plan and Rezoning for Village of Jackson Creek | The gallery

By Site plan

MONUMENT • After months of discussions and two appearances before the Monument Planning Commission and Board of Directors, The Village at Jackson Creek received approval last week for its preliminary site plan and rezoning.

Trustees voted to approve the preliminary plan for the planned development site and rezoning of the village at Jackson Creek on April 5 at City Hall.

After being denied approval by the planning commission in January, the developer was brought before the board after amending the plan to allay concerns raised by the planning commission. The council voted to send the plan back to the commission at that time for further review of the revisions.

Jackson Creek Village is described as a live, work and play community to be built west of Jackson Creek Parkway, across from Jackson Creek Senior Living, east of Interstate 25 and north of Landmark Marketplace. The concept for the development includes improved roads and streetscapes, community gathering space, a library, Class A multi-family and seniors housing, restaurants, retail and employment.

In March, the Planning Commission approved the site plan and rezoning with conditions regarding its 35-foot setback from Jackson Creek Pkwy and building height limits for the development approaching the boardwalk.

Town developer Debbie Flynn recapped the project and its history to monument councils since January and outlined the terms under which the planning commission approved the site plan and rezoning. Brett Bhenke of Creekside Developers returned to the board to re-present the project and address the terms.

Bhenke noted that Jackson Creek Parkway is classified as a major sewer, and for Regency Park zoning code, the setback from a major sewer should be 20 feet. This is the case of the Monument Marketplace and the rezoning of land to the north along the promenade. Instead of building heights, the plan has already adjusted its maximum building height from the 90ft limit to 50, also similar to developments and rezoning around it.

“Why is there a different standard imposed on The Village at Jackson Creek?” said Bhenke. “Imposing a different standard on this project could put us at a disadvantage compared to these other sites.

“I don’t think we have a clear reasoning from the planning commission as to why they felt this particular case required separate guidance.”

Administrator Mitch LaKind asked if the terms set by the planning commission were legally binding. Flynn replied that these were recommendations to the board, but that the board was not bound by the conditions set.

“I would be right to say that these terms are more restrictive than what our code allows,” City Manager Mike Foreman said.

Mayor Don Wilson said the situation could be part of the learning curve for a newly appointed planning commission. He said the commission needs to understand that it can propose policy changes to the city’s board and staff. “We can look at that, but you can’t force it on an individual builder or an individual developer,” he said.

The preliminary site plan and rezoning for the Village of Jackson Creek was approved without council opposition or public input.

In other cases, administrators heard an order to approve the final course for the Monument Industrial Park. Development is planned west of I-25, east of Old Denver Road, and north of Baptist Road, and is within the permitted use of Regency Park zoning.

The Monument Industrial Park is planned on nearly 13.4 acres, of which 9.6 are for a warehouse distribution center and the remainder would include a retention pond. The planning commission had approved the final dish by voting 7-0.

Andrea Barlow of NES Inc. was on hand to talk about the development and noted that the build height of the warehouse would be 40 feet, more or less. The board approved the order 6-0, with trustee Jim Romanello marked as an abstainer due to a connectivity issue on the virtual platform.

Foreman also informed the board that there had been a leadership change within the planning department and that planning director Larry Manning was no longer with the city of Monument. A replacement has not been announced.

Westwood View Elementary sitemap gets final approval – this is what it will look like

By Site plan

On Thursday evening, Westwood City Council unanimously approved a site plan for the new Westwood View Elementary building, a project related to the $ 264 million bond issue recently approved by Shawnee Mission.

Shawnee Mission will build a new school at 4935 Belinder Avenue, the former site of the Entercom radio tower that the district purchased in 2016.

Westwood Mayor David Waters said the city’s strong identification with elementary school means the new building is not just about ensuring children have the best possible education, but is about the future of the Westwood community.

“It’s a community affair,” Waters said. “This is not a piece of property, it really is the heart and soul of our community – and the future of our community in many ways.”

Site map details

Crews have already started demolishing the old radio station, and construction of the new school building is expected to start in the summer of 2021.

The district expects it to be completed by December 2022, when students at Rushton Elementary School will move into the current Westwood View building about a block from the old Entercom site while their school is in operation. rebuilt.

The gymnasium in the new building, in the center, will be able to withstand winds of 250 miles per hour. There will also be several outdoor spaces for students and staff, including the cafeteria patio on the right. Image via Shawnee Mission Papers.

Here are some details of the Westwood view Sitemap, as stated by the district architects at the meeting:

  • Several creative outdoor spaces including three outdoor classrooms and a patio next to the cafeteria for lunchtime visitors.
  • The parking lot, which is on the edge of Belinder Avenue, will be about three feet lower than Belinder. It is an effort to be a conscious neighbor and block surrounding residents from the light and noise that will be coming from the school.
  • Westwood View will accommodate approximately 550 students, nearly double the capacity of the current building.
  • Two soft play areas (like a grass play area with fall protection) and a hard play area that will likely be asphalt.
  • A field that can accommodate soccer and other sports and activities.
  • The gymnasium will be designed to withstand winds of 250 miles per hour and will also have an area where students and staff can retreat in the event of a tornado or other extreme weather conditions.
Westwood View Entrance
The entrance to the new school would face Belinder Avenue. Above, a rendering of the interior of the entrance. Image via Shawnee Mission Papers.

Residents’ concerns about traffic

Two residents, Jan Kyle and Jennifer Merrill, expressed concern about the additional traffic an elementary school would bring on Belinder Avenue.

Kyle said that while she and her husband voted in favor of the bond measure that the new Westwood View was a part of, they don’t think it’s owned by the old Entercom site.

They argued that he should have gone to Rainbow Boulevard on the former site of Westwood Christian Church.

Likewise, Merrill said she saw traffic increase on Belinder when a car is parked on the street – which she said residents do frequently as most of the driveways to homes in the area are the width of ‘one car.

As Rushton students make their way to the current school building in 2023, Merrill said she was concerned about the impact of traffic from two elementary schools on the community of Westwood.

“I’m very, very concerned about the foresight of what this will create in our little community,” Merrill said. “I’m all for school, as I said before. I am less than happy to have the parking lot and all the round trip traffic flow to Belinder.

Board member Jeff Harris said a traffic study had been conducted on the site and concluded that there would be no issues with the placement of Westwood View.

While there are likely to be changes with the new location, Harris said the pandemic has proven humans can adapt – and he has confidence in city staff to stay adaptable as challenges arise in the city. during this process.

Other council members shared similar sentiments, including council member Jason Hannaman who said that while he was upset he and the city could not please all residents, the same concerns would arise in any other place.

The city council unanimously approved the site plan, on the condition that an analysis of the mandates at 49th Terrace and Belinder Avenue be carried out on the first fall of the school’s opening.

The analysis will determine whether additional measures such as a crosswalk for child safety need to be implemented at the intersection.

Site plan approved for a five-storey building along Mike McCarthy Way –

By Site plan

By Kevin Boneske
Personal editor


ASHWAUBENON – A site plan for the first of what could become several buildings along Mike McCarthy Way was approved Tuesday, Jan. 26, by village council.

Merge Urban Development previously entered into a development agreement with the village to build the project on property owned by the Ashwaubenon Community Development Authority on the north side of Mike McCarthy Way between Holmgren Way and South Ashland Avenue.

Merge plans to construct a five-story mixed-use building with 3,100 square feet of commercial space on the first floor, 88 multi-family residential units on the second through fifth floors, and a 12,000 square foot climbing gym on the east side of the building. building.

Community development manager Aaron Schuette said the L-shaped building will have a public courtyard in front and off-street parking along the west and north sides of the building with underground parking not possible in the area due to the slick groundwater.

Schuette said the approved site plan only included the residential and commercial parts of the project, with the exterior elevations of the climbing gym not ready for submission at this time, but would be considered for a future. site review by Site Plan Review Committee, Plan Commission. and the board of directors.

“It’s a beautiful building, and I love that it’s all masonry,” said village president Mary Kardoskee. “He will be really beautiful for a long time.”

Schuette said conditions for approval include that the exterior of the climbing gym be submitted separately for review of the site plan, coordinating with the public works and forestry departments regarding the feasibility of the proposed flowerbeds on along Mike McCarthy Way and all metal wall panels using fully concealed fasteners.

He said the project would also involve cutting a new driveway and closing an existing one, which will require the restoration of on-street parking spaces.

With a development agreement already approved for the project, Schuette said Merge is in the process of obtaining a certified survey map approved to combine two parcels into one to facilitate development of the site.

He said construction of the building could begin this year.

Administrator Gary Paul said he hopes the development will attract more people to the area.

“There is more land there that could be used for other developments,” he said. “I think it’s going well, and like I said, we’re getting another great structure.”

Snoqualmie plant site development enters environmental impact public comment period

By Site development

On Monday April 27, 2020, the town of Snoqualmie made public the long-awaited environmental impact study project (DEIE) for the major development project of the plant site.

The DEIS was prepared by the owner and developer of a 261 acre Planned Commercial / Industrial Site (PCI). The site is located within the city limits of Snoqualmie and is owned by Snoqualmie Mill Ventures LLC. Before the land was sold about 10 years ago, it was the site of a Weyerhaeuser sawmill for almost 100 years. The adjacent Mill Pond / Lake Borst is not part of the planned development. It still belongs to Weyerhaeuser.

About two-thirds of the plant site is expected to be kept in open space, including natural areas, trails, habitat, and flood storage. The developed zone would be done in three stages: planning zone 1, planning zone 2 then planning zone 3, with less certainty in the later stages. The phased project is expected to take place over the next 10 to 15 years.

According to DEIS, “Planning Zone 1 would be developed for a mix of employment, retail and residential activities, organized in a pedestrianized village center adjacent to a“ main street ”. About 160
housing units are offered on the second and upper floors of mixed-use buildings… Apartments would be for rent, at market rates, and would be a mix of one and two bedroom units, of medium size approximately 835 square feet.

Map of the 3 planning zones of the plant site development project in stages. Planning zone 1 would occur first.

If Snoqualmie Mill’s vision comes true, the preferred concept for the area will be wine-related uses, including wine production, wine tasting and other wine-related uses, restaurants, event spaces and the lodging.

The developer of the mill site, Tom Sroufe, said several wineries have already expressed interest in the potential development, but explained that they will need to reassess that interest once the economic impacts of the coronavirus crisis are undermined. .

Plant 1 Site Layout Conceptual Design – Main Street Perspective

Read our previous article on the planned development of the factory site HERE.

It has been three years since Snoqualmie Mill Ventures submitted an application for a development master plan for municipal staff review. Since then, the promoter has prepared the draft environmental impact study. The purpose of DEIS is to identify all impacts (traffic, water, environment, pollutants, sights, archeology, noise, etc.) caused by development and to present plans to mitigate negative impacts.

[Note: That 2017 master plan application contained a controversial component – a large, outdoor amphitheater in Planning Area 1 – which according to Sroufe has been removed from the preferred Mill Site re-development option contained in the DEIS. The amphitheater component, though, is still included in an alternative re-development option in the DEIS (required by the SEPA Act) and is located in Planning Area 3.]

Some examples of mitigation proposals contained in the DEIS [for phase 1] include the restructuring of part of Millpond Road; the addition of a traffic light at the intersection of Fisher Creek and Snoqualmie Drive; treatment of water flowing from impermeable surfaces and entering the Snoqualmie River; a bottomless culvert under the realigned portion of SE Mill Pond Road to allow passage of flood water, small mammals, carnivores and amphibians; clean-up and remediation of inherited contamination in planning zones 2 and 3 where these contaminants have been located. [These a just a few examples of many contained within the large DEIS document]

The development of DEIS took three years [in part] due to the fact that the site was previously a sawmill and therefore presents environmental and contamination issues; its location adjacent to the Snoqualmie River; and the size and duration of the proposed development. The DEIS itself is almost 3,000 pages (including appendices) for the large and complicated site.

Plant site developer and North Bend resident Tom Sroufe said DEIS has taken a long time because he takes it seriously. He explained that they wanted to be thorough, not to be surprised by anything. They asked the hired consultants to complete the DEIS to address the impacts in advance.

The first version of DEIS was presented to the Town of Snoqualmie about a year ago. The city consultants then provided feedback and further work was done to develop the detailed document.

Sroufe commented, “We have done our best to identify any impact on the community and believe that there is no significant negative impact that cannot be mitigated. “

Snoqualmie Town Community Development Director Mark Hofman explained the project has now entered a legally required audience [and state agency] comment period, which will last 45 days.

Hofman said the goal now is to have as many eyes as possible on the document to generate as many feedback as possible, which will make the EIS even stronger to fully mitigate negative impacts.

Once the public comment period has ended, Mill Site Ventures will then be required to respond to each comment provided.

According to the Town of Snoqualmie lawyer, Bob Sterbank, the town will also assess the comments received, make any changes it deems appropriate to the various chapters of the DEIS and appendices, and prepare an additional chapter or addendum that will include the responses. comments related to factual corrections. or when the City determines that the comment (s) do not warrant a further response.

The City then publishes the final environmental impact study (FEIS). This FEIS will accompany the draft commercial / industrial plan (PCI plan) when it is submitted to the town planning commission for a public hearing. The planning commission will then make a recommendation to the municipal council as to the approval / acceptance of the PCI plan and the FEIS. A developer agreement should also be drawn up between the two parties if / when the project progresses.

Written commentary on the DEIS taken until June 11: the review and comment period has been extended from 30 to 45 days for this draft environmental impact statement. Written comments can be submitted until June 11, 2020 and addressed to Mark Hofman, SEPA Manager, Town of Snoqualmie, PO Box 987, Snoqualmie, WA 98065. Comments can also be emailed to [email protected] or [email protected]

Oral commentary taken on May 20 at 4 p.m.: Due to the ongoing COVID-19 emergency and stay-at-home orders statewide, the city will be taking oral comments in a remote online meeting rather than in person. The meeting is scheduled for May 20, 2020 at 4 p.m. The city said information on the calls would be provided at a later date and posted on the city’s website calendar. [To be notified directly about the meeting information, sign up for Notify Me and choose “Mill DEIS”]

Through a city-state press release, “approval of the environmental impact study project would not in itself authorize any physical construction on the site. If approved, Snoqualmie Mill Ventures will need to submit an application to physically develop the property.

If this request were approved, the site would be redeveloped over a period of approximately 10 to 15 years.

For more information, visit the Development Project page of the plant website.

Conceptual image of the western perspective of the main street sector of the factory site

Bee Cave Baldwin Sports Park moves forward with site development

By Site development

On April 14, Bee Cave City Council approved a site development plan for Baldwin Sports Park in an annexed portion of land near the residential area of ​​Lake Pointe. (Courtesy of the Town of Bee Cave)

On April 14, Bee Cave City Council approved a site development plan for Baldwin Sports Park in an annexed portion of land near the residential area of ​​Lake Pointe.

The proposed 26-acre sports complex, located at 2500 Ashley Worth Blvd., Bee Cave, will contain baseball diamonds, batting cages, associated parking, washrooms, concession stands and water quality facilities. .

Bee Cave City Council has so far addressed a number of issues surrounding the park, the most significant of which has been around parking.

At a meeting on September 24, 2019, council voted to ban parking, stopping or standing on Ashley Worth Boulevard which runs alongside the future sports park.

On April 14, city staff briefed council on different facets of the development process so far, from the cutting edge lighting design to the 300 parking spaces that will accompany the complex.

City information indicates that the Baldwin Sports Complex lighting scheme has been certified by the International Dark Sky Association as a community-friendly outdoor sports lighting system.

Council approved the site’s development plan on the condition that the 12 Fields Foundation and Western Hills Little League underwriters pay all pending fees to the city and submit updated tax estimates for various aspects of the development.

Chris Ellis, president of the 12 Fields Foundation, told the board that Baldwin Sports Park has been under construction for about seven years.

“We contacted neighborhoods close to the project… and made sure we understood their concerns,” Ellis said. He added that once the complex opens, a traffic study could provide data justifying a possible traffic light at the entrance to the park.

Estimates from the Town of Bee Cave indicate that the project is expected to require approximately six to 12 months of fundraising and an additional nine to 12 months for construction.

Bettendorf Approves Credit Union Site Development Plan | Government and politics

By Site development

The Bettendorf City Council approved the site plan for the Middle Road branch of the University of Iowa Community Credit Union, paving the way for more development in the city.

The proposed 5,600 square foot development is located at 4060 Middle Road, just south of Woodfield Drive and north of Lindquist Ford.

This is the second development project approved by City Council for the Crown Pointe 12th Addition.

Greatest Grains intends to install a 12,000 square foot store on the land adjacent to the credit union.

Built to Suit, Inc. is the developer of the project.

Community Development Director Bill Connors said the building will resemble the Credit Union’s 53rd Street location.

Jim Kelly, the credit union’s senior vice president of marketing, said the branch was for expanding its customers.

In the first 10 months of the year, its membership grew by 45% in Scott County.

With the Greatest Grains project raising concerns from neighbors about potential traffic issues, 3rd Ward Alderman Debe LaMar also asked how the city would handle increased traffic from the property.

Greatest Grains and the University of Iowa Credit Union will also share an aisle.

Connors said the project meets the city’s requirements and the city has been in communication with both projects about those concerns.

The same traffic problems were addressed by the Planning and Zoning Commission, which unanimously approved the project.

Connors told the planning commission that a traffic light was not warranted at this time, but could be reconsidered in the future.