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A new Pep Boys auto parts store is reaching final approval stage with site plans to be voted on by the Spring Hill Planning Commission next month.

The commission examined the site plan proposed on Monday during its working session in September. If approved, the 7,500 square foot facility and parking lot will be built on undeveloped land at the intersection of Spring Hill Circle and Wilkes Court.

According to the Spring Hill planning staff report to the site, a traffic impact study conducted on August 16 concluded that the Pep Boys are not expected to negatively impact traffic near the area. However, current demand has not indicated a 25-foot shared access drive on the site.

The current plan also includes a 15 foot buffer zone that aligns with a neighboring residential neighborhood, as well as a “tree protection plan” that will preserve existing trees along the north and west property lines.

After meeting with city staff on September 15, planning staff concluded that applicant SEC Inc. should make revisions indicating the shared access drive by October 4.

During discussion of the proposal, Alderman Matt Fitterer said a neighboring landowner to the south had expressed “some reservations” about the project, although details were not given. Although the owner in question is set to meet with city staff ahead of next month’s voting meeting to discuss these concerns.

The installer also disagreed with the design of the site plan, which would place the facility’s transformer at the front of the store, facing an artery. He also had issues with the amount of red paint that will be used on the exterior of the building.

“I think it’s poorly shielded at best, and it would be better to put the transformer in an area a little less visible. If we’re going to leave it up front, it definitely needs better shielding. ‘after what we see, “said the editor. “And I know you’ve toned down the red in the elevations, but we still have a little bit of red in there. I’m not sure how well it’s up to our development standards, so I’m going to ask you to review. this too.”

Planning Commission chairman Jonathan Duda echoed Fitterer’s concerns about the use of red, particularly on one of the vehicle bay doors.

“I don’t understand the need for a bay to have a red garage door, and I encourage you to check out our design review, which prescribes natural tones, at least for that bay,” Duda said. “The other colors are your earth and appropriate, I would say.”

A Pep Boys auto store is located at the intersection of Spring Hill Circle and Wilkes Court.  Its site plan is currently under review by the Spring Hill Planning Commission, with some disputing the design of the facility, which would include a red garage door.

Dave Herbeck, SEC representative, said changing the colors of the bay gate “won’t be a problem” and the decision to teach bright red as outlined in the plan has been implemented.

“[Changing] the garage door is fine, ”Herbeck said. “We lowered the color a few shades, gave it a more matte finish. It looks brighter on [the plan] than the real color. If we have to go a little further, that’s fine, or if we have to do a little less, that’s fine too. “

Duda reiterated that the red on the building and the mark is “perfectly fine” and that the proposed red garage door was the main concern. Duda also expressed to the applicant the need for good communication between neighboring owners regarding the coordination of construction access to the property.

“We have other interconnectivity challenges by Popeye, and it’s not unique, but having a connection between properties is first and foremost what we need to make sure that happens, whether it’s your use or that. from someone else on this property, ”Duda said.

The claimant noted that he had contacted neighboring landowners and that the provision of an access easement in adjacent properties was a prerequisite for submitting the Pep Boys claim to municipal staff.

The proposed installation for the Pep Boys will appear again at the Planning Committee’s regular voting meeting on October 11.