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BATAVIA – There will be another site plan change for Rochester Regional Health-United Memorial Medical Center and YMCA Healthy Living Campus ahead of city planning and development committee approval – removal of one entrance and an exit from Summit Street.

Project leaders will return at the next committee meeting, scheduled for September 21. The committee’s recommendation to remove the entrance / exit came on Tuesday after residents of Summit Street shared their concerns during a public hearing on the project.

“Those of us who live here are well aware of the heavy use of the street and understand that good access to and from our hospital is vital for Batavia and the rest of Genesee County,” said resident Richard Beatty. “The same goes for the YMCA. The project itself is just something we absolutely need in the city and I want to see it move forward.

Plans for the $ 30 million Healthy Living Campus – a collaboration between the YMCA and Rochester Regional Health-United Memorial Medical Center – include a new state-of-the-art wellness center, indoor pool, group and a gymnasium with indoor walking / running track, educational kitchen, indoor play area, youth areas, lounge and meeting rooms. The partnership with UMMC will provide primary care, behavioral health services / crisis intervention, integration of telemedicine, cancer prevention services, chronic disease support services and education services , all in the same establishment. The proposed new facility would include a 69,420 square foot two-story building to house the YMCA with medical offices, off-street parking and a new access point from Summit Street. The building would be located at 211 and 213 East Main St., 1-9 Wiard St. and part of 211 1/2 East Main Rear.

Beatty said he was against the Summit Street alley leading to campus.

“Our street has no other commercial lanes … Creating more traffic is not what we need here,” he said. “With the two-house entrance to St. Joseph’s School, another driveway would cause additional traffic and congestion, as well as more noise and more congestion. “

Residents Brian and Joan McCabe submitted a letter which was read by committee chair Duane Preston. They said in the letter that they were concerned about water runoff, lighting, traffic, noise, vehicle emissions and foot traffic.

Project manager David Ciurzynski of Ciurzynski Consulting, LLC said that with the parking lot redesign on Wiard Street, they would add drainage to the property to address some of these issues.

“Our analysis shows that we need to add drainage along Wiard Street… We’ll have to talk to the city about how we’re going to do this.”

Another letter came from resident Ellen Larson, who said runoff from snowmelt water was a threat to basements on both sides. With excessive traffic, vehicles may be backed up at least until 9 or 11 Summit St., waiting for the light to change.

“In addition, we have considerable bicycle and pedestrian traffic coming from many directions,” she wrote.

The planning and development committee asked if access to the Summit Street campus could be postponed for a year or two to see how things go. Ciurzynski said it was of concern to put the alley from Summit Street to campus on the back burner.

“By getting all the traffic out on Washington Avenue, what’s going to happen is people tend to turn right because it’s easy. They’re going to turn right, then turn right onto Summit Street, ”he said. “Now you put the traffic all the way down half of Summit Street, as opposed to that at the end of Summit Street and get everyone out on Main Street as quickly as possible. “

The other recommendation is that developers work with GO ART! concerning the court between GO ART! and the Office of Aging.

Earlier, Leslie Moma, a resident of Summit Street and member of GO ART! Board of Trustees, spoke about efforts to transform the yard into a more social space through a partnership with the Office for the Aging.

“It will allow GO ART! to provide different kinds of educational and social functions in this space, ”she said. “Our intention is to ensure that the parking provided for this space does not interfere with the yard and activities in the yard.

Moma said the board’s plans for using the yard include small concerts, public art receptions, weddings, and other events that can generate money for GO ART!

“If parking is present all the way to the corner of GO ART !, it means that headlights, noise, exhaust fumes, things of that nature that are an integral part of vehicle ownership will interfere with that space of the vehicle. court, ”she said. noted.

“The problem is that there are six spaces close to GO ART! This is where the problem comes in. The cars which circulate there, their lights will shine on all kinds of activities which take place in the courtyard of GO ART! David Beatty, Board Member, said: He asked Ciurzynski if eliminating six of the planned parking spaces on the west side of the new building near GO ART would be a possibility.

“You would keep everything else in your parking lot. You eliminate those six spaces. Your car park is always as it is now. You move further away from the activities of GO ART! by eliminating the six spaces.

Ciurzynski had suggested putting up a fence. Beatty suggested the landscaping would work, without the need for a fence.

“We have designed and redesigned several times. I would really like to stop the bleeding from my design budget, ”he said. “I’d rather spend time and effort developing the landscaping there rather than losing those six spots. We really believe that it is important for the operation of our establishment to have these places available not only for our customers …

Ciurzynski said those responsible for the project contacted GO ART! to try to develop a solution.

“We would like to continue working with them and come up with a plan before we eliminate anything,” he said. He said that creating a stamp would solve the problem of the headlights shining on GO ART! activities in the yard.

Ciurzynski said the parking plan on the west side of the new building provides for 25 spaces, including spaces for people with disabilities or less mobile than others.

“We have a strip of land there that would buffer this area to try to shelter as much light as possible,” he said.