Skip to main content

Developer of pizza slice sitemap has new hurdles in Matthews | Mmhweekly

By Site plan

MATTHEWS — A homebuilder whose townhouse proposal was chosen by Matthews commissioners last month has come back with revisions that boost its chances of approval.

But the commissioners still challenged the project on safety and price.

Tri Pointe Homes hopes to rezone 13.8 acres at 1748 Marglyn Drive to develop 73 townhouses on the pizza slice-shaped lot.

The homebuilder not only removed six units from the site plan, but also added a central park as a focal point of the community as well as a larger buffer zone between the community and a church.

Tri Pointe Homes also showed elevations with tall farmhouse-style buildings and eight-foot-deep porches, which Commissioner John Urban says matches the character of the town.

“I want to commend Tri Pointe Homes for making an incredible improvement on what was originally proposed,” said Mayor John Higdon. “It’s 1,000 times better than what was originally proposed.”

Mayor Pro Tem Ken McCool asked if the developer could remove three more units from a corner of the site near the road. He was concerned about sightlines for drivers.

A representative from Tri Pointe Homes said she wasn’t sure it was financially viable for the project. McCool countered that this was a serious concern for an already dangerous road.

Commissioner Renee Garner reminded her colleagues that they had 2,000 units, including 457 townhouses, in the rezoning queue. Garner added that only the projects they discussed on June 13 could add up to 70 students to Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools.

“We can complain about the school board and how dysfunctional it is, but our role as commissioners is to keep in mind the balance between growth and the pressure we put on our schools,” Garner said.

Ganer also worried about townhome prices in the $400,000 range.

“It hurts me every time I hear a developer say they keep their projects affordable at $400,000,” she said. “I say it over and over and over again. If we lost our home, our family could no longer afford to live in Matthews. As we approve of these projects, there is something in my heart that truly aches that what we approve of could rob my third-generation family of the city we call home.

The planning board will consider the project on June 28. Commissioners could vote as early as July 11.

Planning Commission Approves TKI Plant Site Plan | Local News

By Site plan

The development of the Neuweiler site in Allentown should respect the history and architecture of the brewery, according to planners at LV | Lehigh Valley Regional News

By Site development

ALLENTOWN, Pennsylvania — The plan to demolish much of the Neuweiler Brewery site in Allentown in favor of retail and apartment space should balance development with respect for the North Front Street landmark’s history , according to the Lehigh Valley Planning Commission.

“The structures to be demolished have considerable local cultural and historical value,” according to a study by Steve Neratko, the LVPC’s chief community and regional planner.

The commission will review Neratko’s recommendations in meetings at noon Tuesday and 7 p.m. Thursday.

The brewery on the west bank of the Lehigh River was completed in 1913 and closed in 1968. The site was used for other purposes in the 1990s but has been vacant since 1998, according to the LVPC. Row houses cover the land to the north and west of the old brewery, and there is a small park to the south.

“While redevelopment of the area is important, attempts should be made to protect those elements of the site that can be preserved and extract any salvageable architectural resources as assets for potential reuse for this project or others” , according to Neratko’s letter, which is a draft until it is approved by the full committee. “Specifically, the copper cupola of the brewery building could be retained and used as an artistic element of the future site.”

The planning commission is reviewing proposed major developments for Lehigh and Northampton counties, but the City of Allentown will make the final decision on whether Manhattan Building Co.’s plan can proceed.

The developer proposes to construct a seven-story building with 37,967 square feet of retail space, 306 apartments and 358 parking spaces. Neuweiler Tower will remain, John Palumbo of the Manhattan Building said at an Allentown Planning Commission meeting in May. The commission requested additional details on the architecture and design of the development, and did not vote on the project at this meeting.

The brewery is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, but it is not a registered National Historic Landmark.

Neuweiler’s range included light lager, ale, premium beer, seasonal Bock beer, porter and other beers. It was a large employer in Allentown, but competition from national breweries led to closure in 1968. Some Neuweiler recipes were brewed by other beer brands after the closure.

LVPC’s professional staff reviews development proposals and makes recommendations which are discussed and voted on by appointed commissioners. The commissioner votes on the recommendations, not on the projects themselves. Once approved, the recommendations are sent to local governments for consideration.

The development of Neuweiler will be discussed by the LVPC’s overall planning committee at noon Tuesday and by the full committee at 7 p.m. Thursday. Both meetings are virtual. Links to the meetings are available on the LVPC website.

Germantown commission backs site plan to allow for building additions

By Site plan

The Germantown Plan Commission backed plans at its June 13 meeting for the expansion of a business along Division Road in the northern part of the village.
Criterion Barrels, Inc., located at W172 N13052 Division Road, has requested a 12,108 square foot addition to its existing building. The item was on the committee’s agenda for a review of the site’s development plan.
According to village staff information, Criterion Barrels is an original equipment manufacturer of gun barrels. The staff report indicates that there has been increased demand over the past two years for the company’s product. As a result, the number of employees increased from 31 to 44 employees while production doubled.
The staff report states: “The addition will optimize product flow throughout manufacturing, allow for future growth in the workshop and create additional space for equipment such as additional bathrooms, a kitchen / break room, additional office space, conference and meeting rooms, changing rooms and an inspection area.
The addition would be added to an existing building on the southwest side of the property and would increase the total size of the building to 35,515 square feet. Associate Village Planner Emily Zandt said the addition will not be visible from Division Road as there are mature trees on the southern boundary of the property while existing storage buildings block the view from the south .

Approval of the layout plan for the Rooms To Go hypermarket in Mt. Juliet

By Site plan
  • Superstore Rooms To Go offered at Mt. Julietsupt

A site plan for the construction of a new 45,800 square foot Rooms To Go “superstore” on Adams Lane in Mt. Juliet was approved by the city’s planning commission on Thursday.

The store would be built on 3.85 acres on land adjacent to the recently approved BJ’s Wholesale.

The property is within the current planned unit development of Providence Central.

Hopes are to begin construction in the first quarter of 2023 and to open the store in the first or second quarter of 2024 “if all goes according to plan,” said Peter Weitzner, vice president of Rooms To Go.

The Mt. Juliet location will include a Rooms To Go, Rooms To Go Kids and a newer concept, the Rooms To Go Patio, Weitzner said.

MORE DEVELOPMENT NEWS:Construction plan for 71 high-end homes in Goodlettsville remains as is after exploring more density

IN NUMBERS :Here’s Who Nashville Police Teams Mental Health Officers Have Served So Far

About 30 employees are expected with the store, Weitzner said.

183 parking spaces are available.

Construction plane at a major intersection

A construction plan for a 9,300 square foot commercial building on just over 1.4 acres at the corner of North Mt. Juliet Road and East Division in Mt. Juliet has been submitted.

The project, submitted as “Citi Station,” would be for a bank, retail and restaurant with separate spaces for each, city officials said. The plan was carried over from the planning commission’s agenda on Thursday, but is expected to return.

Mt. Juliet Station is on the other side of the Eastern Division.

Previous interest in the vacant property included a gas station, which City Commissioner Scott Hefner said he would not support.

Contact Andy Humbles at [email protected] or 615-726-5939 and on Twitter @AndyHumbles.

Former $250m development at Le Cornu site revealed

By Site development

More than 300 apartments and townhouses as well as a rooftop “urban farm” will be built as part of a $250 million market square development planned for the former Le Cornu site in Forestville.

The state government today unveiled its long-awaited master plan for the sprawling 3.6-hectare plot on the corner of Anzac Highway and Leader Street in Adelaide’s inner south, which has been vacant since October 2016, when furniture store Le Cornu ended its operations in South Australia. .

The new $250 million plan for the site, located 3.5 km southwest of the CBD, includes 199 apartments, 106 townhouses as well as short-term tourism apartments, with the development built around a marketplace with a supermarket, outdoor cafes and specialist retailers.

Appointed Venuethe development will comprise 30% green and open space, of which just under half will be accessible to the public 24/7, while the other half will come from “rooftop activations”, including a rooftop urban farm.

A model of the open green space that will be available in the new Forestville development. Image: SA Renewal

Plans have also been drawn up for a “green urban school” to be set up on site, accommodating around 250 disadvantaged students in grades 11 and 12.

The proposal was developed by a development consortium including local developer Buildtec, residential developer WA Peet and the Chapley Family’s commercial retail group – operators of Pasadena and Frewville Foodland stores.

The development will include over 300 apartments and townhouses. Image: SA Renewal

Construction in Forestville, initially scheduled for “end of 2022/beginning of 2023”, has now been postponed to 2024.

The project is not expected to be completed before 2029.

Commercial Retail Group director Spero Chapley did not give details on the expected starting price for Venue apartments, but said the development would offer a range of starting prices.

“At this stage we are not ready to talk about pricing, but what we can say is that through the design and master plan there is an array of residential pricing and options,” said he told reporters.

“We want to talk to first-time buyers to those retiring. We really want to create options for the community.

Renewal SA’s selection criteria included a minimum requirement that 15% of apartments built on site be classified as affordable.

Four five-storey apartment buildings, subject to approval, are planned to occupy the center of the development, while a number of two- and three-storey townhouses will occupy the east end of the development.

An eight-storey “gateway” building will be located on the west corner of the site, along with two other apartment buildings.

Spero Chapley with Planning Minister Nick Champion outside the vacant Forestville site. Photo: Tony Lewis/InDaily

But Chapley said the piazza-style market square was “at the heart” of the development.

“We seek to create a real [orientated] and residential development here, promoting and talking about local products, growers and makers,” he said.

“It’s a showcase site.

Chapley is the president of the educational organization YouthInc which will operate the “Green Urban School” slated for construction in the development district.

The school will offer “the equivalent of a Grade 11 and 12 VET and SACE curriculum” to students aged 17 to 24, Chapley said.

The students will also operate a rooftop urban farm which forms part of the green space planned for the site.

Image: SA Renewal

“The green school will be all about learning and discussing sustainability, climate justice, agriculture and so on,” he said.

“We are really excited, it will be a first for Australia.

“It’s really about getting disengaged South Australians aged 17 to 24… an understanding of themselves, an understanding of jobs and an awareness of their future.”

Planning Minister Nick Champion said the overall project would create 900 jobs during construction and 500 permanent jobs when completed.

The market place will be “at the heart” of Forestville’s development. Image: SA Renewal

Renewal SA bought the vacant 3.6 hectare land in Forestville for $38.2 million in September 2020 after German retailer Kaufland scrapped plans for a supermarket in the area.

Renewal SA under the former Marshall government chose the Chapley Consortium as its preferred developer and was expected to announce the master plan in the second half of 2021. Negotiations have taken “longer than expected”, the agency said, talks are ending. extending beyond the March state elections. .

But Champion dismissed suggestions that Renewal SA’s Forestville decision should be reviewed in the same way as the government’s current inquiry into the Brompton gasworks development plan.

“I think you can’t really compare sites because you can see there’s a high degree of consensus here,” Champion said.

“I think it’s a compelling offer and it’s a non-controversial issue.

Planning Minister Nick Champion and Badcoe MP Jayne Stinson speak to the media. Photo: Tony Lewis/InDaily

“Bowden is somewhat different, Bowden is a former gas works, it has a higher degree of contamination…and obviously there was an issue of public consternation given that the Bowden site was announced very shortly before the beginning of the interim arrangements for the state election.”

Tony Cole, managing director of Renewal SA, major projects and pipeline, declined to reveal how many developers the agency had shortlisted for the Forestville site.

“There were a number of developers interested in the site, we shortlisted and chose based on our vision,” he said.

“We are very passionate about having selected the right team to deliver to this incredible site.”

“It’s a site that will connect the existing community to a new community, it’s retail, it’s jobs, it’s education, it’s residential – it offers everything for the community. “

The Forestville Le Cornu site on March 14, 2022. Photo: Thomas Kelsall/InDaily

A community consultation undertaken by local Labor MP Jayne Stinson last year found that 43% of residents wanted a new school to be built on the Forestville site, followed closely by open green space.

Stinson said a government campaign pledge to ensure his constituents could send their children to Adelaide High or Adelaide Botanic High had “addressed many community concerns about schooling”.

“As for green space…this project has about 15% ground level green space and about 15% elevated green space that needs to be secured after hours,” she said.

“I’m really interested to see what my community thinks about it. A lot of people in my community would like to see all the green space on the site, but I don’t think that’s very realistic.

Formal consultation on the plans will open in October.

Local news matters

Media diversity is under threat in Australia – nowhere more than in South Australia. The state needs more than one voice to guide it, and you can help with a donation of any size to InDaily. Your contribution goes directly to helping our journalists uncover the facts. Please click below to help InDaily continue to uncover the facts.

Donate today

Powered by
Press Patron

Commission approves site plan for major downtown complex | City News

By Site plan

The Scottsdale Development Review Board has approved the site plan for a mixed-use development that contains a 70-foot-tall building, 7,000 square feet of retail space and 40 condominiums near the intersection of N. 70th Street and N Goldwater Boulevard Thursday.

Council voted 6-1 to approve the site plan for the project known as Goldwater despite concerns raised by Mayor David Ortega about it.

Ortega does not sit on the board but attended part of the meeting to voice his concerns. In particular, he disliked that the facility lacked overhangs to provide shade for sidewalks.

“I say covered walkways are just the way we do it… It’s one of the fundamental things we’ve been working on for 40 years,” Ortega said.

Ortega also didn’t like the fact that the top floor of the building wasn’t set back, calling the project “top heavy”.

Karin Santiago, architect for the developer, said the shape and landscaping of the building will provide enough shade for the sidewalk.

“We will work very hard to find more shade,” Santiago said after the June 7 meeting. “We want it to become a real asset and something that’s an enjoyable thing for people who are going to use it every day. That’s the most important thing that it’s an asset.

She also addressed the concern over the top floor setback stating that the project was one floor less than originally planned.

“The first thing we did to try and mitigate the scale was rather than just looking at the limited range of the recoil, let’s go a step further and reduce the scale of the building overall, so rather than six stories we have five floors,” Santiago said.

Commissioner Michal Ann Joyner praised Santiago for removing a story, saying, “I love it and I’m sure the homeowners around there will love it too.”

Commissioner Jeff Brand called the project “a significant benefit to downtown.”

He applauded the way the building is designed to create shade on the sidewalk.

“I think this building does a great job just the way it’s put together,” Brand said.

When Brand asked her what she envisioned in the commercial space, Santiago said she would like to see a restaurant in part of the space. “The patio and grand suite scream brunch to me,” Santiago said. “I hope one day I can have brunch here with my kids.”

Commissioner Barney Gonzales voted alone against the project.

He said he disliked that the building had no overhangs for sidewalks and felt that some of the renderings of the proposed building were inadequate. He didn’t particularly like the fact that the renders didn’t show a required stairwell.

“I have trouble passing stipulations without them being presented in a rendering,” he said, also asking if the building would allow short-term condo rentals. He dropped that line of questioning when a representative from the city attorney’s office said state law does not allow the city to approve the project based on whether or not short-term rentals are allowed.

Santiago said on Tuesday that it does not anticipate any short-term rentals in the space.

The facility will feature a High Intensity Activated (HAWK) crosswalk on N. Goldwater Boulevard.

The 1.2-acre site was rezoned by council to host the project in 2019, so Thursday’s vote was the final step in the development process.

The developer hopes to start construction in the fall, but doesn’t have a specific date for that, Santiago said.

Commission approves site plan for major downtown complex |

By Site plan

The Scottsdale Development Review Board has approved the site plan for a mixed-use development that contains a 70-foot-tall building, 7,000 square feet of retail space and 40 condominiums near the intersection of N. 70th Street and N Goldwater Boulevard Thursday.

Council voted 6-1 to approve the site plan for the project known as Goldwater despite concerns raised by Mayor David Ortega about it.

Ortega does not sit on the board but attended part of the meeting to voice his concerns. In particular, he disliked that the facility did not have overhangs to provide shade for sidewalks.

“I say covered walkways are just the way we do it… It’s one of the fundamental things we’ve been working on for 40 years,” Ortega said.

Ortega also didn’t like the fact that the top floor of the building wasn’t set back, calling the project “top heavy”.

Karin Santiago, architect for the developer, said the shape and landscaping of the building will provide enough shade for the sidewalk.

“We will work very hard to find more shade,” Santiago said after the June 7 meeting. “We want it to become a real asset and something that’s an enjoyable thing for people who are going to use it every day. That’s the most important thing that it’s an asset.

She also addressed the concern over the top floor setback stating that the project was one floor less than originally planned.

“The first thing we did to try and mitigate the scale was rather than just looking at the limited range of the recoil, let’s go a step further and reduce the scale of the building overall, so rather than six stories we have five floors,” Santiago said.

Commissioner Michal Ann Joyner praised Santiago for removing a story, saying, “I love it and I’m sure the homeowners around there will love it too.”

Commissioner Jeff Brand called the project “a significant benefit to downtown.”

He applauded the way the building is designed to create shade on the sidewalk.

“I think this building does a great job just the way it’s put together,” Brand said.

When Brand asked her what she envisioned in the commercial space, Santiago said she would like to see a restaurant in part of the space. “The patio and grand suite scream brunch to me,” Santiago said. “I hope one day I can have brunch here with my kids.”

Commissioner Barney Gonzales voted alone against the project.

He said he disliked that the building had no overhangs for sidewalks and felt that some of the renderings of the proposed building were inadequate. He especially didn’t like the fact that the renders didn’t show a required stairwell.

“I’m having a hard time passing stipulations on without them being presented in a rendering,” he said, also asking if the building would allow short-term rentals in condominiums. He dropped that line of questioning when a representative from the city attorney’s office said state law does not allow the city to approve the project based on whether or not short-term rentals are allowed.

Santiago said on Tuesday that it does not anticipate any short-term rentals in the space.

The facility will feature a High Intensity Activated (HAWK) crosswalk on N. Goldwater Boulevard.

The 1.2-acre site was rezoned by council to host the project in 2019, so Thursday’s vote was the final step in the development process.

The developer hopes to start construction in the fall, but doesn’t have a specific date for that, Santiago said.

Public Meeting for Osceola I-4 Trucking and Freight Site Analysis PD&E Study – June 23

By Site analysis

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will hold a public meeting to evaluate and recommend project plans for potential alternative truck and freight parking sites along the I-4 corridor that are viable for use by private and public operators.

The meeting place for Truck and Freight Alternative Site Analysis The Project Development and Environmental (PD&E) study will be held Thursday, June 23 at 5:30 p.m. at the Osceola Visitor Center and History Museum – Buster Kenton Room, 4155 W. Vine St. in Kissimmee. Attend between 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. to see a looping presentation and project presentations, speak with project team members, and submit comments or questions. If attending in person, please follow all safety and hygiene guidelines. If you are unwell, please consider attending the meeting virtually or by phone.

Speaking of which, residents can join the Virtual Public Meeting (VPH) from a computer, tablet or mobile device. For this option, prior registration is required by visiting attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1863957404204274701. Once registered, attendees will receive a confirmation email with information to join the online meeting. Participants can join the meeting in audio mode by dialing 631-992-3221 and entering passcode 257-996-889 when prompted. All meeting documents including the presentation will be available on the project website at www.cflroads.com/project/447724-1 before the meeting.

Site plan for 80-acre Lone Tree Regional Park passes first vote, city council passes next

By Site plan

The final site plan for Lone Tree Regional Park, an 80-acre park near I-25 and RidgeGate Parkway, passed its first approval vote June 8 at the parks board meeting and recreation in the southern suburbs.

The next step for the proposal is the Lone Tree Town Council. The board will vote on the measure at the June 20 regular meeting.

The regional park is a collaborative effort between Lone Tree City Council and South Suburban Parks and Recreation. If it goes ahead, it will be Lone Tree’s first regional park, according to the city’s website.

The park is part of the RidgeGate East development, a sprawling development on the east side of I-25 and RidgeGate Parkway that involves construction of three residential villages, a 400-acre Lone Tree City Center, retail districts, schools and more.

The preliminary plan for the park includes a variety of amenities, including a dog park, a festival terrace, a multi-level playground and several sports fields, according to the park’s webpage. It will also feature a 5,000-person amphitheater, Deputy City Manager Austin Good said during a June 7 study session.

The concept for the park’s final site plan, created by landscape architect The Architerra Group, is called “The Braid”, Good said.

“Bringing the two halves of the park together is what the plan is known for, which is called the braid. And it’s this intertwining network of trails that creates the backbone and connects the north end of the park to the south end of the park,” Good said.

Where the paths intersect, there will be different sections, also called “rooms,” spread throughout the park, Good said. These rooms can accommodate different uses, depending on the wishes of the community.

“We’re really, really excited about the opportunities that will open up here in the next stage of design when we start talking – ‘Well, what exactly is going on in these rooms? ‘” Good said, adding that some ideas for rooms include a community garden space and community art walks.

Building the park will take time and cost millions, Good explained. He said South Suburban Parks and Recreation has budgeted $300,000 this calendar year to advance the design of the park from its current preliminary plan to further develop a phased plan for the project.

“Right now, we’re estimating about $25 million for a phase one,” Good said, pointing out that it will take more than the city and South Suburban Parks and Recreation to build the project.

On June 8, the South Suburb Parks and Recreation Board voted 4-0 in favor of the plan, excluding board member Jim Taylor who was not present at the meeting, Jennifer said. King, head of district administrative services.

If city council votes to approve the plan on June 20, one of the project’s next steps will be to find additional partners to fund the project, according to a staff report.

“As we seek out potential partners, I am hopeful that Douglas County will recognize this as a real opportunity to provide additional amenities to their Lone Tree residents, but [also] to the community far beyond,” Mayor Jackie Millet said during the study session. “This park, we hope, is also a regional facility.”

Millet said the city has found that many Douglas County residents come to Lone Tree for recreation, and this park is likely to attract people outside of Lone Tree.

“We want to make sure that Douglas County also has a voice at this table as we move forward, to encourage them to invest,” Millet said, adding that she would like the city to engage Douglas County residents during the community feedback process.

Good also stressed the importance of getting community feedback on the park’s current plan and next steps in the process, saying the city will continue to develop the park’s webpage, cityoflonetree.com/regionalpark/, where members from the community can submit questions and comments about the project.

“It’s a big, multi-year effort just to put a shovel in the ground,” Good said. “It’s going to be a really, really important piece, continuing to engage with [the] community throughout the process.

Chappaqua Crossing owner seeks relief from sitemap conditions

By Site plan
Summit Development founder Felix Charney spoke to the New Castle Town board last week, saying the new owners of Chappaqua Crossing want several conditions lifted to help fill store vacancies and save money on restoring the property’s 1850s guesthouse.

The new owner of Chappaqua Crossing is seeking relief from several site plan approval conditions to help him lease the complex’s vacant commercial space and build a clubhouse rather than preserve an 1850s farmhouse .

Representatives of an entity called HPV IV Chappaqua LLC, which includes Heitman, a property management company that now owns the center’s 120,000 square foot retail business, and Toll Brothers, which is building the 91 townhouses on the property , appealed to the New Castle Town Council to relax a handful of the project’s 157 conditions. The demands were first made in an April 21 letter to city council.

Heitman asks the city to eliminate the 7,500 square foot cap for take-out dining establishments at the center to help fill some of the vacancies, to waive the 25% limit on a business’ floor space for the sale of liquor so that he could rent space from a liquor store and allow dumpsters to be stored outdoors rather than indoors.

Meanwhile, Toll Brothers hopes to convince city officials that building a new clubhouse for future owners of 91 units, but using the existing facade of the more than 167-year-old Thomas V. Wright House, near the entrance to Route 117, would be beneficial because Toll could use the money he saved to renovate the Chappaqua Performing Arts Center.

Felix Charney, founder of Summit Development, which built the commercial component and adapted the cupola into more than 60 apartments, said pandemic-related market conditions are at the heart of demands for vacant commercial space. The plan was to lease three spaces to restaurants, but only one is occupied — Sweetgreen, a fast-casual eatery specializing in salads and bowls that opened earlier this spring.

Traditional sit-down restaurants were originally planned for Chappaqua Crossing, said Charney, who Heitman asked to speak on his behalf, although once Summit Development sells its offices at the center, he will no longer be in the game.

“Ultimately, the conditions that are being imposed on us now, we will have to live with, but I think there is now an opportunity based on a bit of hindsight, based on a bit of logic and more specifically when we enter into retail, based on some of the changes the world has seen through COVID, that are worth revisiting,” Charney said.

Since the start of the pandemic, it has been difficult to rent spaces in part due to retail and restaurant uncertainties, but restrictions have also helped, he said. Heitman is asking the owner of a liquor store if he can get the zoning code changed to remove the 25% floor area limit, Charney added.

Allowing take-out restaurants would help rent the spaces. However, under current regulations, Chappaqua Crossing would not be able to accommodate two other businesses like Sweetgreen, which is approximately 3,000 square feet, due to the restriction.

“The mall is running out of energy and some of that energy was driven by food service and we failed to do that,” he said.

Supervisor Lisa Katz said she fears that if the 7,500 square foot cap is removed, there could be an unlimited number of takeout establishments. She and councilor Victoria Tipp wondered if it would be premature to make this change before the townhouses were occupied.

“So, I think, that would really change the dynamic of renting,” Katz said. “Now you’ll have a built-in audience of people who live here but also go to the performing arts center and want to eat afterwards.”

Charney said it could be another three years before the residences are filled. All establishments would have seating but could be closer to Chopt or Chipotle than a white-tablecloth restaurant, he said.

Councilman Christian Hildenbrand mentioned that the city has recently seen two sit-down restaurants open in recent weeks, a Mediterranean steakhouse near Walgreen’s and Italian restaurant Basso 56 on lower King Street.

Summit development project manager David Walsh said the requirement for an indoor dumpster is also proving to be a barrier to attracting restaurants. He said it was also wrong that the city could leave its dumpster outside while forcing businesses to find a place for it inside.

“So it’s hypocrisy to be able to put a dumpster 50 feet from a house, when we want to put a dumpster hundreds of feet from any residence,” Walsh said.

Meanwhile, Toll Brothers wants relief from having to adapt the lower level of the Wright house into a clubhouse. Charney, who said he supports and appreciates historic preservation, mentioned that Toll Brothers rejects any notion that the building is historic.

The building is not in good condition and its interior should be rebuilt from the inside, he said. Charney told The Examiner it was estimated that $850,000 could be saved and redeployed to improve the Chappaqua Performing Arts Center, which would benefit the entire community while residents would get a clubhouse.

The plan would be to put the facade on a new pavilion.

“If we build it new and build it right, make it look like this, it will survive for a long time to everyone’s benefit and the dollars that would otherwise have been used, then we can use it to fix the auditorium,” said Charney.

Town historian Gray Williams countered that the developer had retained one of the area’s most respected architects linked to the preservation of ancient structures, Stephen Tilly, who concluded that it would not be as expensive to save and adapt the first floor for a clubhouse.

In 2019, the city and Toll Brothers reached an agreement that it would preserve as much of the house as possible, but it appears the developer is looking to back down. Williams called it “a unique building” that has changed little since it was built.

“They never wanted it,” Williams said. “They prefer to say it would be expensive. I saw the plans. I don’t think that’s really entirely true. I think they should submit a budget to prove it and measure it against the cost of building something else. »

Katz said the council would refer retail-related items to the planning council and tentatively scheduled a tour of the Wright home for next week.

To share

Germantown Plan Commission Expected to Vote Monday on Two Site Development Plans | Washington Co. Business News

By Site development

GERMANTOWN — The Germantown Plan Commission will meet to review and vote on two site plans during its meeting at 6:30 p.m. Monday in the council chambers of Germantown Village Hall.

The first site plan the board will vote on is for Capstone Quadrangle Development Company/Capstone 41. According to the summary, Capstone 41 is seeking approval of a revised site development plan for the 203,580 square foot industrial building located in the Capstone 41. Business Park and Holy Hill Road Gateway District.

Site development and construction plans were approved by Council in August 2021 for Phase 1 of Capstone 41 Business Park under conditions.


Stay up to date on all the latest Washington County news with a subscription: Click here


Plan Commission condition number 10 states that “the amount of landscaping and the height and design of berms for the area along the north elevation of the building adjoining Holy Hill Road shall be supplemented by berms and additional landscaping Additional landscaping including a mix of evergreen and deciduous trees should be installed along the west side of the truck parking/staging area to the west of the building to provide a better (future) visual display of truck activity.

Condition number 10 required a revised landscape and berm plan to be submitted for approval. before the approval of a first occupancy permit for the industrial building.

Capstone 41 prepared the revised landscaping and grading plans and submitted them to the commission for approval, according to the summary.

The second site plan the plan committee will vote on is for JSD Professional Services, according to the agenda.

Site plan review submitted by JSD Professional Services, on behalf of Criterion Barrels, seeks approval of site development and construction plans for a 12,108 square foot addition to the Criterion Barrels facility located at W172N13052 Division Road to Germantown. According to the summary, Criterion Barrels, an original equipment manufacturer of rifle barrels, has seen an increase in demand for its product over the past two years. This led to an increase in staff, from 31 to 44 employees, but left them running out of space.

To mitigate this, Criterion Barrels would like to add an additional 12,108 square feet to its manufacturing building to optimize flow and allow for future growth, according to the summary.

The Germantown Plan Commission will meet at 6:30 p.m. Monday in the council chambers of Germantown Town Hall, N122-W17001 Mequon Road in Germantown.

Final Approved Site Plan for Silverthorne Daycare

By Site plan
Final plans for the Silverthorne Daycare site have been approved. include six child care centers The plans include six classrooms, a small administrative area, a kitchen and a multipurpose room. There are also three separate play areas for the three supervised age groups in the building.
Town of Silverthorne/Courtesy Image

Silverthorne City Council has approved the final site plan for the facility of the Silverthorne Early Years Center which will add 65 to 70 child care spaces for county children.

Land for the facility was purchased in October 2020, along with space for a potential grocery store, and it sits on the corner of Adams Avenue and Ruby Ranch Road. Since then, the city has partnered with the Summit County government to move the project forward, including sharing the cost of building the facility. The site is 1.72 acres and will have a single storey building it’s about 8,800 square feet. Current plans include six day care rooms, a small administrative area, a kitchen and a multipurpose room. There are also three separate play areas for the three supervised age groups in the building. The facility will have approximately 20 employees in the building for a maximum shift.

The building will have 23 parking spaces, approximately half of which will be reserved for staff. Council member Tim Applegate said he was worried there would be enough space for the drop off because a long line of cars could back down the freeway, but architect Matt Rodgers said it’s because it is a daycare where some parents should enter the school. with a baby or toddler, backing up traffic probably wouldn’t happen.



“It’s not really like what you might see college kids drop off where the kid goes out,” Rodgers said. “(Parents of daycare students) park there for three to five minutes while they check in on that student, and then they drive off. Throughout the design, we worked closely with other forward-thinking facilities in areas such as Timberline (Learning Center), and they have very similar traffic flow for drop-off situations. .

City Manager Ryan Hyland added that city staff can encourage the facility operator to consider a staggered drop-off approach so that not all children are dropped off at the same time. The building is owned by the Silverthorne Childcare Authority, and town leaders have already begun the process of finding an operator to run the daycare.



There is open space for two more classrooms to the west of the building, should the city and county choose to expand. Council Member Mike Spry said including these two classrooms in the build could allow for more children to be added, as child care is a county-wide issue, but Summit County Manager Scott Vargo said they would save that space for a later addition due to construction costs.

“We’ve had conversations about possibly doing an expansion,” Vargo said. “It’s really a question of timing, first and foremost, and certainly also a question of cost. Secondly, the cost of this facility is more than double what we originally planned. But we tried to create at least the opportunity for these classrooms later.

Along with rising construction and supply costs plaguing projects across the country, the estimated cost of building Smith Ranch Daycare in Silverthorne has also increased. Initial estimates from July 2021 had the total cost of the facility at $4 million. At the time, Summit County and the Town of Silverthorne would split the costs, contributing $3 million and $1 million, respectively. In January, that estimate edged closer to about $8.5 million. Now, the current price for the Smith Ranch facility is $9.7 million.

The updated contribution to Silverthorne Daycare would be $2.35 million. Of this amount, $1.2 million would be the value of the land (which is already provided), $150,000 for site development (which has been completed) and an additional $1 million which would be divided equally between the development fund. capital improvement and nicotine sales or 5A housing funds. . The remaining money to build the facility will be a combination of $3 million from the Strong Futures Fund, $3.41 million from Summit County, and $1 million in grants from the Town of Silverthorne and the county.

The municipal council adopted the final site plan unanimously. A ribbon-cutting ceremony is scheduled for the site at 4 p.m. on June 21.

“It’s been a long-standing desire for this area of ​​the county,” Council Member Kelly Owens said. “It’s really nice to see this happening, and happening soon. It’s very necessary.

Council approves site plan for church annexation – Yuma Pioneer

By Site plan

A comprehensive site plan for the church annex at the northeast end of Yuma was approved by the Yuma City Council last week at its regular meeting.

The subject property is the parcel between N. Detroit Ave. and Indian Hills Golf Club. The city bought the property a few years ago, then sold it last year to Yuma Development, LLC, a limited liability company formed by Carlson and Associates.
The site plan, showing the potential for 241 residential lots of various sizes, as well as an industrial area at the south end by the railway tracks, was presented to council by Kent Carlson and Scott Carlson of Carlson and Associates.
They gave information about themselves, saying the family had operated a dairy farm a long time ago and had been involved in real estate development in the Denver metro area since 1964. They said they appreciated the opportunity to work with the Yuma community.
They explained that there had been a delay in submitting the site plan because they were focusing on the industrial part near the railway, but are now moving forward with the residential development. The housing development would be a mix of housing types and sizes. They said they would also seek to sell land to individuals to build their own homes.
The plan includes 20 lots of 200 by 100 that would run along the golf course. There are 38 lots 75 by 110 at the north end, the middle has 85 lots 65 by 100 and 98 lots towards the west side measuring 45 by 100. The plan includes a park in the middle of the development.
The Carlsons told the council that they plan to start with the smaller lots for modules and tiny houses in a bid to help people buy a first home.
The timeline is still up in the air. The Carlsons said they were working on signage and developing a website to kick off the marketing effort. They said they needed to see the scale of the need through marketing, then they would reduce prices and come back to the board with the first phase.
They emphasized that they wanted the development to be a community project.
The board approved the site plan on a 6-0 vote. Mayor Ron Swehla, pro-tem mayor Marc Shay and council members Tim McClung, Terri Frame, Jerome Benish and Marylu Smith-Dischner were in attendance. Councilman Dan Baucke was absent.

Middleburg Heights Reapproves Tru by Hilton Site Plan

By Site plan

MIDDLEBURG HEIGHTS, Ohio — The city initially approved site plans for a Tru by Hilton hotel in 2018, with an expected opening in 2019. Then, as planning for the project progressed, the COVID-19 pandemic hit , causing nationwide work and travel stoppages and disrupting supply chains.

The Middleburg Heights Planning Commission recently extended its approval of the hotel’s final site plan for 17500 Rosbough Drive. No hotel representative was present at the May 25 meeting.

After breaking the ground, architect Dan Barney of Arcinetics said in 2018 that it would take 10 months to construct the building. The Tru hotel concept offers a lower than average rate and smaller rooms.

“This is one of those cases of form versus substance,” Myra Staresina Severyn, deputy legal director for Middleburg Heights, told the commission May 25. “We usually want and require a candidate to explain a project. (In this case) there is nothing (new) to explain, per se.

City Engineer Michael Mackay of Mackay Engineering noted some minor stormwater design issues four years ago, so commission member Eric Smearman asked if Mackay was happy with the final plan.

“There are a few outstanding comments in my 2018 memo, but they’re not major items,” Mackay replied. “They’ve complied with almost everything, and there are a few final details they need to iron out.

“From a technical standpoint, they are largely in pretty good shape with their plan.”

Economic development Director Charles Bichara said company representatives have been “very responsive” in working out variances and miscellaneous items with Building Commissioner Norm Herwerden and other city officials.

Approval from the May 25 panel was granted on the condition that Mackay’s previous stormwater design recommendations be considered.

Read more stories from the Sun News.

Yorkshire villagers celebrate ‘memorable victory’ as government rejects fracking site plan

By Site plan

The government has rejected an appeal by Ineos to get the green light for a shale gas exploration site off Dinnington Road in Woodsetts, near Rotherham.

After planning permission for the site was refused by Rotherham Council, a public inquiry was held in June 2019, which resulted in a planning inspector recommending that the appeal be upheld and planning permission be granted.

Register to our Policy newsletter

But in a recently published government decision, the program has now been blocked.

Members of the campaign group pictured in 2018

A decision by Housing Minister and MP for Yorkshire Stuart Andrew on behalf of Mr Gove read: ‘The Secretary of State disagrees with the Inspector’s recommendation.

“He decided to reject the appeal and refuse the building permit.”

He said the decision was made based on factors including damage to the green belt, negative visual impacts of the project and damage to nearby properties from a 3m high acoustic barrier that was to be constructed. around the site.

The report states: “Overall, he considers that the material considerations in this case indicate a decision consistent with the development plan – that is, a denial of permission. The Secretary of State therefore concludes that the appeal should be dismissed and that the planning permit should be refused.

There has been a long campaign against fracking plans for Woodsetts

Ineos has six weeks to decide whether or not to challenge the decision in the High Court.

Rother Valley MP Alexander Stafford, who campaigned against the fracking site to get the green light in his constituency, welcomed the result.

“I am delighted that the government has stood up for the people of Rother Valley on another crucial issue for our region,” said the Tory MP.

“I lobbied tirelessly from behind the scenes for the Secretary of State to intervene, and I am pleased that my calls have been answered with decisive and positive action.

“No one is a bigger advocate for cleaner energy than I am, but fracking is not and never has been the answer.

“It is not wanted here in Rother Valley, and this Conservative government has once again listened to us and represented us vigorously. I hope the residents of Woodsetts rejoice in this momentous victory we have achieved together.

Rotherham Council leader Chris Read said the Labour-led local authority’s decision to reject the proposal had now been justified.

“Communities in the south of our borough have been living with the threat of fracking hanging over them for far too long, so I’m really excited to finally see the direction coming from the government. Throughout the process, we felt that fracking would be bad news for our communities, for the local environment and an unsustainable way of meeting our energy needs.

“It seemed particularly in jeopardy recently when parts of the Conservative Party began to press publicly to end the moratorium. Our planning committee was one of the first in the country to reject a request for fracking and it is ultimately the government validation of this appeal, and our local planning policy.We all look forward to seeing this threat of fracking gone for good now.

There is currently a moratorium on fracking in the UK which was introduced by Boris Johnson after shale gas exploration was previously backed by Theresa May as a way to improve UK energy security.

More than a decade of efforts to develop hydraulic fracturing for shale gas appeared to be over, with authorities ordering the sealing of the only two horizontal drilled wells in Lancashire. But the order to permanently seal the wells was suspended earlier this year and the government has commissioned a review of the science around the process.

Ineos founder and chairman Sir Jim Ratcliffe said earlier this year it was “ridiculous” that the UK was not taking advantage of its shale gas reserves.

Speaking in April, he said: ‘The UK is in the midst of an energy crisis with ever-rising prices pushing people into energy poverty while giving huge sums of money to schemes oppressive.

“It’s a ridiculous situation with so much gas under our feet. As the United States has shown, homegrown shale gas could make us self-sufficient in 10 years.

But Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng warned fracking would take years to produce commercial levels of gas.

At the Yorkshire Post, we are committed to speaking truth to power on behalf of the people who call County God’s Own home. Our Politics Team and Westminster Correspondent are the eyes and ears of Yorkshire in the halls of power.

Olympia Site Plan hears 60 townhouse project proposal

By Site plan

By Lorilyn C. Lirio

Olympia’s site plan committee yesterday heard Olympic Capital Growth’s proposal to build 60 townhouses on a five-acre plot near North Thurston High School, just west of Sleater-Kinney Road NOT.

According to architect Josh Gobel, of Studio 360 Architects, Olympic Capital also owns the Bayan Trails project, a retirement and townhouse project adjacent to the proposed development.

Gobel said the developer had acquired the land to the north, where he planned to build a row of townhouses and apartments.

“The goal is to tie the northern part of the lot to the Bayans Trail development. The idea is to put a series of homes in the northern part similar to what we are doing on the southern end,” Gobel said.

However, Gobel said the property is not yet zoned for development.

Tim Smith, assistant director of community planning and development, recommended going to the hearing examiner. “And because there’s kind of a 200-foot blurry boundary between land use designations, that could be considered site-specific.”

Smith said there was no need to go through a full plan modification process.

Gobel raised concerns about stormwater on the property. He said there is development in the neighborhood and storm water is draining onto the north property.

Olympia’s lead planner, Nicole Floyd, recommended updating the wetlands report.

Floyd said the last report was over five years old and did not address the current site.

“[Update] a part of a wetland or stream within 300 feet of your site could help define what that area is – is it a stream or a wetland? It might solve the storm water problem you have,” Floyd said.

Technical evaluation

Olympia’s engineering reviewer Zulaika Kim said the development site had water along Sleater Kinney Road. The town would require an extension and backflow devices for the multi-family development project.

As for the sewer, Kim said the closest is about 200 feet north of the site at the intersection of Sleater Kinney and Balsam Avenue. She said an extension of the building was needed.

Kim noted that the development site does not have a continuous passage for the solid waste truck. “You should look for an approved turnaround time for the continued passage of solid waste trucks or emergency services.”

Kim asked the developer to provide an analysis of how the wetland would allow 6th Avenue to connect with Coulter Street and Chehalis Trail.

“If the study or analysis has demonstrated that the wetlands do not connect the streets, then the city would need a neighborhood link or a shared-use path to Coulter Street and the West Trail of Chehalis,” Kim told promoters.

Yorkshire villagers celebrate ‘memorable victory’ as Michael Gove rejects fracking site plan

By Site plan

The upgrade secretary has rejected an appeal by Ineos to get the green light for a shale gas exploration site off Dinnington Road in Woodsetts, near Rotherham.

After planning permission for the site was refused by Rotherham Council, a public inquiry was held in June 2019, which resulted in a planning inspector recommending that the appeal be upheld and planning permission be granted.

Register to our Policy newsletter

But in a recently published government decision, the program has now been blocked.

Members of the campaign group pictured in 2018

A decision by Housing Minister and MP for Yorkshire Stuart Andrew on behalf of Mr Gove read: ‘The Secretary of State disagrees with the Inspector’s recommendation.

“He decided to reject the appeal and refuse the building permit.”

He said Mr Gove made his decision based on factors including damage to green belt, negative visual impacts from the project and damage to neighboring properties from a 3m high sound barrier which was to be built around the site.

The report states: “Overall, he considers that the material considerations in this case indicate a decision consistent with the development plan – that is, a denial of permission. The Secretary of State therefore concludes that the appeal should be dismissed and that the planning permit should be refused.

There has been a long campaign against fracking plans for Woodsetts

Ineos has six weeks to decide whether or not to challenge the decision in the High Court.

Rother Valley MP Alexander Stafford, who campaigned against the fracking site to get the green light in his constituency, welcomed the result.

“I am delighted that the government has stood up for the people of Rother Valley on another crucial issue for our region,” said the Tory MP.

“I lobbied tirelessly from behind the scenes for the Secretary of State to intervene, and I am pleased that my calls have been answered with decisive and positive action.

“No one is a bigger advocate for cleaner energy than I am, but fracking is not and never has been the answer.

“It is not wanted here in Rother Valley, and this Conservative government has once again listened to us and represented us vigorously. I hope the residents of Woodsetts rejoice in this momentous victory we have achieved together.

Rotherham Council leader Chris Read said the Labour-led local authority’s decision to reject the proposal had now been justified.

“Communities in the south of our borough have been living with the threat of fracking hanging over them for far too long, so I’m really excited to finally see the direction coming from the government. Throughout the process, we felt that fracking would be bad news for our communities, for the local environment and an unsustainable way of meeting our energy needs.

“It seemed particularly in jeopardy recently when parts of the Conservative Party began to press publicly to end the moratorium. Our planning committee was one of the first in the country to reject a request for fracking and it is ultimately the government validation of this appeal, and our local planning policy.We all look forward to seeing this threat of fracking gone for good now.

There is currently a moratorium on fracking in the UK which was introduced by Boris Johnson after shale gas exploration was previously backed by Theresa May as a way to improve UK energy security.

More than a decade of efforts to develop hydraulic fracturing for shale gas appeared to be over, with authorities ordering the sealing of the only two horizontal drilled wells in Lancashire. But the order to permanently seal the wells was suspended earlier this year and the government has commissioned a review of the science around the process.

Ineos founder and chairman Sir Jim Ratcliffe said earlier this year it was “ridiculous” that the UK was not taking advantage of its shale gas reserves.

Speaking in April, he said: ‘The UK is in the midst of an energy crisis with ever-rising prices pushing people into energy poverty while giving huge sums of money to schemes oppressive.

“It’s a ridiculous situation with so much gas under our feet. As the United States has shown, homegrown shale gas could make us self-sufficient in 10 years.

But Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng warned fracking would take years to produce commercial levels of gas.

At the Yorkshire Post, we are committed to speaking truth to power on behalf of the people who call County God’s Own home. Our Politics Team and Westminster Correspondent are the eyes and ears of Yorkshire in the halls of power.

Site plan approved for new Premier Tech Prairie facility in Urbandale

By Site plan
















City receives Costco site plan submission

By Site plan

Content of the article

The City of Brantford said Tuesday it had received the complete third site plan submission for the development of a Costco retail warehouse on the Lynden Park Mall property at 84 Lynden Rd.

Content of the article

The city said the bid proposes a Costco with a maximum floor area of ​​15,105 square meters and an associated gas station.

The proposal also includes the creation of access to Costco from Wayne Gretzky Drive, improvements to the mall’s main intersection at Edmondson Street, the construction of stormwater management facilities, on and offsite , and the enclosure of part of the drainage system adjacent to Gretzky Drive. and Highway 403.

The city submission includes architectural, civil, electrical, landscape and survey plans, as well as reports and transportation plans.

The idea of ​​building a big box store in the north has been a hot topic of discussion for years.

In 2014, Costco was tied to a 6.7-hectare property at Morton Avenue and Wayne Gretzky Parkway purchased by a real estate developer.

Despite a site plan and lengthy negotiations, the plans were scuttled when the Department of Transportation raised concerns about increased Costco traffic slowing traffic on the nearby Highway 403 interchange. . The property was eventually put back on the market.

In 2018, Lynden Park Mall presented plans to the city for a large expansion including a hotel, an 85-unit residential building, and a large retail building.

In May 2020, the Department of Transportation said it was in discussions with the city and mall owners about how the development of a Costco store on mall property would affect traffic at the interchange. Highway 403 to Wayne Gretzky Parkway. Then, in September 2020, it was learned that the ministry had completed a study, giving the green light to the mall’s redevelopment plan.

Content of the article

Last month, a department said plans to improve interchanges at Highway 403 and the Wayne Gretzky Parkway are moving forward and construction could begin as early as 2023.

“Improvements to the Highway 403 and Wayne Gretzky Parkway interchange are currently in the detailed design stage,” said Simi Ikotun, Issues Management Coordinator for the ministry.

Ikotun said the ministry is reviewing necessary improvements to the interchange, including entry and exit ramps and ramp terminal intersections.

“The ministry is working with the City of Brantford to support future developments in the area and move this project forward,” Ikotun said.

He said the ministry expects construction to start as early as next year and be completed in a single construction season.

City planning staff received a second site plan submission in February 2021 for the Costco development.

Planning Commission discusses proposed plan for marijuana site

By Site plan

IRONWOOD — Ankur Rungta, a business owner who hopes to open a marijuana retail facility called QPS Holdings at 100 W. Cloverland Drive in Ironwood, recently submitted an amended site plan for his facility to the Planning Commission. of Ironwood, which was discussed at a public hearing. Thursday.

Community Development Director Tom Bergman clarified to the commission that QBS Holdings does not have a marijuana retail establishment license and is not pre-approved for one. However, they wanted to modify their already proposed site plan in hopes that the city would change their ordinance to allow for additional establishments.

The city commission is currently considering an amendment that will permit two additional marijuana retail locations and will hold a public hearing on those changes in the auditorium of the Ironwood Memorial Building at 5:20 p.m. Monday.

Rungta wants to modify the QBS Holdings site plan so that customers can enter the building for curbside service – similar to Rize UP, another marijuana retail establishment that plans to open the doors of its outlet at 411 E. Cloverland Drive this summer. Rungta said this would allow QBS Holdings to take full advantage of its ownership while retaining the full interior layout as originally planned.

The new sitemap with a drive-thru has eight fewer parking spaces than the original sitemap, but Rungta said this amendment will improve traffic flow due to the number of customers who will be using the new feature.

Bergman said there was a lane between the parking spaces and the facility in the site plan and the owners would need some sort of traffic mechanism to prevent the lane from being blocked. Rungta said they plan to have signage and a road block to restrict traffic when entering the store, which will be staffed by an employee.

The planning commission has expressed concern that the venture is attracting more cars than parking spaces and that traffic is spilling onto surrounding roads, particularly Lowell Street. Rungta proposed closing the east entrance with traffic cones during their peak hours and redirecting traffic to the north entrance on Southland Avenue.

The planning commission decided to table this item on Bergman’s recommendation because he wanted to discuss the pros and cons of closing the Lowell Street entrance with City Manager Scott Erickson and building inspector Dennis Hewitt.

The planning commission also approved a conditional use permit for a dog grooming house at 210 E. Harding Avenue.

Site plan supported for development of former Sunset School site

By Site plan

A site plan to develop the former Sunset School property into a 26-unit multi-family development received support last week from Sturgeon Bay’s Aesthetic Design and Site Plan Review Board.

Sturgeon Bay Common Council had previously approved a planned unit development for the site so that SC Swiderski could develop two eight-unit, two-storey buildings with attached garages between Erie Street and Delaware Street, as well as four and six-unit attached buildings one-story along 8th Avenue North.

Kortni Wolf, Business Development Manager for SC Swiderski, said the development, which will be known as SCS Sunset Estates, will feature two different building types, as well as community space; and have two entrances: one on Delaware Street and the other on Erie Street.

Wolf said the 26 units will include two and three bedrooms with six different floor plans.

“We have private entrances and our rental rates are very inclusive,” she said. “We also have ample parking on site.”

Jacqui McElroy, the company’s director of business development, said rent will be based on market rates, with specific prices to be released 90 days before the apartments open.

Tenants will pay for electricity, but McElroy said the monthly rent will include heating.

Kortni Wolf, Business Development Manager for SC Swiderski, appears May 23 before the Sturgeon Bay Aesthetic Design and Site Plan Review Board to discuss the company’s plans to build 26 apartments on the site of the Old School Sunset. Photo by Kevin Boneske.

“Our hydronic heating system is very efficient, so that’s one of the reasons we use it,” she said. “We pay for heating because we want to use this system instead of forced air. It’s more efficient. »

McElroy said the wall units will be used for air conditioning.

Project timeline

Instead of remodeling the existing school building into an apartment, as is currently the case at the old West Side School, the plans for the project call for the demolition of the old Sunset School and the construction of four new buildings.

McElroy said demolition work is expected to begin in about a month, with the company now working with the city on how best to handle the asbestos removal from the existing building.

She said groundbreaking is scheduled for late summer, after the existing building is demolished, with plans for the project to be completed next April.

Site plan committee hears plans for new fast food restaurant

By Site plan

By Lorilyn C. Lirio

The Olympia Site Plan Committee heard a proposal to build a one-story, 4,987 square foot Chick-fil-A restaurant at 2930 Capital Mall Drive Southwest, Olympia on Wednesday, June 1.

The location was the site of the Fujiyama Japanese Steakhouse for many years.

Project engineer Estefania Escamilla, of Barghausen Consulting Engineers, said she proposed the demolition of the existing structure and the new construction of the fast food restaurant with concrete drive-thrus, order canopies, parking in asphalt, a garbage enclosure and associated utilities. .

According to the project document submitted to the committee, there will be two vehicle access points, both located along Mall Loop Drive Southwest. The first is located to the northeast near the waste enclosure and the second to the southwest, closer to the middle of the site.

Olympia’s associate planner Paula Smith said the property was in the design review district. The project is subject to review based on basic commercial and high-density design criteria. “It has a lot to do with the facades that face the high-density corridor street, which is Cooper Point Road.”

Smith also pointed to the sewer line that runs on the property along Cooper Point. “In this case, you would want to build up to the easement lines.”

If there are no easements, Smith said the city would require the developer to provide a 10-foot easement area. “We would seek to have your building placed right at this line. We would consider bringing it up to the street frontage.

Parking requirements

Smith said the city requires 10 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet at a drive-thru or restaurant.

The project proposed 80 parking spaces.

Smith said the developer was allowed 50 parking spaces depending on the size of the building. “An increase in parking beyond this amount would require a change in parking.”

She explained that changing parking between 10% and 40% is subject to administrative review, while more than 40% requires a decision from the Hearing Examiner. “I encourage you to review the criteria to be able to provide you with a waiver or amendment for increased parking.”

Smith also touched on perimeter landscaping. It asks the promoter to develop the facades on the street and the parking spaces.

According to Smith, the developer’s plan did not meet city code on parking lot walkways, which are at least 12 feet wide to accommodate a tree.

She added that parking rows should accommodate landscaped islands of at least 114 square feet.

Smith also asked the developer to provide them with a pedestrian access map showing where people are walking to and passing through the development.

The plan should also include bicycle parking – short-term outdoor and long-term parking for employees, Smith told the developer.

Land Use Review

The project triggers a land use review, Smith commented.

“The city usually organizes a neighborhood meeting. The meeting would be sent to landowners and business owners within 300 feet of the project site,” Smith said.

“Neighborhood meetings help provide information to the public about the plan and give them the opportunity to ask questions and raise concerns,” she added.

Planning committee approves site plan for shelter project

By Site plan

“It’s a facility our city needs. I think we all wish it wasn’t. Maybe one day it won’t be. But it is now.”

Content of the article

A five-year struggle over the Salvation Army’s plan to build a large shelter on Montreal Road continued Friday at a special planning committee meeting.

Advertisement 2

Content of the article

Most of the committee voted to approve the site plan for the 211-bed facility, giving the last political approval the Salvation Army needed before it could put shovels in the ground.

They were under considerable pressure not to do so. Community leaders in Vanier on Friday reiterated their objections to the development itself and its potential impacts on the area and described recent consultation efforts as dishonest and unproductive.

“I can assure you at this time that Vanier and its community do not need a shelter,” said Michel Gervais, outgoing executive director of the Vanier Community Service Center. “(It is) healthy, clean, permanent affordable housing that is urgently needed for this community and across Ottawa.

Advertisement 3

Content of the article

However, what was up for debate on Friday was not whether shelter should be allowed at the site. This battle has already been decided, and the site plan control process, planning committee staff and management pointed out, is supposed to address development elements such as landscaping, building location and parking lot layout.

“We’re not dealing with zoning today, we’re not dealing with programming today, and we’re also focusing on the exterior of the building rather than the interior of the building,” Co-Chair Glen Gower reminded his colleagues. colleagues.

Council granted the Salvation Army the zoning and official plan amendments it needed for its vision for 333 Montreal Road. more than four years ago, and these were upheld in 2020 by the provincial court that hears land use planning appeals.

Advertisement 4

Content of the article

Staff recommended approval of the site plan and described the proposal in a report to the committee as “well designed in consultation with staff” and with “safety and security in mind”.

A presentation from the Salvation Army project team outlined how its plan for the low-rise H-shaped complex evolved, including replacing an addictions program with housing with support services and reduction of building height and footprint. The design principles shaping the development learned from the “obvious flaws” of the existing Salvation Army George Street Shelter, they noted.

According to Ottawa Inner City Health Executive Director Wendy Muckle, the only public delegate to approve the site plan, customers and staff at local shelters have consistently responded very positively to the design plans. A regular observation, she said, was that it didn’t look like an institution and looked more like a fancy apartment building or a college campus.

Advertisement 5

Content of the article

“Of all the voices you’re going to listen to today…the voices of the people who actually need to access and use the facility should perhaps be the most important,” Muckle said.

She noted that her organization intended to provide services in a “special care unit” planned for the site and had a say in its design, as did the homeless clients they served.

This is an exception to the disregard that a number of community organizations and service providers the committee speaks to said they encountered when attempting to participate in the project. They shared particular frustration about their experience with a council-created advisory committee on the site plan and future programming, which involved Salvation Army staff and team.

Advertising 6

Content of the article

Marc Maracle, CEO of the Gignul Non-Profit Housing Corporation and representative of the Ottawa Native Coalition, described the committee process as “deeply disillusioning” and said it was “tactically and strategically focused on examining of the sitemap, and any conversation about programming was wrongly avoided.

Maracle predicted that the project would have a disproportionate impact on the large indigenous population in the area and said the Salvation Army had yet to provide an adequate response to this impact, particularly with regard to the safety of the workers. Indigenous women, girls, seniors and children.

Future clients using drugs and alcohol in the surrounding community, in the absence of a space to do so locally, was a concern for Lauren Touchant of the Vanier Community Association. Council Housing and Homelessness Liaison Officer, Coun. Catherine McKenney, opposed the exchange of on-site supportive housing units. “No one should live in a shelter or be attached to a shelter,” McKenney said.

Advertising 7

Content of the article

Gervais spoke about concerns about the duplication of services already available locally and the potential for this to impact government funding for existing community service providers.

They want to work with the Salvation Army, said Quartier Vanier Business Improvement Area general manager Nathalie Carrier, and their community needs services.

“But the services they offer and what is actually needed are different, and they refuse to hear that; so that’s where the animosity comes from.

Marco Manconi of ND Management told the committee that The Salvation Army is “100% absolutely committed to detailed engagement with all of the stakeholders you’ve heard from today, and others,” and said acknowledged that “we have absolutely not been perfect, by no means stretched, but we have made attempts based on getting this sitemap approval process.”

Advertising 8

Content of the article

There is a desire to eventually move all beds in the complex to supportive housing, The Salvation Army’s Glenn van Gulik told the committee. Other residential uses currently planned for the facility – 99 emergency accommodation beds, plus a self-contained transitional residence and a special care medical unit – make up the bulk of its bed count.

“It’s a facility that our city needs. I think we all wish that wasn’t the case. Maybe one day it won’t. But this is now,” Gower said in his closing remarks to committee colleagues.

Nine of the 11 planning committee members voted in favor of site plan approval. Com. Shawn Menard voted against and advised. Tim Tierney was absent.

Regional Councilor Mathieu Fleury, a longtime opponent of the Salvation Army proposal, won the support of the planning committee and staff for a number of additional site plan conditions, such as a separate sidewalk at the front of the property, securing several access points to the site and directions on the use of security cameras.

At the end of the meeting, Fleury vowed to continue fighting the project. He pointed out that Ottawa-Vanier MP and Cabinet Minister Mona Fortier and newly re-elected MLA Lucille Collard opposed it and that provincial and federal funding should be sought for the project.

[email protected]

twitter.com/tayblewett

Advertisement 1

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively yet civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to be moderated before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread you follow, or if a user follows you comments. Visit our Community Rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.

The Recorder – Greenfield ZBA approves fire station site plan and special permit

By Site plan

GREENFIELD — The Zoning Appeal Board has approved the site plan and special permit with conditions for the new fire hall, to be built on Main Street near Coombs Avenue.

These conditions include the planting of low-growing green shrubs along the parking area on the Coombs Avenue side of the development; adding a barrier around the concrete transformer pad (or a transformer that provides significant sound reduction); and that the project meets all city and state building requirements. Council members also approved sewer connection plans, while acknowledging receipt of a memo submitted by Technical Superintendent Alan Twarog.

The special permit, which allows for a waiver that would reduce the 8-foot buffer requirement along Coombs Avenue and the 15% open space requirement for new developments, was unanimously approved by the ZBA Wednesday night. With members of the fire station construction committee, David Singer and Jim Winn, recusing themselves due to conflicts of interest, the permit required the support of the remaining four board members.

The overall budget of $17 million for the fire station includes $2 million for the construction of the temporary station on Hope Street, in addition to the construction of the new station, professional fees and provident funds. The temporary fire station, which the service moved into in September, is expected to be used for two years.

Members of the fire station construction committee said the aim was to have the bid package sent out by July 1, hoping to meet the contract award date of August 15 and the start of construction in September.

Speaking on behalf of the city, Katrina Pacheco of Pacheco Ross Architects and Jon Allard of Fuss & O’Neill presented plans for the new fire station, noting their request for a waiver.

“Most of the landscape, you’ll see, is at the north end of the building, where we separate the facade with some planting, and along the side of the visitor parking lot as well,” Allard said, pointing to the 15 spaces. parking for visitors. /employees on the east side of the building, accessible from Main Street.

Allard explained that while there is a landscaped buffer between the employee parking lot and Coombs Avenue, it is currently less than a foot. In this parking lot, there are seven spaces reserved for employees.

“It’s, without a doubt, kind of a narrow site,” commented ZBA President Mark Maloney.

At one point, Maloney suggested the possibility of increasing the open space by decreasing the number of parking spaces. Fire Chief Robert Strahan, however, said the department “cannot afford” to lose designated spaces for both employees and visitors, given that heavy staffing days would require them.

ZBA member Peter Wozniak pointed out that if the extent of parking is necessary, there should be signs to ensure that anyone who parks in those spaces is there on department business.

He also expressed concern about hum, or potential noise, that could come from the proposed transformer block on the Coombs Avenue side of the building, near residences.

“Something should be done to mitigate the noise coming from this transformer because it doesn’t appear that far from the residence,” he said.

Other discussions focused on navigating motors and other service vehicles to and from the building, stormwater drainage plans, and the two proposed sewer lines. In his correspondence, Twarog noted that one sewer line per building is typical and would be recommended unless absolutely necessary.

“They are mostly arranged that way because of the berries,” Pacheco replied.

One of the lines, she explained, includes an oil and water separator, capturing any oil and other contamination on site, while the other is primarily for sanitary waste. office areas and dormitory areas. Maloney asked if there was a way to accommodate the Department of Public Works’ note that a sewer line is the norm.

“I think it wouldn’t be cost effective to combine them,” Pacheco said, adding that it would involve a “complex feat” to do so.

Maloney stressed the importance of the board granting a waiver, noting that during his tenure at the ZBA, only one was granted.

“Gaps in Massachusetts are hard to find,” he said. “I think we’re going to be pretty flexible, because I think we know we have to have a real fire station and have our fire department in a real building and get them out of the tents. I think whatever conditions the board is inclined to impose…I’m sure you’ll all smile with joy and comply.

No member of the public commented during the public hearing portion of the meeting.

“I know it’s been a long session, but it’s important for the project,” Pacheco told members before beginning their deliberations after nearly two hours of discussion. “I appreciate offers to help us mitigate what we are asking for.”

In the end, all four members voted in favor of the waiver with conditions.

Reporter Mary Byrne can be reached at [email protected] or 413-930-4429. Twitter: @MaryEByrne

Olympia site plan committee reviewing two downtown residential pre-submissions

By Site plan

By Lorilyn C. Lirio

On Wednesday, May 25, the Olympia Site Plan Committee held pre-submission hearings for two potential downtown housing development projects.

221 Fifth Avenue SW: Apartments

Architect Jeff Walls of Studio 19 Architects said the new construction will include six-story apartments, a lobby and amenities.

He added that the project would include 130 apartments and 160 parking spaces in the garage. The units will consist of studios, one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments. The total project area will be 158,745 square feet. The building above is proposed in a C-shape with a central courtyard facing Water Street.

Walls said one of his goals was to achieve a one-to-one parking ratio and wanted to achieve the city’s if that aspect of his plan met code requirements.

Olympia planner Casey Schaufler reminded the applicant that the surrounding streets of 5th Avenue, Columbia and Water are all pedestrian only and that Olympia’s design review standards require these streets to be suitable for pedestrians.

“The parking structure is not necessarily prohibited, but it does not meet the intent and purpose of these streets,” he said.

“For more usable by pedestrians, you can’t have residential units on the ground floor. That would indicate more for commercial space,” Schaufler added.

625 Water Street: Condominiums

The site planning commission also considered a second project, a smaller six-storey building.

Walls described what a 30-unit condominium would look like with ground floor parking for residents.

Olympia’s associate planner Jackson Ewing said the site could be determined to be in an “urban waterfront” area. “The fact that it’s downtown, it would have to go through the standard land use review process,” Ewing said.

Ewing also pointed out that if any part of the project site is within shoreline jurisdiction, it would trigger another review under the Shoreline Master Program and require a Substantial Shoreline Development Permit. “The waterfront jurisdiction would have a height limit of 35 feet instead of 65 as permitted by the zoning code.”

Historic preservation

Olympia Historic Preservation Manager Marygrace Goddu told the developer that the site of both projects has a long history, noting that Native Americans were active along the coastline before the 1900s.

The Sanborn 1920-1945 map also indicated building improvements at these locations.

Goddu suggested that early consultation with interested Native American tribes would be essential for any proposed development at this site.

“Given the proximity to known and documented archaeological and historical resources and the high risk of disturbance to underground cultural resources, contact with the tribes is highly recommended,” Goddu said.

“The critical line that drives all of this to bring your project into this code is that the protection of cultural resources will be given substantial weight in decisions on land use approval and subsequent issuance of permits,” said she added.

Final Site Plan for Tupelo Sands Resort Approved | Millville

By Site plan

Millville City Council voted unanimously this week to approve final site plans for the 216-unit Tupelo Sands apartment complex. The complex is to be located along Route 17 (Roxana Road) adjacent to property owned by Beebe Healthcare, which is expected to expand Beebe’s current facility in the coming years.

Tupelo Sands consists of seven three-story apartment buildings surrounding a stormwater management pond, with a swimming pool and pavilion, as well as a maintenance building and garage. The apartments will be built on 32.75 acres.

City Engineer Andrew Lyons Jr. told council at its Tuesday, May 24, meeting that the project met all of the city’s requirements. Zachary Crouch of Davis, Bowen & Friedel, project engineer, told council that all state and county requirements were also met.

The Millville Planning and Zoning Commission voted 5 to 0 on November 9, 2021 to approve the preliminary site plans for Tupelo Sands. On January 13, 2022, the City received a revised application that included changes to building size and layout, number of buildings, and parking changes, as well as other site plan changes.

In the new plans, the developer again asked for a reduction in parking spaces, from 432 to 398, which was granted.

During the public hearing on the Tupelo Sands plans at the May 24 meeting, some of those present questioned the upkeep of the property, the signage on the proposed water tower (which is not related to the project but adjacent) and the efforts of the proponent. aimed at making the project environmentally friendly.

Crouch said the resort will be “professionally managed by a management company”, which may or may not be a “third party”.

Mayor Ron Belinko, responding to concerns about potential commercial development within the planned communities that make up the majority of Millville’s current construction projects, said the city will review its overall plan – its plan for future growth and development – at the course of the coming year. The city is approaching the fifth year of the 10-year comprehensive plan cycle, and this is usually a time when cities re-examine their plans to see if any changes are warranted.

When questions arose about transit options in Millville’s future, Belinko said, “Things are moving quite slowly in that direction,” but added that “naturally it’s necessary,” with l large elderly population and given Beebe’s plans to expand the South Coastal Health Campus in the coming years, possibly with a full-fledged hospital and/or assisted living facility.

The May 24 council also approved, 5-0, changes to the city code regarding the definitions of hotels, motels and bed and breakfasts. Lyons told the council that the new definitions, which address limits on the number of rooms in different categories, are “more consistent with county and state definitions.” City attorney Seth Thompson said the current definition – the one that’s being superseded – has a “kind of scope that encompasses a lot of things that have nothing to do with a hotel, motel or inn “.

CHELSEA: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR FINAL APPROVAL OF “CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT” SITE PLAN

By Site plan

A request has been filed by Danny Veri from Livonia Builders G2, LLC 18261 Shelley Pond Ct., Northville, MI 48168 for the approval of the final site plan at build twenty-five single-family residences on a site of approximately 10.5 acres as a “clustered development” on the following described plots of land:

TAX CODE: # 06-06-13-275-036, 06-06-13-275-044, & 06-06-13-275-034

Machnik Drive, Chelsea, MI 48118

The final site plan application will be reviewed by the Chelsea Planning Commission on Tuesday, June 21, 2022 to 7:00 p.m. at the City of Chelsea Council Chambers at 311 S. Main St. The meeting will also be accessible to members of the public via Zoom. The information will be posted on the City of Chelsea website (www.city-chelsea.org).

Signed, written comments regarding the application will be accepted prior to the Planning Commission meeting and will be read at the meeting upon request. Comments should be directed to the Chelsea Planning Commission, 305 S. MAIN ST. ST. 100, Chelsea, Mich. 48118.

Persons requiring reasonable accommodation for persons with disabilities so that the hearing is accessible to them, are requested to notify the Chairperson of the Chelsea Planning Commission no later than five (5) working days prior to the date of the hearing. hearing of this disability.

CITY OF CHELSEA PLANNING COMMISSION

Sarah Haselschwardt, secretary

Meijer moves forward with site plan at Glen Carbon

By Site plan

Meijer asked to move forward with his site plan for downtown Orchard in Glen Carbon during a construction and development meeting on Tuesday.

The Michigan-based grocery chain has stepped forward to replace Menards as the project’s flagship store following the hardware chain’s termination of its purchase agreement with the village earlier this month.

The committee approved the measure, 3-0. The director of construction and development of the village, Stacy Jose, was on vacation.

“Menards has been unable to close the property with the current developer, the Staenberg Group,” village administrator Jamie Bowden said. “The developer proceeded to push Meijer forward.”


Besides running lumber, patio furniture, lawn and garden, and furnace filters at the grocery store, Meijer demanded 24-hour operation, which no other grocer in the village or the surrounding municipalities does not currently offer. Additionally, the grocer would cover nearly 160,000 square feet, nearly 50,000 less than Menards at 209,000 square feet.

In addition to asking to remain open all the time, Meijer will ask for more parking spaces as well as licenses or permits for the sale of alcohol, a pharmacy drive-thru, an outdoor exhibition/sale, a program of pickup with eight parking spaces and a garden center. Bowden added that Meijer is considering adding a convenience store and gas station to the site, but it’s not final yet.

Mike Flickinger, who is part of Meijer’s real estate department, gave the committee an introduction and overview of the company at Tuesday’s meeting.

Meijers plans to sell general merchandise, lawn and garden supplies, food and liquor, and a pharmacy in the new store and hire an average of about 250 employees over three shifts. The store would be 60% grocery and 40% retail.

Flickinger said a pillar of the company is giving back to its communities. He said a minimum of six percent of his annual net profits are donated to charities. The company has internal partnership programs that add to this gift in return.

Sustainability is another pillar of the company. He said Meijer has been recognized for its fleet of clean diesel vehicles, its reduction in carbon emissions and its refrigeration program. In the company pharmacy, he said there were free prenatals available as well as free antibiotics.

The store requested 541 parking spaces, eight more than needed, 20 ADA accessible spaces, also eight more than needed, plus two bike racks. Three derogations are requested: one for three monumental signs, one of which is off-site; one for the total area of ​​the sign; and one for 32.5-foot-tall parking lights. Meijer notes that the height of the building would be between 18 and 36 feet compared to the height of 45 feet requested by Menards.

Flickinger and Tim Lowe, Staenberg’s vice president for leasing and development, said it typically takes 12 months to build and open a Meijer, but it’s too early at this point to talk about a big date. opening.

Some changes from Menards may include two connections to the nearby Madison County Transit Goshen Trail, versus a single connection from Menards, as well as a common area, including bike racks, internal sidewalk connections as well as outdoor tables for hikers and cyclists. The smaller footprint offered by Meijer and more green space makes this possible, Lowe said.

Lowe, Bowden and others at the party hall are aware of the arrival of more tenants than Chick-fil-A. The names of potential tenants were not named at the meeting.

“I think we’re going to have a very qualitative selection of restaurants and off-plot users in this project,” Lowe said. “Meijer helps with that. Meijer has upped the game a bit. Most people want to be there because it’s on Troy Road and everyone wants to be on Troy Road but I think the fact that Meijer is here has a changed the dynamics little.

“As we know, two have been announced. One is Chick-fil-A as the first candidate. We have a very nice combination of three or four quality sit-down restaurants with maybe a few other fast-casuals, and then some really good fast food. All the good names, all the national brands and all that’s not in this market today.”

This plan has not been reviewed extensively by the building and zoning or public works departments as usual, as it is only a concept plan. All plans and documents are only thoroughly reviewed after approval by the building and development and official plans have been submitted by the developer. During this review process, plans submitted may not comply with all village codes and additional waiver requests may be made.

The next steps in the process are for Meijer representatives and the developer to return to planning and zoning with a preliminary site plan with all deviations. If approved during planning and zoning, the full council will vote on the final site plan later this summer.

The Twinsburg urban planning commission favors the layout of industrial buildings

By Site plan

TWINSBURG — Despite intense opposition from several Old Mill Road residents, the city’s planning commission favored a final site plan for two large industrial buildings on the north side of the road, just east of Darrow Road.

At its May 16 meeting, the committee sent a positive site plan recommendation to City Council for what is being called Project Gumbo, which involves erecting 299,000 and 156,000 square foot buildings on the north and the west of many houses.

Scannell Properties has proposed development of the 33.5 acres east of Siffron in the I-2 Limited Industrial Zoning District, and is working to finalize the purchase of an adjoining 1.5 acre residential property.

Emotions ran high at a handful of meetings because nearby residents said the project would negatively impact their lives and possibly reduce the value of their properties.

“These plans have been reviewed by a number of local, state and federal professionals and approvals have been given,” planning committee chairman Marc Cohen said.

“We have to rely on these professionals for information so that we can make decisions. Although I wish the development was smaller than what is offered, Scannell followed all procedures, codes and regulations.

The panel vote was 3 to 1 in favor of the sitemap, with Michael Walker voting “no” and Cohen, Steve Shebeck and David Kleinman voting “yes”. Kraig Shipley was absent.

Some revisions to the original plans were described by Matt Weber of Weber Engineering, including reducing the width of a building’s facade from 240 to 210 feet, eliminating an 18-foot-tall barrier wall, and relocation of a port lane for trucks.

“We worked within the guidelines presented to us,” Weber said. “We have completed studies, received approval from multiple regulatory agencies, and received or applied for wetland permits from the US Army Corps of Engineers.”

Some of the infrastructure improvements proposed by Scannell are the addition of an Old Mill turning lane at Darrow, changing the signage at the intersection, landscaping to conceal buildings from neighboring houses and sidewalks along of Old Mill.

City planner Lynn Muter said Summit County officials said they would support lowering the speed limit to 35 mph on the Old Mill Township side, and Twinsburg Township administrators said they would support that.

Neighboring residents have expressed concerns about truck and car traffic accessing the property from Old Mill Road, fumes from trucks, how the project will affect their water wells and nearby wetlands and streams, bright lighting and noise.

The main theme expressed by residents is that the industrial development “is not harmonious with the surrounding neighborhood”. They were particularly critical of Old Mill Road, rather than Darrow, being the access point to the property.

City officials explained that the reason access is not possible from Darrow is that no easements were obtained to extend East Summit Commerce Park Drive east from Darrow when the installation of Siffron was built.

Weber said Scannell tried to buy a small parcel from Siffron so that the two proposed buildings could be located farther west, but that attempt failed.

ADDING STORAGE

The panel approved a final site plan for a 2,000 square foot storage building behind Summit Sound & Security at 8027 Darrow Road, south of Old Mill Road and north of Darrow Road Plaza.

TLJ Cos. LLC wants to erect the addition on its 0.75 acre lot in the C-2 Community Commercial Zoning District. Summit Sound occupies 3,000 square feet of the existing building, with Subway occupying the remaining 1,788 square feet.

Thirty-two parking spaces are available for Summit Sound and Subway, including 13 on-site and 19 on the adjacent Havana’s Cigars property. There is a shared access drive off Darrow Road for both properties.

A side lot setback waiver was granted by the Zoning Appeal Board.

The planning committee changed its next meeting date from June 20 to June 27 because the city will observe the old date as the June 19 holiday.

Contact the newspaper at [email protected]

Preliminary site plan for Empire Parkway site approved in Macedonia

By Site plan

MACEDONIA – A preliminary site plan for the first of a handful building to be built on 125 acres on Empire Parkway, which includes land where Bedford Anodizing once stood, was approved by the city’s planning commission on 16 may.

ARKO National Construction representative Russell Clark said the company plans to build a 353,400 square foot (310 by 1,140 ft) warehouse/distribution center south of East Highland Road and east west of the Norfolk Southern Railroad tracks.

At its March 21 meeting, the planning committee approved the clearing of the site. Clark said the trees were felled but not removed. He noted that the specification building would house two as yet unknown tenants.

Empire Parkway would be extended and access to other future buildings would be via a driveway leading to Empire Parkway past the initial building.

When the building is complete, Clark explained that car parking will be provided on the north and south sides and truck parking on the west side, with 39 loading docks on the west side and 11 on the north side. A total of 104 parking spaces are planned.

City planner Brian Frantz said a waiver from the zoning appeals board would be required regarding the number of parking spaces, and the building’s proposed 40-foot height meets zoning code requirements.

Stormwater management ponds are planned on the west and northeast sides, and Clark said the developer will add landscaping. “We look forward to working with the city on a successful project that brings economic development,” he noted.

Frantz said photometry and detailed landscaping plans must be submitted prior to final site plan approval, and approvals from the Ohio EPA and/or the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are required for areas. wetlands and impacts on watercourses.

Last July, the city council approved a tax increment financing agreement with Macedonia Empire LLC to redevelop the site.

The city benefited from nearly $1.5 million through a cooperative effort between the city, the Summit County Land Bank, the county tax office, and state and federal regulatory agencies to redevelop the property.

The city acquired the property in October 2019. It was state-owned under forfeited land status and was included in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure process.

The plant carried out metal finishing work and ceased operations in June 2013.

OTHER BUSINESS

The panel approved a final site plan for a new Don Basch Jewelers store on Fairway Drive, construction of a pavilion and gazebo at Specialty Lubricants on Corporate Park Drive, and signage for IHOP at 613 E. Aurora Road.

The Basch building will be north of Route 82, west of Fairlane Drive and behind the First Watch/AT&T building. The company plans to move from its current location on the north side of Route 82, east of Fairlane Drive and next to the Winking Lizard.

The 6,500 square foot building will be erected on the west side of the lot, with the entrance and parking lot on the east side. It will include spaces for merchandise, repairs and offices, as well as a community hall and kitchen.

A flagpole is planned near the building entrance, with trees, evergreens and shrubs as landscaping around the property.

A mound on the north side of the parking lot was eliminated from the plans, the height of a tower at the entrance to the building was reduced to 32 feet, and Frantz said additional landscaping is recommended along Route 8 and north of the parking lot.

A usage gap and a handful of setback/forward width gaps were granted by the BZA.

The specialty lubricants pavilion will measure 30 feet by 26 feet and 10 feet in height and will be erected in front of the building adjacent to the parking lot.

A crosswalk will cross a paved driveway to the front lawn, and a sidewalk will be installed between the paved driveway and the pavilion/gazebo.

Signage for the IHOP restaurant, which sits on the site of the former Pizza Hut, includes three wall signs totaling 61 square feet and one floor monument sign totaling 40 square feet. Frantz said the signage meets zoning code standards.

Contact the newspaper at [email protected]

Vista revised to Uptown site plan in Brighton approved

By Site plan

May 20, 2022

by Tom Tolen / [email protected]

The footprint of the Vista at Uptown luxury housing project near Brighton city center has just become noticeably smaller, while at the same time the number of units has increased significantly. The development is to be located between N. Second St. and Mill Pond. The project developers are Lansing’s DTN Development Group

Last night Brighton City Council approved the amended site plan for the revamped development by a 5-1 vote, with council member Renee Pettengill the only one not voting.

Vista at Uptown is a development proposal that has been on the books since 2018 but was delayed for at least two years when the COVID pandemic hit. John Woods, representing Lansing’s DTN Brighton LLC, told the board that despite COVID the company remained committed to the project and believed in Brighton’s future. He said, in his words, “The economy has changed with COVID and costs have gone up, but we’re still committed to the project.”

Developers originally proposed 199 apartments over four floors with a 110,000 square foot footprint and a parking structure. This then grew to 205 apartments. The most recent revised plans call for 235 housing units, but on a smaller footprint of around 80,000 square feet. Woods says they will be able to accomplish this by placing the parking structure below ground level. This will make 190 underground parking spaces and 180 surface spaces. Two other changes will be to have two rooftop courtyards instead of one and to move the swimming pool.

After his presentation, Woods told WHMI that the project’s estimated costs had skyrocketed due to COVID and inflation, from the initial $40 million to around $60 million. The high-end development — with 1- to 3-bedroom apartments costing $1,300 and up — these numbers are preliminary, the developer says — will feature a patio, pool, outdoor kitchen and grill, fitness centers, conference rooms, foyers, club rooms and bocci ball fields. The luxury apartments will range from 500-foot studios to 1,300-square-foot 3-bedroom units. Woods says the company intends to begin work on the foundation this fall and hopes the project will be completed in the spring of 2024.

Approval of revised site plan view of Uptown in Brighton

By Site plan

May 20, 2022



Approval of revised site plan view of Uptown in Brighton

by Tom Tolen / [email protected]

The footprint of the Vista at Uptown luxury housing project near Brighton city center has just become noticeably smaller, while at the same time the number of units has increased significantly. The development is to be located between N. Second St. and Mill Pond. The project developers are Lansing’s DTN Development Group

Last night Brighton City Council approved the amended site plan for the revamped development by a 5-1 vote, with council member Renee Pettengill the only one not voting.

Vista at Uptown is a development proposal that has been on the books since 2018 but was delayed for at least two years when the COVID pandemic hit. John Woods, representing Lansing’s DTN Brighton LLC, told the board that despite COVID the company remained committed to the project and believed in Brighton’s future. He said, in his words, “The economy has changed with COVID and costs have gone up, but we’re still committed to the project.”

Developers originally proposed 199 apartments over four floors with a 110,000 square foot footprint and a parking structure. This then grew to 205 apartments. The most recent revised plans call for 235 housing units, but on a smaller footprint of around 80,000 square feet. Woods says they will be able to accomplish this by placing the parking structure below ground level. This will make 190 underground parking spaces and 180 surface spaces. Two other changes will be to have two rooftop courtyards instead of one and to move the swimming pool.

After his presentation, Woods told WHMI that the project’s estimated costs had skyrocketed due to COVID and inflation, from the initial $40 million to around $60 million. The high-end development — with 1- to 3-bedroom apartments costing $1,300 and up — these numbers are preliminary, the developer says — will feature a patio, pool, outdoor kitchen and grill, fitness centers, conference rooms, foyers, club rooms and bocci ball fields. The luxury apartments will range from 500-foot studios to 1,300-square-foot 3-bedroom units. Woods says the company intends to begin work on the foundation this fall and hopes the project will be completed in the spring of 2024.

Kosy Co Living releases images of Brighton’s new multi-site development | New

By Site development

Kosy Co Living, part of the Kosy Living Group, has unveiled images of the second phase – Enterprise Point – which will house 278 studios with shared common areas.

Residents of Brighton’s new co-living scheme will have unlimited access to a wide range of modern facilities and amenities including co-working spaces, fitness and wellness suites, cafe/dining options , a cinema, a games and leisure room and outdoor areas including gardens, barbecue areas and a roof garden terrace.

Paul Brundell, CEO of Kosy Living, said, “With phase one ready to begin, we are excited to release our vision for phase two of our co-living urban village. It will be a truly unique living option for Brighton and will attract local professionals and graduates keen to stay in the city – a key element in solving the housing shortage whilst helping to retain its skilled working population.

kosy2

“Our development will be transformative for this area by improving the public realm along Melbourne Street and regenerating a dilapidated brownfield. There will be better pedestrian areas and cycle paths, new green spaces, new dining options and coworking spaces for residents.

Kosy Living announced its partnership with Maven Capital Partners and Puma Property Finance for the first phase on Melbourne Street earlier this year.

The first co-living residents will move in in 2024.

NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR FINAL APPROVAL OF THE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

By Site plan

NOTICE OF APPLICATION

NOTICE OF APPLICATION

For

FINAL APPROVAL OF THE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

A request has been filed by Danny Veri of Livonia Builders G2, LLC 18261
Shelley Pond Ct., Northville, MI 48168
for the approval of the final site plan at construction
twenty-five single-family residences
on a site of approximately 10.5 acres as
“cluster development” on the following described parcels of land:

TAX CODE: # 06-06-13-275-036, 06-06-13-275-044, 06-06-13-275-034
Machnik Drive, Chelsea, MI 48118

The final site plan application will be reviewed by the Chelsea Planning Commission on
Tuesday, June 21, 2022 to 7:00 p.m. at the Chelsea City Council Chambers at 311
S. Main St. The meeting will also be accessible to members of the public via Zoom.
The information will be posted on the City of Chelsea website (www.city-chelsea.org).

Signed and written comments regarding the application will be accepted before the
Planning Commission meeting, and will be read at the meeting upon request. comments
should be addressed to the Chelsea Planning Commission, 305 S. MAIN ST. ST. 100,
Chelsea, Michigan 48118.

A public hearing on the site plan will take place, if requested in writing by any property
owner or occupant within three hundred (300) feet of the property line being
considered.

Persons requiring reasonable accommodations for disabilities in order for the hearing to be
which are accessible to them, are asked to inform the chairman of the Chelsea Planning Commission
no later than five (5) working days before the date of the hearing of this disability.

CHELSEA PLANNING COMMISSION
Sarah Haselshwardt, Secretary

The Outer Banks Voice – KDH board approves Wawa site plan

By Site plan

KDH Board Approves Wawa Site Plan

By Michelle Wagner | Outer Banks Voice May 17, 2022

No timetable set for local construction

Kill Devil Hills will host the first Wawa convenience store in North Carolina after city commissioners approved a site plan May 16 for one of its stores at 1900 N. Croatan Highway, located on the west side of the city. highway just south of BB&T and across from the old Kmart.

The site, which was unanimously approved under certain conditions, will include a 6,000 square foot convenience store, eight gas pumps and 52 parking spaces. The plan was put together by Arista Development on behalf of Wawa, which also has its eye on several other sites in North Carolina, according to its external public relations supervisor, Jennifer Wolf. In an email to The Voice written after the board vote, Wolf said there was currently no timeline for the store to be built in Kill Devil Hills.

Wawa operates more than 850 convenience stores (600 of which offer gas) in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Florida and Washington, D.C. The chain is known for its made-to-order meals, its freshly brewed coffee, hot breakfast sandwiches and other Wawa brand items.

“Overall the package we got is extremely comprehensive, it’s well designed, it’s very detailed – how each post hole is going to be drilled and where each piece of wire goes,” the Kill Devil mayor said. Hills, Ben Sproul, before the vote. . “We want people here in the public and people in the neighborhood to know that we have your best interests at heart, we do our best for the community at all times. You certainly have a quality engineering team that put this package together.

Several residents who live on nearby streets spoke during the public comment portion of the meeting, expressing concerns, including Wawa’s plans to install a vinyl fence as a neighborhood buffer. “A vinyl fence won’t provide any barrier against noise, lights or anything else,” one resident claimed.

When presenting the site plan, however, Deputy Director of Planning Cameron Ray said the claimant had since revised the site plan to replace the vinyl fence with a shadowbox fence to take into account the load of the wind and other maintenance issues.

For his part, Kill Devil Hills commissioner Terry Gray said he would like to see the candidate go further.

“I urge the developer to look at the closing of Lowe’s and try to go further and help buffer residences,” Gray asserted. He said in the future he would like to see city ordinances strengthened to require buffering that provided more of a sound barrier in situations similar to the Wawa project, where commercial establishments adjoin residential properties.



NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING TO REVIEW PLANS FOR OUTSIDE BANKS EVENT CENTER
Dare County, North Carolina
Dare County Visitor Center

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Visitors Bureau will hold a public meeting to review plans for an Outer Banks Events Center. The meeting will be held on Monday, June 6, 2022 from 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. at the Keeper’s Galley building in Haven on the Banks, 115 Dove Street, Nags Head North Carolina 27959.

Still in the conceptual phase, the Events Center is intended to provide a suitable and flexible space for year-round events, concerts, sports, meetings, smaller trade shows, galas and many more. other uses. Learn more about visitor and resident benefits and how the event center is planned to complement the new Soundside Promenade being designed.

The staff will be at your disposal to answer all your questions. For more information, please see our Event Center FAQ Page.



Site plan committee reviews proposed office conversion and subdivision

By Site plan

By Lorilyn C. Lirio

Olympia’s site plan committee is considering two requests for development projects – one is to use the existing building and the other is a proposal to subdivide 1.4 acres into nine lots with eight single-family homes.

Office space

In a meeting on Wednesday May 11, LDC Principal Engineer Ross Jarvis provided a brief overview of the client’s proposal for a building at 720 Lilly Road, SE, Olympia.

The site includes two buildings with 36 parking spaces.

He said the Montessori school uses one of the buildings; the other is a bank.

As indicated in the narrative description submitted to the site committee, the Montessori building would remain on its land.

The developer plans to split the second building in two and use it as a dental clinic and office space.

The drive-thru that is on the east side of the building will be removed and a new exit door installed.

No additional buildings will be established, Jarvis added.

Olympia planner Casey Schaufler asked Jarvis to submit the binding site plan amendment, which outlines their drive-thru plan.

“Some of the parking requirements may depend on whether or not you meet a threshold of 50% of the package’s rateable value,” Schaufler said when explaining why he had to request their plan with drive-thru.

“If you have a project that meets this threshold, you will have additional requirements for parking islands that must be installed on site,” Schaufler added.

He also recommended referring to the building’s binding 1997 site plan. “It shows the proposed building for the school and the bank. We need to see an actual outline.

Housing estate

At the same meeting, the Site Plan Committee heard a proposal from JSA Civil on behalf of a client who seeks to subdivide 1.4 acres into nine lots and construct eight single-family home parcels at the south end of Decatur St. at about 18and Avenue SW, just northwest of the offices next to the Auto Mall west of Olympia.

The project also proposed a new connection between the sidewalk and the pedestrian path on Decatur Street to provide expanded pedestrian amenities for residents of the project and adjacent neighborhood.

BADA approves plan for two warehouses along Boulevard Enders | Winchester star

By Site plan

BERRYVILLE — Only two new warehouses will be built along Jack Enders Boulevard.

On Wednesday evening, the Berryville Area Development Authority (BADA) approved a site plan for LGV Group LLC to build the warehouses on 12½ acres adjacent to Clarke County Business Park.

The company initially proposed to develop three warehouses there.

Originally owned by Brent Mercke, the property was already zoned to accommodate types of businesses suitable for small industrial parks.

BADA advises the Clarke County Board of Supervisors and Berryville City Council on land use issues involving an area targeted for possible incorporation into the city.

Her unanimous vote, following a motion by Kathy Smart seconded by Diane Harrison, ends more than six months of indecision on the project.

Based in Loudoun County, LGV operates a business on Station Road in Berryville where metal windows and doors are manufactured.

Each of the three warehouses initially proposed was to comprise 60,000 square feet. LGV planned to occupy one and lease the other two.

The review of the site plan has been postponed several times. Officials asked for more information on how the warehouses would affect their environment. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) also reviewed the project.

To address the DEQ’s concerns about stormwater runoff, LGV decided not to build one of the warehouses. This will reduce the amount of impermeable surface on the site from 8.2 acres to around 6 acres, documents show.

One of the warehouses to be built will include 60,000 square feet. LGV plans to occupy this warehouse, which will be closest to the boulevard, according to Berryville Community Development Director Christy Dunkle.

The other warehouse will be 85,000 square feet and will be leased, Dunkle said in his understanding.

A stormwater management system will be installed on the property, she said.

The approved site plan will also establish a larger buffer zone between the property and the adjacent subdivision of Berryville Glen. Dunkle said landscaping pads will be installed.

The LGV “responded to the (local) requirements of the buffer zone”, she stressed.

The company did not say when construction would begin, it said.

Lucan Commercial Development Receives Conditional Site Plan Approval

By Site plan

Content of the article

Lucan-Biddulph City Council has conditionally approved the site plan for a planned large new shopping center at the north end of Lucan.

Content of the article

Conditional site plan approval was granted at the May 3 council meeting at the Glenns Shopping Center at 315 Main Street on a 3.73-hectare (9.24-acre) parcel of land at the far end north of Lucan (north of the community center). The land is now used for agriculture.

As Middlesex County planner Dan FitzGerald explained in his report to council, site plan approval allows “the construction of a large format commercial development primarily for retail, restaurants , professional offices and commercial services in the form of a gas station and an automatic car wash. ”

The project proposes a commercial development of 5,087.49 square meters consisting of five separate buildings.

According to the FitzGerald report, “Municipal services currently do not exist on the property and access is maintained via Main Street. As a condition of development, the developer would be required to extend municipal services to the property through Main Street.

Certain conditions and provincial approvals must still be met for the site plan agreement to be signed. Responding to the con. To Daniel Regan’s concerns about traffic on Highway 4, FitzGerald said there will be a requirement for two left turn lanes on Highway 4 in the development.

Com. Jaden Hodgins asked if the sidewalks off Highway 4 leading to the property are part of the project. Public Works Director Jeff Little said sidewalks are not part of the project and will need to be addressed in the future.

Torrington P&Z approves school construction project site plan, with conditions

By Site plan

TORRINGTON — Members of the Planning and Zoning Commission and city planner Jeremy Liefert have approved the city’s $180 million school construction project, although concerns remain about traffic and sustainable practices such as the solar panels.

The School Building Committee requested special exception permits and site plan approval for middle and high school buildings and new administrative offices for the school district, replacing the aging Torrington High School, which will be demolished once the new construction is completed.

Amy Samuelson, representing the SLAM Collaborative, the developer of the project, answered a number of questions regarding traffic issues raised by the police sergeant. Dustin Baldis.


“There are traffic issues that have yet to be resolved with the Winthrop Street intersection,” Liefert said, referring to reports and comments from Baldis.

“There still has to be traffic analysis, and there still has to be a solution. But I think we are in a good position at this point,” Liefert said.

Baldis requested that all bus traffic entering and exiting school property during construction enter the school campus using the back or “north route,” according to Liefert.

Commission member Starley Arias asked how these buses would affect nearby neighborhoods.

“I understand the buses will be coming from the back of the school; (this area has) been closed and not used,” he said. “There’s a little condo neighborhood there, plus the cul de sac neighborhood up the hill. They haven’t seen any bus traffic, but now we’re using it as a method to get students to high school during construction. … Trafficking could cause problems for these communities.

Building committee co-chairman Ed Arum said no other traffic would be allowed except for buses. “The buses come, the doors are closed, and when school is over, the buses come back to pick up the kids,” he said. “No one else is allowed to go there.”

Baldis’ biggest concern, according to Liefert, is traffic at the three-way intersection on Winthrop Street and Major Besse Drive. Even with the diverted buses, incoming and outgoing vehicles and pedestrians using crosswalks could cause traffic jams and other hazards, Baldis said.

“Sergeant. Baldis said there would be traffic jams at the three-way intersection and something should be done now rather than later,” Liefert said.

In his own memorandum of approval, the planner set out a condition that all traffic issues must be resolved before the certificate of occupancy is issued.

“We recommend that the claimant stay in contact with Officer Baldis and resolve these issues,” he said.

Arum said he and the committee would continue discussions with Baldis. “We have met the sergeant several times and we will continue to meet him,” he said. “We also meet the bus drivers.”

Arias also asked if solar panels and other “sustainable systems” for the new building were being considered.

“You said you designed the school to have solar panels, but they’re not in the design,” he said. “Or (are there) backup generators; a sustainable system for the school in case of bad weather.

Samuelson said the buildings had a generator that would provide power in an emergency. “That includes all lighting, security systems, alarm systems, access control and many other things,” she said. “As a measure of sustainability, we designed the building with the possibility of putting solar panels on the roof, and sized the roof to accommodate these (panels).”

Arias said, “Our state is evolving to be more sustainable, to be a green state,” he said. “I want to be sure that any future projects we approve are consistent with these goals.”

Arum said the building committee did not put solar panels in this design. “We don’t want to install the panels until the building is complete,” he said. “We want to make sure we have enough money to build a school for the children of Torrington.”

Glen Carbon holds hearing over gas station site plan

By Site plan

At one of two public hearings on Monday, the Glen Carbon Planning and Zoning Commission heard a preliminary plan and site plan for a proposed gas station and convenience store.

The commission struggled to assemble a quorum but eventually voted in favor of the site plan with four variants and a possible fifth variant for parking should the village staff deem it necessary.

The preliminary platform and site plan was for The Game Gas Station and Convenience Store. The new plans would completely redevelop the current gas station which sits just off Route 157 at Glen West Drive and south of Interstate 270. The preliminary flat proposes taking the current five lots on the site and redesigning them. -flat in all three lots, totaling 2.39 acres.


Dan Koziatek, a civil engineer with Civil and Environmental Consultants, and owner Bobby Patel represented the project. Koziatek also served as a spokesperson.

He said the project will be carried out in two phases. First, the existing 3,500 square foot convenience store and gas pumps will remain open while crews dig the ground for the new store and pumps behind or west of the current store. The new gas storage tanks will go to the southeast corner of the site while a new buried storm water retention pond will go to the southwest corner. If the village grants final approval, construction could begin as early as July.

When the new store is complete and the pumps are ready for use, a demolition crew will then level the old store and pumps and remove the old storage for remediation. The new convenience store and liquor store would be approximately 6,000 square feet and include a gas awning. Access to and from the site will only be from The Game Drive, not 157.

“The biggest challenge of this project has been access [to and from Route 157]”said Koziatek. He said they had met with the village’s building and development committee about adding an in/out fee on 157, but it was opposed.” Ultimately, what was clear from their perspective was that the sidewalk cuts must remain on The Game Drive.”

At one point, Scott Slemer, the village’s director of public works, stepped in with a future IDOT project that will affect the width of the road.

“The village advanced by making a [agreement] for this intersection, so we have this design,” Slemer said. “There will be another lane and a sidewalk that will be put in place further to the west.

He said the village applied for a Congestion and Air Quality Mitigation (CMAQ) grant, but failed to obtain it. They will resubmit, and Slemer said there’s a strong chance the village will get the funds next time around.

“More than likely this whole intersection will be under construction in 2026,” Slemer said.

The developer, Ma Tulja, Inc., submitted the following deviations:

• Not providing “street trees” along The Game Drive, which has approximately 226 linear feet of frontage requiring six street trees. The developer says that due to the large driveways and paved areas along The Game Drive, the waiver is requested to place these trees along 157 and the west side of the site instead.

• Request that said street trees be within 10 feet of the back of the sidewalk. Due to the creek that runs along the western boundary of the property and the wide driveways required for tanker trucks that haul fuel, “street trees” should be placed five feet from the back of the sidewalk along the 157

• No sidewalks along The Game Drive Due to a future Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) development plan to widen the road and change its overall elevation, it is impossible to design a site that will connect the proposed and existing roads while providing a sidewalk that meets the requirements of the village. The IDOT project is currently not funded

• Allow a 25 foot setback from the stream bank without disturbance. The existing creek along the western boundary would be rerouted to align with an existing culvert under The Game Drive and remove any invasive species along that segment of the creek. The west driveway of the site is located 15 feet into the buffer zone. Erosion control devices would be installed to protect the bank

This project will be presented to the full board in time for the May 24 meeting or at one of the meetings next month.

Tribal Council approves $75 million for ‘theme show’ and site development at exit 407

By Site development

One of the world’s largest amusement park companies, based in France, Puy du Fou, is teaming up with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to create a “theme show” centered on Cherokee history on the property of 200 acres under development by Kituwah LLC, off Interstate 40 at Exit 407 in Sevier County.

The Cherokee Tribal Council voted May 11-1 to appropriate $75 million for the project, including $45 million budgeted for attraction construction and $30 million for site development costs on the entire 80-acre section of the property slated for Phase 1 development. The Puy du Fou project is expected to control 4-5 acres when it opens in 2024.

“This project in Tennessee developed with EBCI means a lot to us: it will initiate our presence on American soil, where there are so many great stories to tell”, Nicolas de Villiers, President & Artistic Director of Puy du Fou . “As lovers of history and cultural roots, we are proud and honored to partner with the EBCI Tribe to achieve this goal.”

Twice voted “Best Theme Park in the World”, Puy du Fou operates an original flagship park in France that attracts more than 2.3 million visitors each year and only follows Disneyland Paris for the most in the country. The park features multiple shows, vintage villages, and more than half a dozen on-site resorts custom designed and built with authenticity as the focal point. The company now has attractions in Spain, the Netherlands, the UK and China.

This would be its first foray into the US market, and under the agreement, Kituwah LLC would have first right of refusal on any future US projects.

“We are excited to take the first steps towards developing this world-class attraction that will help sustain our nation economically while creating a new platform to share dimensions of Cherokee history that many have never heard” , Tribal Council Chairman Richard French said in a statement.

The concept

The tribe’s relationship with Puy du Fou at exit 407 will be similar to its relationship with Caesar’s Entertainment at its casinos. The tribe will own the property, building and business through a newly formed company called Cherokee Rose, which in turn is owned by Kituwah LLC, but Puy du Fou will design and operate the attraction.

The attraction itself will consist of a 125,000 to 175,000 square foot “retail entertainment” dining and entertainment space, with an immersive show that will be the first of its kind in the United States, said Matthew Cross, CEO of OE Experiences, the Knoxville-based experience development company that represented Kituwah and The 407 in their global search for ideal partners.

“The closest example would be something like Titanic over there in Pigeon Forge where you walk around a themed space, but it’s much more about immersion and the authenticity of actually being there,” said said Cross. “And those sets are complemented by live actors, which is sort of Puy du Fou’s signature.”

“The vocation of Puy du Fou is to tell stories in an innovative, original and rooted way,” said Manon Rigaudeau, Puy du Fou’s international press officer. “This new immersive show is the embodiment of this vocation: it will plunge visitors into the heart of a moving epic, from the Appalachians to the plains of Champagne.

Puy du Fou is one of the only companies in the world to create its own creative design and operate the attraction, allowing it to “seamlessly integrate” guest experiences into the space.

The show itself will present the “authentic and heartbreaking” story of Cherokee heroism during World War I through a “fully immersive” show that will take guests on a “patriotic and moving journey for the whole family”, according to a news. Release.

“These were Cherokees who actually participated on behalf of the Allies, and this experience will put you in the thick of the action as someone who travels overseas with them and has that experience,” Cross said. “Our goal, as is the goal of any experience, is for it to be highly transformative. This is going to be a very emotional yet very positive story, and we hope everyone comes away with a sense of admiration for a story that many people don’t know and which, in my opinion, deserves to be told.

Council debate

During a May 5 Tribal Council discussion, Big Cove representative Teresa McCoy said the proposal met with a favorable reception from Big Cove residents when she discussed it with them at a meeting. She said she was also “comfortable” with the decision, despite the steep price tag.

“If we give the information to our people, they will read it and make their own decisions and take away the fear of us sitting here and handing out $75 million, because it’s scary,” she said. . “He is.”

Birdtown representative Albert Rose was the only one to vote against the project. He disputed that the tribe, not Puy du Fou, would pay to build the attraction and wondered what the return on investment would be. His instinct is that it’s not a good deal, he says.

“Commercial games, you’re going to get a pretty quick return,” he said. “This, I don’t know when I was going to get it back.”

Registered member Ernest Tiger also spoke out against the proposal.

“I just think the money could be better spent,” he said. “Why not spend $75 million and buy every member of the tribe a house?”

Progress on the 407

Buc-ee’s, the first company to announce its partnership with Kituwah, is currently working to vertically build what will be the world’s largest convenience store when it opens next summer. The entire 80 acres of Phase 1 is now the subject of letters of intent from restaurants, retail chains and concepts looking to build there. Although these letters are not binding, Cross expects the Puy du Fou announcement to prompt these companies to make their own public commitments. In December, the Tribal Council voted to allow another of its LLCs, EBCI Holdings, to proceed with construction of a sports betting bar on the property.

In addition to work at Buc-ee, fine grading has begun for the construction of a Marriott Courtyard owned by Kituwah LLC. The tribe hopes to see this facility open in 2023, but achieving that goal will be “challenging” given current supply chain issues, Cross said.

Cross said he doesn’t anticipate any zoning issues with the development, as the property was designated as a tourism improvement district before the tribe purchased it in 2019. However, he said the developers are discussing the how the current labor shortage might impact development plans and considered potential solutions, including labor housing, and also assessed infrastructure needs in the community.

“Many new timelines all start at the same time after a milestone like this, but we pay a lot of attention to the City of Sevierville, Sevier County, and the Tennessee Department of Transportation regarding area infrastructure and which is necessary to support not just our development, but the community itself.

Edinburgh International Book Festival unveils new sitemap for years to come

By Site plan

The Edinburgh International Book Festival has announced the locations of its upcoming events.

The festival will be held at the Edinburgh College of Art, before moving to a brand new city center and the University of Edinburgh site in 2024.

Building on the success of last year’s hybrid program, this year will see the current site expand, with increased capacity and number of sites. Last year was the first year the Book Festival has moved since its inception in 1983, beginning its long-term partnership with the University of Edinburgh.

As part of the partnership, the event will move to the Edinburgh Futures Institute in 2024, a landmark development based on the site of the former Royal Infirmary on Lauriston Place.

READ MORE: The centenary of the birth of Hugh MacDiarmid – and the Scottish renaissance

The University of Edinburgh said it was transforming the building into a space for multidisciplinary collaborations and partnerships.

Organizers say the institute will provide the Book Festival with a variety of accessible indoor and outdoor venues as well as the necessary facilities to host a hybrid program of live and in-person events. They say the venue provides ample space to create the atmospheric literary gathering place that audiences and authors have long enjoyed for socializing, connecting and sparking ideas.

Festival director Nick Barley said: “We are extremely excited to return to Edinburgh College of Art in August, where we can bring back the buzz of Edinburgh’s best festival years. We’ll build on what we offered last year and look forward to sharing how this charming and welcoming site can provide unforgettable experiences for audiences and authors alike.

“We have worked closely with the University of Edinburgh over the past two years and are delighted that our new permanent home will be the Edinburgh Futures Institute from 2024, a historic building with a ‘green village’ outdoor space. very important campaign which is developed for the enjoyment of all and of which our festival city can be proud.

He continued: “It creates extraordinary and game-changing opportunities for the book festival, but more importantly – for the first time in our festival’s history – it helps us plan a number of years in advance.

“The new site will allow us to continue to rebuild our world-renowned program, while placing accessibility, sustainability and innovation at the heart of what we do with a very important outdoor ‘green village’ space.”

READ MORE: The Catalan arts festival will take place across Scotland this spring

Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh, Professor Peter Mathieson, said: “I am delighted that the University of Edinburgh is deepening its partnership with the Edinburgh International Book Festival.

“We will provide world-class venues, and our students and staff will be an integral part of the festival programme, sharing and discussing ideas with audiences in Edinburgh and around the world. We look forward to welcoming book festival-goers to Edinburgh College of Art for the next two years.

“When the festival then moves to the Edinburgh Futures Institute from 2024, it will help realize the inscription engraved on its wall: ‘Patet Omnibus’, which stands for ‘Open to All’.”

This year’s hybrid festival will take place from August 13-29.

Approved Site Plan for Don Sol Restaurant

By Site plan

Posted May 10, 2022 7:55 PM

Last updated on May 11, 2022 09:08

Written by Greg Sapp

Premier Local News 2022

Members of the Effingham City Plan Commission on Tuesday approved a site plan for a Don Sol Mexican restaurant, which will be located at 1303 Avenue of Mid-America.

The restaurant will be located along the south side of the Avenue of Mid-America, north of TGI Friday’s and will relocate the fountain north of the Thelma Keller Convention Center. The 6,385-square-foot building will feature a pick-up window, but no walkway.

The Commission voted to recommend that City Council rezone the properties at 801,805, 807, and 809 North Keller Drive from the R-2 single-family residential zoning to the B-1 Ward shopping area. Some residents who live in the Hickory Hills Subdivision, west of these properties, have asked what could be developed on the lots if rezoning is granted. They also said that, if the properties are developed commercially, what arrangements could be made so as not to affect their standard of living. Buffers, berms, fences, plantings and other landscaping were all suggested. City council will likely consider the proposed rezoning at its May 17 meeting.

The Commission recommended that Council approve a subdivision of the Oak Pointe subdivision so that the land north of Kohl’s could be developed as a residence on Lake Pauline. A subdivision flat for the 4th addition to the HGI subdivision, essentially the Don Sol site, has also been recommended for approval.

Developer Scott Conant has asked the Commission to withdraw his application to rezone a property near Effingham Country Club and to delay his application for a flat of the property.

Brian Hayes and Dave Storm were re-elected Chair and Vice-Chair of the Planning Commission for another year, and Ken Wohltman was welcomed as a new member of the Commission.

05/10/2022 | Sitemap for Triple Crown Estates Development Advances

By Site plan
Phases one and two of the new Triple Crown Estates development are shown in a rendering above. Image courtesy of Vista Design Inc.

SNOW HILL – As construction on the first phase begins, plans for the second phase of a new development off Route 589 are also progressing.

Last week, the Worcester County Planning Commission reviewed the site plan for the second phase of Triple Crown Estates, the residential community built next to Ocean Pines.

“This project has been approved for a very long time,” attorney Mark Cropper said. “It’s just a continuation of what was originally approved with no major changes.”

Cropper presented the site plan for Phase Two of Triple Crown Estates to the commission last Thursday. The project, which received initial approval in 2015, at one time included duplexes but was adjusted in 2020 and is now made up of 60 single-family homes.

Phase one, which is currently under construction, consists of 30 units while phase two, which was under review last week, will also consist of 30 units.

ocean city live cams

The homes will be connected to Ocean Pines via an extension of King Richard Road and will not be accessible via Route 589 or Gum Point Road.

“The only access is from Ocean Pines,” Cropper said.

Planning commission member Ken Church said he had received calls from residents of Gum Point Road who said they had seen construction vehicles on their street.

Cropper said the vehicles were not associated with Triple Crown Estates, but were instead related to the county’s sewer installation along Gum Point Road.

“I have been told that any activity that has been observed has nothing to do with the construction of the subdivision,” Cropper said.

He added that, as proposed, the second phase of the planned residential community (PRC) was consistent with the county’s overall plan and plans for the project had not changed since the duplexes were converted to single-family homes in 2020.

“If the RPC did not comply with the compensation plan, zoning regulations and other guidelines, it would never have been approved to begin with,” he said.

The commission voted unanimously to forward the RPC to County Commissioners with a favorable recommendation.

The Urban Planning Commission approves the plan for the implementation of the project in the city

By Site plan

May 10 – A final site plan has been approved for the second phase of an age-limited development along US 15 in Frederick that is expected to have nearly 400 units.

The city’s Planning Commission voted unanimously on Monday to approve the combined preliminary plan and final site plan for Section 2 of the Bloomfields community, being developed by Natelli Communities.

The community – on the east and south sides of Willowbrook Road and west of US 15 – will add 207 detached single-family homes and 186 townhouses and villas.

The entire Bloomfields community is bordered by Sundays Lane to the north, Willow Road to the south, US 15 to the east and Willowbrook Road to the west, according to a Planning Commission report prepared by city staffers.

The first section of the community, with 229 single-family homes and 79 townhouses/villas, was approved in November 2020, according to the staff report.

The developer is trying to take much of the design from Section 1 and has tried to focus on how the units are oriented around small parks and other areas that can be destinations for residents, said Michael Natelli, of Natelli Communities, to the commission.

The commission granted an amendment to allow noise walls in a section of the neighborhood to be up to 12 feet high – above the 6 feet allowed by the city’s land management code – to help limit the noise from nearby freeway.

Natelli said the developer would try to keep the fences under 12 feet if possible, but asked for some flexibility in the requirements.

The wall in this area will need to be further away from the homes it would protect, requiring a higher height to be effective, he said.

The project will include five types of single-family homes and two models of villas, according to the staff report.

Bloomfields was annexed to the city in two parts, according to the staff report: 286 acres in September 2009, then 252 acres in September 2012.

A previous master plan called for up to 1,200 units, 1.3 million square feet of retail or office space, and a 15-acre school site.

A preliminary plan and a final site plan for the first residential phase were approved prior to the cessation of project activities.

A new annexation resolution was passed in 2017 after Natelli Communities announced plans to create an age-restricted community.

A master plan was approved in October 2018 for 1,500 non-residential units and amenities.

The project includes 45 acres of public park and open space, including 15 acres that the city will transfer to the county for a school site and 15 acres for public park that will include a portion of the Tuscarora Creek Trail and a shared-use trail. There is also land for a future water tower.

The final 15 acres will be a linear park along US 15 that will be part of the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Scenic Byway, according to the staff report.

Planning Commission approves the plan for the implementation of the project in the city | Real estate and development

By Site plan

A final site plan has been approved for the second phase of an age-limited development along US 15 in Frederick that is expected to total nearly 400 units.

The city’s Planning Commission voted unanimously on Monday to approve the combined preliminary plan and final site plan for Section 2 of the Bloomfields community, being developed by Natelli Communities.

The community – on the east and south sides of Willowbrook Road and west of US 15 – will add 207 detached single-family homes and 186 townhouses and villas.

The entire Bloomfields community is bordered by Sundays Lane to the north, Willow Road to the south, US 15 to the east and Willowbrook Road to the west, according to a Planning Commission report prepared by city staffers.

The first section of the community, with 229 single-family homes and 79 townhouses/villas, was approved in November 2020, according to the staff report.

The developer is trying to take much of the design from Section 1 and has tried to focus on how the units are oriented around small parks and other areas that can be destinations for residents, said Michael Natelli, of Natelli Communities, to the commission.

The commission granted an amendment to allow noise walls in a section of the neighborhood to be up to 12 feet high – above the 6 feet allowed by the city’s land management code – to help limit the noise from nearby freeway.

Natelli said the developer would try to keep the fences under 12 feet if possible, but asked for some flexibility in the requirements.

The wall in this area will need to be further away from the homes it would protect, requiring a higher height to be effective, he said.

The project will include five types of single-family homes and two models of villas, according to the staff report.

Bloomfields was annexed to the city in two parts, according to the staff report: 286 acres in September 2009, then 252 acres in September 2012.

A previous master plan called for up to 1,200 units, 1.3 million square feet of retail or office space, and a 15-acre school site.

A preliminary plan and a final site plan for the first residential phase were approved prior to the cessation of project activities.

A new annexation resolution was passed in 2017 after Natelli Communities announced plans to create an age-restricted community.

A master plan was approved in October 2018 for 1,500 non-residential units and amenities.

The project includes 45 acres of public park and open space, including 15 acres that the city will transfer to the county for a school site and 15 acres for public park that will include a portion of the Tuscarora Creek Trail and a shared-use trail. There is also land for a future water tower.

The last 15 acres will be a linear Park along US 15 which will be part of the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Scenic Byway, according to the staff report.

City Council approves site plan for 224-unit development

By Site plan

Posted on Monday, May 09, 2022

Owen Sound City Council has approved a site plan application to permit the construction of 6 purpose-built 4-storey multi-unit residential buildings totaling 224 units, as well as a common amenity building, a parking area, landscaping and a network of sidewalks at 1144 1st West Ave.

The development proposal comes from Hansa Financial & Property Management Inc.

The property is the location of the former BCK Foundry where propellers were cast for Canadian-built vessels until it closed in 1996. The factory buildings were removed in the early 2000s and ownership of 8 acres has since been vacant.

The site is a former brownfield site with fully serviced utilities, access to public transit, and walking distance to amenities in the city’s riverside district, making it ideal for developing strong, livable communities that promote the long-term prosperity and social well-being. -be.

More information on this and other projects is available on the City’s website at www.owensound.ca/development.

For more information, please contact Amy Cann, Planning and Heritage Manager at 519-376-4440 ext. 1232 or by email at [email protected]

Fast facts:

  • The Application for Site Plan Approval proposes the construction of six (6) purpose-built four-storey multi-unit residential rental buildings with a total of 224 units at 1144 1st Ave W.
  • A number of studies, including a site condition report and a traffic impact study, were submitted in support of the applications.
  • The proposal is consistent with the policies of the City’s 2021 Official Plan and meets the requirements of the City’s Zoning By-law

-30-

Site Development Manager – Data Center

By Site development
This opportunity is with a market leader in the critical data center developer / wholesaler / colo provider space. This company provides data center solutions tailored to the requirements of their customers’ critical operational facilities. They ensure the reliability of critical installations for most of the world’s largest organizations, including the Hyperscale market.

Data Center Strategy and Site Development Manager – Ashburn, VA
This position is also available in: Santa Clara CA, Portland OR, Denver CO, Chicago IL, Charlotte NC, Atlanta GA, Dallas TX and Toronto ON.

Our client is looking for a Site Development Manager. The ideal candidate will have extensive experience leading data center and infrastructure development efforts, including ownership due diligence and licensing, site and facility design, utility interconnection, finances and taxes. The candidate should also understand municipal issues as they relate to site strategy and land acquisition.

Responsibilities:

  • Lead infrastructure development activities, including negotiation of land deals and support agreements
  • Develop and manage project budgets
  • Assist in the development and management of project budgets and participate in data center site localization efforts
  • Managing due diligence and permitting efforts, optimizing utility and network interconnections, collaborating with design and construction teams
  • Negotiate data center development transactions, including supporting legal real estate procedures
  • Maintain strategic relationships with stakeholders in the region
  • Collaborate with the sales team to offer custom build opportunities and product development

Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree in business, finance, construction or engineering, master’s a huge plus
  • 3-6 years of experience developing data center sites and other mission critical facilities
  • Previous experience with acquisition of existing sites/assets
  • Involved in the placement of vertical telecom assets
  • In-depth understanding and experience in conducting complex transactions
  • Attention to detail and ability to manage multiple projects with internal staff, external consultants, vendors and other stakeholders
  • Ability to effectively communicate complex business and market information and analysis at all organizational levels to include senior management, utility partners, government officials and local stakeholders
  • Proficiency in MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint
  • Must pass a comprehensive background check
  • Travel required is 25-50%

Submission Instructions:

Qualified candidates can send their CV to [email protected] (CV on pkaza dot com) with 15306048 in the subject. After applying, if you have any further questions, you can call 973-895-5200 and ask for Iggy. You can also submit through our career portal and also see all of our critical plant openings at: https://jobs.pkaza.com

If this job isn’t for you – feel free to pass it on to someone who might be a good fit – WE PAY FOR RECOMMENDATIONS!!

EOE/AA Employer M/F/D/V

Pkaza, LLC is a third-party employment company. All fees assessed by Pkaza will be paid by the employer we represent and not by the candidate.

City gets site plan for new dispensary – Hasso Hering

By Site plan

Seen from across Ninth, this is the site of a proposed “Albany Dispensary”, between the street and the back of the white building in the background.

Albany’s planning division issued public notice of a proposed construction project, called “Cannabros Albany” on one plan sheet and “Albany Dispensary” on another, off the eastbound leg exiting the Pacific Boulevard overpass.

The vacant property sits on two adjoining tax lots at 739 and 815 Ninth Ave. SE Ninth Avenue, it is part of the couplet carrying two freeways, Oregon 99E and US 20.

The site is between the freeway and the back of a strip mall facing Pacific Boulevard. There is already a marijuana store in the mall and two more less than a block east.

The owner, Peter E. Brock of Sherwood, told me on the phone that the project was still in the planning stage and that he did not want to comment on it.

Plans submitted to the city for review call for a one-story 2,438 square foot retail building. Planning staff say it’s a marijuana store. There would be parking for 18 cars and 10 bicycles.

Planning staff said the application was for site plan approval as well as an adjustment to a property line.

Property owners within 300 feet were notified of the application and asked to comment on it against city development code standards. The standards cover things like off-street parking, landscaping and more. Comments are expected before the close of business on May 18.

The zoning designation for the property is “Commercial Community” and the proposed use is permitted.

Site plan approval is required before a building permit can be issued. But not all approved site plans result in something being built. (hh)

This bare parcel of land is approximately where the parking lot for the proposed building would be.

Site plan to be presented for new South Chatham Catholic School

By Site plan

Content of the article

A site plan for a new Catholic elementary school and day care center in south Chatham will be presented to city council on Monday.

Content of the article

The property is located on the south side of a recent extension of Tweedsmuir Avenue West, west of Keil Drive South. The targeted lands of 3.24 hectares are currently vacant.

St. Clair Catholic District School Board is proposing the construction of a 3,129 square meter facility while +VG The Ventin Group Architects Ltd. participate in the design of the project.

In the plan, the new two-story school would have an adjoining single-story daycare center.

The Ontario Ministry of Education approved $26.6 million in 2017 for the local Catholic school board to merge Chatham’s six elementary schools into two new schools to deal with declining enrollment.

The school board already owned land on McNaughton Avenue West where the $16 million St. Angela Merici Catholic Elementary School was built and is now open.

In December 2020, council approved the proposed Plan of Subdivision Application, Official Plan Amendment and Zoning By-law Amendment for future institutional uses.

‘The proposed primary school and day care center is within the urban limits of Chatham and is adjacent to the existing built-up residential areas, which it will serve,’ says a planning report.

“The development is an efficient use of vacant, appropriately designated land that has access to all municipal services and is in an area that includes existing and planned transit facilities and other public services.”

Halifax councilors call for revisions to site plan for homeless tents

By Site plan

Despite lingering questions over designated tent sites for the homeless, Halifax Regional Municipality councilors have agreed to move forward with a revised version of the proposal.

Read more:

Why having some parks for homeless people in Halifax ‘misses the point’, says expert

HRM staff initially recommended 16 possible outdoor sites on municipal land that they deemed suitable for accommodation – 11 of them for “overnight stays” and five for longer-term situations.

Halifax staff proposed 16 outdoor spaces across the municipality where people could shelter.

Halifax staff proposed 16 outdoor spaces across the municipality where people could shelter.


Halifax


The motion passed on Tuesday evening included asking staff to formalize the criteria and locations of designated accommodation sites, while removing one-night options. Most councilors objected to one-night options, which would only be open from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.

The story continues under the ad

“If someone doesn’t want to leave at 8 o’clock and has nowhere to go, where do they go? Will they turn around the corner waiting for the compliance officer to leave? It’s a tricky situation,” the adviser said. Iona Stoddard, who represents District 12 (Timberlea – Beechville – Clayton Park – Wedgewood).

An amendment was made, requesting a staff report on the negotiation of a memorandum of understanding with the province on support for unhoused residents. This report, the advisers said, should define the roles of each level of government.

“The least worst option”

Staff told councilors at Tuesday’s virtual council meeting that there have been people sleeping “roughly” in the municipality for decades now.

Com. Waye Mason, who represents District 7 (Halifax South Downtown), said designated spots will only work if they are properly stocked and safe.

“We need to make sure these camps are a place that maximizes safety for everyone,” he added.

Read more:

Nova Scotia Housing Crisis: How the Emergency Reached a Boiling Point

The report was prepared after a six-week reassessment of the city’s approach to homelessness and encampments. The city and province recently partnered to create modular units to provide housing on the Halifax and Dartmouth side. The Dartmouth units were operational by January. The Halifax versions have not yet been opened.

The story continues under the ad

In a statement to Global News, Halifax Mutual Aid said the group was disappointed with the report from HRM staff.

“Halifax Mutual Aid is disappointed that the council did not consult a single member of the homeless community when drafting a report which directly impacts their safety and self-reliance,” a spokesperson wrote.

“The absolute bare minimum they could have done was involve people in their planning. They should be a primary stakeholder in this conversation. This once again shows their lack of compassion for our homeless friends and neighbors.

Deputy Mayor Pam Lovelace, who represents District 13 (Hammonds Plains – St. Margarets), echoed that concern.

“Their voices are not in this report. Yes, we have voices of homeless people, but the most important people we’re trying to help – we haven’t heard from them,” she said at the council meeting.

She said the idea of ​​designated sites had “good intentions, but it’s not going to work.”

Modular units work, she said, because they’ve partnered with an organization that has on-site workers and community groups to work with clients.

“But if you start placing people only in these designated sites without any management, coordination or community connection, it will be chaos,” she said.

The story continues under the ad

‘I can’t support this until staff come up with a real detailed plan of how the rules and regulations will actually be enforced.’


Click to play video: “Report details hardship of homeless people in Halifax”







Report details plight of homeless people in Halifax


Report details plight of homeless people in Halifax – April 6, 2022

Vicky Levack, a housing and disability advocate with PADS Community Network, watched the debate and told Global News that law enforcement is still a top concern for many in the community.

“We are concerned about the powers of compliance officers and whether the police will be used,” she said. “They say they won’t unless there is actually violence perpetrated against someone.”

The issue of security was raised several times by councilors during the council meeting.

“I don’t want to see August 18 recreated in 16 different places,” the adviser said. Lisa Blackburn, who represents District 14 (Middle/Upper Sackville – Beaver Bank – Lucasville), in reference to evictions at downtown Halifax sites last year.

The story continues under the ad

She and others have also expressed frustration about the province’s lack of input. Housing, they pointed out, falls under provincial jurisdiction.

“We’re running out of millions of reserve dollars that we can get off the couch to spend on this problem,” Blackburn said.

She added that the municipality’s “level of expertise” was “reaching its limit.

The motion adopted by the board in its entirety:

THAT Halifax Regional Council:

1) Direct the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) to continue to support the province and other partners to ensure people have safe, supportive and affordable housing,

2) To request the CAO to continue its efforts to increase the availability of affordable housing, as described in the body of this report,

3) Direct the CAO to formalize the criteria and locations for the designation of overnight accommodation sites in the parks in accordance with the criteria and locations described in the body of the staff report dated April 28, 2022, with the deletion of the sites overnight camping, and adding these sites to the list of potential longer-term camping sites if necessary and possible to ensure sufficient supplies to meet requests to be brought back to Council for consideration,

4) Direct the CAO to continue to review options for adding off-park sites to the inventory of outdoor sites available for overnight accommodation,”

The story continues under the ad

5) Authorize the Executive Director to negotiate and enter into a contribution agreement with United Way to convene a lived experience committee to advise staff, and

6) Request the CAO to return to the Board with a subsequent report with additional analysis and recommendations for actions, including a timeline and plan to support people transition, education and implementation that is led and provided by civilian personnel.

7) Request the Executive Director to provide a staff report on the negotiation of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Province of Nova Scotia on support for non-housed HRM residents. The report should include defining the roles of each level of government and specific actions to support and prevent homelessness within HRM.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Site plan for three-house project approved | Beaches

By Site plan

INDIAN SHORES — A developer who had asked for the construction of three single-family residences on 2nd Street in the Town Square neighborhood has revised the construction plans for the condominium units, which appeased members of the planning and zoning board and of the city council.

Both councils unanimously approved the project on April 26, 3-0 by the planning board and 5-0 by the council.

A packed house attended a first planning council meeting on April 12 as well as its continuation on April 26. Residents had height issues and argued that the project would trigger flooding and disturb wildlife and vegetation. Opponents said the 3-sided garages would be a potential hurricane hazard, there would be parking issues due to construction trucks, and they were concerned about pile driving.

An issue with the middle building in the site plan being too small to meet the city’s criteria for a single-family dwelling led Hunter P. Brown, who was representing New Port Richey developer Coastal Design Consultants at the meeting, to agree to change the concept of three individual single-family dwellings to condominium status.

City Engineer Jerry Dabkowski and City Building Official Brian Rusu said the proposed site plan meets or exceeds all existing city code requirements. Both supported the plan once the lot size met condominium requirements versus single family residence requirements.

Dabkowski noted three conditions: the applicant had to be aware that the state Department of Environmental Protection permit expires on May 22, 2024; Applicant must demonstrate purchase of 0.07 Saltwater Forest (Mangrove) and Wetland Mitigation Credits from Little Pine Island Mitigation Bank; and an Army Corps of Engineers permit appeared to have expired, with the applicant required to prove that the permit is still valid in writing to the Corps.

Police Chief Rick Swann also required the development to submit a traffic control plan as part of the permit requirements.

Brown noted that a silt fence would surround the construction area to keep the construction contained.

In other business, council was told that the civic center has officially reopened for recreation classes, Library Read & Feed and other events from May 2.

Convalt Energy obtains site plan approval from Hounsfield planners

By Site plan

May 4 – HOUNSFIELD – Convalt Energy has received site plan approval from Hounsfield City Council to begin construction of a 330,000 square foot solar panel manufacturing facility near Watertown International Airport on Highway 12F.

The five-member board of directors unanimously approved the project on Tuesday evening.

“I think this is a big step forward,” said Convalt CEO Hari Achuthan. “We just have a lot of work ahead of us now to do that.”

Mr Achuthan said construction will likely start in July, although he hopes for June. Operations are expected to begin early next year.

“This is the most important step,” he said of the planning board’s approval.

The next step is for Convalt to gather financing documents and submit approvals to the US Department of Agriculture for a loan guarantee.

“And once that’s done, I think we’ll be revolutionary,” he said.

Convalt purchased two Watertown buildings that will be used for storage – the former New York Air Brake building at 100 Purdy Ave. and part of the Black Clawson complex at 511 Pearl St.

The company plans to invest $4 million to renovate the 52,000-square-foot Purdy Avenue structure into 100,000 square feet of space, Jefferson County Economic Development CEO David J. .Zembiec.

A section of the old air brake structure continues to house the Living Waters Fellowship Church. Mr Achuthan said last week that he planned to build a new church near the Purdy Avenue property to replace meeting space.

The Watertown Local Development Corp., also known as the Watertown Trust, approved a $300,000 bridging loan for Convalt on Thursday.

The loan will be combined with another $1.050 million loan from the Jefferson County Industrial Development Agency and the Sackets Harbor Local Development Corp. which will be used for working capital.

Funding from the bridge gap will go to trucking $8 million worth of solar power plant equipment the company purchased from SunPower, a former Oregon solar company. The first of more than 200 trucks carrying the equipment began arriving last week and will be stored at the Purdy Avenue and Pearl Street buildings.

The company plans to employ more than 380 workers in the first three years of the plant.

Times writer Craig Fox contributed to this story.

MPC Approves Checkers Site Plan and Old Jesup Road Development

By Site plan

May 4 – The Glynn County Continental Planning Commission voted on Tuesday to approve a site plan for a new Checkers drive-thru restaurant on Altama Avenue.

The land on which the developer, listed in county documents as Valerie Babb of Starrchex Georgia LLC, would like to build the 1,343-square-foot drive-thru restaurant is a wooded lot at 5599 Altama Ave. road intersection with the Scranton Connector near Golden Isles Laundry and Dollar General.

In October 2021, the MPC voted to rezone the property from medium residential to roadside commercial to allow for new development.

The planning commissioners voted 7-0 to approve the development.

Katarina Crumpler, with EMC Engineering, represented the developer on Tuesday. She said it was too early to tell when construction might begin or when the restaurant might open due to the lengthy development approval process that remained.

The MPC also voted to recommend approval of a rezoning on Old Jesup Road to allow up to 70 residential units on the west side of the road, just south of Walker Road.

County Community Development Department Director Pamela Thompson recommended that the MPC require the applicant to conduct a traffic survey prior to construction, which the commission did.

Jake Hightower of Roberts Civil Engineering gave the MPC and the public a first look at the proposed neighborhood. While the proposed rezoning would allow for 90 residential units, the development is expected to be closer to 60 units.

“What she (the owner, Mayte Cruz) envisioned was a new neighborhood similar to the other nearby development of Settler’s Cove,” Hightower said.

The intention is to create a peaceful neighborhood of clean, well-built homes with traditional off-street parking. All but a few units the developer intends to keep will be sold at a standard market rate to individual owners, he said, and will ideally benefit property values ​​in the area.

MPC member Richard Strickland asked if the main road through the neighborhood could connect to Boyd Road. Hightower said the owner had no ownership of the property that would allow this. It would also require a level crossing, he said.

Several residents expressed concerns about problems the development would cause for traffic and the sewage system on the busy thoroughfare.

Brenda Boyd Cross, who lives nearby, said her family had lived opposite the proposed development for over 100 years. More houses are planned on Walker Road around the corner, she said, and overall both will have a negative impact on traffic. She was also very concerned that the development would cater to low-income residents.

“We frown on having this here because we’re scared. If it’s high income, we’ll be fine, but if it’s low income, we’d be scared,” Cross said. “We love our house, but we don’t want someone moving in who destroys our house or kills us, you know what I mean?”

Timothy Johnson said his family have also lived on Old Jesup Road for over 100 years. He was mainly concerned about traffic. The Canal Crossing shopping center on Canal Road has seen a noticeable increase in traffic and Old Jesup Road needs more work to reduce traffic, not development. Emergency vehicles are already having trouble crossing the area.

Rather than improving property values, Johnson said the neighborhood would hurt him because of all the trees that would be cut down and overload the area’s sewer system.

Neighboring resident Mike Carter said he wanted a privacy fence around the neighborhood, which Hightower said would be part of the project.

Hightower responded to citizens’ concerns by assuring them that the developer would carry out a traffic study to ensure that the necessary road arrangements were taken into account.

In response to questions about sewer capacity, he said the Brunswick-Glynn County Joint Water and Sewer Commission had issued a letter confirming the system could accommodate the new development.

He reiterated that the intent is to create a clean, thoughtful, and orderly neighborhood by addressing Cross’s concerns about low-income residents.

MPC member Missy Neu suggested the developer agree to lower the residential unit cap from 90 to 60. Hightower said it was a reasonable request, but would significantly hurt the owner’s potential income.

Mike Boatright, another MPC member, said any traffic problems arising from the property would be temporary as Old Jesup Road will have to be widened to four lanes anyway.

In the end, the MPC voted to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning on the condition that townhouses be excluded from development and density be capped at seven residential units per acre for a maximum of 70 units. residential.

Planning Commissioners Strickland, Boatright, Neu, Darrel Dawson and Chair Sherrye Gibbs voted in favor of the motion with restrictions. MPC member Bo Clark was the only opposing vote.

The Glynn County Commission will decide on the rezoning at an upcoming meeting.

In other cases, the MPC has recommended approval for a rezoning at Heritage Christian Academy.

Thompson said the church to which the school is attached wants to remove the old mission house and replace it with new modular classrooms, but cannot due to the residential zoning of that part of the property. The church has requested that this portion of the property be rezoned to commercial zoning.

The commissioners voted unanimously to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning.

MPC members also voted for:

—Approve a site plan for a new medical practice at 140 Martin Palmer Drive.

—Approve a site plan for a new 50 foot by 20 foot storage building at Golden Isles Collision on Candler Road.

– Recommend that the County Commission approve a rezoning of a property at the corner of Ga. 99 and Chanslor Road to allow for more residential development in addition to residential and commercial uses already permitted.

MPC Approves Checkers Site Plan and Old Jesup Road Development | Local News

By Site plan

On Tuesday, the Glynn County Continental Planning Commission voted to approve a site plan for a new Checkers drive-thru restaurant on Altama Avenue.

The land on which the developer, listed in county documents as Valerie Babb of Starrchex Georgia LLC, would like to build the 1,343-square-foot drive-thru restaurant is a wooded lot at 5599 Altama Ave. Road intersection with the Scranton Connector near Golden Isles Laundry and Dollar General.

In October 2021, the MPC voted to rezone the property from medium residential to roadside commercial to allow for new development.

The planning commissioners voted 7-0 to approve the development.

Katarina Crumpler, with EMC Engineering, represented the developer on Tuesday. She said it was too early to say when construction might begin or when the restaurant might open due to the lengthy development approval process that remained.

The MPC also voted to recommend approval of a rezoning on Old Jesup Road to allow up to two 90 residential units on the west side of the road, just south of Walker Road.

County Community Development Department Director Pamela Thompson recommended that the MPC require the applicant to conduct a pre-construction traffic survey, which the commission did.

Jake Hightower of Roberts Civil Engineering gave the MPC and the public a first look at the proposed neighborhood. While the proposed rezoning would allow for 90 residential units, the development is expected to be closer to 60 units.

“What she (the owner, Mayte Cruz) envisioned was a new neighborhood similar to the other neighboring development of Settler’s Cove,” Hightower said.

The intention is to create a peaceful neighborhood of clean, well-built homes with traditional off-street parking. All but a few units the developer intends to keep will be sold at a standard market rate to individual owners, he said, and will ideally benefit property values ​​in the area.

MPC member Richard Strickland asked if the main road through the neighborhood could connect to Boyd Road. Hightower said the owner had no ownership of the property that would allow this. It would also require a level crossing, he said.

Several residents expressed concerns about problems the development would cause for traffic and the sewage system on the busy thoroughfare.

Brenda Boyd Cross, who lives nearby, said her family had lived opposite the proposed development for over 100 years. More homes are planned on Walker Road around the corner, she said, and overall both will have a negative impact on traffic. She was also very concerned that the development would cater to low-income residents.

“We disapprove of the idea of ​​having this here because we are afraid. If it’s high income, we’d be fine, but if it’s low income, we’d be scared,” Cross said. “We love our house, but we don’t want someone moving in who’s going to destroy our house, or who’s going to kill us, you know what I mean?”

Timothy Johnson said his family has also lived on Old Jesup Road for over 100 years. He was mainly concerned about traffic. The Canal Crossing shopping center on Canal Road has seen a noticeable increase in traffic and Old Jesup Road needs more work to reduce traffic, not development. Emergency vehicles are already having trouble crossing the area.

Rather than improving property values, Johnson said the neighborhood would hurt him because of all the trees that would be cut down and overload the area’s sewer system.

Neighboring resident Mike Carter said he wanted a privacy fence around the neighborhood, which Hightower said would be part of the project.

Hightower responded to citizens’ concerns by assuring them that the developer would carry out a traffic study to ensure that the necessary road arrangements were taken into account.

In response to questions about sewer capacity, he said the Brunswick-Glynn County Joint Water and Sewer Commission had issued a letter confirming the system could accommodate the new development.

He reiterated that the intent is to create a clean, thoughtful, and orderly neighborhood by addressing Cross’s concerns about low-income residents.

MPC member Missy Neu suggested the developer agree to lower the residential unit cap from 90 to 60. Hightower said it was a reasonable request, but would significantly hurt the landlord’s potential income.

Mike Boatright, another MPC member, said any traffic problems arising from the property would be temporary as Old Jesup Road will have to be widened to four lanes anyway.

In the end, the MPC voted to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning on the condition that townhouses be excluded from development and density be capped at seven residential units per acre for a maximum of 70 units. residential.

Planning Commissioners Strickland, Boatright, Neu, Darrel Dawson and Chair Sherrye Gibbs voted in favor of the motion with restrictions. MPC member Bo Clark was the only opposing vote.

The Glynn County Commission will decide on the rezoning at an upcoming meeting.

In other cases, the MPC has recommended approval for a rezoning at Heritage Christian Academy.

Thompson said the church to which the school is attached wants to remove the old mission house and replace it with new modular classrooms, but cannot due to the residential zoning of that part of the property. The church has requested that this portion of the property be rezoned to commercial zoning.

Commissioners voted unanimously to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning.

MPC members also voted for:

• Approve a site plan for a new medical practice at 140 Martin Palmer Drive.

• Approve a site plan for a new 50 foot by 20 foot storage building at Golden Isles Collision on Candler Road.

• Recommend that the County Commission approve a rezoning of a property at the corner of Ga. 99 and Chanslor Road to allow for more residential development in addition to residential and commercial uses already permitted.

Convalt Energy Obtains Site Plan Approval from Hounsfield Planners | Business

By Site plan

HOUNSFIELD — Convalt Energy has received site plan approval from the Hounsfield Town Planning Board to begin construction of a 330,000 square foot solar panel manufacturing plant near Watertown International Airport on Highway 12F.

The five-member board of directors unanimously approved the project on Tuesday evening.

“I think this is a big step,” said Convalt CEO Hari Achuthan. “We just have a lot of work ahead of us now to do that.”

Mr Achuthan said construction will likely start in July, although he hopes for June. Operations are expected to begin early next year.

“This is the most important step,” he said of the planning board’s approval.

The next step is for Convalt to gather financing documents and submit approvals to the US Department of Agriculture for a loan guarantee.

“And once that’s done, I think we’ll be revolutionary,” he said.

Convalt purchased two Watertown buildings that will be used for storage – the former New York Air Brake building at 100 Purdy Ave. and part of the Black Clawson complex at 511 Pearl St.

The company plans to invest $4 million to renovate the 52,000 square foot Purdy Avenue structure into 100,000 square feet of space, Jefferson County Economic Development CEO David J. .Zembiec.

A section of the old air brake structure continues to house the Living Waters Fellowship Church. Mr Achuthan said last week that he planned to build a new church near the Purdy Avenue property to replace meeting space.

The Watertown Local Development Corp., also known as the Watertown Trust, approved a $300,000 bridging loan for Convalt on Thursday.

The loan will be combined with another $1.050 million loan from the Jefferson County Industrial Development Agency and the Sackets Harbor Local Development Corp. which will be used for working capital.

Funding from the bridge gap will go to trucking $8 million worth of solar power plant equipment the company purchased from SunPower, a former Oregon solar company. The first of more than 200 trucks carrying the equipment began arriving last week and will be stored at the Purdy Avenue and Pearl Street buildings.

The company plans to employ over 380 workers in the first three years of the plant.

Times writer Craig Fox contributed to this story.

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Letter to the Editor: Car Wash Site Analysis

By Site analysis

In the March issue of this publication, I wrote an article called “Site insights”. The article offered practical best practices for operators looking to build a new car wash. Among other site selection and design questions, I asked Henry Shine of WhiteWater Express Car Wash and Michael Murry of Champion Xpress Carwash, “What does a modern car wash look like in 2022?”

Click here to read more

However, as one of our readers recently reminded me, proper site selection and design is more than meets the eye. Robert Johnson, Principal Engineer of Civilogistix in Roswell, Georgia, was kind enough to take the time to share his thoughts in the following letter to the editor.

Rich: I just wanted to congratulate you on the editorial and article for the March issue of Professional Carwashing and Detailing magazine. I would just like to put more emphasis on property selection and site design.

I started designing fast food drive-throughs, convenience stores and gas stations nearly 40 years ago; Since that time, the company has evolved a lot. The automated car wash industry is no exception — in a very short time.

A big mistake I see small business owners make is to dive headlong into site selection – following all the basic car wash business advice – determined to acquire what they think is the perfect site…only for discovering this site, downtown, in the perfect location, reasonably priced, vacant for 20 years is for a reason. The reason may be imperceptible to the untrained eye.

As engineers who specialize in this type of development and have multiple car wash clients, we see the end result of what happens when investors choose the “wrong site” and have to spend many days and money trying to make it work.

Leading car wash investors have learned that they need experts at all levels to achieve the desired outcome. But, the smaller ones, some just trying to save money by “expanding”, often run up against development codes, utility restrictions and environmental regulations, and they tend to get discouraged very quickly when the site is not finished and to return them the money as soon as they expected.

As a service to prospective car wash owners/operators, someone should tell them that it’s money well spent to hire a professional engineer, who has experience in this particular type of fit-out to guide them through the procurement and entitlement phases, produce the latest effective innovations and aesthetically appealing site design, and guide the process to satisfactory completion. There is much more I could say, but time and space forbid it.

Back to my first thought, nice article, happy reading and keep providing this much needed information.

Sincerely, Robert Johnson.

Robert, thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts and for reading PC&D.

BREAKING: City OKs sitemap for new car wash

By Site plan

Can’t say it’s a good idea — Randall Guarnieri

The Rio Rancho Board of Directors on Thursday night approved a site plan application to build a car wash at 507 NM Highway NE. (Matt Hollinshead Photo/Observer)

Rio Rancho’s board of directors approved a site plan late Thursday to build a second Champion XPress car wash in the city, but not before residents voted against the proposal.

The company opened a car wash at 1890 Abrazo Road NE in March. The proposed location would be by Northern Boulevard, Monterrey Road and New Mexico Highway 528.

“When seeking new locations for development, our primary considerations include sites that the city has zoned for commercial use and areas with existing high traffic,” said company spokeswoman Lindsey Joy. Observer in an email.

“I hate to see this turn into another Stripes situation”

The Board of Directors voted 5-1 in favor of the sitemap. Councilor Dan Stoddard was absent.

Councilman Bob Tyler voted against it, arguing that Champion XPress picked the wrong location to open.

Although the city does not have the right to tell a business what it can or cannot build on a property, the access location, off Monterrey Road, could be a barrier for residents. , did he declare.

Several residents agreed.

The car wash is said to be just a few feet from the home of Professor Randall Guarnieri of Cleveland High School.

There could be dozens of cars queuing on the street in the afternoon when school buses come down to drop off the kids. Traffic would turn the street into a one-lane road, he said.

“I can’t say it’s a good idea,” Guarnieri said.

Resident Darryl Gregerson said he was worried about traffic going in and out of the car wash.

“I would hate to see this turn into another Stripes (Burrito) situation,” he said.

The proposed car wash would have three lanes that can accommodate up to 34 vehicles as well as 16 drying stations, according to the company.

“These elements help us understand how quickly cars will be able to cross the queue and start moving on the roads, so that they don’t all go off the road at once,” Councilor Karissa said. Culbreath. .

The Board then approved an amendment directing Champion Xpress to come up with a design to create a right turn lane at the car wash. The plan would then be submitted to the city’s public works department.

Other Concerns

Resident Andrea Lerner said she fears the flooding on Monterrey Road will get worse as the car wash opens.

Hull then proposed an amendment – ​​which was approved – requiring the company to submit its grading and drainage permit for review by the city.

Some residents also felt that the car wash would interfere with their scenic views of the city.

Kevin Breen said he loved being able to watch the Sandia Mountains and the balloons at the annual party.

“Mass Ascension is going to be totally clogged with this car wash,” he said.

The car wash would only be about 36 feet tall and things could be worse. For example, the proposed company could have been larger, Hull later said.

“Unless you own the property between you and the mountain, there are no protected views in the town of Rio Rancho,” he said, adding that the town “cannot deprive someone of a property right which has been established”.

Laurel Park Phase One, 173 Units, Under Site Plan Review | Business

By Site plan

Phase one site plans are currently under review for the 306-unit Laurel Park housing development on 60 acres adjoining Highpoint, which will be located at the end of Laurel Street off Orange Road in the town of Culpeper .

The Culpeper Planning Commission provided an update on the project during a working session on March 29.

Once proposed to be built in three phases, Laurel Park is now expected to develop in two phases, starting with 84 single-family homes and 89 townhouses for a total of 173 new residences. The Culpeper City Council rezoned the property, bordered to the south by US Route 29, for the higher density earlier this year.

The Laurel Street extension will provide access to the neighborhood via a roundabout leading to Lily Lane and Laurel Park Drive on the north side, parallel to Apricot Drive on the south and seven cross streets, in accordance with planning and zoning . The development will have 19.2 acres of open space, a park on the west boundary, two pocket parks on the east side and a center green in the middle.

People also read…

Laurel Park will have two community basketball courts and a capacity of nearly 1,400 parking spaces – a mix of garages, driveways, on-street parking and off-street parking. The extended Laurel Street will be widened with sidewalks, curbs and gutters installed before the first certificate of occupancy is issued, city staff told the planning commission.

Improvements to the Orange Road intersection, including dedicated turning lanes, will be completed near the end of the first phase. A total of 746 parking spaces will be provided in the initial phase along with one of the basketball courts and pocket parks.

The city’s multi-agency technical review committee continues to review the phase one site plan also still under review by the Department of Environmental Quality.

Asked by the planning commission what the homes in Laurel Park would look like, city planner Ben Holt said the renderings are included in the project narrative, adding that the developer is not tied to them.

“I anticipate it would look like most new home construction we see right now,” Holt said.

Planning commissioner Jeffrey Mitchell championed pedestrian safety in the upcoming development. The posted speed limit will be 25 miles per hour, which means motorists will drive at 37 mph, he said. Mitchell suggested setting it to 20 mph.

Holt said the roads would be public streets with a standard 25 mph display.

Planning Commission Member, Councilor Meaghan Taylor had questions about the Orange Road deceleration lanes and whether they would be long enough to safely accommodate cars waiting to turn onto Laurel Street.

Roddy Reyes of Bowman Consulting, representing the plaintiff, said the turn lanes would meet the VDOT’s minimum standards of a 100ft right turn lane with a 100ft taper and a 100ft left turn lane with a 150 foot taper and a 200 foot transition from Elizabeth Street, across Orange Road.

Across the city, a separate site plan to launch the Greens on Lake Pelham housing development was resubmitted after the project went dormant after its initial submission in 2006 during the housing crisis.

The latest plans show 58 single-family housing lots on 23 acres, two open space lots totaling 0.654 acres, and three stormwater management areas. A 10-foot-wide golf cart path is proposed from the Culpeper Country Club property to Golf Drive, according to city staff.

The project is located at the north end of Sunset Lane, Country Club Estates to the northeast and bordered by the country club golf course. Access to the homes would be via Sunset Lane and Golf Drive.

Mitchell wondered how residents of the development would walk to businesses near Madison Road. He encouraged the addition of golf cart paths and other pedestrian features.

[email protected]

540/825-4315

Solar Company Withdraws Industriplex Sitemap Change Request | Woburn

By Site plan

WOBURN – As the city council prepares to declare a handful of site changes as major alterations, a Waltham-based solar energy company has recently abandoned plans to build a new access road through a North Woburn solar farm.

At their final rally at City Hall last week, the council voted unanimously to let ECA Solar withdraw without prejudice a request to change several fence lines and the site’s main access point to a new solar power facility by Commerce Way, Atlantic Avenue and New Boston. Street.

According to a memo submitted to the board earlier this month by ECA Solar representative Michael Redding, company officials intend to reconsider the proposal in light of recent comments from the Special Permits Committee. .

“[We] Respectfully withdraw our minor edit request. We plan to revise our plans based on feedback received from city council and will resubmit them in the future,” wrote Redding, who heads the company’s engineering division.

In June 2021, the city council granted the petitioner a special permit to build a solar farm on a 36-acre portion of the IndustriPlex site.

The solar panels will include a smaller 2.45 megawatt facility and a larger farm capable of generating up to 498 kilowatts of electricity. Both green power facilities will be located near a series of new residential developments off New Boston Street by Anderson Regional Transportation Center.

Since the original special permit was issued, ECA Solar officials have been asked by the Woburn Conservation Commission to move sections of the green power facility away from on-site wetlands. To reflect these changes, the petitioner earlier this spring requested permission to revise the special permit to reflect a change to the perimeter security fence and the relocation of a utility pole and streetlight.

The council generally doesn’t object to most changes, but was hesitant to call a “minor change” a proposal to add a new access road through the solar power fields from Atlantic Avenue to at a nearby Passport car park. Originally, access included a paved “apron” where maintenance workers could park while the panels were being serviced.

During a discussion at City Hall on the application earlier this month, members of the Special Permits Committee also concluded that the access road was a major alteration that would require an entirely new process for public audience.

In coming to this conclusion, council referred to a recent memo from Building Commissioner Thomas Quinn, who noted that he considered the requested changes to the site plan to be “substantial” in light of what was originally proposed.

Before voting to allow the petitioner to withdraw, Ward 5 Councilor Darlene Mercer-Bruen asked if council should instead reject the petition to clarify council’s position.

However, according to City Clerk Lindsay Higgins, council would not “turn down” the proposal, but rather declare the proposed changes to be “major amendments”.

In Higgins’ view, the end result of such a vote would amount to allowing the withdrawal, as the petitioner is forced to refile the application or redraw the access road in a manner more consistent with the plan of origin of the site.

“Technically, within the parameters of the order, you’re not refusing a minor modification. You consider this to be a major change and then [vote] triggers what looks like a special permit process,” Higgins explained.

Concern over waste site plan off A19 at Tollerton

By Site plan

VILLAGERS are calling on planning bosses to reject a proposal to create a waste transfer station in open countryside, fearing it could worsen an accident black spot on the A19.

Some 22 months after Riley Plant Hire Ltd applied to North Yorkshire County Council for permission to change the use of land and buildings near the A19 in Tollerton, North York, the company and residents are awaiting a recommendation from highways authority officials on whether the plan would increase the risk of accidents.

A decision on the project, which has so far been delegated to planning officials although it is controversial, is expected to follow shortly after the highways department delivers its conclusion.

Documents filed with the application by Riley Plant Hire, which specializes in demolition, excavation, plant and dumpster hire, indicate that the site would receive around 3,000 tonnes of waste per year, with 20 tonne heavy trucks making about five deliveries a day.

Read more: Darlington made list of top ten best places to live for home and office work

Company officials say the accident data “clearly demonstrates that access to the site can accommodate both the volume and capacity of traffic likely to be generated” and that the use of the A19 junction at Tollerton did not result in any accidents involving heavy goods vehicles between 2015 and 2019.

They added: ‘The application contemplates the development of a facility remote from any sensitive receptors and, although located in open countryside, the character of the site lends itself to the establishment of a facility such as this.’

The section of the trunk road between Shipton through Beninborough and North Tollerton has developed a notorious reputation for serious collisions with large vehicles over the past two decades.

Incidents on the A19 near Tollerton include a 27-year-old woman who died after a crash involving a bus and a black car last year, a York driver who was killed in a collision with a tanker in 2018 and in 2014 a 45-year-old Middlesbrough man died in a head-on collision between his car and a bus.

Since 2000 there have been several other fatal accidents on the A19 near Tollerton.

However, Hambleton District Council has raised concerns about increased use of the site, with a transport company, waste transfer site and agricultural use all operating from there.

Read more: Joyous display of iconic Bible stories told through wool – Here’s where to see it

In its objection to the scheme, Tollerton Parish Council said lorries heading to and from the remote countryside site via a narrow lane would see the flow of waste increase, causing more vehicle movement and “a nuisance additional for surrounding properties, on both sides of the A19”.

He said: “This junction is a high-risk area as traffic passes at high speed. Additional movements of heavy goods vehicles in this area will potentially increase the risk of accidents.”

Keep up to date with all the latest news on our website or follow us on Facebook, Twitter and instagram.

You can also follow our dedicated North Yorkshire Facebook page for all the latest news in the area by clicking here.

For all the top news from across the region straight to your inbox, sign up for our newsletter here.

Do you have a story for us? Contact our press office on [email protected] or contact 01325 505054

Site plan approved for a 15-unit waterfront building with underground parking

By Site plan

The Huntsville Planning Committee has approved a site plan for a three-storey building located at 32 Brunel Road and overlooking the Muskoka River.

The approval includes 15 condominium units: one one-bedroom unit, six one-bedroom units plus a den, four two-bedroom units and four three-bedroom units, according to Huntsville planning director Richard Clark.

The developer is offering about 23 parking spaces, about four above ground and 19 underground, according to Clark.

The property has an area of ​​1,849 m². It contained a dwelling and detached garage and has approximately 70 meters of river frontage and 72 meters of Brunel Road frontage.

Clark noted that in 2009, a zoning bylaw amendment was approved to allow development of 15 units with underground parking. “In addition, a minor variance was approved in 2011 to provide additional zoning relief to allow development within the 200 meter setback requirement between new housing units and water treatment facilities. worn. A site plan application proposing a similar development was also conditionally approved by the City in 2012.”

Various iterations of the plan have been proposed over the years, but on April 13, the committee agreed with the planning staff’s recommendation and approved an updated site plan for a total of 15 units. Approval is conditional on the landscaping being revised to remove landscaping along the shore, such as a retaining wall, and replace it with “appropriate native plantings to the extent possible to the satisfaction of the municipality”. And that all drawings and plans are to the satisfaction of the municipality and commenting agencies.

The owner’s planning consultant, Lanny Dennis, said he did not foresee any problems with meeting the conditions subject to site plan approval. “The owners will continue to work with the city and district to address their feedback and they are certainly looking forward to continuing the project and another infill project to help address the housing shortage in Muskoka,” Dennis said.

Owner Ed Wiebe also addressed the committee during their remote meeting. He said it was a long process. He started the project in 2009 with his partner Glen Smith, then the real estate market experienced a downturn in early 2012. But now, with the dismantling of the sewage plant and with the high demand for housing, it is the good time to move the project forward.

“I did preliminary work as you saw in the photos,” he told the committee. “There is an excavator on site. We are currently carrying out soil sampling to ensure that the site is suitable for housing. We are putting in chopper coils, it will just determine the size and quantity of chopper coils and once we are approved we will be ready to start.

An excavator sits on the site of a future 15-unit condominium.
Renderings of the proposed elevation of the building are included in the staff report. (See more at the link at the end of this post.)

Huntsville councilor Bob Stone called the building quite imposing on the river, “and from Brunel it’s right on Brunel Road, so imposing on both sides,” he added. “And yet it addresses serious housing issues and I guess we have to understand that housing is so important that we have to consider these things right on our river. I am delighted to hear that there is going to be some robust vegetation planted. I hope there are many things that protect the building from the river and from Brunel.

Stone also spoke to Wiebe and said, “I hope the facade of that – some effort can be made to make it look a lot like Muskoka and it’s hard to define what that means, but I think Mr. Wiebe knowledgeable about what we like to see in Huntsville.

Councilor Dan Armor asked if the additional cars associated with the development on Brunel Road would require a traffic study. Dennis said it would be a district requirement since Brunel is a district road, but he said a unit count below 50 does not generally require a traffic study.

Finally, the committee approved the site plan. For more information, you can find the staff report here.

Don’t miss the Doppler!

Register here to receive our email digest with links to our most recent stories.
Local news delivered to your inbox three times a week!

Click here to support local news

Silverlake Dorset luxury holiday sitemap to add huge spa, pools and restaurant

By Site plan

A master plan has been unveiled to add a spa, restaurant and sports areas to a luxury holiday village in Dorset. The Silverlake luxury holiday home site on the outskirts of Crossways near Dorchester, which was previously Warmwell Quarry, has been redeveloped into a luxury, eco-friendly site since its takeover by The Habitat First Group in 2011.

Habitat First group has submitted a reserved application to Dorset Council to create a spa with a restaurant, outdoor space, bin stores, factory and ancillary buildings, communal areas, landscaping, parking and the associated infrastructure. Known as Dorset Spa, it is proposed to be built around Lake 5, which is located at the center of the development, west of the five licensed villages and south of Knighton Heath Forest and the Biodiverse Heart.

The design and access statement outlines how the owners want to create an “open and welcoming” spa and restaurant and “provide a community center for the development as a whole”, as well as “provide economically sustainable development”. Sketches show that the restaurant will take advantage of a lake view with up to 90 seats inside and 80 seats outside, and further seating inside the bar.

Read More – Dorset family frustrated with Ukrainian visa system delays

The developers say the spa, which will contain two pools, a sauna and a steam room, is articulated to capture southern views and daylight and could accommodate 73 people in its indoor pool, 46 in its outdoor pool, 16 people in its hammam. Plans also show that its outdoor spa will contain a large thermal area with hot hubs, thermal cabins, relaxation decks and a floating fire pit, as well as a treatment area and event space.

A hydrotherapy activity hub, which offers water sports, has been offered, alongside lakeside treatments and cabins, a welcome hub and open-air spa cabins. Due to the expansion of the site, Habitat First Group believes the new site will create at least 66 new jobs with a mix of management, therapist, chef and staff roles available, and additional scope for more staff during high season.

Computer-generated sketches show that the proposed buildings will be ‘sustainable’ and ‘create a positive impact on the wider community and respect and harmonize with nature’. Natural materials, sourced locally, will be used to create buildings in line with the location, with a margin of greenery on the buildings.



Luxury holiday home site Silverlake has unveiled expansion plans to build a new restaurant, spa, cabins and more on the former Warmwell Quarry site

A number of pathways and access points for cyclists and shuttles will also be created to connect the new development to the wider site. A new car park aims to provide 180 parking spaces for guests and visitors.

The design and statement read: “Habitat First Group creates communities of private vacation homes that share a love for mother nature. By combining excellence in architecture, interior design, amenities, security and service, vacationers can escape the rigors of city life. Habitat First provides an oasis of space where families can comfortably and responsibly vacation, explore and recharge safely in acres and acres of natural habitat.

The existing site was previously a 227-hectare quarry, and before that a World War II air base. Prior to this planning application, the last phase to gain approval included a “flagship” four-bed house, numerous properties as well as outbuildings, a gym, a communal jetty on the lake and private jetties for several of the houses.

Comments are welcome on the application on Dorset Council’s planning section of its website until 21 May, with application reference number P/RES/2022/02437.

Do you have a story to share or an issue we need to investigate? Email us at [email protected] or tweet @DorsetLive_

You can stay updated on the best news near youu with FREE Dorset Live newsletters – enter your email address at the top of the page or sign up for our newsletters here.

More from Dorset Live:

New sitemap for Hospital Cross in Helston with The Range removed

By Site plan

New plans have been submitted for the proposed retail park in Helston, showing one less store.

A full planning application was submitted last September for development of land at the top of the town to include a McDonald’s, Aldi, The Range and Costa.

The pristine 2.7 hectare site is in Hospital Cross, between Sainsbury’s supermarket and Flambards theme park, and RNAS Culdrose.

However, a new sitemap has now been submitted by the Pegasus Group, on behalf of Parsonage Developments Ltd, which shows The Range removed from the plans.

This follows an objection from the Ministry of Defence, which led developers and planners to agree to an eight-week deadline to make room for further consultation, after it was found that current proposals should be modified or risk being rejected.

The objection stated that the development would fall within a safeguard zone of one of the MoD’s air navigation aids, a High Resolution Direction Finder (HRDF), which is located on a mast near the runway at RNAS Culdrose.

The safeguard zone that surrounds the HRDF is designed to maintain a protected grade line around the instrument, so that it is not obstructed or its performance degraded by nearby buildings or structures.

The sitemap now, with The Range removed Photo: The Pegasus Group/Cornwall Council

Along with breaching the Safeguard Area, the MoD also raised concerns about bird strikes that could result from the development, “providing additional attractants to dangerous birds, resulting in an increased risk of strike of birds for aircraft operating from RNAS Culdrose”.

The Ministry of Defense has also raised concerns that waste generated from the development could end up on the base’s runway, causing a risk of “foreign object debris”.

The new site plan shows that Aldi has been moved further to the Culdrose side of the site, into space that would previously have been occupied by The Range.

The remaining area is now designated as a service yard and parking lot, following a redesign of the parking spaces.

Details of the layout of McDonald’s and Costa appear to remain unchanged.

The previous sitemap with The Range alongside Aldi Picture: Pegasus.

The previous sitemap with The Range alongside Aldi Picture: Pegasus.

The app continues to divide opinion, with members of the public commenting as recently as February and March this year.

The most recent comment was supportive, with the writer saying, “I fully support this development in hopes it will improve my children’s quality of life, save me gas money to travel more away to use these businesses, and will bring jobs and business to Helston.

“I will also be returning to work very soon and as someone experienced in retail I can see the potential to get a job with one of these companies.”

Another wrote: “Interest in Helston is rapidly diminishing as it doesn’t have much to offer. I think these new ventures are a very good idea to bring more attention to the town and also more jobs for residents.

However, a third person wrote: ‘As a resident of the Lizard Peninsula, I strongly oppose this proposed development for several reasons.’

He then listed some of them, including traffic, describing the roundabouts which would be affected by the proposal as ‘already awful in the summer months’, adding: ‘There are many days where traffic is blocked for miles in all directions from these intersections. It’s the only way out of the Lizard and traffic is more than an inconvenience, it’s a significant health and safety concern. Imagine you’re rushing towards A&E or you are evacuating an area due to a fire that is spiraling out of control.

He also cited conservation as another reason, as well as concerns about noise and odor nuisance, particularly air pollution, concluding: “I believe this development project will be a social, fiscal and health burden. for our community.”

In total, Cornwall Council has received 282 comments from the public so far, with 190 objecting and 88 in favour.

The latest site plan and proposed designs can be found on the Cornwall Council website under Plans PA21/07481.

North Little Rock Unveils Entertainment Site Plan

By Site plan

North Little Rock developers and officials announced a new $28 million entertainment complex on Friday that will include a driving range, restaurants, shops, bars and bowling alley.

People filled the lobby of North Little Rock City Hall for the much-anticipated announcement that the city will land a new “family-friendly” entertainment complex that will become a major draw in central Arkansas during its opening in the last quarter of 2023.

The project will be built on the site of the now closed Wild River Country Water Park on Crystal Hill Road.

“This is something, as I said, not just for North Little Rock but for Maumelle, West Little Rock, all of central Arkansas,” North Little Rock Mayor Terry Hartwick said. “When we bring people here, now they will have something else [to do] and, yes, go spend their money.”

The new development will be dubbed Maly’s Entertainment Area, after the Conway-based developer – the Maly Group – leading the effort. Maly Group owner Dr James Thomas said he expects his project to become a new model of entertainment.

“As a child, you were probably hanging out in a mall,” said Thomas, who is also a cardiologist at Conway. “There are no more malls now, so kids and everyone else needs a place to be entertained.”

The anchor of the new entertainment complex will be a golf and dining complex called “T-Time”, similar to Top Golf, the driving range chain. The complex will also include a virtual arcade, restaurants, specialty shops and eventually a hotel and multi-family homes.

The project is estimated at $28 million, which includes plans for the driving range and bowling alley, Thomas said.

Thomas said he landed on a site in North Little Rock while researching places in the area, eyeing a spot west of Little Rock. But with Wild River Country shutting down during the pandemic, the land in North Little Rock became available.

“His [got] easy access to highways with very good visibility both from [Interstate] 40 and [Interstate] 430,” Thomas said.

After finding the location, the Maly Group approached the town of North Little Rock with their plan. Hartwick and North Little Rock development manager Robert Birch said he was happy with the plan, as it is expected to create around 200 jobs.

“One thing we miss is that we don’t have these part-time jobs that students can work,” Birch said.

Hartwick, who was carrying a golf club at Friday’s event at Town Hall, couldn’t hide his delight at the announcement, stepping in to hug Thomas, after Thomas said the project would pay off $10 million to the city per year, including tax revenue.

Announcing the project was made easier because the Maly Group did not ask the city for money or tax breaks, Hartwick and Birch said. However, at the press conference, Thomas said he wanted a four-lane road connecting his development to I-40.

When asked what made North Little Rock attractive for a developer as opposed to Little Rock, Hartwick replied “besides the mayor”, jokingly referring to Little Rock Mayor Frank Scott Jr.

For many, the news of an upcoming high-tech driving range and sports bar in central Arkansas was welcome news. In 2020, Little Rock officials attempted to get Top Golf to open a location in War Memorial Park, but ultimately no action was taken.

The North Little Rock site will be similar to Top Golf, but not affiliated with the chain and will be dubbed “T-Time”. Thomas said he considered trying to bring Top Golf to central Arkansas, but decided to back out of working with the chain.

“Oh my God, we never thought we would get such a response,” Thomas said. “We just wanted to showcase it, so Top Golf [doesn’t] announce in Little Rock.”

Thomas said he consulted Kansas City-based T-Shotz, a golf-focused entertainment and dining venue when considering his plans for North Little Rock. A previous report in the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette incorrectly reported that T-Shotz would anchor the new development at North Little Rock.

Concord approves site plan for former job security building

By Site plan

The next stage of the long-awaited redevelopment of the former Job Security Building quietly moved forward this week with a major milestone for the project just a month away.

Following widespread comment on the downtown building’s ugly appearance, the Concord Planning Board approved the John J. Flatley Company’s major site plan for demolition of the current structure and construction of 64 apartments on the 32-34 South Main Street plot.

Plans for the project include a six-story building with a fitness center, ground floor parking, a swimming pool and a pergola. Construction could be completed as early as spring or summer 2023.

The city first purchased the building from the state in 2014 for $1.575 million. Since then, the sales and development process has been bumpy. A previous deal with Dol-Soul Properties fell through and last fall the discovery of additional asbestos outside the building delayed the closing date with Flatley Company, which is now set for May 31.

In all, Concord paid $2.65 million into the property. After fees, subsidies and a final sale price of $350,000 from Flatley, the city’s net investment will be approximately $1.6 million.

Planning board chairman Richard Woodfin said that usually the board would expect more people to show up at a public hearing for a large multi-family development like this.

“This type of project would usually involve a few people, either neighbors or people with a heart to get rid of a beautiful historic building,” he said, prompting laughs.

The DES building is known for its dated facade with a grid of blue and yellow panels interspersed with windows of equal size.

By comparison, a heated aisle dispute between two East Concord neighbors took up a third of Wednesday’s board meeting, leaving a nearly empty room for the Flatley Company’s presentation.

Attorney Ray D’Amante told council he hated the current building on South Main, which has been an eyesore in downtown Concord for as long as he can remember.

“I’m very happy to be part of the team ahead of you tonight,” said D’Amante. “I’ll be even happier when that first bullet hits the side of that building.”

Council granted waivers for a traffic study requirement and a slightly steeper driveway grade.

Annual property taxes for the redeveloped site could yield between $200,000 and $257,000 per year, using the 2021 municipal tax rate. Concord estimated that the assessed value of the site would be between $8 million and $10.24 million. dollars.

These tax dollars will go to the Sears Block Tax Increment Finance District to pay off the debt before they go to the general fund. A tax increase district, or TIF district, is a tool that municipalities like Concord use to encourage economic development in a particular area by paying for infrastructure costs.

Planning Board Vice Chair Carol Foss asked the Flatley team about the lack of playgrounds in the complex’s outdoor spaces.

“I don’t see any accommodations for kids,” Foss said.

Doug Richardson, vice president of acquisitions and planning for the Flatley Company, said that at the other four Flatley properties in New Hampshire, children made up only 4 to 5 percent of occupants.

“The main residents who come to a place like this are usually young professionals and empty nests,” Richardson said.

Foss said even a few children could benefit from a swing.

On Wednesday, the council also approved a multi-colour light display on the roof of the Concord Hotel, where previously only one color could be lit at a time. Currently, the top of the building is lit with blue and yellow lights at night in support of Ukraine, which lead planner Sam Durfee said was a particular exception.

Capital Commons conducted a trial on Dec. 24 with green and red lights. Some of the light scheme ideas included red, white and blue lights for July 4 and rainbow colors for Pride month.

The East Market Street site plan is discussed –

By Site plan

Picture

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (CBS19 NEWS) — Construction of new downtown townhouses could begin in late fall this year.

Eric Woolley of Woolley Engineering and Eleventh Street Partners has submitted a preliminary site plan which includes ten townhouses along East Market Street and 11th Street NE.

Construction could take a year.

The project would also include streetscape improvements and new sidewalks.

The aim of the project is to bring a new high quality and environmentally friendly residential offer to the city centre.

“It’s extremely exciting for our team to be able to grow in Charlottesville, especially downtown in a great neighborhood,” said Keith Payne, one of the owners.

The preliminary site plan will be administratively approved by City staff as the proposed use is de jure with no rezoning or special use permits required.

However, city staff cannot approve the preliminary site plan until Charlottesville City Council acts on a related matter. The project involves the closure of a paper alley, which requires council action.

“City council does not approve closing the lane, it wouldn’t necessarily preclude approval of the current development, but we would need to make design changes in response to their action,” Woolley said.

The staff development review team is currently reviewing the preliminary site plan and subdivision applications.

Next Public Consultation for Truck and Freight Site Analysis PD&E Study

By Site analysis
FDOT logo color

PHOTO COURTESY OF FDOT

” title=”FDOTPHOTO COURTESY OF FDOT logo color”/>

IMAGE COURTESY OF FDOT

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will hold a public meeting regarding the Project Plans Development and Environmental Assessment (PD&E) of the Truck and Freight Alternate Site Analysis Project on Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 5:30 p.m. The purpose of this project is to evaluate and recommend potential alternatives for truck and freight parking sites along the I-4 corridor that are viable for use by private and public operators.

Additional public meetings for potential alternative truck parking sites along the I-4 corridor are scheduled for April 2022 for Orange and Osceola counties. A public meeting was held in Seminole County in March 2022. Each public meeting for this project will include the same information and presentations about potential sites in all counties.

The Department offers several ways for the community to participate in the meeting. All participants, regardless of the platform they choose, will participate in the same live meeting.

Virtual option: Interested parties can join the Virtual Public Meeting (VPM) from a computer, tablet or mobile device. A VPM is a free live presentation or webinar over the Internet. For this option, pre-registration is required by visiting attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2683019897236010765. Once registered, attendees will receive a confirmation email with information to join the online meeting. Please note that Internet Explorer cannot be used to register or attend this webinar. If registering online, please provide sufficient online time to view the presentation in its entirety.

Telephone option (listening only): Participants can join the meeting in listen-only mode by dialing 631-992-3221 and entering passcode 218-033-636 when prompted.

In-Person Open House Option: Attendees may attend in person by heading to Volusia County Fairgrounds, Talton Exhibit Hall, 3150 E New York Ave., DeLand, FL 32724 anytime between 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. to view a looping presentation and project exhibits , talk with project team members, and submit comments or questions.

If you are attending in person, please remember to follow all safety and hygiene guidelines as well as obey local ordinances. If you are unwell, please consider attending the meeting virtually or by phone.

All meeting materials, including the presentation, will be available on the project website at www.cflroads.com/project/447724-1 prior to the meeting.

Audience participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability, or marital status. Individuals wishing to raise concerns regarding FDOT Title VI compliance may do so by contacting Jennifer Smith, FDOT District Five Title VI Coordinator, at [email protected]

The environmental review, consultation, and other actions required by applicable federal environmental laws for this project are, or have been, conducted by FDOT pursuant to 23 USC §327 and a memorandum of understanding dated December 14, 2016, and performed by the Federal Highway Administration and FDOT.

Individuals requiring accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or individuals requiring (free) translation services should contact Mark Trebitz, PE at 386-943-5157 or [email protected] dot.state.fl.us at least seven (7) days prior to the meeting. If you have hearing or speech problems, please contact us using the Florida Relay Service, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770 (Voice).

Montreal’s Loew’s Theater commemorated in the development of a new site

By Site development
From left to right: John Marcovecchio, CEO, Magil Construction; Marco Millin, Vice President, Real Estate Financing, Business Services, Laurentian Bank; Kate Low, Regional Vice President (Quebec), Real Estate Finance, BMO; Charles Li, Tianqing Group; Kheng Ly, President and CEO, Brivia Group; Chee Sing Yip, founder of Kim Phat Group; Fangfei Wang, Deputy Director, Montreal Branch, Bank of China; Michelle Vien, Senior Director, Real Estate Finance Division, Eastern Canada, CIBC and Olivier Legault, Senior Associate Architect, BLTA. Photo courtesy Brivia Group

A 19-story mixed-use development will soon be built on the former site of Montreal’s historic Loew’s Theatre, giving the city’s Mainsfield Street a new face.

A significant presence of asbestos and significant structural constraints made it impossible to preserve what remained of the dilapidated theatre, other than the walkway over the north aisle. Moreover, the subdivision of the interior over the years has damaged the characteristic spatial sequence, affecting the historical value of the building. However, in keeping with the promoter Groupe Brivia’s commitment to Montreal’s heritage, the company is building a project in its place that blends carefully into its immediate environment, consisting of several buildings of architectural interest.

The design will reconnect Cathcart and Metcalfe streets and recall the site’s cinematic past with a dome above the main entrance soffit that will mimic the original theater ceiling. Pedestrians will be immersed in an urban mural, bringing together elements inspired by the former Loew’s Theatre.

As site excavation begins, 226 downtown residential units take another step toward completion. Future residents of the project will have the opportunity to live next to Sainte-Catherine Street, starting in 2024.

Béïque Legault Thuot Architectes (BLTA), the architects of the project, reflected the different uses of the site in their vision. At the forefront of urban life, an outdoor swimming pool on a rooftop terrace overlooking Dorchester Square and the shops and boutiques of downtown Montreal will be one of the main features of the building.

“Redeveloping an iconic site like the former Loew’s Theater requires skill and sensitivity, and I am particularly sensitive to what this place represents,” said Kheng Ly, Founder, President and CEO of Brivia Group. “As a Montrealer, I understand the attachment of citizens and the community to traces of the past. Here in Mansfield, we will strive to remember the beautiful hours and moments experienced by Montrealers who, for decades, occupied the seats of Loew’s Theatre. I want this atmospheric walkway to be a time-tested reminder of the site’s cultural past.

Planning commission approves site plan for large housing estate | Local News

By Site plan

A preliminary site plan was approved by the Defiance planning commission on Monday to build dozens of homes in the southeastern outskirts of the town.

The subject property, located at the northwest corner of the T-intersection of Carter Road and Ohio 15 in Defiance Township Section 36, is being proposed for new single family homes by Duane and Jhonelle Kees of Zion Real Estate Development in Fort Wayne.

Some 82 homes are proposed for the first round of development with another phase planned for the future.

The site plan was approved Monday without opposition and details plans for the construction of 82 single-family homes with more possible in a future phase. A small pond is proposed in each phase with houses built around them.

“We are delighted,” Johnelle Kees told the commission on Monday. “We hope you are.”

Kees hopes the houses could be started in about a year.

Asked about home prices, Kees said between $250,000 and $350,000 at today’s prices.

The site has not yet been annexed to the city.

Defiance County Commissioners have approved a petition asking for the 52,371 acres to be incorporated into Defiance, but the annexation must still be submitted to the city council for approval after a required 60-day waiting period.

The council has already approved legislation indicating which municipal services the city government would extend to the property after annexation to Defiance.

Also on Monday, the commission approved a zoning exemption requested by Cheryl Rupple of The Purple Dog, 1506 Baltimore Road, for a new building measuring 40 feet by 60 feet.

The variance allows for an eight-foot fence on the property instead of the six-foot maximum allowed under city zoning requirements.

A neighbor at 1502 Cherry St. expressed concern about maintaining a fence between properties, but it should remain.

Rupple informed the commission that his company planned to set up parking behind the building for its employees. This will allow customers to park in front.

The company offers boarding services for dogs. Rupple said 1,800 dogs were in his database.

Carolina Panthers Rock Hill SC Headquarters Site Development Schedule

By Site development

READ MORE


Panthers-Rock Hill Saga

Go in depth with what happens behind David Tepper and the Panthers ending their deal to build their headquarters in Rock Hill.


The Carolina Panthers have announced the termination of their contract with the City of Rock Hill for the construction of a new team headquarters and practice site. The project had been seen as transformational for Rock Hill and York County.

So how did the team and the city get here?

Here’s a timeline of key developments spanning five years of planning for the Panthers’ move:

An August 2018 letter from Rock Hill Mayor John Gettys to Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper, later published online by Gettys, features Rock Hill as a sports destination and invites Tepper to visit the city and explore options for a new team headquarters and training facility.

In November 2018, broadcaster and then-voice of the Carolina Panthers, Mick Mixon, spoke at a meeting of the York County Regional Chamber of Commerce in Rock Hill, where Mixon released a list of hypotheses alluding to a headquarters project.

“What if I told you a few hundred acres somewhere near here is going to be bought up pretty soon,” Mixon said at that meeting, “and a state-of-the-art training facility with restaurants, stores, banks , condos, apartments are going to be built and the Carolina Panthers business center is going to move here?”

After the meeting, area business leaders said they viewed Mixon’s comments as hypothetical and not an announcement.

“As speaker of the chamber, I hope that’s true,” said Rob Youngblood, then speaker of the chamber. “It would be great even to be considered for something like that.”

In March 2019, U.S. Representative Ralph Norman and Rock Hill Mayor John Gettys confirmed that the city and the team had discussed a headquarters in Rock Hill. The two chosen ones met the team in February 2019 to pitch the Rock Hill project.

That same month, state lawmakers and Gov. Henry McMaster met to discuss legal changes — they would ultimately be approved in May 2019 — to allow tax incentives for the Panthers.

Later in March 2019, Gettys confirmed that the Hutchison Farm site off I-77 was under consideration for the team’s training facility. The property was in York County, but later annexed to the Rock Hill town limits.

In May 2019, a joint letter signed by the mayors of Rock Hill, Columbia, Charleston, Greenville, and Myrtle Beach expressed support for the Rock Hill site. The letter from the state’s major landmarks urged state lawmakers to enact economic incentives under discussion at the time, which those lawmakers would do.

“The impact on Rock Hill and York County in the specific case before us today will be felt for generations to come,” the mayors wrote.

In June 2019, Tepper and team officials joined city and state leaders for a cheer rally in downtown Rock Hill to announce a partnership. Tepper spoke of a world-class orthopedic and executive medicine facility in addition to the Panthers facility in Rock Hill, which would attract people from across the country.

“It’s going to be a showcase here,” Tepper said at the Fountain Park rally. “We are going to bring people to this area. We’ll just have a sense of excellence not only up there for the football team, but everything we do here at Rock Hill.

In September 2019, multiple sources reported that land was under contract to be sold to the Panthers. In October 2019, Team Vice President and COO Mark Hart presented plans for the training site to the Rock Hill business community during a downtown business retreat. Hart talked about a training facility and headquarters, but also venues for other events, and even a golf course purchase.

“We want our facility in this community to have an iconic presence,” Hart said.

In November 2019, the Rock Hill City Council began the team headquarters approval process, after months of discussions ranging from allowing what could have been South Carolina’s tallest building to playing , tattooing and other possible businesses on the site.

Gettys asked its business community in December 2019 to convey the need for a sense of urgency to York County officials to bring the $2 billion Panthers project to fruition. City officials requested changes to tax districts, which the county would have to approve, to allow Opportunity Zone funding for the Panthers and other development projects.

“The one thing we’re missing to make all of this happen is a sense of urgency,” Gettys said at the time.

In February 2020, the state Department of Transportation issued a public notice of an I-77 interchange planned to serve the Panthers project. The $90 million project would be part of a larger road improvement plan in the region, boosted by the new headquarters.

In March 2020, the hiring of contractors began for the construction of the new Panthers site. That same month, York County agreed to its share of the project and released details of the incentives involving the city, county and team.

The county’s final vote in April took place despite few people being able to attend, amid the early stages of social distancing due to COVID-19.

In March 2020 the team purchased Waterford Golf Club and its planned headquarters.

In June 2020, nearly $35 million in federal funds was announced for the new I-77 exit.

Foundation stone laid in July 2020 with the aim of opening the new head office in 2023.

Hart held a virtual presentation for around 1,000 people in October 2020 to update plans for the site, which the team called “The Rock”.

In February 2021, the team had a time lapse video to show the construction progress.

A May 2021 request from the team to York County requested assistance with infrastructure costs. A letter from Hart to the county that month indicated that Rock Hill’s expected money had not come. Bonds were to be issued by the city by October 2020, according to the letter, and an extension to February 2021 had already been missed. The city said it has met its financial obligations up to this point.

“Unfortunately, infrastructure funding remains at a crossroads,” Hart wrote to the county.

In June 2021, the team and the Tepper family announced a combined donation of $700,000 to Miracle Park, indicating plans for an ongoing partnership with the city where his team would operate.

A March announcement from the team said the headquarters project would be put on hold due to ongoing funding issues with the city. An announcement from Tepper Sports & Entertainment read:

“Given the economic realities, the difficult but prudent decision has been made to put the project on hold. Ongoing work will continue with our partners to find an economically acceptable solution for all parties to continue this project at Rock Hill.

Later in March, York County agreed to a newly proposed funding agreement with the team and the city. In it, four decades of incentives would pay for the $225 million in public infrastructure at the heart of the team’s funding with the city.

On Tuesday, the team announced that it would end its contract with Rock Hill for construction at the site off I-77.

This story was originally published April 19, 2022 1:26 p.m.

Related stories from the Rock Hill Herald

John Marks graduated from Furman University in 2004 and joined the Herald in 2005. He covers community growth, municipalities, transportation and education primarily in York and Lancaster counties. The Fort Mill native has won dozens of South Carolina Press Association awards and several President McClatchy Awards for news coverage in Fort Mill and Lake Wylie.
Support my work with a digital subscription

Valvoline Roswell-JF Site Plan Approved Archives

By Site plan

Cobb commissioners on Tuesday approved an amendment to the site plan and details of the development of an oil change business in a vacant quadrant of the Roswell-Johnson Ferry Road intersection.

Valvoline Instant Oil Change’s proposal to construct a 2,088-square-foot building on the site of a former Chevron station was put on the agenda with consent from commissioners at a rezoning hearing.

You can read the revised application by clicking here and an updated development plan by clicking here.

The new company will have three bays and will have access to them on a right-in, right-out basis. The plans call for a landscaping plan and 15 parking spaces. The Chevron station, which closed in 2020, was demolished last year and the nearly three-acre lot has stood vacant ever since.

The land is in front of the Merchants Festival shopping centre, but not part of it.

The East Cobb Civic Association also submitted comments ahead of the vote that were not immediately available online.

Related stories

Receive our free newsletter by e-mail!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the week ahead in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to register, and you’re good to go!

The planning commission approves the layout plan for a large housing estate | Local News

By Site plan

A preliminary site plan was approved by the Defiance planning commission on Monday to build dozens of homes in the town’s southeastern outskirts.

The subject property, located at the northwest corner of the T-intersection of Carter Road and Ohio 15 in Defiance Township Section 36, is being proposed for new single family homes by Duane and Jhonelle Kees of Zion Real Estate Development in Fort Wayne.

Some 82 homes are proposed for the first round of development with another phase planned for the future.

The site plan was approved Monday without opposition and details plans for the construction of 82 single-family homes with more possible in a future phase. A small pond is proposed in each phase with houses built around them.

“We are delighted,” Johnelle Kees told the commission on Monday. “We hope you are.”

Kees hopes the houses could be started in about a year.

Asked about home prices, Kees said between $250,000 and $350,000 at today’s prices.

The site has not yet been annexed to the city.

Defiance County Commissioners have approved a petition asking for the 52,371 acres to be incorporated into Defiance, but the annexation must still be submitted to the city council for approval after a required 60-day waiting period.

The council has already approved legislation indicating which municipal services the city government would extend to the property after annexation to Defiance.

Also on Monday, the commission approved a zoning exemption requested by Cheryl Rupple of The Purple Dog, 1506 Baltimore Road, for a new building measuring 40 feet by 60 feet.

The variance allows for an eight-foot fence on the property instead of the six-foot maximum allowed under city zoning requirements.

A neighbor at 1502 Cherry St. expressed concern about maintaining a fence between properties, but it should remain.

Rupple informed the commission that his company planned to set up parking behind the building for its employees. This will allow customers to park in front.

The company offers boarding services for dogs. Rupple said 1,800 dogs were in his database.

Corning Northside School Site Plan Involves Rental of Single-Family Homes

By Site plan

After years of delays, plans for Northside Place have changed and 24 single-family rental homes are now planned on the former Northside School site in Corning.

Riedman Companies, which purchased the site in early 2020, originally planned to build single-family homes, costing between $336,900 and $377,900, at Northside Place.

But the plan has been delayed by COVID-19, rising costs, delays in sourcing building materials and lack of interest, forcing the company to change its approach.

Jerry Watkins, senior real estate director at Riedman Companies, said construction of the first single-family rental home will begin in April, with work on a new home beginning every two weeks thereafter.

The first house is expected to be completed in January 2023, with the entire project expected to be completed in January 2024, Watkins said. Rental rates for 1,400-1,500 square foot homes are to be determined, but will be at or above market rate.

Related:Corning city leaders angered by lack of progress on planned Northside Place housing

Lodging in Corning:Plan to resurrect Corning church project fails in city council vote

Real estate:How hot is the real estate market near Corning? Home prices rise to $133,000

Chris Sharkey, president of Corning Enterprises, said she contacted Riedman Companies in February to ask if there was a different, accelerated plan that would address the Northside Place project.

Riedman Companies, a Rochester-based company, worked diligently to develop a new plan for the project on the city’s north side.

“In terms of making that decision, if you look at some of the news and some of the stuff that’s going on out there, single family home rentals are becoming a popular thing,” Watkins said. “So we think that will be an ideal thing to do.”

Councilman Mark ReSue, I-7, who represents the neighborhood where Northside Place is located, is hopeful but not convinced the work will actually take place.

“I’ll believe it when I see it,” ReSue said. “Riedman made multiple obligations that they failed to meet.”

The letter Riedman Companies wrote to the city and Corning Enterprises regarding its new plan is not legally binding.

“They have no obligation to follow up on this,” ReSue said. “They didn’t follow up on anything else that was presented to us. When they do, that’s when I’ll start to believe it.

To date, Riedman Companies has not violated any contractual or legal agreement with the city, or any law.

But ReSue’s comments are partly due to Riedman’s announcement in late August 2021 that construction of a second single-family home would begin on the site in September. This work never took place.

The number of single-family homes built for rental purposes is growing and currently accounts for about 6% of all new homes built in the United States, according to the US Census Bureau. This number is expected to double in the next 10 years.

“Corning Enterprises will work diligently with Riedman Associates to ensure the timeline and schedule are met,” Sharkey said.

Mayor Bill Boland called Riedman’s plan a wonderful change.

“It’s something we’ve been looking forward to for quite some time,” Boland said. “It sounds like an exciting concept.”

Boland said the project reflects an emerging concept in housing across the country.

“I think it’s just a whole new product that’s welcome and innovative,” Boland said.

Riedman Companies has a strong property management presence in Corning and will manage the development. The company operates Academy Place – the former building of the Corning Free Academy – as well as locations in Hornell and Elmira.

“It’s been very successful for us down there in the southern part,” Watkins said.

Solar farm site plan discussed in Tusculum | Local News

By Site plan

The Tusculum Planning Commission reviewed a preliminary site plan for an 80-acre solar farm off Ball Road on Tuesday evening and interviewed a representative of the Silicon Ranch project owner.

Commission members raised their concerns with Emma Tillitski, a senior project development associate with the Nashville-based company.

The Planning Commission must approve a site plan so that Silicon Ranch can begin work on the property. The company finalized the purchase of the land in March and expects the solar farm to be operational by December.

Tillitski said questions posed by members of the Planning Commission on Tuesday will be answered in time for the commission’s next meeting on May 10, when company officials seek formal approval of the site plan.

On February 28, the Tusculum Council of Mayor and Commissioners approved by a 2-to-1 vote a Silicon Ranch rezoning application to make the M-1 industrial property uniformly zoned.

Commissioner Mike Burns, who is also vice-chairman of the Planning Commission, voted against the rezoning application. Teresa McCrary, Secretary of the Planning Commission, is asking for more information about the project and also for assurances from Silicon Ranch that it will restore the land to its previous state after the solar farm ceases operations.

The Tusculum Solar Farm is one of four planned for Greene County by Silicon Ranch. In addition to the Tusculum property, the company has also completed the purchase of a 141-acre parcel on Liberty Hill South Road and a 55-acre property off Reed Road, both in unincorporated sections. of Greene County.

The Tusculum solar farm would operate on land bordered by Ball Road, Afton Road and US 11E. Company officials said the solar panels would be surrounded by fencing and the property would be lined with plant pads.

Electricity produced by the solar farm would be sold to Greeneville Light & Power System and fed into the utility’s electrical grid. The Tusculum location and other planned solar farm sites are all near utility substations, Brown said.

A total of 180 solar panels housing 14,350 solar panel modules will be arranged in four separate rows on the property, which will also include two electrical transformers, two chain-link perimeter access gates and two 20-inch driveway security gates. feet. A driveway intended for use by Greeneville Light & Power System will have an entrance on US 11E, while a service road will have an entrance on Ball Road.

The site would include 3,350 feet of gravel access road. Approximately 36 acres will be fenced, along with the surrounding vegetative buffer. The Project’s “disturbance area” is just under 50 acres.

A final site plan including the envisioned landscaping was not complete, Tillitski said.

“We are working on the project with Greeneville Light & Power,” she said.

Silicon Ranch’s purchase of the 80.25-acre property from Wayne Jeffers was officially finalized on March 8. The purchase price is $1.3 million, according to a warranty deed filed with the Greene County Deed Registry Office.

Preparatory work has begun. Some trees have been cleared from certain sections of the property, Tillitski said.

The company has been in contact with the owners of land adjacent to the planned solar farm.

“Some people have been active and interested in the project,” Tillitski said.

A petition signed by more than 50 property owners opposing the rezoning application was presented to the Mayor’s Council and Commissioners ahead of the February 28 vote approving the rezoning.

Developers are trying to “maintain the integrity” of the ridge line surrounding the property, Tillitski said.

“We have tried to prevent the clearing of trees as much as possible,” she said.

The solar panels are designed to present a low profile to surrounding neighbors, Tillitski said.

McCrary is concerned about the acceptability of land use for a solar farm project.

“We have to make sure it’s legal and make sure we’re not responsible,” she said.

McCrary asked about the noise level at the solar farm. She mentioned a controversial Bitcoin mine in Limestone in Washington County that led to numerous noise complaints and lawsuits against owners to cease operations, and a Silicon Ranch solar farm in Jonesborough that began operations in January. .

Tillitski replied that solar farm technology has nothing to do with a bitcoin mine. Tillitski said she would look into any issues related to what McCrary called the “energy conversion” process at the Jonesborough Solar Farm site.

Tillitski said that once the construction phase of the Tusculum solar farm is complete, noise from power generation is barely audible on site.

Rick Fancher, who lives next door to the solar farm, said he was concerned about the location of two transformers that will be on the Tusculum property, as shown in the proposed site plan, and “the glare” from solar panels as they move during the day to convert sunlight into electricity.

The modules will be arranged to minimize glare, Tillitski said. She will also consider a request to place additional hedges along the property line.

McCrary referenced a bill pending in the state General Assembly that would direct the Tennessee Advisory Committee on Intergovernmental Relations to conduct a study “of the overall effect of solar power development in large scale in this state”.

“There’s so much we don’t know and so many issues that haven’t been looked into,” McCrary said.

To ensure that Silicon Ranch returns the land to its undeveloped state after the solar farm’s operational life ends, McCrary asked about the possibility of issuing a “decommissioning bond” to ensure that the city ​​is not responsible for the works.

“We don’t make any income unless we generate electricity” so the property isn’t allowed to fall into disrepair, Tillitski said after the meeting.

“It’s a field that we consider an asset,” she says.

Tillitski earlier told the Planning Commission that Silicon Ranch hopes to follow its previously announced timeline for the project. She will seek answers to questions posed on Tuesday ahead of the Planning Commission’s consideration of site plan approval at its May 10 meeting.

“I should be frank. We had to delay construction if the site plan was not approved in May. It would affect our relationship with Greeneville Light & Power,” she said.

Washington City Council Approves Site Plan for EBD Project | Radio KCII

By Site plan



Washington City Council Approves Site Plan for EBD Project | KCII Radio – The one to rely on



































The Washington City Council accepted a major site plan for a local business at their recent meeting.

Council has approved a resolution for a construction plan for a wood storage building at Engineered Building Design located on Highways 1 and 92 north of West Main Street. Mayor Jaron Rosien shared that he and other city officials recently heard about the project during a tour for the director of the Iowa Economic Development Authority: “I will point out that we appreciated a tour of Engineered Building Design with Sally. [Hart] and Deanna [McCusker] when Debi Durham visited and David talked about this addition. It has also gone through P&Z, there is a site plan for drainage, which has been a high priority for P&Z and is recommended for approval.

A memo from the city’s construction and zoning official, Jeff Duwa, mentioned that the site plan had been reviewed by Garden and Associates for stormwater retention and flow before being submitted to the Planning Commission. and zoning. EBD is planning a 78 foot by 128 foot structure located near its truss fabrication facility in the southeast corner of its property. This will allow for easy access and dry storage of wood for their building projects that are currently outside in the elements.


1138764958

Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.3; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/100.0.4896.88 Safari/537.36

f3d8f82ee005967538a60f70f72e841d5957a59f

1

The auditor can determine if the conditions of the site plan are met

By Site plan

Engage in Arlington civic activism and you will almost invariably be embroiled in one or more sitemap battles between the developers on the one hand, the community on the other, and somewhere in between the government. County.

At the end of the day, a deal is usually negotiated. In exchange for increased density or other bonus features, the developer agrees to provide community-specific gear. Public art here, underground utilities there, affordable housing there. . . this kind of things.

But when the vote is taken and all parties move on, what then? That could be the goal of the Arlington government auditor over the next year.

Auditor Chris Horton has offered to spend about 300 of his 2,000 hours of work in fiscal year 2023 evaluating old site plans to determine whether the benefits promised to the public have actually materialized.

His work plan, which will have to be endorsed by the County Board, was welcomed at the April 7 meeting of the government’s audit committee.

“I really like this idea,” said John Vihstadt, a former county council member who currently serves as a citizens’ representative on the panel.

Vihstadt said ensuring the community benefits emanating from site plan covenants actually materialize will go a long way to “building community confidence in how the county is handling development and growth.”
“It will be reassuring for people,” he said.

County Executive Mark Schwartz agreed with the idea, saying it would be timely and help assess “how we are doing with the promises that have been made.”

But just wait a second, some of you long involved in county activism might say. Haven’t we been down this road before?
Indeed we have.

More than 15 years ago, the county government hired a consultant to determine if site plan conditions were being met.

“There was a lot of community involvement in 2005 and 2006,” said Schwartz, who was in county government but not county executive at the time.

The consultant delivered the report and while some recommendations to improve the monitoring process were adopted, a number were never addressed.
“Some [recommendations] have been implemented, but many have not,” acknowledged Schwartz.

The reason? It often boils down to staff availability and overall government priorities.

“I don’t want to pretend we have enough people” to complete every project, the county executive said.

Horton’s proposed audit is not likely to delve into the larger topic of whether the community was getting a fair deal in sitemap agreements with developers, as this is a matter of policy rather than an administrative task.

“I’m always thinking about ‘scope drift,'” Horton said of asking for a direct assessment of whether the site plan conditions are being met.

County Council will vote on Horton’s planned fiscal 2023 work plan in June. It is likely that the site plan audit will go through the approval process; two county council members (Takis Karantonis and Christian Dorsey) sit on the audit committee and have expressed support for the idea.

“Obviously we’re very interested in that,” Karantonis said.

The site plan audit will likely be the only major new initiative in Horton’s arsenal for the upcoming fiscal year, which begins July 1, as it has a number of projects from previous years that need to be completed.

“Deferral audits are going to make up the bulk of the time spent” over the coming year, he said.

Horton is one of the few county government employees who report directly to the county council, rather than to Schwartz. The Audit Committee is an advisory committee appointed by the County Council.

Planning Board Approves Site Plan Revisions for Kmart Plaza | News

By Site plan

HERKIMER, NY — The Herkimer Planning Board approved site plan revisions for the abandoned Kmart Plaza development in Herkimer on Monday evening.

The place has been vacant since the store closed in 2017.

In October, BME Associates of Fairport, which is located near Rochester, announced that it would purchase the site and redevelop the land into 4 separate building zones that will house a mix of commercial and retail users. Pristine Auto Wash, Wellnow Urgent Care and T-Mobile are 3 of the tenants known to move into the site.

The 4and is a yet-to-be-determined fast food restaurant with drive-thru.

As for the Kmart building itself, that remains to be seen, says planning board chairman Adam Hutchinson.

“At this point, they’re not doing anything with the old K-mart building. They’re splitting the lot. They’re subdividing it into different lots. Basically, they’re focusing on developing the front half which is the parking lot right now. This is where the buildings are going to be erected”.

Rebecca Spurr, project engineer at BME Associates, told the planning committee that work on the T-Mobile and Wellnow Urgent Care buildings would begin as soon as possible.

New Multi-Site Development to Bring More Affordable Housing to Louisville | Business

By Site development

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) – A local developer has big plans to bring thousands of apartments to Louisville and help low-income families in the process.

The new development was announced Monday morning. It’s called Lou 2.2 and there are 10 resorts in the plan.

One of the approved projects – The Prestonian – will be located at the corner of South Gray Street and East Clay Street, near the Phoenix Hill neighborhood of Louisville.

LDG Development plans to create 2,200 units within the 10 complexes, some of which will be scattered throughout downtown Louisville, including the Russell neighborhood near Lake McNeely and Cane Run Road.

Some of these housing units will be set aside in an effort to meet the need for affordable housing in Louisville. The city needs 30,000 affordable housing units, so 1,300 of Lou 2.2 units will be specifically for those earning only 30-80% of the city’s median income.

LDG says the resorts will have on-site health and education services to improve the lives of its residents, especially those with low incomes.

“We all know homelessness is an issue in this community,” said Chris Dischinger, co-founder and director of LDG Development. “You don’t have to go very far to see it, feel it and believe it. And there are no easy answers to homelessness. I know that. You all know that. But we We have to start with having enough housing.”

Some of the Lou 2.2 projects are ready to go, while others are still in the proposal phase, but if all goes well, LDG Development expects the project to be completed in about 5 years.

The company plans to innovate on The Prestonian and 4 other sites by the end of this year and complete some by 2024.

Copyright 2022 by WDRB Media. All rights reserved.

Dundas 71 Main Street builder prepares site plan and permit approvals

By Site plan

Legacy Constructors Inc. this week installed temporary fencing around 71 Main Street in preparation for site plan approval and building permits for a 64-unit, nine-storey residential development on the site.

City of Hamilton spokeswoman Michelle Shantz confirmed eight site plan conditions remain outstanding, along with the city’s approval of a construction management plan and construction agreement. shoring and encroachment, before building permits are issued.

Shantz said April 5 that conditions still pending approval include: grading and drainage control; servicing plan, site plan drawing, taxes, tariff of fees, security deposit, removal of a holdback clause and special servicing agreement.

In an April 6 email to neighbors, Legacy Constructors and Porte-cochere houses vice president of operations and construction manager James Cameron said the company had arrived at the site for “preparatory activities” including tree removal and fencing installation.

“We have conducted an initial hazard assessment, with the safety of the public (and all) being our primary concern,” Cameron said in the email. “Under no circumstances should anyone enter the construction area unless authorized construction personnel.

“We will do our best to be good neighbors while working on this site, and that sentiment is echoed by the owner. We can appreciate the inconvenience and disruption that our work can sometimes bring. Please also understand that we have a job to do and are working together. If you have any legitimate concerns, please bring them to my attention. We will do our best to provide periodic updates in the future.

In a previous notice, Cameron said inquiries can be directed to his attention at 905-637-8888, ext. 204 or [email protected]

If construction excavations reveal undocumented archaeological resources, the Ontario Heritage Act requires work to be stopped and a licensed archaeologist hired for assessment.

If human remains are discovered during the excavation, the police or the coroner and the provincial registrar of cemeteries must be notified.

Solar farm site plan to be discussed by Tusculum planners | Local News

By Site plan

The Tusculum Planning Commission will meet Tuesday at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 145 Alexander St.

Agenda items include a discussion of the site plan for a solar farm off Ball Road.

The purchase of the 80-acre property by Silicon Ranch Corp. from Nashville was finalized on March 8.

The Tusculum Council of Mayor and Commissioners on February 28 approved a resolution to rezone several parcels of land for the solar panel farm at all M-1s (Industrials).

The property had been divided into zones M-1, R-1 (low-density residential area), and B-1 (neighborhood business area).

The solar panel farm will be on property bordered by Ball Road, Afton Road and East Andrew Johnson Highway in Tusculum.

The solar panel area will be surrounded by fences and the property will be lined with plant pads, a Silicon Ranch spokeswoman told council members in February before voting 2-1 in favor of the rezoning request.

A more detailed site plan will be reviewed Tuesday evening by the Planning Commission.

A final site plan is subject to the approval of the Planning Commission. Silicon Ranch must also obtain regulatory approval from the state and other agencies for the project.

Electricity produced by the solar park will be sold to Greeneville Light & Power System and fed into the power grid for use by commercial and residential customers. The Tusculum location and three others slated for solar farm development in unincorporated sections of Greene County are near utility substations.

The current site plan locates the solar park entrance area off the East Andrew Johnson Highway.

Also on the planning commission’s agenda is a discussion regarding double-width homes in the city of Tusculum.

A discussion of “possible fence regulations” in the city is listed as another agenda item.

The next scheduled Planning Commission meeting after Tuesday evening is at 6 p.m. May 10 at Tusculum City Hall.

Fleming Residence could start next year pending site plan approval

By Site plan
An architectural rendering of the proposed student residence for Fleming College on the Haliburton campus in Glebe Park. Screenshot

Fleming Residence could start next year pending site plan approval

By Darren Lum
Construction of the first phase could begin in late spring and take up to 18 months
Fleming College’s student residence plan with 94-bed space takes a step forward in its process to add much-needed accommodation to the area, following a special council meeting on March 25 which took place held virtually.
Council for the Municipality of Dysart et al accepted the zoning by-law amendment to address setback provisions and deferred the site plan agreement to be discussed at a future meeting.
The plan, which is expected to be executed in three phases, includes a 1,790 square foot residence, with four three-story buildings, divided into two pavilions, which includes 54 suites.
The first phase includes the construction of the first two buildings, with one building for each of the following phases. Pending site plan approval, the first phase is expected to begin in late spring or early summer 2023 and construction will take up to 18 months, then the college will assess the success of phase 1 by terms of occupancy to determine the need for further development. A year or two would pass before starting phase two. This residence will be served by municipal sewage and a new private well.

Even before the start of the discussion, the mayor of Dysart, Andrea Roberts, who is convinced that the residence will be filled during the opening phase, has shown her enthusiasm for the development.
“It’s a very exciting day for Dysart and for the college. It’s been a long time coming and it’s a desire of the municipality and basically the county to see a student residence here which will only help the college grow and [I’m] look forward to today’s meeting,” she said.
Public consultation on plans for Fleming College’s new residence on the 3.7 acres in Haliburton continues. Part of this already included the “traffic requirements of all neighboring property owners within 120 meters of the lands in question and the appropriate agencies were circulated for comment on March 1, 2020. The required advertisement was also placed in the local newspaper , in accordance with the requirements of the Planning Act,” said Kris Oran, Senior Planner at Dysart.
While the mood in the township and college was positive, there are concerns among stakeholders. Some of these concerns include parking, for example whether there would be designated places for students, users, which include hikers, cyclists and Nordic skiers; lighting of parking lots and walking paths; the location of the wooden frame entrance barrier (closest to the college); accessibility; ensure that a trail width is consistent with the needs of the winter snowmobile trail under the Haliburton County Snowmobile Association and ensure that the access route for emergency vehicles is established in accordance according to the requirements.

The proposed plan for the Haliburton Residence at Fleming College includes four buildings completed in three phases. Screenshot

The college and its team were encouraged to address these concerns and consider the recommendations, as presented through this process, which included delegations made at the meeting. The team’s plan includes native landscaping, lights that meet the requirements of the night sky, and ensuring a landscaped buffer between the museum’s historic buildings and the residence. The latest concerns raised are expected to be addressed in the plan which has yet to be approved and will be part of a future meeting later this year.
Area resident Adam Brind, who lives a short walk from the college parking lot, asked about lighting and suggested planting mature evergreens to reduce the light directed at the back of his home.
A member of the consulting team, DM Wills Associates Limited lead designer Joe Fleming was open to the suggestion and said it was “an excellent suggestion for mitigating light intrusion”.
He added that the trees would also help provide shade for the parking lot.
Jim Blake of the Glebe Park and Museum Committee spoke on behalf of a few groups such as the museum, the HCSA and individuals. Blake pointed out that the path between the museum and the wood-framed entrance is frequently used as a passage and should be considered part of the plan that was not visually final with a path. The kiosk is valuable and should remain, as it functions as a gathering site and the space between the gate and the parking lot is used as a staging area for groups, he added.
Blake said Mike Darlington noted that the college parking lot lights went out at night.
“That’s right, Jim. The parking [lot] the lights go out when the college is closed. However, once we start having a residence there where students come and go all hours of the night, we will have to be mindful of their safety. That being said, I think we can have other conversations around the overflow parking lot [furthest away from the college]. I think we can do it for sure. But we can’t turn off all the lights. We just have to be very, very mindful of student safety,” said Sandra Dupret, Fleming College’s executive vice president, academic and student experience.

Blake also raised concerns with Darlington about “how the water management ditch silted up at the bottom of the hill near the leaf sculpture”. It has been suggested and it needs to be looked into, so that the water does not flow into the houses where his residence is instead of going east to Head Lake.
Another issue that came up at the meeting was the planned use of asphalt for the nearly 200-space parking lot, which was chosen in part for accessibility. The council was concerned about the environmental problems that asphalt could pose and that it was not complementary to the environment.
“Dealing with climate change and everything else in our world is always about trade-offs. And, you know, I guess I’m counting on the college team to kind of express a willingness or an unwillingness to go away, maybe, to reassess the need for all that asphalt,” Smith said.
Until council saw this recent plan, they were unaware of the choice to use asphalt for the parking lot. The Fleming team said stormwater management was being considered to mitigate flooding prior to the Darlington sighting.

Dupret said she recognizes the concern over the choice of surface.
She will consult with the team to deliberate on options related to the amount of asphalt used as requested by council.
Smith suggested the team look at the Minden Animal Hospital parking lot, with its permeable surface, as an example to consider.
Prism Partners Inc. co-chief executive Susan Conner, who is the project manager for the development, said the timeline for completion of the three phases is not known at this time.
“We heard a lot today. I think we need to digest that and think about what those solutions would look like, both in terms of implementation and cost of implementation. And I also think that working with Kris [Orsan, Dysart senior planner] and Jeff [Iles, Dysart director of planning]we need to do some housekeeping with the site plan agreement that you have in front of you… I think we need to do another draft, you know, and work with the staff to do a draft that addresses some of the things that I just spoke,” she said.

Auburn Planning Board reviews Popeyes site plan | Business

By Site plan

Traffic was the main topic of conversation when the Auburn Planning Board considered a proposed Grant Avenue development that includes a Popeyes restaurant.

Engineer Brett Steenburgh and Kevin Parisi of developer Liberty Restaurants presented the project site plan to the board on Tuesday. It would merge six parcels — 121, 135, 139, 143 and 145 Grant Ave., and 9-13 McGarr St. — into three. The first would be a Popeyes and the second another quick-service restaurant, and both would be connected to Grant Avenue by a new access road.

The third plot was originally intended to be a two-story apartment complex. However, Steenburgh told the board that the developer is now considering a temperature-controlled self-storage facility on the 3.1-acre parcel. In addition to attracting less traffic, such an installation would meet a need in the sector, according to market studies. It would still have two floors and contain a freight elevator.

People also read…

The three houses, two garages and the commercial warehouse currently on the lots would be demolished.

“We hope to redevelop this and make it better than it would have been or was when these houses were occupied,” Steenburgh said.

The site plan will continue to take shape as Liberty works with the State Department of Transportation on traffic issues. Stephen Selvek, the city’s deputy director of planning and development, said the department’s analysis will be “critical” to the city’s decision on whether the site can support the project. According to department Datathis segment of Grant Avenue is Auburn’s busiest neighborhood.

Steenburgh said he didn’t anticipate Popeyes and the other restaurant, to be determined, would attract much more traffic. Popeyes would have two drive-thru lanes that can accommodate 12 to 14 vehicles, as well as 17 parking spaces, so backups wouldn’t be an issue either. However, Steenburgh continued, traffic patterns and especially turning movements could be altered by the project.

One way Liberty could mitigate those changes is to only allow right turns onto Grant Avenue from the access road, he said. Another possibility is to connect the road to Standart Avenue, and the developer is contacting the neighboring property owner in the hope that this will happen. Liberty also hopes to reduce the number of sidewalk plots on Grant Avenue from the current four.

One of the nation’s most popular fast-food chains may be coming to Auburn as part of an effort to redevelop some of the real estate near the…

“We obviously want to make sure we have everyone’s support,” Parisi said. “We’re pretty confident that we’re going to work on something, but we just don’t know. A lot has to happen to get there.”

Council voted to table the site plan as the developer works to finalize it with the Department of Transportation.

Ahead of the vote, Selvek said council may consider approving the project in phases, beginning with Popeyes, after completing a state environmental quality review for the six plots.

The city wants to welcome new businesses, said board member Crystal Cosentino, but not at the expense of existing businesses.

“That’s what Grant Avenue is for,” she said. “If Popeyes is interested, it’s great that they want to invest in Auburn. But I think we have to make sure we hear people and make sure the city is comfortable with the design, and how the traffic can bypass Grant Avenue, so we don’t cause more headaches because it’s not good for business in general.

Lake Life editor David Wilcox can be reached at (315) 282-2245 or [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @drwilcox.

Washington City Council to Review Site Plan | Radio KCII

By Site plan



Washington City Council to Review Site Plan | KCII Radio – The one to rely on



































The Washington City Council will hold a public hearing on the status of funded activities for the city regarding the Community Development Block Grant housing rehabilitation program on Tuesday.

The board will also consider an amendment to a processing agreement with Iowa Renewable Energy, a major site plan for engineering building design, and a tractor bid for the sewage treatment plant. Finally, the council will consider at second reading an ordinance repealing an ordinance declaring certain assets surplus and providing for their disposal. The council meets at 6 p.m. in the council chamber of the town hall.


392798200

Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_14_6) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/83.0.4103.116 Safari/537.36

ba4bd567a116cff72c63404d4ddd8c471c29f7c9

1

Guelph/Eramosa Council Approves Site Plan for Eight-Unit Building in Rockwood

By Site plan

ROCKWOOD – Guelph/Eramosa Council has approved a site plan application for an eight-unit building in Rockwood.

At Monday’s meeting, council approved in principle the site plan application for an eight-unit apartment building at 150 Alma Street. Council has also delegated final approval of the plans, drawings and site plan agreement to Township General Manager Ian Roger.

The proposed site consists of an eight-unit apartment building with a height of 11 meters with 14 parking spaces, including two visitor parking spaces and two accessible parking spaces.

“The intent of the site plan application that has been submitted is to basically redevelop the site by removing the single family home and constructing an eight-unit apartment building that will be two and a half stories tall,” said Meagan Ferris, county director of planning and environment.

Ferris noted that the proposal complies with applicable zoning regulations and standards, including lot size, frontage, setbacks, landscaping and parking requirements.

“This application has been thoroughly reviewed with internal and external commenting agencies. The proposal, in terms of the use itself, is permitted in the county official plan and an apartment building is a permitted use on this property. It also complies with all required provisions of the bylaw,” Ferris explained.

“At this time all review agencies are generally supportive of this request and the overall site plan itself, there are only minor tweaks that are required before final approval.”

The application was reviewed by the Ministry of Transportation (MTO); Grand River Conservation Authority; Gas Union; emergency services and firefighters; the township’s consulting engineer, RJ Burnside; and the head of the building department.

Ferris further noted that there were no objections to the application and that all necessary MTO permits and building permits had been obtained.

The council was happy with the request, as the development is only two and a half stories high and would suit the aesthetics of the township.

“It ticks all the boxes in terms of immediate relief. The fact that they already have MTO approval is no small feat. It adds eight more units to Rockwood and I think that’s a good thing. Housing is a serious problem everywhere. This small path contributes to the lack of housing,” the councilor said. Marc Bouwmeester.

The rest of the council echoed Bouwmeester’s remarks about the housing crisis and thought the building would help fill the township’s housing shortage.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Conversations are opinions of our readers and are subject to the Code of conduct. The Star does not share these opinions.

Council approves site plan for eight-unit building in Rockwood

By Site plan

GUELPH/ERAMOSA – City Council has approved a site plan application for an eight-unit building in Rockwood.

On April 4, council received a planning report regarding the application for 150 Alma Street.

The proposed site plan consists of an eight-unit building and would contain a total of 14 parking spaces, including two visitor parking spaces and two accessible parking spaces.

Wellington County Planner Meagan Ferris said the proposal complies with applicable zoning regulations and standards, including lot size, frontage, setbacks, landscaping and parking requirements.

“The proposal, in terms of the use itself, is permitted in the County Official Plan and an apartment building is a permitted use on this property,” Ferris explained.

“At this time all review agencies are generally supportive of this request and the overall site plan itself, there are only minor tweaks that are required before final approval.”

She noted that no objections had been received and Ministry of Transportation (MTO) permits had been issued.

“He ticks all the boxes,” councilor Mark Bouwmeester said. There isn’t much there and the fact that they already have MTO approval is no small feat.

“It adds eight more units to Rockwood and I think that’s a good thing.”

He added: “Housing is a serious problem everywhere, or the lack of housing, so that helps in a small way to add more houses.

“It will be a nice addition to Main Street Rockwood.”

Acknowledging the housing crisis, Mayor Chris White echoed Bouwmeester’s comments.

“I think you’re absolutely right in terms of housing, and rental homes are just as dire as housing, so getting smaller rents on the market is absolutely a positive thing for those who are downsizing or coming to enter the market,” White said. .

New councilor Steven Liebig said: “Even with the province looking at ways to increase residential development, housing etc. and the need for it is a great idea.

“Looks like it’s well built and well designed…will be a great addition to Rockwood.”

Ferris said the site plan agreement is being drafted and once finalized will be forwarded to the township attorney for review and then to the developer for signature.

She recommended Council approve the site plan.

Council has approved the proposed site plan and will delegate final approval of the plans, drawings and site plan agreement, once finalized, to the township chief executive, the report said.

Plans revealed for phase two development of key Crewkerne site

By Site development

Residents of Crewkerne got their first glimpse of how the rest of a major development in their town could take shape.

Taylor Wimpey Exeter has won planning permission to build 635 new homes on the key Crewkerne site, which lies between the A30 Yeovil Road and the A356 Station Road east of the city centre. South Somerset District Council approved detailed plans for the first 110 homes in March 2021, with construction officially starting later the same year.

The developer has now revealed its proposed designs for the remaining homes at the northern end of the site, which could be delivered within the next three to four years. The master plan for the key site includes the new homes being delivered in two phases – the first phase of 110 homes in the south (which will also provide employment land and a 60-bed care home) and phase two of 525 homes in the north ).

READ MORE: NHS list of official Covid symptoms expanded as free lateral flow tests scrapped

The new link road will connect the two phases, with the vacant space between becoming the “southern park”, with new woods and open green spaces in addition to the planned play areas. Once construction is complete, these green spaces will be transferred to either Crewkerne Borough Council or the new Somerset Unitary Council, which is due to formally take over in April 2023.

The first details of phase two were released as part of a consultation event hosted by Taylor Wimpey in late March before a formal planning application was submitted to the district council. Of the 525 homes offered in phase two, 33 will be affordable, bringing the total for the two phases to 50.

Plans include an area near the A30 which is for a new primary school – one of the conditions for granting preliminary permission. However, Somerset County Council advised in January 2021 that the site will no longer be needed in light of its reforms of existing schools in and around Crewkerne and Ilminster which will come into effect in September 2022.



Plans for 525 homes in phase two of key Crewkerne site

In light of this, the school site is likely to be given over to further accommodation – although this will require a separate planning application. Taylor Wimpey is still to provide more than £2.2million for new places in Crewkerne Schools as part of the outline permission – one of several financial contributions to the town that have been secured.

These include over £393,000 for open space and recreation outside the site (which could be used to improve other parks and play facilities), £277,000 to improve Crewkerne’s existing road network , £164,000 to secure local bus services and over £100,000 for improved cycling facilities in and around the city.

A spokesperson for Taylor Wimpey said: “At the heart of the development is the new Village Green and Local Center which provides informal and formal open space, including a playground. To the east of the Village Green, a new local center building is located which will provide opportunities for shops, cafes or other facilities for the community.

“The southern parks area will provide additional informal space for people and wildlife, with extensive timber plantations creating habitats here and informal mown paths providing walking routes.”



Plans for open green space and link road in phase two of key Crewkerne site
Plans for open green space and link road in phase two of key Crewkerne site

A formal planning application covering phase two is expected to be submitted to the district council in the coming months. Taylor Wimpey has indicated that the haul road linking the phase one and phase two sites could be delivered in full by summer 2023, with the last link road and access to the A30 completed when the first 200 houses are occupied. .

Construction of phase one is expected to be completed by the summer of 2024, with phase two commencing around that time, provided additional planning agreement can be secured.

Crescent City Harbor Officials Refuse Site Development’s Request to Present Their Vision for Redevelopment of Bayside RV Parks, Redwood Harbor Village | Wild Rivers Outpost

By Site development

Jessica Cejnar Andrews / Friday, April 1 at 12:19 p.m. / Local Government

Crescent City Harbor officials decline on-site development application to present vision for redevelopment of Bayside RV Parks, Redwood Harbor Village


Previously:

• Another firm moves to Port of Crescent City on its RV parks, says plan includes long-term residents

• “This is not my port, this is not my vision”; developer will meet with Crescent City Harbor Commissioners and RV Park residents

###

Crescent City Harbor Commissioners will not hear a presentation from On-Site Development, the area-linked construction company offering an alternative to Alex Lemus and Renewable Energy Capital to revitalize two RV parks at the harbor .

In an email to on-site development project manager Kay Fry on Thursday, Harbor Master Tim Petrick said the stewards chose to deny his request to be placed on Tuesday’s agenda on the advice from their lawyers.

“In this case, the Crescent City Harbor District Board issued a request for proposal in 2020 and then selected a developer,” Petrick told Fry. “We appreciate your interest in working with the Port District and encourage you to monitor and submit proposals to any future tenders.”

According to Petrick, since the Harbor District Board of Commissioners approved a project by Lemus, which was the sole respondent to a request for proposals in December 2020 to redevelop the harbour, they could not accept the on-site development proposal.

After lengthy negotiations, including holding a closed-door meeting on Thursday, the Harbor District Council is expected to consider a lease deal with Lemus on Tuesday, Petrick told the Outpost.

In August 2021, Lemus unveiled plans to upgrade Bayside RV Park’s landscaping and infrastructure, purchase Airstream trailers, and install cabins for short-term overnight stays. He also proposes placing electric vehicle charging stations at Spotty’s Car Wash, installing solar panels on the old car wash and building a cooperative for local fishermen to sell their catch.

In January, in response to concerns from residents who feared being evicted to make way for the project, Lemus said he and his company would create transition plans for each individual tenant.

Fry appeared before the Harbor Commission at its March 15 meeting, saying she and her father, On-Site Development founder Jim Fry, had developed a redevelopment plan for Bayside RV Park and Redwood Harbor Village that includes her long-term tenants.

In a later conversation with the Outpost, Fry said she and her father approached the RV park tenants before making their presentation to the Harbor District. While she wasn’t ready to say what On-Site Development’s vision for the parks is, she said one possibility would be to change the layout to accommodate both overnighters and long-term tenants.

However, when asked why she did not respond to a December 2020 request for proposals that the Harbor District had sent out to developers, Fry said her company had already accepted a project to build a park. $2.4 million motorhomes at Cave Junction and was unable to respond to the tender, although it piqued their interest.

On March 15, Fry, speaking in public comments, remarked to the Harbor Commissioners that they had not yet signed a lease with Lemus and that “negotiations cannot go on forever”. She received an invitation from Harbor Board Chairman Rick Shepherd to pitch her business to the Harbor District on Tuesday.

In an email to the Board of Commissioners earlier this week, Fry welcomed the invitation.

“President Shepherd’s invitation to learn more on April 5 demonstrated that you approach this in an unbiased and open manner,” she said.

The Crescent City Harbor District Board of Commissioners will meet at 2 p.m. Tuesday. Agendas are available here.


SHARE →


Approval of the final site plan for Millenium Place Condos

By Site plan

By Doug Marrin, STN Reporter

At its March 28, 2022 meeting, Dexter City Council approved a planned unit development and final site plan for Millenium Place condominiums for working adults and professionals who wish to live in Dexter.

The three-story, 23-unit condominium development will feature three two-story townhouses facing Grand St. The remaining 20 units will be a mix of one-, two-, and three-bedroom condos ranging from 774 to 1,405 square feet . Parking will be at the rear of the complex, hidden from passing traffic by architectural design. An open green space and patio are provided with picnic tables around the rain garden. Plans include protected bike racks to further address the growing desire for non-motorized modes of transportation.

Aerial view of the 0.71 acres at 7956 and 7960 Grand St. approved for Millenium Place Condominiums. Carlisle/Wortman Assoc. of the city council package

In its written description of the project, developer Marhofer/Campbell Development Co., LLC, said, “Living within the city limits provides convenient access to all of the amenities of the downtown community, including restaurants, theater, health services, retail, parks/trails B2B and mass transit, identified as attractive to many current markets, as analyzed in the City of Dexter’s Target Market Analysis (MSHDA/Land UseUSA, 2015).

The condos are designed with aesthetics in mind. Material variations aim to break up the facade of the building and blend into the surrounding neighborhood while maintaining an urban feel. The landscaped buffer zones and exterior design are intended to create a visually appealing landscape for passing pedestrians and motorists. Facade materials will be primarily environmentally friendly and durable.

Conceptual rendering looking west. Jeffrey A. Scott Architects PC of the City Council Package

The property has no historic or significant structures. A small house will be removed. Many trees on the lot are unhealthy or invasive. Ten maple trees will be removed and replaced, some with trees suitable for growing under the power lines that cross the plot.

Council asked Marhofer/Campbell partner Jack Campbell if he had received any feedback from neighbours. Besides working with a neighbor on some shared ownership issues, he replied that no one else had contacted them, which was unusual.

“We got none of that. I think that will really be a benefit to the neighborhood,” he told the Council.

Council approved the plans with some conditions regarding lighting and a low wall to prevent vehicle headlights from shining into first floor windows.

Conceptual view looking from the east. Jeffrey A. Scott Architects PC of the City Council Package