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Maryland Introduces Washington Commanders to Sprawling FedEx Field Development

By Site development

Newly obtained documents show that Prince George’s and the state have developed an expanded vision for a five-mile economic development corridor to surround a new stadium, similar to Virginia’s “mini-city” approach. state and county told the team in confidential documents that Prince George’s would help further team president Jason Wright’s goals for a stadium project that is also progressing social justice initiatives.

Maryland is clearly willing to spend big on stadiums. Lawmakers are proposing a plan to invest $1.2 billion to upgrade the state’s other two major professional sports stadiums in Baltimore. But, so far, heads of state have not introduced legislation to implement the commanders’ speech.

And if Prince George’s loses the commanders and the multi-billion dollar project to build a new team stadium, the county would face an economic crater.

“I ask you to remember Prince George’s County,” Alsobrooks said in his first public appeal for money for the stadium proposal. “Residents of Prince George’s County deserve the same commitment and resources.

A spokesperson for the commanders said Wednesday that the FedEx Field site, where team owner Daniel Snyder already owns more than 200 acres, is the only site the team is considering in Maryland.

The 89-page pitch, delivered to the team in May and obtained by The Washington Post this week, offers the most detailed look yet at how a government vying for the team offered much more than incentives. economic or state-funded stadium.

He describes a “stadium district” that would not only anchor acres of sports-related development – ​​including a hotel, convention center, shops, homes and an on-site sports betting site – but also funnel billions into a predominantly black jurisdiction that local leaders say have been repeatedly left behind.

“We believe the prospect of a new stadium represents an opportunity for even greater long-term impacts, serving as a driver for equitable and inclusive economic development and social justice,” the pitch reads.

Yet in the months that followed, Maryland leaders failed to submit a financial proposal for public debate, even as Virginia lawmakers advanced a lucrative bid for a stadium in northern Virginia. The team searched for a new stadium site for years, pitting the two states and the district against each other. Commanders are contractually obligated to play in Landover, Maryland until 2027.

Maryland’s proposal included a 65,000-seat indoor stadium as the development’s crown jewel, built just east of FedEx Field and atop the current parking lots, placing the stadium a 15-20 minute walk from a station. metro. The stadium-district concept is similar to those implemented with Truist Park outside of Atlanta, SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, California outside of Los Angeles, and Nationals Park in southeast Los Angeles. Washington, which ushered in acres of redevelopment near the DC waterfront.

In Landover, the redevelopment vision would use the stadium to anchor the five-mile investment corridor. It would run along Central Avenue and four Blue Line stops from the DC boundary at Capitol Heights to downtown Largo, east of FedEx Field. The county has already begun investing resources in the “Blue Line Corridor”, with the goal of turning it into an urban extension of DC

Over 10 years, according to the pitch, the FedEx Field site would house nearly 4 million square feet of development, with rooms set aside to ensure minority-owned businesses benefit from the windfall. There would be four training grounds alongside the team headquarters, as well as public parks and 2,100 homes – many of which are designated as affordable housing, to help black families build “generational wealth”, says the ground.

The campus would be integrated into the community, hosting a K-8 charter school, a field for 16 basketball and volleyball courts, and a “team culture and history museum.”

Parts of the campus would be connected by a pedestrian and bicycle path, part of which would be an elevated bridge. He would be nicknamed the “Bobby Mitchell Greenway”, in honor of the team’s first black player.

“It can demonstrate how corporate partnerships can innovate equity, education, recreation and social justice initiatives,” the proposal states.

Money for Baltimore stadiums, but not for commanders

Although the proposal bore the signatures of Alsobrooks and Gov. Larry Hogan (R), Alsobrooks’ call to Annapolis on Tuesday signaled that the plan has yet to gain widespread local approval like Virginia’s. Hogan publicly rejected on Tuesday the idea that the state would build a stadium for a team, even though he supports investing in those of the Orioles and Ravens.

In May’s proposal to commanders, Maryland highlighted the Maryland Stadium Authority’s decades of experience with professional sports venues, likely to contrast with Virginia, which is expected to create a football stadium authority in the next special session. of the Commonwealth.

Hogan’s spokesman, Michael Ricci, downplayed the governor’s May field signing, calling it a “marketing piece” that “consists largely of pro forma information and boilerplate language regarding the capabilities of state agencies to help the team develop facilities.”

Ricci added, however, that Maryland “will continue to provide support and expertise to the county in its discussions with the team.”

A bill being considered Tuesday in Annapolis would allow the Maryland Stadium Authority to inject $600 million into upgrading the Orioles’ Camden Yards and an additional $600 million into the Ravens’ M&T Bank stadium. But efforts to amend the bill to include commanders have not moved forward, prompting public advocacy from Alsobrooks.

Prince George’s proposal suggests the team could, as in the Virginia plan, get a reduction in taxes generated by the new development – a feature that has not been publicly discussed. The county also had no plans to eventually expand tax incentives to reduce costs and attract further development around the stadium, including the team’s headquarters and practice facilities.

In an analysis, the proposal touted the viability of the FedEx Field site while pointing out the flaws of alternative sites the team had once considered, such as Landover Mall (“relatively small site with high acquisition costs”), Oxon Cove (“large site, but not near Metrorail” and “environmental constraints limit development potential”) and Greenbelt (“limited space on site” and “would compete with proposed FBI headquarters”).

The Commanders spokesperson said that after working with the county executive’s office, the team decided to focus on the FedEx location in Maryland.

Regional competition heats up

DC Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) outlined plans on Wednesday to build a $60 million indoor athletics stadium on the RFK Stadium campus as part of an effort to demonstrate his commitment to building a sports entertainment district and attracting the team. the. “I think world-class cities have their football team within their city limits,” Bowser told reporters.

In Virginia, Wright, the team’s president, met with Loudoun County officials on Tuesday to discuss the team’s concept for a new stadium and retail complex, likely near a quarry northeast of Virginia. Dulles International Airport, Loudoun officials said.

County Board Chairwoman Phyllis J. Randall (D-At Large) called the introductory meeting saying, “They went through a very high-level idea of ​​what they want to come up with, if they were going to come up with Something.”

If commanders were to relocate to Loudoun at two other possible sites in neighboring Prince William County, Randall said, she would like the team to be more transparent about its issues of sexual assault allegations, which make the under investigation by Congress.

“I don’t particularly care who you are, what entity or individual you are – I will always stand on the side of listening and supporting women,” she said.

Prince William’s officials said they have yet to meet with commanders.

As jurisdictions seek the financial windfall a project would bring, Maryland leaders are also seeking to avoid the economic devastation that would be left behind if FedEx Field were abandoned.

“I have thousands of voters who live within a mile whose property values ​​will drop if they have an empty stadium in their backyard,” Del said. Jazz Lewis (D-Prince George’s), chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, whose district includes FedEx Field.

“We’re just looking for parity,” Lewis said, referring to the state’s willingness to invest $1.2 billion to retain Baltimore’s stadiums.

Whether or not the county keeps the team, Alsobrooks said getting resources to the Blue Line Corridor is a primary goal of his administration.

“This is our next opportunity,” she said. It is also, she said, the “best opportunity for commanders to achieve their vision of long-term economic sustainability.”

Antonio Olivo and Julie Zauzmer Weil contributed to this report.

Chronicle: Meeting on the development of the site of the former prison well attended | News, Sports, Jobs

By Site development

ESCANABA – On March 8, the Escanaba City Council hosted a special meeting for the public to get a first-hand look at proposals from four development teams seeking to use the former Delta County Jail and the former chamber commerce property as a blank canvas to paint their vision of Escanaba’s latest lakeside addition. In my humble opinion, all the proposals have very positive economic impacts on the future of the region. Everyone will have a favorite proposal that they would like to see move forward and become a reality. Delta County and the City of Escanaba could benefit from any of these projects and I would love to see more than one come to fruition. Who wouldn’t love more commercial expansion, more hospitality venues to support tourism and luxury living spaces. They are all in high demand. As impressed as I was with the developer presentations, I was very excited to see the great audience participation to better understand the projects. The live audience was so large that a satellite section had to be set up in the lobby for people to sit and watch the meeting on television. There was also a large audience of viewers online. Whatever proposal our elected municipal officials choose, I hope we all understand that it may not be perfect, but it will be very good. This could be a starting point for further development in housing, tourism, small business expansion and job creation that our citizens outlined in the 2016 Escanaba City Master Plan. We may have different opinions on how to start this journey, but I think we all know we have to move on. Our mayor made an important announcement at the meeting that many of us might have overlooked towards the end of the session. Mr. Ammel reviewed the many openings on the Escanaba Town Board at this time. Many of our municipalities and service groups need energetic new people to join their group. Adding new people will bring new ideas and perspectives that will help all of our teams be more successful.

The past two years have been very difficult to get involved with new groups as we have been asked to socially distance and attend meetings remotely. We see life returning to a kind of new normal as we started 2022. It’s time to get involved and make a difference, even if it’s very small, it will benefit the larger group.

There are many opportunities to help, if not now, when? Everyone is busy, but make your involvement this year a priority for you. We will all be better thanks to your involvement!

I had the opportunity to participate in a meeting with a service club last week as they recruit new members and highlight all they can do to make a positive difference in our community. I have known the organization for a long time, having played in Little League and Babe Ruth League Baseball for the Kiwanis club. I always appreciated their sponsorship as a young man and grew to appreciate all the efforts that organizations like Kiwanis made to make a difference. The Kiwanis Club will celebrate its 100th anniversary at Hereford & Hops on March 16 from 5-7 p.m. Come tell them how much you appreciate what the organization has done over the years.

— — —

Ed Legault is Executive Director of the Delta County Economic Development Alliance.



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Rocky Hill will review the site plan for the redevelopment of the Ames property; 213 apartments for a mixed project

By Site plan

The Rocky Hill Planning and Zoning Commission is expected to discuss a proposed site plan for redeveloping the long-vacant Ames headquarters on Main Street on Wednesday.

This is the second site plan submitted to the city by developer Belfonti Cos. LLC, based in Hamden.

The first plan was rejected by the commission about two months ago, but changes have been made to the overall design of the project, including the addition of additional public gathering space, according to Raymond Carpentino, director of economic development from Rocky Hill.

The latest site plan calls for the construction of 213 apartments in about 11 buildings, he said.

The project will include 93 one-bedroom units and 120 two-bedroom units, with 10% designated as affordable, according to Planning and Zoning Commission records.

The mixed-use development at 2418 Main Street will also contain 11,067 square feet of office space and 9,959 square feet of retail space with associated site improvements on approximately 12.65 acres.

CoStar

The former Ames Corporate Center in Rocky Hill at 2418 Main St.

About an acre of the property will be set aside for public gathering space, Carpentino said, including a large patio and fire pit.

The former 180,000 square foot Ames property has been vacant since 2002 and city leaders have called it an eyesore in the heart of the city. Proposals for rehabilitation have come and gone over the years, but remediation of the asbestos-contaminated structure has been key.

Last April, the state stepped in to help move redevelopment efforts forward by approving a $500,000 grant to help fund the demolition.

MEC: Mississippi invests nearly $25 million in site development

By Site development

Below is a press release from the Mississippi Economic Council:

Governor Tate Reeves recently announced that the State of Mississippi is investing nearly $25 million in site development projects across the state. Site development grant funds made available through the Mississippi Development Authority (MDA), Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), and RESTORE Act assist local economic development entities in their efforts to stimulate economic growth by attracting new industries to competitive and start-up sites.

“Ready-to-go sites are a top priority for businesses looking for a new location,” Governor Tate Reeves said. “By investing in these sites today, we are laying the foundation on which businesses can quickly locate, grow and create jobs for future generations of Mississippians.”

The MDA recently awarded a total of $1,637,983 under its Site Development Grants program for projects in the Ready Sites and Premier Sites categories. Ready sites require a minimum of 20 highly developable acres, and the site must be ready for operation within six months and must be able to have utilities on site within 12 months. Ready sites are eligible to receive up to $50,000 in funding. Premier sites require a minimum of 100 acres and must have attributes that set them apart from other properties, such as being in high-demand locations, having large-scale “mega” development acreage, or having significant utility infrastructure already in place. They must also have a workforce capable of attracting the target market. Premier sites are eligible to receive up to $250,000 in funding. Those who have secured funding include:

Sites ready

Cleveland-Bolivar County Chamber of Commerce – $25,000 for performing environmental due diligence at the Cleveland Industrial Park

Jones County Economic Development Authority – $50,000 for drainage improvements at Howard Industrial Park

Greene County Board of Supervisors – $50,000 for environmental due diligence at the Greene County Railroad site

Harrison County Development Commission – $28,000 for the installation of broadband in the North Harrison County industrial complex

Marion County Economic Development District – $50,000 for environmental due diligence and compensation at Columbia New Generation Park

Walthall County Board of Supervisors – $49,983.20 for clearance and design and construction of an entrance to US Hwy. 98 Locations

Yellow Creek State Inland Ports Authority – $50,000 to conduct environmental due diligence and clearing and grubbing at the Boothe property development at the Port of Yellow Creek

Prime Sites

Community Development Foundation – $250,000 for the construction of a construction site and an expansion site, and the initial construction of an access road to the HIVE Business Park

Hancock County Harbor and Harbor Commission – $250,000 for environmental due diligence at Port Bienville Industrial Park Site #1

Madison County Economic Development Authority – $250,000 for clearing and grubbing at the Madison County mega site

Panola partnership – $85,000 for the engineering/design of an elevated water reservoir at the Panola County Airport Industrial Park

Rankin First Economic Development Authority – $250,000 for the construction of a construction platform at the East Metro Center rail site in the EMC Industrial Park

Smith County Economic Development District – $250,000 for infrastructure improvements at the Smith County industrial site

The MDA has also committed $11,642,589 in Site Development Grants – funding for selected sites. The Select Sites program was created in 2021 to increase the number of highly competitive industrial sites in the state that are available and ready to meet the needs of potential businesses. Twenty of the state’s major public industrial sites were assessed by the Greenville, South Carolina-based Strategic Development Group, which was contracted by the state’s electric utilities. Among these sites, the following have been invited to apply for funding for the selected sites, depending on the current availability of funds:

Select locations

Belwood Industrial Park, Adams County – $1,825,977 to complete the construction of the dike and make drainage improvements

Ceres Research and Industrial Interplex – Site B, Warren County – $1,368,000 for stream mitigation, drainage improvements, water and sewer system upgrades and to design entrance improvements

Site I-59 South, Jones County – $553,600 for access roads and clearing

Supply Chain I-59 Park (at Hattiesburg-Laurel Regional Airport), Jones County – $3,402,858 to improve sanitary sewer capacity; build a construction platform and make the intersection modifications

NorthStar Industrial Park, Oktibbeha County – $679,775 for permits and wetland mitigation; clearing, grubbing and grading; and the development of an all-round access road

Springs Industrial Park, Marshall County – $346,875 to thin and fell trees

University of Southern Mississippi – The Garden, Forrest County – $3,465,504 for clearing, grubbing and grading and construction of an access road

Governor Reeves also approved ARC funding for the NorthStar Industrial Park and invited the site to submit a full application for $2,719,102 in ARC SAAW funding.

RESTORE Act funding in the amount of $8,927,940 is also helping three projects with site development needs. The projects approved on RESTORE Act funds, administered by the Environmental Quality Department, are:

Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport – $4,180,000 for development work on a 241-acre economic development site at the airport

Hancock County Harbor and Harbor Commission – $2,547,940 for engineering/design and site development works at Stennis International Airport Site #13

Hancock County Harbor and Harbor Commission – $2,200,000 for site development at Hancock County Tech Park at Stennis International Airport

“MDA commends each of these communities for taking the initiative to ensure their sites are competitive and ready to meet the unique needs of businesses across a wide range of industries,” said Laura Hipp, Interim Chief Executive Officer of MDA. “Mississippi is a great place to do business, and the continued development of these industrial sites is another attribute we can add to our strong portfolio of competitive business advantages.”3100 Audubon Dr

Mississippi is investing nearly $25 million in site development

By Site development

JACKSON, Miss. (WDAM) – Governor Tate Reeves announced that the State of Mississippi is investing nearly $25 million in site development projects across the state. This includes Columbia New Generation Park in Marion County.

The Mississippi Development Authority, Appalachian Regional Commission, and RESTORE Act help local economic development entities drive economic growth by attracting new industries to competitive, start-up sites.

“Ready-to-go sites are a top priority for businesses looking for a new location,” Governor Tate Reeves said. “By investing in these sites today, we are laying the foundation on which businesses can quickly locate, grow and create jobs for future generations of Mississippians.”

The MDA recently awarded a total of $1,637,983 under its Site Development Grants program for projects in the Ready Sites and Premier Sites categories.

Ready sites require a minimum of 20 highly developable acres and must be ready for operation within six months. They must also be able to have utilities on site within 12 months. Ready sites are eligible to receive up to $50,000 in funding.

Premier sites require a minimum of 100 acres and have attributes that set them apart from other properties, such as being in high-demand locations, having large-scale “mega” development acreage, or having significant utility infrastructure already in place. square. They must also have a workforce capable of attracting the target market. Premier sites are eligible to receive up to $250,000 in funding.

Those who have secured funding include:

• Sites ready

  • Marion County Economic Development District – $50,000 for environmental due diligence and compensation at Columbia New Generation Park
  • Cleveland-Bolivar County Chamber of Commerce – $25,000 for performing environmental due diligence at the Cleveland Industrial Park
  • Jones County Economic Development Authority – $50,000 for drainage improvements at Howard Industrial Park
  • Greene County Board of Supervisors – $50,000 for environmental due diligence at the Greene County Railroad site
  • Harrison County Development Commission – $28,000 for the installation of broadband in the North Harrison County industrial complex
  • Walthall County Board of Supervisors – $49,983.20 for clearance and design and construction of an entrance to US Hwy. 98 Locations
  • Yellow Creek State Inland Ports Authority – $50,000 to conduct environmental due diligence and clearing and grubbing at the Boothe property development at the Port of Yellow Creek

Premier Sites

  • Community Development Foundation – $250,000 for the construction of a construction site and an expansion site, and the initial construction of an access road to the HIVE Business Park
  • Hancock County Harbor and Harbor Commission – $250,000 for environmental due diligence at Port Bienville Industrial Park Site #1
  • Madison County Economic Development Authority – $250,000 for clearing and grubbing at the Madison County mega site
  • Panola partnership – $85,000 for the engineering/design of an elevated water reservoir at the Panola County Airport Industrial Park
  • Rankin First Economic Development Authority – $250,000 for the construction of a construction platform at the East Metro Center rail site in the EMC Industrial Park
  • Smith County Economic Development District – $250,000 for infrastructure improvements at the Smith County industrial site

The MDA has also committed $11,642,589 in Site Development Grants – funding for selected sites.

The Select Sites program was created to increase the number of highly competitive industrial sites available for potential business needs.

The following sites have been invited to apply for funding for the selected sites based on current availability of funds:

• Select sites

  • University of Southern Mississippi – The Garden, Forrest County – $3,465,504 for clearing, grubbing and grading and construction of an access road
  • Site I-59 South, Jones County – $553,600 for access roads and clearing
  • Supply Chain I-59 Park (at Hattiesburg-Laurel Regional Airport), Jones County – $3,402,858 to improve sanitary sewer capacity; build a construction platform and make the intersection modifications
  • Belwood Industrial Park, Adams County – $1,825,977 to complete the construction of the dike and make drainage improvements
  • Ceres Research and Industrial Interplex – Site B, Warren County – $1,368,000 for watercourse mitigation, drainage improvements, water and sewer system upgrades, and entrance improvement design
  • NorthStar Industrial Park, Oktibbeha County – $679,775 for permits and wetland mitigation; clearing, grubbing and grading; and the development of an all-round access road
  • Springs Industrial Park, Marshall County – $346,875 to thin and fell trees

“MDA commends each of these communities for taking the initiative to ensure their sites are competitive and ready to meet the unique needs of businesses across a wide range of industries,” said Laura Hipp, Interim Chief Executive Officer of MDA. “Mississippi is a great place to do business, and the continued development of these industrial sites is another attribute we can add to our strong portfolio of competitive business advantages.”

Copyright 2022 WDAM. All rights reserved.

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Mississippi invests nearly $25 million in site development | Mississippi News

By Site development

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi is investing nearly $25 million in site development projects across the state, Gov. Tate Reeves said Thursday.

“Ready-to-go sites are a top priority for businesses looking for a new location,” Reeves said in a press release. “By investing in these sites today, we are laying the foundation on which businesses can quickly locate, grow and create jobs for future generations of Mississippians.”

Reeves said the grant funds were made available through the Mississippi Development Authority, the Appalachian Regional Commission and the RESTORE Act to assist local economic development entities in their efforts to spur economic growth. .

Sites eligible for funding of up to $50,000 include drainage improvements at Howard Industrial Park in Jones County; the broadband installation at the North Harrison County Industrial Complex in Harrison County and clearance, and the design and construction of an entrance to the US Hwy 98 site in Walthall County.

Premier sites, which can receive up to $250,000 in funding, include the engineering and design of an elevated water reservoir at the Panola County Airport Industrial Park and infrastructure improvements to the site Smith County industrialist.

political cartoons

And some sites, eligible to receive funding ranging from $346,000 to $3.4 million, include Belwood Industrial Park in Adams County to complete levee construction and make drainage improvements and Ceres Research Industrial Interplex in Warren County to mitigate watercourses, improve drainage, improve water and sewer systems, and design entrance improvements.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

The sitemap process for Convalt will take several months

By Site plan

Feb. 2 – HOUNSFIELD – The businessman who was planning to build a solar panel manufacturing plant near the airport received sobering news when he learned that the town’s planning council was n wouldn’t approve of the 350,000 square foot factory next month.

Planning Board Chair Yvonne M. Podvin told Hari Achuthan, CEO of Convalt Energy and DigiCollect, and members of her management team that the earliest it could be done would be May.

She warned him that the two companies still do not own the proposed business park land near Watertown International Airport on Route 12F in the town of Hounsfield.

The Jefferson County Industrial Development Agency must sell the land to Convalt before the project can receive site plan approval, she said.

Mr Achuthan said he was frustrated that the project had not moved forward, citing that National Grid had informed him that it would cost $19million and two years to bring power to the site.

“I can tell you right now that we are pregnant with complications,” he said. “It’s not easy to do that.”

After a few tense moments, both parties seemed to understand what they were going to do over the next few months to get the project approved.

“We are ready to work with you,” Mr. Achuthan said.

Michael Wiser, the company’s chief strategy officer, blamed himself for the misunderstanding, thinking the Planning Board approval process could take just two months.

A project of this size would normally take six to eight months or possibly longer, Ms Podvin said afterwards.

Company officials said they plan to return for the April 1 planning board meeting. By then, JCIDA will need to apply for a land division and the company will need to submit a full set of plans before the process can proceed.

After the meeting, Marshall Weir, deputy executive director of Jefferson County Economic Development, JCIDA’s sister organization, said he hoped the agency would approve a tax abatement project in March, which would allow the process to approval from the city to move forward.

Despite a delay in the process, Mr. Achuthan promised after the meeting that the solar manufacturing plant would be operational by the end of the year.

“Maybe part of the production, maybe not all of it, but part,” he said.

He also said the company would go it alone to power the site.

The solar manufacturing plant would initially employ between 200 and 210 workers, with 60 to 70 working per shift, Wiser said.

The company purchased equipment from a solar panel manufacturing plant in Oregon. The 115,000 pieces of equipment have been dismantled and all are packed and ready to be transported by rail to the north of the country, Mr Achuthan said.

He also recently offered to buy an old hydroelectric plant from the city to renovate it and use it for some of the plant’s energy.

If the project is fully developed, the Convalt plant could create 4,555 jobs in 10 years, according to the company.

Its sister company, DigiCollect, a software company that makes sensors for monitoring home networks and transmission lines, would also build a 50,000 square foot facility near the airport.

The sitemap process for Convalt will take several months | Business

By Site plan

HOUNSFIELD – The businessman who planned to build a solar panel manufacturing plant near the airport received sobering news when he learned the planning council would not approve the plant of 350,000 square feet next month.

Planning Board Chair Yvonne M. Podvin told Hari Achuthan, CEO of Convalt Energy and DigiCollect, and members of her management team that the earliest it could be done would be May.

She warned him that the two companies still do not own the proposed business park land near Watertown International Airport on Route 12F in the town of Hounsfield.

The Jefferson County Industrial Development Agency must sell the land to Convalt before the project can receive site plan approval, she said.

Mr Achuthan said he was frustrated that the project had not moved forward, citing that National Grid had informed him that it would cost $19million and two years to bring power to the site.

“I can tell you right now that we are pregnant with complications,” he said. “It’s not easy to do that.”

After a few tense moments, both parties seemed to understand what they were going to do over the next few months to get the project approved.

“We are ready to work with you,” Mr. Achuthan said.

Michael Wiser, the company’s chief strategy officer, blamed himself for the misunderstanding, thinking the Planning Board approval process could take just two months.

A project of this size would normally take six to eight months or possibly longer, Ms Podvin said afterwards.

Company officials said they plan to return for the April 1 planning board meeting. By then, JCIDA will need to apply for a land division and the company will need to submit a full set of plans before the process can proceed.

After the meeting, Marshall Weir, deputy executive director of Jefferson County Economic Development, JCIDA’s sister organization, said he hoped the agency would approve a tax abatement project in March, which would allow the process to approval from the city to move forward.

Despite a delay in the process, Mr. Achuthan promised after the meeting that the solar manufacturing plant would be operational by the end of the year.

“Maybe part of the production, maybe not all of it, but part,” he said.

He also said the company would go it alone to power the site.

The solar manufacturing plant would initially employ between 200 and 210 workers, with 60 to 70 working per shift, Wiser said.

The company purchased equipment from a solar panel manufacturing plant in Oregon. The 115,000 pieces of equipment have been dismantled and all are packed and ready to be transported by rail to the north of the country, Mr Achuthan said.

He also recently offered to buy an old hydroelectric plant from the city to renovate it and use it for some of the plant’s energy.

If the project is fully developed, the Convalt plant could create 4,555 jobs in 10 years, according to the company.

Its sister company, DigiCollect, a software company that makes sensors for monitoring home networks and transmission lines, would also build a 50,000 square foot facility near the airport.

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Rivian sitemap revealed | News

By Site plan

The long-awaited site plan for Rivian Automotive’s new multi-billion dollar electric car manufacturing plant in Stanton Springs North was released this week.

Rivian’s new site plan paints a stark picture of how unprecedented the massive plant will be when fully built, spanning 2,000 acres in Morgan and Walton counties.

“We’ve never seen anything like it here,” said Walton County Economic Development Manager Shane Short.

The vast green pastures of the former Verner and Bowden family farmlands in Rutledge will soon be covered in concrete, becoming the hub of industrial development heading into Rutledge town centre.

“Many of Rivian’s buildings will be built on former Verner family farmland and Bowden family farmland,” Short said. “This will help preserve some of the green spaces and wetlands closer to I-20 and US Highway 278. The plant will be approximately three miles from the town of Rutledge.”

According to the recently released site plan, approximately 13 million square feet of the Rivian plant will be built in Morgan County. The total project requires up to 20 million square feet of construction space.

Rivian’s new plant could be up to 20 times larger than Takeda Pharmaceutical’s Stanton Springs plant, which is 1 million square feet. Even Kia’s West Point, Georgia plant is just 2.2 million square feet.

For a visual comparison, 20 million square feet of building space equals 347 football fields. It would be three times bigger than Disneyland and four times bigger than Vatican City.

In addition to manufacturing warehouses and office buildings, roads, parking lots, access points and stormwater management areas will also be constructed in Morgan County for the project.

Rivian will invest up to $5 billion in the new plant, generate 7,500 jobs and produce 400,000 electric vehicles per year when fully operational. Details of the site plan were revealed after Morgan County Planning Director Chuck Jarrell filed two Developmental Regional Impact (DRI) statements with the Georgia Department of Community Affairs, as the requires the law for the project to go ahead.

Jarrell said the Joint Development Authority (JDA) expects to earn $100 million in local tax revenue each year from Rivian’s development, which will be split among Morgan, Walton, Newton and Jasper counties, as well as the City of Social Circle.

Jarrell also noted that Rivian’s development will affect 26 landowners who control 43 parcels of land in Morgan and Walton counties. Short said all owners involved voluntarily sold their land to the JDA, and no eminent domain was used to acquire land for the Rivian development.

The site plan also calls for major roadworks in and around the Rivian Automotive plant. Jarrell said a traffic study will be conducted in the near future to determine all the details.

Going forward, the site plan calls for the construction of a new exit off I-20 to Old Mill Road in Rutledge. Other improvements include widening US Highway 278 and connecting Old Mill Road to Highway 278.

Short believes the Rivian plant will bring significant benefits to the people of Morgan County and beyond, while becoming a force for environmental protection and stewardship.

“In all my years of economic development, this is the greenest company I have ever encountered. Their mission is to reduce the carbon footprint of our world,” Short said. “But we’re very excited about the jobs it will bring to the region…Rivian will provide generational career opportunities and benefits for thousands of families.”

Short and JDA members held a community meeting at Social Circle Middle School on Tuesday, January 11 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss the new site plan and other details of Rivian Automotive’s development. At press time, details of the reunion were not yet available.

Leaked site plan shows how Rivian could build up to 20 million square feet in Georgia

By Site plan

Rivian’s RS1 SUV model, which debuted at the 2018 Los Angeles Auto Show.

Electric car maker Rivian’s plans for a $5 billion assembly plant include nearly 20 million square feet of development in Stanton Springs, a 2,000-acre economic development megasite about 50 miles east from Atlanta.

As part of the landmark investment, the electric vehicle company could build a test track for its vehicles, wooded “adventure trails” and space for research and development, according to a leaked site plan. published on the Rivian Forum website. News of the sitemap was first reported by the Electrek green energy information site.

The logo of Savannah-based engineering firm Thomas & Hutton appears on the aerial render. Calls to the company have not been returned at press time.

The rumored sitemap closely matches what the company previously revealed about its assembly plant in a recent filing with the Georgian Ministry of Community Affairs, which requested a total of 20 million square feet of assembly and auxiliary buildings. But the documents offered more specific details about the campus, including 13 buildings, the adventure course and a test track.

Rivian wouldn’t be Georgia’s first car test track. The Porsche Cars North America headquarters next to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport includes a customer experience center with a test track. There are no details on what the adventure trail entails, such as whether it would be accessible to the public or only to Rivian workers or whether it would be pedestrian or a path to test the models of SUVs that Rivian plans to produce at the plant.

Other details on the site plan include 144 charging stations, a 100K SF event facility, outdoor amenity spaces and a 2.5M SF research and development facility. In one current filing with the state, Rivian also outlined road improvements for his project, including a new interchange at Old Mill Road and Interstate 20, as well as improvements and widening of the Interstate 278 interchange. The state previously announced plans to build a technical school on campus to train future workers.

California-based Rivian, founded in 2009, went public in November and has a market cap of more than $85 billion, but has yet to make a profit. Prior to its IPO, Rivian was a darling of the electric vehicle industry, attracting investment from Amazon, Ford and Cox Automotive. Experts say Rivian is part of a new generation of automakers aimed at an industry that is set to see tremendous growth over the next few years.

Rivian plans to hire 7,500 people. Once fully operational, state officials said Rivian would be able to produce up to 400,000 vehicles per year. Construction of the facility is expected to begin this summer with production expected to begin in 2024.

Rivian site plan unveiled reveals unprecedented size for historic development near Rutledge | News

By Site plan

The long-awaited site plan for Rivian Automotive’s new multibillion-dollar electric car manufacturing plant in Stanton Springs North was released this week.

Rivian’s new site plan paints a startling picture of the unprecedented scale of the massive factory when fully constructed, spanning 2,000 acres in Morgan and Walton counties.

“We’ve never seen anything like it here,” said Shane Short, Walton County economic development director.

The expansive green pastures of former Verner family and Bowden family farmland in Rutledge will soon be covered with concrete, becoming the hub of industrial development heading into downtown Rutledge.

“A lot of Rivian’s buildings will be built on former Verner family farmland and Bowden family farmland,” Short said. “This will help preserve some of the green space and wetlands closer to I-20 and US Highway 278. The plant will be approximately three miles from the town of Rutledge.”

According to the recently released sitemap, approximately 13 million square feet of the Rivian plant will be built in Morgan County. The total project requires up to 20 million square feet of construction space.

Rivian’s new plant could be up to 20 times the size of Takeda’s pharmaceutical plant in Stanton Springs, which spans 1 million square feet. Even the Kia plant in West Point, Georgia is just 2.2 million square feet.

For a visual comparison, 20 million square feet of construction space represents 347 football fields. It would be three times the size of Disneyland and four times the size of Vatican City.

In addition to manufacturing warehouses and office buildings, roads, parking lots, access points and stormwater management areas will also be built in Morgan County for the project.

Rivian will invest up to $ 5 billion in the new plant, generate 7,500 jobs and produce 400,000 electric vehicles per year when fully operational. Site plan details were revealed after Morgan County Planning Director Chuck Jarrell filed two Regional Impact Development (DRI) statements with the Georgia Department of Community Affairs, as the demands the law to move the project forward.

Jarrell said the Joint Development Authority (JDA) expects to earn $ 100 million in local tax revenue each year through the development of Rivian, which will be split among Morgan, Walton, Newton and Jasper counties, as well as the town of Social Circle.

Jarrell also noted that the development of Rivian will affect 26 landowners who control 43 plots of land in Morgan and Walton counties. Short said each landowner involved voluntarily sold their land to the JDA and no prominent estates were used to acquire land for Rivian development.

The site plan also provides for major road works in and around the Rivian Automotive plant. Jarrell has indicated that a traffic survey will be conducted in the near future to determine all the details.

As of now, the site plan calls for the construction of a new exit off I-20 to Old Mill Road in Rutledge. Other improvements include widening US Highway 278 and connecting Old Mill Road to Highway 278.

Short believes the Rivian plant will provide significant benefits to residents of Morgan County and beyond, and become a force for environmental protection and stewardship.

“In all my years of economic development, this is the greenest company I have ever come across. Their mission is to reduce the carbon footprint of our world, ”said Short. “But we are very excited about the jobs this will bring to the region… Rivian will provide career opportunities and generational benefits to thousands of families.”

Short and members of the JDA held a community meeting at Social Circle Middle School on Tuesday, January 11 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss the new site map and other details of Rivian Automotive’s development. At the time of going to press, details of the meeting were not yet available.

The Rome subdivision is OK for the sitemap

By Site plan

A site plan review of a 50-lot first phase of a large residential subdivision of approximately 69 lots off Merrick Road, via Charles Anken Boulevard, known as Delta Luxury Townhomes, LLC, was approved by the Rome Planning Council at its monthly meeting on Tuesday, on condition that the developer agrees to install street lighting in the development in the future.

Steven Buck, owner of Buck Construction of Whitesboro, appeared before the board after members said at the December meeting that the project engineer had not provided evidence, since the November discussions, plans to install sufficient street lighting in the proposed residential subdivision for public safety. .

“Unfortunately, it is not in our budget to install the lighting, but we are committed to putting arrangements in place to facilitate the addition of a lighting district and fixtures to the project,” said Buck.

Last month, the project engineer explained how the site plan now included driving lights on each lot and that it would be “built into” the deed and rental agreements that residents would be required to light. these fires “during the hours of darkness”.

Buck mentioned Tuesday how the costs of building materials continue to rise, making the installation of lighting out of his budget for the project. He said his engineer altered the site drawings to indicate the installation of the lighting district conduit. Buck said he plans to work with National Grid to see if the gas and electric company would allow development to join the company’s “trench” as they dig trenches, but if they don’t. not, “we will provide a trench in the right-of-way of a solid conduit.

Buck and National Grid “are coordinating an effort to have a complete pipeline system where electricity can be supplied at any time in the future,” he said.

The plans continue to include outdoor lighting for installation in the home’s garages, Buck added. He also said the conduit could be tied to his next project to be submitted to town planning council and included on the February agenda, for the addition of 44 single-family lots.

City planner Garret Wyckoff said it was on the recommendation of the city’s Department of Community and Economic Development that the planning council approves the site plan for Delta luxury townhouses given the current escalation. material prices and that city codes do not require street lighting. Wyckoff said it was in the city’s best interest for the project to go ahead as it provides additional housing as the city grapples with a “lack of housing supply.”

Planning council vice-chairman Joseph Calandra said he would like to see the project “go ahead”, but recommended that a motion be made to approve the site plan, provided Buck adds street lighting once it is able to sell the units and make a profit. Then he could use the profits to reinvest in development, including adding lighting, Calandra added.

“Right now he (Buck) has a cash flow problem, but once he’s up and running we can recommend that he install street light – it’s a financial burden for him right now,” said Calandra.

Installing street lighting in the development would cost an additional $ 195,000, city officials said.

President Mark Esposito then asked how the city planning council or city might make the recommendation enforceable in the future.

City Assistant Corporation attorney James S. Rizzo said it would “not be a legal problem” to recommend that lighting be added in the future, because “there is nothing wrong with what the developer comes back for a status report “.

It was later indicated that Buck could give a status update during the licensing process in conjunction with the Planning Council, the Department of Public Works and the city codes office.

A motion to approve the site plan on the condition that Buck add street lighting to the development in the future was passed unanimously.

Also on the program:

• The review of the environmental quality of the site and the review of the site plan for a WellNow 4,375 square foot emergency care facility to be located at 1790, boul. Black River. have been deposited.

Project engineer Kevin Bamann explained that emergency care would be located next to the mall’s new Starbucks cafe. He explained that Caliber Commercial Brokerage, LLC of Rochester is developing the facility, along with Starbucks. The cafe’s sitemap was approved by the board in September for Randy Soggs, owner of Mohawk Acres Plaza.

Bamann said he, on behalf of Caliber Brokerage, was due to appear before the city’s Zoning Appeal Board next month to ask him to “line up” the reverse side of the emergency care building with Starbucks due to the existing water pipe.

As for Caliber taking over the development of WellNow and Starbucks, Bamann said Soggs sold the property to Caliber because the trading firm “made a lot of it (Starbucks) to other cities” and had to experience working with the company.

“From what I understand, WellNow is very responsive and Starbucks not so much,” Bamann said of explaining the sale.

As the board was still awaiting the SEQR review, Esposito proposed that the SEQR and sitemap be tabled, which were approved unanimously.

• A negative statement on a SEQR examination and preliminary plaque examination, requested by Pat Busyczak for a minor subdivision of two lots across from 6327 Lamphear Road, was unanimously approved. It is planned that the owner Busyczak will build a house on the second lot and sell it.

Site map approved for the project anchored by the national steakhouse chain

By Site plan

West Des Moines City Council this week approved the site plan for a development that will include a Ruth’s Chris Steak House. Architectural rendering by BSB Design

A development proposal that will include a popular national steakhouse lifted a key hurdle this week when West Des Moines City Council approved the project’s site plan.



The developer of the CRG Residential project, located in Carmel, Indiana, plans to construct a mixed-use building that will be anchored by Ruth’s Chris Steak House, a chain of New Orleans-based steakhouses. The restaurant will occupy 15,000 square feet in the four-story building that will be located on the southwest corner of Jordan Creek Parkway and Ashworth Road, according to city documents.



The building, with a brick and fiber cement exterior, will include an additional 8,000 square feet of commercial space and 199 multi-family residential units, according to city documents. Multi-family units and commercial space will wrap around a multi-level parking structure.



Development costs are estimated between 20 and 30 million dollars.



City officials are working with CRG Residential to finalize a development deal that could include an economic development grant of up to $ 2.3 million, according to a city document. The agreement could also include a breakdown of who will be responsible for infrastructure improvements.



According to information provided to the board, items that could be part of the deal include:

  • The city is paying for and building improvements to 76th Street between Ashworth Road and just north of Aspen Drive. The city would install traffic lights at Ashworth and 76th Street.
  • The developer ensures that sidewalks around the development are installed, a private east-west street between Jordan Creek Parkway and 76th Street is constructed, and a regional underground detention pond is developed for the project site and the 76th area. Street. The city would reimburse the developer for the cost of the work.
  • The developer initiated the process of installing streetlights around the development and ensured that a power line along Ashworth Road between 76th Street and Jordan Creek Parkway was buried. The work would be carried out by MidAmerican Energy Co. and the city would reimburse the associated costs.



Work on the project site is unlikely to begin for several weeks, according to city officials. The promoter is not yet the owner of the property. Once the land is acquired, documents must be completed to link the properties together. In addition, architectural plans need to be revised, a process that can take up to four weeks.



Once development of the site begins, construction could take up to 18 months.

Site plan approved for project anchored by national steakhouse chain

By Site plan

The West Des Moines City Council this week approved the site plan for a development that will include a Ruth’s Chris Steak House. Architectural rendering by BSB Design

A proposed development that will include a popular national steakhouse cleared a key hurdle this week when the West Des Moines City Council approved the site plan for the project.



Project developer CRG Residential, located in Carmel, Indiana, plans to construct a mixed-use building that will be anchored by Ruth’s Chris Steak House, a steakhouse chain based in New Orleans. The restaurant will occupy 15,000 square feet of space in the four-story building that will be located on the southwest corner of Jordan Creek Parkway and Ashworth Road, according to city documents.



The building, with a brick and fiber cement board exterior, will include an additional 8,000 square feet of commercial space and 199 multi-family residential units, according to city documents. Multi-family units and commercial space will wrap around a multi-level parking structure.



Development costs are estimated at $20-30 million.



City officials are working with CRG Residential to finalize a development agreement that could include an economic development grant of up to $2.3 million, according to a city document. The agreement could also include a breakdown of who will be responsible for infrastructure improvements.



Based on information provided to the board, items that could be part of the deal include:

  • The city is paying and building improvements to 76th Street between Ashworth Road and just north of Aspen Drive. The city would install traffic lights at Ashworth and 76th Street.
  • With the developer ensuring sidewalks around the development are installed, an east-west private street between Jordan Creek Parkway and 76th Street is constructed, and a regional underground retention pond is developed for the project site and the area of ​​the 76th street. The city would reimburse the developer for the cost of the work.
  • The developer initiating the process of installing streetlights around the development and ensuring that a power line along Ashworth Road between 76th Street and Jordan Creek Parkway is placed underground. The work would be done by MidAmerican Energy Co. and the city would reimburse the associated costs.



Work on the project site likely won’t begin for several weeks, according to city officials. The promoter does not yet own the property. Once the land is acquired, documents must be completed to bind the properties together. In addition, architectural plans must be revised, a process that can take up to four weeks.



Once site development begins, construction could take up to 18 months.

Development of the Covington IRS site is back on track with the hiring of a project manager; the dog park is advancing, more

By Site development

By Ryan Clark
NKyTribune journalist

The development of the IRS site is back.

After stopping and starting – and en route replaced the Covington City Manager – on Tuesday evening, the commissioners approved the hiring of JS Held, LLC, for project management services to “implement the master plan strategic for Covington’s central waterfront, ”read in city documents. .

They refer to the management of the 23-acre IRS site.

“This is a very important first step that we are taking in the redevelopment of the IRS site,” Mayor Joseph U. Meyer said at the regular legislative committee meeting.

The deal will result in brownfield redevelopment in the Covington Central Riverfront area, under the direction of the city manager and the director of economic development, the mayor said. The goal is to develop it into usable land that could support a mix of potential uses.

City Manager Ken Smith said he could provide weekly updates on the project to the Commission, if they so wish.

Over the summer, the commissioners chose to stop and completely rethink how they wanted to use the site.

The city bought the site in March for $ 20.5 million, and since then Covington has struggled to manage the project. They first entered into several demolition and design contracts when former general manager David Johnston recommended certain options; the Commission decided not to follow these recommendations.

In June, Johnston and the town went their separate ways. Perhaps it wasn’t a surprise, then, that the city decided to officially start over.

“No project is more important,” said Mayor Meyer at the time. “We only have a bite of an apple to get it right.”

The city received three responses to its call for tenders for management services. The payment of the contract, which runs from November 1 to October 31 of the following year, is illustrated in the agreement as follows:

First year of the contract: $ 371,217
Second year of contract: $ 367,545
Third year of contract: to be determined
Fourth year of contract: to be determined
Fifth year of contract: to be determined

Thus, the contract, which will run in six phases, begins with an initial period of one year, with the possibility of four one-year renewals. The potential term of the contract should not exceed five years or $ 738,762.

Under the contract, JS Held, LLC, “will act as owner trustee and oversee all aspects of real estate development on behalf of the city.”

The project will include scope development, tendering and coordination with the city; the demolition and remediation of the 23-acre brownfield site; and site engineering and construction of new public rights-of-way with utilities, the contract says.

A general description of the services required includes:

• Project development for all phases
• Management of the project and program development of all phases from the start
Upon completion
• Facilitate and manage all required services, activities and communications
necessary for the completion of the project on behalf of the city
• Selection of engineers, consultants and contractors
• Management of the negotiation and creation of contracts
• Supervision and coordination of engineering and design processes and
• Manage all engineering, design and inspection services related to the
redevelopment project

Director of neighborhood services, other employees

Commissioners approved the hiring of Deputy Warden of Neighborhood Services Brandon Holmes as Warden effective October 27, and Keith Bales as Deputy Warden of Ward Services, effective November 8.

The commissioners also approved the appointment of Gregory Paeth to the Covington Motor Vehicle Parking Authority for a four-year term, effective October 27, 2021 and expiring October 26, 2025.

Stormwater maintenance supervisor hired

The commissioners also approved the hiring of Todd Redman for the stormwater maintenance supervisor position, effective October 18.

The role is budgeted from the rainwater operating budget.

Map of the dog park presented

Ben Oldiges, Director of Parks and Recreation, presented the Commission with a plan for the construction of the city’s first dog park.

“This is a really exciting new initiative,” he said. “We’ve made pretty good progress on this project.

Oldiges said the idea had been floating around the city for about a decade, and when he was hired as manager in 2020, he made it one of his top priorities to make it happen.

The project would be hosted in Kenney Shields Park and paid for with CDBG funds and a $ 10,000 grant from the Northern Kentucky Association of Realtors.

Oldiges said they chose to target the location because of its lighting, safety, neighborhood setting, shade and water source.

“It’s a pretty solid foundation for a dog park,” he said, noting that the goal is to develop several in the city.

He said they hope to pave the way for winter 2021 or spring 2022.

Executive session

The commissioners ended Tuesday’s meeting by meeting in executive session to “discuss pending litigation,” the mayor said.

He also said that they would not meet again and that no further action would be taken.

Next meeting (there is no meeting next week because it is election day)

The next regular meeting of the Covington Commission will be a caucus meeting at 6:00 pm on November 9 at the City Building at 20 W. Pike St. in Covington. Meetings can be followed live on Fioptics channel 815, Spectrum channel 203, the Northern Kentucky Telecommunications Council (TBNK) website, TBNK @TBNKonline Facebook page, and TBNK Roku channels.

Site map modified OK for 2 new hotels in Anderson

By Site plan

October 27 — ANDERSON – Plans to build two new hotels in Anderson have moved forward with hopes of opening their doors within the next 18 months.

The Anderson Plan Commission voted unanimously on Tuesday for a modified main platform at the request of Amerilodge Group and New Born Logistics for the property east of the current Fairfield Inn.

The two hotels will have four floors, will have 92 rooms and will have parking for 96 vehicles.

One hotel should be a Tru by Hilton hotel and the second an Avid by IHG hotel.

Steve Aldridge of the Amerilodge Group said Anderson’s location was chosen because of the proximity to Hoosier Park Racing & Casino, the north side of Indianapolis and the potential for future economic development.

He said they hope to innovate by winter; construction normally takes 14-18 months.

Tim Stires, deputy director of Anderson’s municipal development department, said the development will require a special exception approved by Anderson’s board of directors on zoning appeals.

Stires said the modified main platform creates three properties for commercial development, with the two hotels occupying 5.2 of the 45.7 acres available.

Municipal development staff have recommended approval of the modified main property for development to be known as Scatterfield Commons.

Steve Servies of Servies Engineering & Surveying said the properties would drain north into a retention basin near Interstate 69.

The properties were dezoned for commercial use in 1994, with Fairfield Inn built in 2019 and the 64th Street extension east of Scatterfield Road completed about 10 years ago – and dead ends at the east end of the Sherwood Forest Subdivision.

The property was originally intended to be part of the baseball / softball training complex known as “The Farm” which was never developed.

Amerilodge Group is located in Michigan.

Amerilodge has several hotels in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio.

Follow Ken de la Bastide on Twitter @KendelaBastide, or call 765-640-4863.

Site map modified OK for 2 new hotels in Anderson | Business

By Site plan

ANDERSON – Plans to build two new hotels in Anderson have moved forward with hopes of opening their doors within the next 18 months.

The Anderson Plan Commission voted unanimously on Tuesday for a modified main platform at the request of Amerilodge Group and New Born Logistics for the property east of the current Fairfield Inn.

The two hotels will have four floors, contain 92 rooms and have parking for 96 vehicles.

One hotel should be a Tru by Hilton hotel and the second an Avid by IHG hotel.

Steve Aldridge of the Amerilodge Group said Anderson’s location was chosen because of the proximity to Hoosier Park Racing & Casino, the north side of Indianapolis and the potential for future economic development.

He said they hope to innovate by winter; construction normally takes 14-18 months.

Tim Stires, deputy director of Anderson’s municipal development department, said the development will require a special exception approved by Anderson’s board of directors on zoning appeals.

Stires said the modified main platform creates three properties for commercial development, with the two hotels occupying 5.2 of the 45.7 acres available.

Municipal development staff have recommended approval of the modified main property for development to be known as Scatterfield Commons.

Steve Servies of Servies Engineering & Surveying said the properties would drain north into a retention basin near Interstate 69.

The properties were dezoned for commercial use in 1994, with Fairfield Inn built in 2019 and the 64th Street extension east of Scatterfield Road completed about 10 years ago – and dead ends at the east end of the Sherwood Forest Subdivision.

The property was originally intended to be part of the baseball / softball training complex known as “The Farm” which was never developed.

Amerilodge Group is located in Michigan.

Amerilodge has several hotels in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio.

To follow Ken de la Bastide on Twitter @KendelaBastide, or call 765-640-4863.

Council greenlights site master plan for new Civic Hospital

By Site plan

The goal is to commission the $2.8 billion facility by 2028.

Content of the article

City Council approved a site master plan for The Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic Campus, another hurdle now cleared in the hospital’s quest to get the $2.8 billion facility operational for 2028.

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Content of the article

By then, the current Civic on Carling Avenue will be over a century behind its opening date. Hospital officials and affiliates have emphasized the need and benefits of a contemporary, state-of-the-art regional hospital, and there appears to be little disagreement in this regard.

But the journey to Civic 2.0 has not been smooth, with controversy over site selection in the rear-view mirror, some lingering dissatisfaction over elements of the hospital plan, and debates to come over exactly how to link the hospital to the city’s light rail transit system. , and other aspects of the site.

City staff recommended approval of the master plan, concluding that it demonstrated that transportation, parking, LRT access, cycling and pedestrian infrastructure, built heritage and other matters “have been carefully considered and designed”. Some components will still need to be fine-tuned, staff said, as the hospital submits site plan control requests to implement the various phases of the project (the master plan outlines 10 extending to 2048).

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Staff will have delegated authority to approve such requests unless a ward councilor decides to revoke it, planner Sean Moore explained Wednesday. That said, staff have already committed to presenting the site plan control application for the hospital parking garage – part of the first phase of development – ​​to the planning committee for approval.

Council voted 19-4 Wednesday in favor of the master plan, with councilors Jeff Leiper, Shawn Menard, Rawlson King and Catherine McKenney opposing it.

“I think as a city we need to ask for better in this case,” Menard said, sharing his belief that the plan falls short when it comes to SLR integration and parking plans and that there are better alternative designs for the site footprint that would reduce the loss of trees and green space and improve the transit experience.

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Stephen Willis, the city’s general manager of planning, infrastructure and economic development, said the hospital’s architects carried out several iterations of the site layout, taking into account considerations such as the distance needed from to a railway line to avoid interference with medical instruments, geotechnical problems and protection. of trees currently on the site.

“Our staff regularly challenged them, as did the (National Capital Commission) staff, about their setup, and they presented this as the best arrangement for the needs of health care delivery in establishment,” Willis said.

For his part, Mayor Jim Watson refuted nearly every argument against the hospital’s current plan: the significant cost and other hurdles associated with burying the planned parking lot; TOH’s commitments to green and public spaces, tree preservation, and replanting five trees for every tree felled; the need for on-site parking for hospital users; and plan provisions for direct and weather-protected LRT connectivity, transport monitoring and a transport demand management plan.

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“I believe that after 14 years of planning, we are finally in a position to move this file forward and help bring this new world-class hospital to Ottawa,” said Mr. Watson. He told his fellow board members “there are municipalities across Ontario that would be happy to receive these coveted and scarce health care funds to build a hospital in their community.”

Ahead of the Planning Committee’s vote on the site’s master plan earlier this month, Joanne Read, TOH’s Executive Vice President and Chief Planning and Development Officer, was asked what would happen next. it was not immediately approved.

Ms. Read said she thought the project’s construction and completion timelines would be in jeopardy and was also concerned that TOH was the only one “knocking on the province’s door” over funding.

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Committee members tempered their approval of the site’s master plan by asking staff to work with TOH on elements of cycling infrastructure, tree planting and a substantial reduction in surface parking.

Regional Councilor Leiper also obtained approval to require certain conditions of a neighborhood traffic study and that the TOH fund recommended mitigation efforts based on this study.

Staff were also tasked with ensuring that the internal road network proposed for the new Civic could accommodate local transit services and that site lighting met certain conditions.

All board members, including Watson, approved a board proposal. Riley Brockington will ask Watson to write to federal cabinet ministers, new MP for Ottawa Center Yasir Naqvi and National Capital Commission Board Chair calling for federal legislation to ensure long-term land protection remains of the Central Experimental Farm and a new master plan for the farm.

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Naqvi pledged during the election campaign to introduce a law to protect the farm in perpetuity.

Paul Saurette, a member of the Dows Lake Residents Association’s special committee on the new hospital, called the committee members’ motions “very genuine and constructive attempts at problem solving” and said the association is looking forward to it. to partner with the city and the hospital for, for example, the planned neighborhood traffic study.

Karen Wright, president of the Civic Hospital Neighborhood Association, shared a similar mindset on Wednesday and said her association would remain engaged with any upcoming site plans. Already, she and other community association officials have met with the hospital to go over details of planned parking.

The site plan control app will be available on the city’s website in the coming weeks, according to Moore, the planner, and residents will have an opportunity to provide feedback.

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The Lisbon Development Committee invites comments on the development of the Worumbo site

By Site development

The Worumbo Mill building was demolished in 2016. Time registration file

The Lisbon Development Committee is preparing plans for the former Worumbo Mill site and wants public participation.

On September 7, the city council awarded a bid to The Chesapeake Group, an economic analysis and development firm, to conduct a market analysis in Lisbon, including the site.

The results, combined with additional community feedback, will help identify redevelopment opportunities in the city, said Brett Richardson, director of economic development for the city, during the development committee meeting on Wednesday.

The first phase of the analysis examines regional and local markets and opportunities for future real estate and commercial development in Lisbon.

The second phase is a feasibility analysis of two redevelopment scenarios for the Worumbo site.

“There will be a community survey following the completion of the first phase of the market analysis to get community feedback on the two scenarios the community would like the Chesapeake Group to use for its feasibility analysis,” Richardson said. . “We will have the opportunity through this market analysis to choose two different development scenarios and dive deep with the pro forma on what the financial performance of this would be and how much investment would be required.

Surveys will add crucial data, Richardson added.

“Hopefully the polls will encourage people to attend the meetings, and then the meetings will lead to the next poll,” said planning board committee member Lisa Ward. ” The goal is presentation, but these meetings will include feedback and comments from the public. »

The community retail survey will likely take place in October. The survey will take place online, but Richardson said she will make it available to everyone.

“I think as a committee we need to think together or maybe select or seek outside help to figure out the best way to reach the maximum number of people to get 6,000 meaningful survey results,” said Don Fellows. , member of the committee.

Fellows added event content with possibility of open result.

Lisbon residents were asked to complete a survey last year, choosing from three potential development scenarios developed by the two private companies to facilitate meaningful public input. However, some residents criticized the survey as it only covered 306 people out of 10,000 residents.

Sandy Harkin, owner of the nearby Railroad Pub, seemed cautious about her hopes for future development.

“Over time, things eventually develop,” Harkin said. “But for me, you have to be careful what you develop and what you lose. It’s not about dollars and cents or how high the skyscraper can get. Once up there, everything is blocked.

Members of the Lisbon Development Commission at a meeting on Wednesday Screenshot


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Planning Council approves site plan for 7-story apartment tower in Kelley Square

By Site plan

WORCESTER – The planning board on Wednesday approved a final site plan for the redevelopment of the Table Talk Pie complex in Kelley Square into a mix of housing and retail.

The board of directors voted unanimously to approve the first phase of Boston Capital’s plans to redevelop the four-acre parcel, which includes the construction of a seven-story apartment complex in which the 83 units will be affordable.

The plan Boston Capital presented on Wednesday actually reflected an increase in the number of units from the 77 it predicted when it first applied to the Town Planning Council for approval of a final site plan.

Attorney Todd Rodman told the Planning Board that Boston Capital added the additional units after discussing its plans with the state.

The Table Talk Pies building in Kelley Square in Worcester.

Boston Capital will seek state social housing tax credits on the project and is in talks with the city to receive federal HOME funds.

Rich Mazzocchi of Boston Capital

Rich Mazzocchi of Boston Capital said the site’s comprehensive master plan includes approximately 400 housing units and 40,000 square feet of retail space.

Mazzocchi said the apartment tower planned for the first phase of the project will consist of a mix of studios and one-bedroom, two-bedroom and three-bedroom units. The units will be priced at 60% of the region’s median income, which he says is the US standard for housing and urban development for affordable housing. He said that for a family of four in Worcester, that works out to a total income of around $ 98,000.

The development includes the creation of Spruce Street, which in Boston Capital’s plans is one-way from Washington Street to Green Street. Mazzocchi said the development extends the character of the canal district and complements other ongoing developments in the district as well as existing businesses.

David Sullivan of the Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce said the chamber fully supports Boston Capital’s plans. He said greater density in the neighborhood would lead to continued economic development, and he supported the promotion of more affordable housing.

‘Charm of a HLM tower’

Allen Fletcher, who lives in the old Ash Street school and who developed the Worcester Public Market across the street, said the first phase of development “has all the charm of a high-rise public housing “and that the Spruce Street proposal represented a wasted opportunity. to inject some human scale development at street level into the project.

Fletcher said he and others in the Canal District had been advised by Boston Capital that there would be a mixed-use development and that downstairs retail would be coming, and none of those- this is only offered in the first phase of development.

And Dino Lorusso, owner of Crompton Place on Green Street, said the development, with fewer parking spaces than residents, would only add to parking problems in the Canal District.

Lorusso said the city’s installation of a parking meter across the neighborhood has increased the cost of parking for company employees and neighborhood residents. He said people are currently paying $ 175 to $ 200 a month for private spots; he estimated that once the Boston Capital project is completed, that bonus will increase to $ 300 to $ 500 per month.

Industrial style of the neighborhood

Mazzocchi has said he respectfully disagrees with Fletcher and Lorusso. He said he believed the design, which includes elements of brickwork, metal panels and cement board, respects the industrial style of the neighborhood.

Mazzocchi said the 40,000 square feet of retail space planned for the full construction of the project is a significant amount. He said that in the COVID-19 era, he was not sure the neighborhood would be able to absorb 40,000 square feet of retail at a time.

And, added Mazzocchi, there is little room to create a parking lot. But he believed there was enough to support this project. He noted that there is indoor bicycle parking and said the project is proposed in a pedestrian zone, close to large employers and Union Station.

Planning Board members also expressed some concerns about the aesthetics of the proposed seven-story building and wanted to see a more elaborate plan to activate the new stretch of Spruce Street, but were pleased to see a proposed affordable housing development. in the project context.

Mazzocchi said Boston Capital plans to acquire the Table Talk site early next year, when the pie-making company moves to a new headquarters. currently under construction near South Worcester Industrial Park.

Whole Foods Site Plan Gets PZC Approval in South Windsor | Windsor South

By Site plan

SOUTH WINDSOR – The Planning and Zoning Commission on Tuesday approved construction plans for the planned Whole Foods building at Evergreen Walk.

At the regular meeting, committee members unanimously approved the site plan for the 50,000 square foot building, which will replace two existing buildings, the current sites of Old Navy and Sakura Garden, an area of ​​53,000 square feet. The new building will consist of two units: a 40,000 square foot unit for Whole Foods and a 10,000 square foot retail space that will be available for lease.

PZC President Bart Pacekonis said he was somewhat concerned with empty retail space, recalling a similar space attached to the old Highland Market that was not in use.

“I see your group as being more active in finding tenants, and I hope we don’t make the same mistake and have that horror for 10, 15 years,” Pacekonis said.

Karen Johnson, project planner for Charter Realty, the management company of Evergreen Walk, said the company had seen an increase in rental activity since the Whole Foods announcement and was not concerned by the vacancy of the retail space.

“We are confident it will be hired shortly,” Johnson said.

The construction of Whole Foods is part of a larger initiative by Charter Realty to revitalize the property as a shopping destination for South Windsor and surrounding towns. These plans, described in a document released by the company, detail efforts to lease retail locations to various companies, though the document conceals their names.

An undeveloped 5,680 square foot lot by the former Moe’s is to be leased to a “national burger chain” and a “national track and field brand” expects to lease 5,715 square feet of space. Other storefronts have letters of intent for businesses to rent, but details have not been announced.

David Gagnon, a civil engineer at Langan Engineering, said the hope is to have Whole Foods accessible via the sidewalk of Evergreen Crossing, a nearby retirement community, which would also help connect it to the rest of Evergreen Walk.

Stephen Wagner, a member of PZC, said he was excited about the development of Evergreen Walk and satisfied with the way Charter Realty had handled it.

“It’s great to see that there is a long term plan to keep this place going and keeping it alive,” Wagner said.

PZC Alternate Member Megan Powell said that while she was not present throughout the entire application process, the company did a good job with the Whole Foods sitemap, except for minor concerns. .

“I think special care was taken throughout the process,” said Powell.

PZC member Michael LeBlanc said he liked the mural planned for the back of the building, but wanted to make sure it was easy to touch up if needed.

“The only problem is they’re hard to maintain,” LeBlanc said.

Pacekonis said he was also concerned about the upkeep of the mural, as well as what could happen in the distant future.

“I’m also worried that at some point this mural might want to be replaced with advertising,” Pacekonis said.

The commission finally agreed to make the approval of the request conditional on no advertising being able to replace the mural.

Mayor Andrew Paterna said he believes the new Whole Foods will be great for Evergreen Walk and presents plenty of additional development opportunities.

“This shows that South Windsor is still in a great position to attract economic development,” Paterna said.

Kentucky Power grants $ 35,375 for the development of the Hager Hill industrial site

By Site development

ASHLAND, Ky. (WTVQ) – The Johnson County Tax Court has received funding of $ 35,275 from an economic development grant from Kentucky Power for improvements to the Hager Hill industrial site. The grant is funded by the Kentucky Power Economic Growth Grant (KPEGG) program.

The grant will help the design and engineering phase of Johnson County’s plan to achieve Build-Ready certification for the site. This certification is a Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development program designed to make sites more marketable for potential businesses. According to Kentucky Power, this proves to a company that unknown roadblocks have been removed, site due diligence has been completed, and the project’s implementation schedule has been sped up significantly.

“One of the most important aspects of economic development is having sites ready for business. Johnson County’s work at Hager Hill is a great fit for the KPEGG program, as one of its primary goals is site development, ”said Kentucky Power President Brett Mattison. “We commend the Johnson County Tax Court for their investment in the project and look forward to working with them to bring investment and jobs to eastern Kentucky. “

The KPEGG program makes it possible to finance economic development programs or projects that encourage the creation and maintenance of manufacturing activities as well as industrial investment and employment. The program has completed its fourth annual cycle. Last year, 19 grants were awarded for economic development efforts in Kentucky Power’s service territory, totaling $ 859,175.

Funding for the program comes from the Kentucky Economic Development Surcharge. Kentucky Power explains that for every $ 1 dollar collected monthly from non-residential customers, the company’s shareholders match customer contributions dollar for dollar to generate nearly $ 800,000 per year for investments at the local and regional levels. The program is available in the 20 counties served by Kentucky Power.

Grant applications are reviewed by a committee made up of employees and delegates of the Kentucky Association of Economic Development and the Kentucky Economic Development Cabinet.

You can find more information at https://kentuckypower.com/development/.

Duke Energy Selects Carroll County For Site Development Program | News

By Site development

CARROLL COUNTY – Carroll County has been selected as one of four communities in the state for an economy-boosting site development program.

The program, operated by Duke Energy, works with local economic development organizations to identify potential properties for industrial development and / or redevelopment opportunities.

The Carroll County Economic Development Corporation, in partnership with Camden / Flora Rail Corridor Commission and the City of Camden, has submitted the JNT Farms plot in Camden for Duke Energy’s 2021 Site Preparation Program.

“This is exactly how teamwork pays off,” said Jake Adams, executive director of Carroll County Economic Development Corp. “Most people see an industry taking hold and don’t realize all the collaboration that goes into it. We are delighted to have a rail serviced asset to market for potential projects. “

JNT Farms is a 90 acre site along East 450 North, just northeast of Camden. It is currently used for agriculture.

The others chosen were a 175 acre site in Charlestown, a 46.5 acre parcel in Poseyville, and a 150 acre site in West Lafayette.

“Economic development is a team sport,” said Erin Schneider, Indiana economic development manager for Duke Energy. “Thus, we work closely over the long term with our local and regional economic development partners to help bring lasting economic improvements for each community. “

A nationally recognized site selection company, Site Selection Group (SSG), will assess and make specific recommendations to further develop sites to attract business. In addition to concept drawings for the four sites, Banning Engineering of Plainfield will review and present its recommendations for sites located in Carroll and Posey counties.

At the end of the program, SSG and Banning will present their findings for each site – including concept drawings – to local economic development officials.

Once each site’s readiness progresses, Duke Energy’s business development team will strategically market these sites nationwide to companies looking to expand or relocate their operations.

Ideal properties for Duke Energy’s site preparation program are typically 40 acres or more, serviced by the utility, or a vacant industrial building of at least 20,000 square feet identified to support renewed industrial growth and development. sustainable in a community.

Planning Board approves site plan for Erie Boulevard. West car wash

By Site plan

The Rome Planning Board approved the state environmental quality review and site plan review for Hoffman Development Corp. of Albany to build a 6,400 square foot car wash at 1315 Erie Blvd. W., the site of the former West Rome School, at its monthly meeting on Tuesday.

Despite opposition from community members and representatives of the Historical Society of Rome and Oneida County Historian Joseph Bottini stating that it is a historic site that must be preserved, the City officials and council said legally there was no reason the project couldn’t go ahead.

Deputy Director of Community and Economic Development Matthew J. Andrews answered questions throughout the meeting, adding that the project meets all city codes, as well as building and safety guidelines.

Before comments from city officials and board members, however, Andrews read comments submitted by the public, all of which opposed the construction of a car wash on the site.

“Please don’t let another historic building in Rome be destroyed,” commented Kathleen Haley, of Phoenix, Arizona and formerly of Lee, suggesting there are more suitable places in the city to build the lava. -auto. She wondered if the city had learned anything from the downtown construction and revitalization projects.

Michael Rescigno said it didn’t come down to whether Rome needed another car wash, but questioned why it had to be done at the expense of a historic building, asking Hoffman to change his plans .

A resident said just because the ancient school of western Rome isn’t on historical roles doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be. He mentioned the extensive renovations going on at the Capitol Theater right now, and how this building is only eight years older than the old school in Rome West.

“It still has all the original architecture and it can be proud of for the next 100 plus years if you allow it,” the local resident said. Former students “think that this proposal is a travesty towards the community”.

Those who oppose the project, as a group, “got a lawyer and through that lawyer they offered to buy out the property,” he said. “Just because this building can be destroyed doesn’t mean it should be. Listen to your community — those who live here and pay taxes here. Too much has already been destroyed.

William Rapke, who has previously spoken out against the demolition of the old school in West Rome, said Hoffman’s plans were “flawed in several respects” and that their “supporting documents are not complete”.

“They said they consulted with local authorities about the historical significance of the building, but that was never done,” Rapke said. He went on to say that there were also traffic problems in the area with the potential for more accidents at the intersection, as well as questions about sewage and its impact on the wetlands of the property.

It was also mentioned that through Change.org, Rapke collected over 1,300 signatures from people in favor of saving the old school.

“Please don’t continue the mistakes of the past,” he said, adding that county historian Joseph Bottini also wrote a column published in the local newspaper speaking on behalf of saving the old school demolition and preservation of local historic sites.

After reading the comments, Gavin Vuillaume, Landscape Architect at Environmental Design Partnership, Civil Engineer at 1315 Erie Blvd. W. Car Wash, and the proposed car wash at 1727 Black River Blvd., destroyed elements of the site plan that were questioned at the February planning committee meeting.

Vuillaume said they had a letter of signature responding to council’s concerns about an archaeological survey being carried out at the site, stating there was no impact on archaeological or architectural resources and that Hoffman was clear to develop the site. .

Another question from the last board meeting that Vuillaume responded to was the use of existing limestone from the West Rome School and its incorporation into the project. He said the limestone would be used as part of the commercial sign detailing, as well as as part of the historical marker that Hoffman proposed to place in front of the property, marking the location of the ancient School of Rome West.

“We propose to improve the sidewalk and create a small seating area with a few benches” on either side of the marker, Vuillaume said.

Planning Council Chairman Mark Esposito then asked if the group wanted to respond to some of the public comments made.

“The building had been for sale for several years…the whole place was kind of remodeled on the inside by the vet clinic and with the asbestos pollution it would cost over $100,000 to fix it. remove,” said Tom Hoffman Jr., owner of Hoffman Car Wash. & Jiffy Lube, in reference to what it would take to save the building.

“In addition, we do our due diligence. We have verified the “historical significance of the site” and have invested a great deal of time and energy and look forward to continuing construction to begin in the summer, with opening in the fall.”

As for an offer from opponents of the project to buy the building, “Their lawyer contacted us and I replied that we weren’t interested in selling it,” Hoffman said. “She hasn’t made a monetary offer and I haven’t received a response from her, so I don’t know where that stands.”

Hoffman also offered that if the city had other ideas for the location of the historic marker, green space, and seating area, it was open to suggestions.

“I have empathy for the people who went to school there, but it is a private building and sale, and there is nothing in the city or the federal statutes – nothing to warrant the board not approving this project and issuing a negative SEQR statement that I can see,” Chairman Esposito said.

In his comments to council, Andrews said the SEQR and site plan comply with land use and zoning regulations, that it would not “adversely impact traffic volume, that ‘there is no adverse impact on existing facilities or changes to natural resources’ and ‘it is not expected to create a hazard to environmental resources or human health’.

Andrews said: “The proposed action will result in the removal of a structure that is valuable to some members of the community, but there are no established local laws” to prevent approval of the project. The building sits “outside the local historic district boundary…and has been determined not to be eligible for the Register of Historic Places.”

Andrews also added that because Hoffman Development has not accepted any (federal) funds for the project, they are under no obligation to restore or protect the property.

“They have offered to use existing stone as part of the project and are offering a historic marker that matches the existing cobblestones in the right-of-way,” he said. “And the historical marker was developed in good faith.”

At the end of the meeting, Hoffman also offered that RHS Executive Director Arthur L. Simmons III visit the site before demolition and construction began, with an expected start in the spring.

Gateway region of Virginia is home to largest development of spec sites in Virginia

By Site development

PRINCE GEORGE, Virginia., February 18, 2021 / PRNewswire / – The Hollingsworth Companies have pre-classified the site and are starting construction of a 650,250 square foot speculative building in the Southpoint Business Park located in Prince George County. It will be the 12the and the largest facility developed by The Hollingsworth Companies in Southpoint, which has provided the community with facilities supporting hundreds of jobs and millions of dollars in investment.

With this new facility, Southpoint Business Park will have 1,600,000 square feet of industrial space suitable for high-growth manufacturing and distribution businesses located along I-295, just minutes from I-85 and I-95. The specification building will be a concrete tilting wall with 40 feet of headroom, 60 feet by 60 feet column spacing, 142 dock doors and 177 trailer drops.

Although there are “build to measure” projects in Virginia exceeding 1,000,000 square feet, it will be the largest speculative building on the market. Speculative buildings are developed to provide immediate occupancy and attract large site selection projects. Since the building will be completed with improvements, target customers can take possession in less than 60 days, compared to custom construction projects which can take up to two years for land acquisition, site work. and the construction of buildings.

“We are extremely excited to be building this new speculative development in the Southpoint Business Park. Buildings of this caliber will quickly attract industrial prospects and provide immediate support to the local and regional economy, thereby increasing prosperity, ”explains Keith boswell, President and CEO of that of Virginia Gateway Regional Economic Development Organization (VGR). “This latest 650,250 square foot Hollingsworth building in Prince George County will translate into a business that will create additional jobs and investment, an increased tax base, and drive the region’s prosperity, while giving us another tool to help us in our continued efforts to diversify our economy and to help anyone in the front door region who wants a job, can get one. “

“We appreciate that Hollingsworth has responded to the demand for industrial facilities necessary to expand our community now and on the horizon,” Boswell concluded.

Joe hollingsworth, CEO of The Hollingsworth Companies, said: “Despite the economic pressure from COVID-19, we are very optimistic about the Richmond metropolitan statistical area, and more specifically the region of the gateway and Prince George County markets. We have been successful in growing our business on the belief that American manufacturing will continue to thrive, and the Southeastern United States will lead this growth. He went on to say, “I want to thank the community for being willing to invest time, effort and money to become a true partner in the success of this park. I have no doubts that the next eight years will be the best economic times of our lives, ”Hollingsworth said.

About the Hollingsworth Companies

The Hollingsworth Companies is the largest non-urban industrial real estate developer and construction company in the Southeastern United States with 125 tenants and 18 million square feet of industrial space in 17 states. The Hollingsworth Companies has facilities located in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, Caroline from the south, Tennessee and Virginia. For more information on Hollingsworth companies, contact Tom mann, Senior Vice President of Industrial Real Estate by phone or email.

On that of Virginia Gateway region

that of Virginia Gateway Region is the regional economic development organization that markets the cities of Colonial Heights, Hopewell and Petersburg, and the counties of Dinwiddie, Prince george, Surry and Sussex. VGR focuses its efforts on new and existing business investments and job creation.

Press contact:

Tom mann
865-719-6884
[email protected]

Jill vaughan
804-363-7175
[email protected]

SOURCE Hollingsworth Companies

IRS site development and COVID testing of lack of demand discussed in Covington

By Site development

There is a strong demand from potential contractors who want to work in the early stages of the redevelopment of the old IRS site in Covington.

There is, however, no similar demand from the public for the free COVID-19 tests that are currently offered there through a federal program.

The City of Covington commission heard updates on the two issues at Tuesday night’s caucus meeting.

“There has been a dramatic drop in the number of people coming for testing, so they’re going to be stepping up their advertising there,” City Manager David Johnston said of COVID-19 testing there. A parking lot on the 23-acre site is currently set up to accommodate free drive-thru testing services. “After going through this (promotion) process for a few weeks, they will assess whether this site is necessary or not.”

Johnson said he spoke to the Kenton County Emergency Management Office about the matter.

“What you are seeing now is the surge in vaccinations,” said Johnston, speculating that more people are interested in being vaccinated than being tested. “A lot of people are focusing on the vaccination side of what’s going on and not on the test sites.”

“Don’t be surprised in about a week or so that we hear from the test site,” Johnston said.

Meanwhile, after issuing requests for qualifications from companies to remove IRS buildings, pavement, and mitigate environmental issues, as well as initiating the process of designing streets and utilities, the demand initial is high, said Johnston.

Forty-eight engineering and demolition companies had at least considered the tender to demolish the buildings. “That’s all we know,” said Johnston. “We will get a good answer from that.”

Forty-one companies have reviewed the tender for the removal of asbestos and old underground storage tanks at the site, the city manager said.

Twenty-one companies have verified the request for design quotes, he said.

“So there is interest in what’s going on on this site,” said Johnston.

Additionally, the city commission is set to approve the placement of $ 83,500 in an escrow account as the state assesses the potential of the former IRS site as a district for funding tax increases (TIF ) to support its redevelopment prospects.

A consultant is responsible for evaluating this possibility.

“The city will have the opportunity to review the findings and will be involved with consultants throughout the process,” said Tom West, city’s director of economic development. “We don’t just write a check and wait. We will be involved in the process.”

-Michael Monks, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher

Photo: COVID-19 test on the IRS website

St. Petersburg publishes the development proposals for the Trop site

By Site development

The city of St. Petersburg has released seven proposals for redeveloping the Tropicana Field site that include plans with and without a baseball stadium.

The plans, released late Tuesday afternoon, showcase the green spaces around Brooker Creek and include affordable housing options as the city expands.

Mayor of Saint Petersburg Rick kriseman announced Tuesday morning that the city would publish the advance proposals to redevelop the historic site of Trop.

The announcement came amid the Kriseman news rejected the last proposal of the Tampa Bay Rays for a new stadium on the site of Tropicana Field.

The city has a commentary section on the Web page so that residents can give their opinion on each of the development proposals.

Once Kriseman and his staff review all of the comments received through the webpage, his administration will create a shortlist of proposals, and from there the city will go through another candidate selection process.

The city will review the proposals with 26 professionals, looking at development under the aspects of sustainability, health, public policy, economic development, job creation and equity, especially for the African American community who have been moved with the existing site Too much has been developed.

Here’s a look at what each has to offer:

Downtown development

Midtown Development is a Florida-based company that offers the site as a pedestrian-scale mixed-use neighborhood called “Creekside.”

It seeks to fill the site with office, retail, hotel, civic and residential spaces with “Immediate focus on breaking down the physical and metaphysical barriers that have unfairly deprived the African-American community and the heritage of St. Petersburg,” according to the proposal.

The edge of the stream proposal comprises over 10,000 housing units, of which 1,000 are designated low and middle income residential units and certified green.

The plan also includes the heritage trail, to celebrate and honor the history of the site, as well as a central park near the creek, which would also have a walkway for the water pavilion.

The plan also highlights a plaza as a pedestrian area, filled with greenery and benches, as well as a walking area.

The eastern end of the site would have a commercial development, an innovation campus, and a hotel and conference center. The middle of the site with Booker Creek would be the destination and entertainment hub for the whole city. The west would act as a neighborhood.

The Pinellas County Urban League is part of the development team.

The total cost would vary based on density options determined by square footage. If the city opts for the 10.5 million square feet, the expected cost is $ 2.75 billion and for 14.2 million square feet, $ 3.75 billion.

Portman Holdings, Third Lake Partners

Developers in this group have already completed several developments in St. Petersburg, including ONE St. Pete, a 253-unit, 41-story luxury residential building in the city center.

The proposal Describes accommodations targeted at a variety of family sizes and income levels, including affordable accommodations, as well as a 400-key hotel with 50,000 square feet of meeting space. Regarding residential space, the proposal provides for 3,900 units.

A technology-driven research campus is envisioned to be occupied by a larger user of educational or healthcare institutions to help spur innovation and catalyze local research and development activities.

The site would also create a cultural space and amphitheater to be occupied by museums, arts organizations or other creative users.

This proposal, without the ball park, would cost $ 2.6 billion.

SROA, Holabird & Root, ARGO

This proposal will feature several mixed-use spaces, as well as a tech campus, a baseball museum and an open-air amphitheater.

In terms of housing, the plan includes 50% affordable multi-family apartments and 50% at market rate, or about 2.3 million square feet of apartments, or about 2,100 units.

The proposal includes up to 470,000 square feet of retail space.

The plan includes up to 675,300 square feet of office space to be used for the expansion of successful local businesses in marine and life sciences, financial services, data analytics, specialty manufacturing, creative arts and design.

This plan is estimated at $ 2.67 billion.

Sugar Hill Community Partners, JMA Ventures

This group of developers completed the St. Pete Pier approach.

The proposal set a target of transforming 35 to 40% of the total residential units on the site into affordable housing, and an additional 10 to 15% into workforce housing. It would also designate some of the units available to local artists to offer an “artist in residence” program.

The developers also plan to partner with Three Daughters Brewing and the Florida Brewers Guild to develop a mentorship program to support, educate and empower a local entrepreneur to become one of Florida’s first minority-owned breweries.

Their plan includes a 650,000 square foot convention center and an associated 500 room hotel.

It also has a 500,000 square foot technology campus to provide office, research and creative space for the facility.

It would also include a new park around Booker Creek, which “would be enhanced with public gathering spaces and both passive and active features.” The site would include a “historic walk” to honor the history of the site.

This plan would cost $ 3 billion.

TRS Development Services

This proposal promises that small businesses will make up at least 50% of its retail space.

He plans to create a public recreation area around Brooker Creek.

The development would also include a minimum of 50,000 square feet of conference space attached to a large flagship hotel and would include space for higher education.

This plan would include a community cultural center on the ground floor of the East Hotel, with the aim of educating the community about the history and culture of the city.

The total cost to the city is estimated at $ 475 million. More general costs have not been included in the proposal.

National Development Unicorp

Unicorp plan would create “Petersburg Park”, which would be filled with outdoor and green spaces.

The developers noted that they would offer three months of rent-free occupancy to any small business that moves to Petersburg Park or a new business that chooses to relocate there.

The proposal would create approximately 3,450 units, spread across a variety of housing types such as residential uses above retail and commercial spaces, living and working spaces. About 900 units would be dedicated to affordable housing.

The site would also house 312,000 square feet of retail and lifestyle, 288,000 square feet for higher education, 155,000 square feet of office space and a 66,000 square foot conference center and hotel. of 400 keys.

Wendover

The developers involved in this proposal have been working with St. Petersburg for almost 15 years.

The proposal projects that 1,286 units, approximately 58% of the total residential units in the plan, would represent affordable housing and labor / multi-family housing.

The residences would be integrated throughout the site, with six plots dedicated to affordable housing occupying the west side and several other mixed-income towers adjacent or to the east.

The plan also includes a hotel and conference space, industrial space for business schools, street-level retail, food and entertainment.

The estimated construction cost is $ 2.42 billion.


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National Road Business Park Secures $ 3M Site Development Grant

By Site development

ZANESVILLE – In an effort to attract new businesses to Muskingum County, JobsOhio provided a $ 3.1 million grant to National Road Business Park.

The funding will support the 203-acre property’s readiness for building construction by commercial occupants, according to a press lease from JobsOhio. Grant funds will be used to build an access road and upgrade water and sewer lines. The due diligence studies and the technical reports necessary for the development of the site were also carried out.

The result will be a business park fully ready to accommodate a building as large as 1 million square feet, as well as other smaller commercial and industrial facilities. The sites on the property will vary in size from 3 acres to over 70 acres. The Port Authority is marketing the site to growing local businesses and working to attract new employers to the county.

The Port Authority purchased the National Road Business Park property in Perry Township from the Ross Johnston Trust in July 2018 for nearly $ 3 million. Funding for the purchase and development is shared by the Port Authority, Muskingum County and the Town of Zanesville. “We were looking at five sites, and one of the parameters was connectivity to I-70,” Matt Abbot, executive director of the Port Authority, told The Times Recorder at the time of the purchase. “Another is the infrastructure, which is in place and can be moved within the site. We also saw some historical value in giving it the name of the national road and what that meant for trade in the past. “

“Every effort that has gone into making the National Road Business Park a reality has been the multitude of local, regional and state organizations working together to achieve a common goal,” Abbott said in the press release. “OhioSE and JobsOhio continue to play a vital role in our efforts to expand and attract businesses. “

Funding to improve these sites was made available through the JobsOhio / OhioSE Site Initiative, a program that began in 2018 with the goal of helping counties in Southeastern Ohio by creating competitive sites. capable of gaining new business investment. The program sites were selected with the help of a group of South Ohio CEOs who have advised JobsOhio and OhioSE.

Mike Jacoby, president of Southeast Ohio Economic Development and former director of the Muskingum County Port Authority, commended the port authority for continuing the project and thanked JobsOhio for its support. “Our region needs sites and buildings that are ready to compete in economic development,” said Jacoby.

With planned site preparation and due diligence studies completed, the site will be fully ready for building development by the end of this year. Several other sites in Southeast Ohio are completing due diligence reviews as part of this initiative. These due diligence reviews include title review, wetland boundaries, threatened and endangered species study, cultural resources report, geotechnical report, utility assessment, grading plan. and an estimate of the engineering development costs. Other sites in the program are currently under review and additional rewards may arrive in the future for stronger sites.

“This project is another example of the incredible teamwork between Jobs Ohio, Ohio SE and the ZMCPA,” said Adam Holmes, Ohio House State Representative for the 97th District. “The leadership and vision of these business development leaders continue to be a powerful engine of our regional economy and a critical component of our strategic regional economic development. We are very fortunate to have these organizations leading our community’s business recovery after COVID -19.

National Road will join the county’s three current business parks, which employ thousands of residents.

Northpointe Park is a 390-acre mixed-use area that is home to Kellogg’s, Spectrum, Barnes Advertising, Saunders Machine Works, Federal Express, JW Garage Door Company, KE Dittmar Company, Ohio Textile Service, Champion Gymnastics, Flow-Liner Systems, JD Equipment , Winnelson and Northpointe Fitness.

The airport’s distribution fleet, which covers approximately 500 acres, counts as tenants 5B’s, Bimbo Bakery, Plaskolite, Wayne Manufacturing, SEOIL USA and White Castle Systems.

The Eastpointe business park spans approximately 1,200 acres with distribution centers for Dollar General and AVON Products, manufacturing facilities for Bimbo Bakery and Bilco Company and also includes Halliburton Energy Services and TRP Zanesville, a division by Hissong Kenworth.

Site Analysis Identifies Three Public Market Locations in La Crosse | News

By Site analysis

LA CROSSE, Wisconsin (WXOW) — The United States Post Office in La Crosse, the Riverside Festival area and a location in the River Point District were selected as finalists to host a public market open all year round. year.

The city hired consultant Aaron Zaretsky to write the 33-page report for city officials to review. The place would serve as a cultural hub filled with small businesses and local vendors, bolstering the success of seasonal farmers’ markets.

“This is something you normally see in large communities and so having one really envisioned for the city of La Crosse is exciting,” said Robin Moses, executive director of Downtown Mainstreet, Inc.

The site analysis took into account 15 locations across La Crosse from the Valley View shopping center to the parking lot in front of the Charmant hotel. Officials are also not ruling out new proposals that may become available in the future.

Data from the report indicates that the Riverside Festival area is leading the way.

“We would like to see a lot better development there with maybe more activity,” said Andrea Schnick, economic development planner for the town of La Crosse. “This is something the consultant looked at, is what benefit the public market would bring to the rest of the neighborhood.”

The Riverside Festival site is just under 12 acres and includes the Oktoberfest grounds.

“I think proximity is really important to be near downtown, and that’s where we currently have a big boom in residential growth,” Moses said.

The next step in the process is to work with the owners of these sites and uncover any potential environmental liabilities.

The consultant is also working on developing a business plan that includes the potential sources of funding for the attraction, the different management structures and the suppliers that would operate.

“To move forward, I hope something happens quickly,” Schnick said.

City officials hope to start working in the market within the next two to three years.

Real Estate Insider: Don’t Expect Joe Louis Arena Site Development Anytime Soon

By Site development

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development contradicts developer Emmett Moten Jr.’s claim last week that the department is demanding the demolition of the United Artists Theater, attached to the United Artists Building, for the $ 56 million redevelopment of the 18 floors. tower overlooking the Grand Circus park.

“We’ve been looking for ways to use it, and you can’t use it for anything,” Moten told the Detroit City Council’s Standing Committee on Planning and Economic Development Thursday. “They won’t shut down this project unless the building collapses.”

the Detroit News first reported Response from HUD.

Marta Jauniza, Chicago Public Affairs Specialist for the HUD, sent me the same statement she sent to The News: “The HUD did not impose a condition requiring the theater to be demolished. The borrower’s proposal was to demolish the theater.

A loan for the project would be provided through HUD’s 221 (d) (4) program, which provides a 40-year multi-family construction loan that requires departmental assessment of market, demand and other issues.

However, it may be a question of speaking of generalities.

John Graves, one of Moten’s Bagley Development Group LLC investors, said Gershman Mortgage, which is expected to provide around $ 34.5 million in senior debt for the project tentatively scheduled for 2021, believes it will not demolish the theater would put it in jeopardy financially.

He provided a letter from Adam Hendin, vice president of Gershman’s office in Clayton, Missouri, outlining the mortgage company’s position. Hendin confirmed on Tuesday morning that he wrote the October 2 letter to Moten.

The letter states that the theater is removing possible parking spaces for residents, making “the project less attractive and less marketable to potential tenants”, and that “the theater building is dilapidated and not an attractive building to live in. to the side”.

Further, the letter states: “If the theater building is renovated and becomes operational again, Gershman is concerned that this adjoining commercial and public use will disrupt residential tenants and therefore make the project less attractive and less marketable as a running business. .

The letter says that “the development has been presented to Gershman and the HUD in such a way that the adjoining theater is demolished.”

“As part of the demolition approval by Gershman and HUD, we will need the appropriate approvals from the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO),” the letter said. “It was recently brought to Gershman’s attention that there are plans not to demolish the theater. Not demolishing the theater is a significant change from the funding request that has been submitted and approved to date, and this change will put 221 (d) (4) funding at risk. ”

Detroit City Council’s Standing Committee on Planning and Economic Development last week recommended approval to establish an obsolete property rehabilitation district and property tax allowances totaling $ 2.43 million. in dollars – about $ 175,000 for the OPRA and $ 2.25 million for the NEZ, according to Tracey Lynn Pearson, deputy director of media relations to Mayor Mike Duggan.

Southeastern North Carolina Gets Employment Sector Grant, Site Analysis

By Site analysis

Southeastern North Carolina, an 18-county regional economic development group, has received approval for federal funding to review industrial sectors and industrial real estate in its territory, according to a recent announcement.

The organization, which includes the Wilmington area, has received approval for a $ 148,000 grant from the US Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration (EDA), officials said in a press release.

Southeastern North Carolina will contribute 20% to the tune of $ 37,000 of the total project cost of $ 185,000.

The EDA grant project, called Southeast Regional Industrial Sector Analysis, has four components: an industrial sector analysis; an industrial site analysis; an incubator development strategy; and efforts to refine the group’s regional marketing and revamp the Southeast North Carolina website, last updated in 2011.

Southeastern North Carolina plans to launch the project on September 1, Southeast North Carolina President Steve Yost said this week. It is expected to be completed in September 2020.

Part of the overall industrial sector assessment of the organization’s 18 counties could include a component focused on the micro-region of Wilmington, which includes New Hanover, Pender, Brunswick and Columbus counties.

Columbus County was recently included in the organization’s strategic marketing plan for the micro-region of Wilmington, released earlier this year.

“Throughout the history of this organization, the Greater Wilmington region has always been an essential part of the South East region… It is one of our urban engine areas; the other urban engine being the Grand Fayetteville, ”said Yost.

The study will provide a more comprehensive overview of the business and industry sectors in the 18-county territory, Yost said.

“Health care is probably the most important [employment sectors] in southeastern North Carolina now, which it wasn’t 10 years ago, ”Yost said. “So that [study] will look at all the dynamics and trends that are happening across all industries, including those we are now targeting for marketing. “

The study’s findings will help the organization adjust, if necessary, any marketing targets for the entire 18-county region, or parts of the region, he added.

Southeastern North Carolina, which was founded in 1994 and is currently celebrating its 25th anniversary, launched its first industry cluster strategy in 1999 and last updated those plans in 2006.

Since its inception, the organization has helped generate more than $ 2.1 billion in announced capital investments, as well as more than 14,000 new jobs announced, and has helped recruit 148 companies, the statement said.

Since the last pooled analysis in 2006, the focus of the group has increased from 11 to 18 counties. Yost said that was also before the group started looking at micro-regions.

“Updates are particularly important at this time because of the dramatic changes that have been made to the region’s footprint in recent years,” said Joe Melvin, business development manager for Southeast North Carolina , in the press release.

His entire region has seen growth in the number of residents and employers, as well as new additions to regional assets and infrastructure, officials said.

“With the modern economy being what it is, we need to make sure that we base all of our assumptions on the most accurate, up-to-date and relevant information available,” Melvin added in the statement.

In addition to focusing on industrial sector analysis, Yost said, plans are to hire a site selection consultant to help review the region’s industrial real estate inventory to identify strengths, gaps and the needs of sites and properties.

Another element of the four-part project is to bring together policies and best practices for an incubator development strategy to support the employment growth of small businesses and startups.

“We are grateful that the US Department of Commerce agrees that successful regional economic development begins with a thorough assessment of strengths and opportunities,” Yost said in the statement.

The assessment is to incorporate the latest data into a “credible framework” on how the region’s economy fits into domestic and global trade trends, officials added in the statement.

“We look forward to involving our county, state, academic and private partners in this important effort, which will inform the region’s recruiting strategies for the next five to ten years,” said Yost.

The development plan for the Muhlenberg hospital site is moving forward

By Site development
The facade of Muhlenberg Hospital in Plainfield in 2009. The hospital closed in 2008 after 131 years of operation.

PLAINFIELD – Plans to redevelop the long-vacant 10.8-acre Muhlenberg Hospital site at the intersection of Park Avenue and Randolph Road took another step forward this week.

In a 5-2 vote, city council members on Monday approved a financial deal with developer Muhlenberg Urban Renewal LLC of Bloomfield that will bring the city more than $ 10 million in revenue over 30 years.

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Councilors Bridget Rivers and Diane Toliver voted against the ordinance. The project has already been approved by the city’s planning council, officials said.

Several residents have spoken out against the $ 56 million mixed-use project that provides 120 market-priced luxury one- and two-bedroom apartments as well as a 186,000 square foot medical complex.

2008 Statehouse protests to save Muhlenberg Hospital in Plainfield.  The state approved the hospital to close later that year.

A resident expressed concern that Centennial Hall meeting space would be destroyed as part of the redevelopment plan.

A resident of Carlton Avenue said she was opposed to anything other than a hospital on the Muhlenberg property.

Alan Goldstein, a resident of Madison Avenue, asked if the agreement made provisions for employment of residents or businesses in the city. He said that otherwise he would not approve of the plan.

Carlos Sanchez, deputy city administrator for economic development, said 40 percent of the project is reserved for Plainfield contractors, subcontractors and suppliers. In addition, the project provides for 200 construction jobs and when completed, around 600 jobs are expected to be made available to city residents.

“It’s in the deal, it’s black and white,” Sanchez said.

A Hillside Avenue resident, a retired teacher who lives about 20 homes from the Muhlenberg property, said the hospital has always been a good employer and a good neighbor.

She believes Plainfield doesn’t need more apartments and noted that it’s not near a transit hub that would encourage people to move in. She also thinks the 120 apartments with high-end granite countertops won’t suit an area that’s primarily single-family homes.

Lilas Borsa said the hospital was one of the reasons she moved to Plainfield in 2000.

“We have enough apartments that have already been built or are in the process of being built. I don’t know how many more apartments we can build,” Borsa said, adding that the city should attract doctors and hospitals. , or put a park on the site.

City Councilor Cory Storch asked what has been done to market the property.

Sanchez said the city started working on the project in early 2014. He said consultants had been hired to review the best use of the property and that there had been around seven meetings with residents before that the city does solicit requests for proposals.

He said the city is still looking to bring a medical item back to the property, but New Jersey is not issuing any certificates of need for new hospitals, and none are planned for the next 15 to 20 years.

With the tenders, the city received six concepts and Muhlenberg’s urban renewal plan was deemed the best for the site.

“It is not a hospital and we understand that,” Sanchez said, adding that a hospital on the site is simply not feasible or supported by the market.

He added that every year the hospital building continues to deteriorate. If the city does not move forward with the proposal, the building will remain empty and become a danger to the safety of the community.

The deal calls for Muhlenberg Urban Renewal to pay the city $ 442,968 per year in lieu of property taxes. Residential units on site are expected to be completed within 18-30 months of receiving approvals. The deadline for medical practices is 18 to 60 months after approvals.

The state approved the hospital shutdown in 2008, about five months after Solaris Health Care System, which owned the 396-bed acute care facility with JFK Medical Center, announced plans to shut it down.

Toliver said a municipal complex on the site would have been a good idea. She asked why this had not been taken into account.

“It’s not that we haven’t looked at it,” Sanchez said, adding that a new municipal complex would cost more than $ 90 million, a price the city cannot afford, while leaving the existing city hall, annex and municipal court buildings empty and developers would consider housing only for these sites.

“It’s a great idea, but it’s not the right place,” Sanchez said.

But Toliver said the city’s existing municipal buildings are old and work to update them could ultimately reach $ 90 million anyway.

“It’s like you choose your battle,” Toliver said. “Repair, repair and repair, these buildings are old and we are constantly investing money in them.”

Editor-in-Chief Suzanne Russell: 732-565-7335; [email protected]

St. Paul continues Ford site development despite opposition

By Site development

A huge field of dirt in the St. Paul’s Highland Park neighborhood could one day house up to 7,200 people and be the workplace of a thousand or more.

This vision of the former Ford assembly plant, which excites some and alarms others, won key approval from the city’s Planning Commission on Friday.

“The Ford site represents a unique development opportunity,” Mayor Chris Coleman said in a statement after the commission unanimously recommended the plan. “This well-thought-out plan lays the foundation for a vibrant and vibrant community on the banks of the Mississippi River.”

City council will likely review the plan in the fall. The document, which will frame the zoning and development of the 122-acre Ford property, continues to face opposition from residents who argue the city has downplayed community concerns.

Neighbors for a Livable St. Paul, a group of residents opposed to the plan, said St. Paul staff left comments on documents presented to the planning commissioners. They asked the Planning Commission to delay its vote and ask a third party to review the community input.

“The public and decision makers need accurate information. … This is something that will affect the Highland neighborhood and the city for decades to come,” said Charles Hathaway, who lives in the area and is a member of the group.

A “technical glitch” caused city staff compiling comments to miss some emails, both for and against the plan, said Mollie Scozzari of the Department of Planning and Economic Development. A resident alerted the city to the missed messages, and Scozzari said a staff member found them in a separate inbox.

The planning commissioners voted 9 to 7 not to delay their decision. Several commissioners said city staff shared the missing comments with them a few weeks ago and they had plenty of time to review the comments.

St. Paul staff have been gathering feedback from residents on the site for the past decade. The plan they arrived at has a mix of uses and building heights, with two stories closest to the Mississippi River and rising to eight or 10 stories near Cleveland Avenue. It includes a grid of streets that would connect to surrounding roads and pockets of green space that would dot the site, including a stormwater feature that resembles a stream.

Ford, which still owns the property, is expected to bring the site to market this year or early 2018 and the city expects development to take 15 to 20 years.

Some Highland Park residents are concerned about the housing density and traffic congestion the plan could create. Other neighbors – who have started their own group, Sustain Ward 3 – agree with the plan’s vision, which they say is an environmentally friendly design that will encourage the use of public transport.

Two city committees recommended the plan and said in a memo that Highland Park already has many single-family homes and needs more multi-family housing as the city’s population grows. And the site developer would make more money if they were able to add more accommodation to the site, said lead planner Merritt Clapp-Smith, which could reduce the potential need for government subsidies.

The Planning Commission agreed to some changes to the plan on Friday, including limiting the width of buildings to 500 feet in a bid to encourage developers to add courtyards or space for public amenities. They also agreed to increase the number of housing units permitted on the five blocks along Mississippi River Boulevard, which could reduce density elsewhere on the site.

“You have the most desirable property on the entire site,” said Commissioner Kris Fredson, who did not want hard limits on the number of people who could live along the boulevard.

Data center construction: site development, permits and zoning

By Site development

Shawn Mills is a tech entrepreneur, founding member and president of Green House Data. You can find him on Twitter at @tshawnmills.

SHAWN MILLS
Greenhouse data

This series of articles follows the process of developing a new data center, focusing on how small operators can build energy-efficient facilities without the resources of large companies. Previous entries have included planning for expansion, selecting a site, finding incentives and deciding if a real estate and / or design partner is right for you and designing your new facility.

Once the design wheels are spinning, it’s time to work with state and local governments on site development, permits, and zoning. A lot of people are moaning about the politics involved, but it can actually be a rewarding chance to engage your community and also improve business relationships.

Check under each stone for incentives

After selecting a site, you should contact the local government to see if there are any additional development incentives. In the case of Green House Data, it has been very enjoyable to work with the Cheyenne Town Building and Development Office. We’ve all heard stories about the permit process and jumping through hoops to get there. In the Compass Data Center building series here on Data Center Knowledge, meetings seem woefully boring. They certainly can be. Mr. Curtis also makes an important point when he describes the process as not being decided on technical merits, but on a subjective basis. The technical aspects of the building are definitely discussed, but often this process is as much about forging relationships as it is about tackling the nuts and bolts.

Choosing a location with “incentive” data centers can work your way again here. These estates want your business and they will do whatever they can to partner up. To start with, Cheyenne’s economic development entities like Cheyenne LEADS and the Wyoming Business Council helped us acquire the land at a very competitive price. Because we’re aligned with our business goals (we want a new facility, they want more jobs and industries), local managers can actually help everything go easier when they are working, even though the State and city allow it. This strong working relationship has helped us overcome schedule challenges and has been invaluable in helping us sort through documentation, ensure meetings are productive, and keep track of many details of this great project.

Stay on top of the planning

Whether you have a sympathetic or indifferent local government, you should always be prepared to tackle lengthy documents and meetings. Missing deadlines can cost you weeks because everything is on a schedule. Each municipality will have different processes, but there are frequently some overall similarities. In Cheyenne, it goes more or less as follows, including the expected timelines:

  • Annexation: If necessary, land adjacent to existing towns may need to be annexed (up to 5 months)
  • Decking: Platting is the subdivision of plots. The process can be divided into preliminary and final stages (3-5 months)
  • Zoning: Different areas of cities are zoned for different purposes like residential, industrial, etc. If the area needs to be changed for your use, this requires public notice, application, multiple commissions / council approval (3 months)
  • Sitemap: Site plan reviews are typically required for new construction and analyze access, parking, landscaping, drainage report, traffic survey, setbacks, etc. If you request an exemption, an additional period applies (10 days to 6 weeks)
  • Examination of the construction plan: Construction plans are subject to a specific service and are chargeable. They can be revised at any time during the development process and must include a ‘plot plan’, an extended site plan (3 weeks minimum)
  • Examination of the construction plan: The technical drawings of the development site are checked by a separate office (2 weeks minimum)
  • Classification permit: If the site requires grading, a separate permit should be obtained and the plans should be reviewed. This involves a request and costs (2 weeks minimum)
  • Passage permit: For development within the city right-of-way, a separate permit is required, with its own application and fees.
  • Building permit: This must be obtained before starting any construction, can only be issued to a licensed contractor, and requires application, fees and approval of the construction plan and site plan.
  • Sign the permit: If you plan to erect road signs, a separate application and permit is required.
  • Site map Certificate of conformity: Once the site plan is approved, you can obtain this certificate, which allows you to obtain a certificate of occupancy.

Phew! It’s a long list, and while many steps may overlap, it takes a long time. With almost every step requiring its own application, licensing, and review process, there are plenty of dates to follow. Most of the exam sessions involved take place on specific dates due to public notice or other factors, which means that it’s critical that you stay on top of your schedule.

Codes: the key to approval

For construction and site plans, local building codes will be critical to your success. The required codes are likely listed on your municipality’s website, and most cities adhere to international building codes (including residential / mechanical / plumbing / electrical and so on).

As you have designed your facility with your development partners, you should have a good understanding of building code requirements, which often conflict with your infrastructure needs. Home inspectors and permit approvers focus more on the safety of people than on the efficiency of your building. Be sure to discuss many of your features with your designers so you can explain your reasoning to the authorization and inspection teams.

Now that you’ve won the permitting process, it’s finally time to start building! Our next entry will finish things off as we innovate and begin construction.

Industry Perspectives is a Data Center Knowledge content channel highlighting thought leadership in the data center industry. See our guidelines and submission process for more information on how to participate. Check out previously published Industry Insights in our Knowledge Library.