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Site Development Plans Filed For Amazon Delivery Center In Former Westside Kmart | Jax Daily Record | Jacksonville Daily Record

By Site development

Site development plans were filed Dec. 11 for an Amazon.com ecommerce delivery hub in the former Kmart along Blanding Boulevard in Westside.

The civil engineering plans, designed by Fort Lauderdale-based Langan Engineering and Environmental Services Inc., were submitted through Miami-based landowner, Blanding Self Storage LLC.

Amazon describes the facility as an ecommerce distribution, fulfillment, and delivery hub.

The sitemap for the Amazon delivery center.

Plans for the old Kmart at 4645 Blanding Blvd. show that the existing building will remain with modifications to the parking and loading areas.

The plans show a van parking area, eight platform doors, 72 van loading spaces, 131 van parking spaces and 236 parking spaces.

The landowner has requested the zoning change of the property from Commercial / General-2 community to the development of planned units for use as an e-commerce distribution, fulfillment and delivery center. Approval of the rezoning is expected in the first quarter of next year.

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What is the next step in the development of the St. Paul Ford site? Here is an update

By Site development
Interior view of the Ford site in St. Paul’s Highland Park, looking northwest to the Ford Street Bridge over the Mississippi River in upper left, and buildings along Ford Parkway, November 12, 2019 . (Pioneer Press / Scott Takushi)

The former Model T and Ford Ranger pickup truck factory site in St. Paul’s Highland Park is currently empty land, but likely not for long.

Last year, Ford Motor Co. selected Minneapolis-based Ryan Cos. As the lead developer for the 122 acres of vacant land that once housed its Twin Cities manufacturing campus.

Pending city council approval, Ryan officials say they could start building 3,800 mid- and high-density housing units and additional offices, businesses and parks by next spring.

City officials continue to market the land overlooking the Mississippi River as a future national model of sustainability and “infill” urban redevelopment.

However, several key questions remain before the construction crews begin work. The Ryan Companies are planning a community meeting from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday at the Joan of Arc Auditorium at St. Catherine’s University in Whitby Hall, located at Randolph Avenue and Kenneth Street.

Here is an update on the status of the project and what will follow:

WHO OWNS THE FORD SITE?

A general concept plan for the former Ford Twin Cities automobile plant in Highland Park, which will be converted into 3,500 housing units and 150,000 square feet of retail space. In total, the development will span some 40 city blocks. At the bottom right is the property of the Canadian Pacific Railway. (Courtesy of Ryan Companies)

Ford owns the Ford site. The Michigan-based automaker plans to sell the plot that housed the main assembly plant to Ryan Cos., Although both sides have been silent on how quickly that could happen.

The Canadian Pacific Railway still owns the nearby 13-acre marshalling yard, a wedge-shaped parcel on the southern border of the site.

The unclear sales schedule has raised concerns among critics that some $ 53 million in potential municipal property tax misappropriation – a type of public investment called “tax hike funding” – to cover the costs of infrastructure would simply increase the selling price, making more money for Ford to the fresh taxpayer. TIF dollars used for affordable housing could add up to $ 48 million more in public contributions.

IS THE EARTH CLEAN?

State officials say the land has been cleared.

Walker Smith, a spokesman for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, which has been monitoring cleanup issues at the Ford site for years, said Ford has taken the initiative in removing soil contaminated by decades of auto manufacturing and to make the earth family friendly again.

“It has been cleaned to standards suitable for residential development,” Smith said. “Basically, they dug all of the soil from the site down to bedrock and backfilled it, for the most part.”

A representative from the MPCA will address environmental issues at the Highland District Council’s Community Development Committee meeting, which will be held Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at the Highland Park Community Center.

WILL THERE BE AFFORDABLE HOUSING?

Render of the future development of the former Ford Twin Cities car plant in Highland Park. The habitat will become more dense towards the east. (Courtesy of The Ryan Companies)

Yes. In 2017, St. Paul City Council approved the Ford Site Master Plan, which calls for 20% of 3,800 units to be affordable. Tuesday, Ryan Cos. announced that Project for Pride in Living, CommonBond Communities and Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity have agreed to be affordable housing partners for these 700 units.

According to the master plan, about 10 percent of housing will be for individuals or families earning no more than 30 percent of the region’s median income, or about $ 30,000 for a family of four. Another 5 percent will be affordable for those earning no more than 50 percent of the region’s median income. And 5 percent will be targeted at people at or below 60 percent of the region’s median income.

“We’re going to do a little bit of each,” said Scott Cordes, CFO of Project for Pride in Living, which will develop about half of the affordable housing on site. “The units that we will produce and CommonBond will produce will be affordable multi-family buildings, and within those they may have some income variability in the affordable range. “

Funding for affordable housing will come from a variety of locations, including up to $ 48 million in TIF. “We expect this to be gradual, much like (the development schedule that has been) set for overall development,” Cordes added. “Each project will be subject to its own approvals.

WHAT ABOUT ZONE C?

Next to Hidden Falls Park, a sloping man-made parking lot on Boulevard on the Mississippi River continues to raise questions in the community and at City Hall.

Formerly a dumping ground for paints and other wastes from the Ford plant, Area C was covered with excess material from an Army Corps of Engineers dam project, then covered with excess concrete from a project of public works of the city.

Ford added a layer of asphalt and vehicles parked on it for a while. This is generating a lot of concern, but MPCA officials say they are not alarmed.

“This is a site that is across the river route, an area where 60 or 70 years ago the Ford company did away with solvents and paint sludge and that sort of thing,” he said. Smith said. “Basically, they just threw him over a cliff, which was perfectly legal at the time. Since then this area has been covered and covered, but this area has been flooded dozens of times. We asked the Ford company to do some testing there, and all of the results we saw showed that there was no level of contamination that would pose a threat to humans or the environment.

100% ELECTRICITY WITHOUT CARBON – BUT HOW?

Throughout his final years in office, former St. Paul’s mayor, Chris Coleman, frequently highlighted the potential of the Ford site as a defining example of sustainability – an environmentally balanced neighborhood of tomorrow. It remains to be seen exactly how Ryan Cos. plans to achieve this.

During a media event at the Ford site on Tuesday, Ryan officials said they had worked closely with Xcel Energy to ensure that 100% of the electricity at the Ford site will come from renewable or non-renewable sources. carbon. This includes electricity from what is likely to be the state’s largest urban solar power grid – a seven-acre facility. Each building will be ready for solar energy.

“When we told them to think outside the box, they took the box and threw it away,” Ryan Vice President Tony Barranco said.

Where else will the energy come from? Hydropower is a strong possibility. The hydroelectric plant on the site is owned by Brookfield Renewable Power Inc.

April 11, 2018, aerial photo of Lock and Dam # 1 on the Mississippi River, just downstream of the Ford Parkway Bridge between St. Paul, right, and Minneapolis. (John Autey / Pioneer Press)

“The project is still in its early stages, but… we are currently exploring ways to provide locally sourced renewable energy by combining on-site hydropower with new solar power,” said Matt Lindstrom, spokesperson for Xcel Energy.

“Although still in the early stages, we are excited about the plans on offer and look forward to seeing what we can offer our customers in St. Paul,” said Lindstrom.

Ryan officials have not disclosed any further details. Previous concepts had called for exploring geothermal heating and other innovations, but no mention was made on Tuesday of this possibility or how to offset the use of natural gas on site.

“On the 100% renewable electricity front, the last news I heard was that more than one option to get there was being considered,” said Russ Stark, St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter’s Resilience Officer. .

Access to transport is part of the sustainability strategy. Plans call for the extension of the existing road network from Highland Village, but with better access for bicycles and pedestrians. There will be at least 100 new electric charging stations, and stormwater will be collected and treated on-site, preventing direct runoff to the Mississippi River.

HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE TO COME TOGETHER?

Ryan officials have said the market is driving development, but demand for housing is quite high right now.

The holistic vision of 3,800 housing units, 265,000 square feet of office space and 150,000 square feet of retail space could take 10 or even 20 years to reach full construction, especially if plans are slowed by a recession.

If construction begins in the spring as planned, the first residents will likely move in within three years. Ryan Cos. plans to start at a civic plaza near Ford Parkway and single family homes along Mississippi River Boulevard, which are sure to be quick sellers.

The City of St. Paul has posted answers to frequently asked questions on the Ford website at tinyurl.com/Ford2019.

St. Paul gives green light to development of Ford plant site

By Site development

St. Paul has reached a final deal with the developer to remake the old Ford Motor Company assembly plant in St. Paul.

Mayor Melvin Carter and Ryan Companies on Tuesday announced the deal at the vacant 122-acre site in the Highland Park neighborhood, promising hundreds of new housing units, more than 13,000 construction jobs and 1,000 permanent jobs on the site.

They also said it would have 3,800 housing units, 265,000 square feet of office space and 150,000 square feet of retail space.

“This is just the start,” Tony Barranco said with Ryan Cos. “We will have more conversations with city council.” We would like to start construction in the spring.

The agreement calls for 20 percent of housing to be subject to income restrictions, with 760 affordable units for households between 30 and 60 percent of the region’s median income.

Carter said his administration plans to present the final development agreement to city council for formal approval this year.

Further board approvals will have to follow virtually block-by-block as the site is built, Ryan Cos officials said.

The site has been the subject of fierce debate in the region as neighbors have called for both increased residential density in Highland Park and a halt to development which will increase traffic on the neighborhood streets. . Opponents tried unsuccessfully in 2017 to put the city’s plan to a public vote in a referendum.

Developer Mike Ryan said the build process will take a long time. He expected it to be three years before the first residents settled in the area, and five years before infrastructure and public amenities were fully built.

Carter said it would add $ 1 billion in value to the city’s $ 23 billion property tax base and said the deal his administration reached included at least $ 53 million in funding by tax increase, or TIF, to build streets and other public infrastructure on the site.

Barranco said he expects the developer to also seek more TIF to build affordable housing on the site as construction proceeds. He refused to give a definitive figure on public subsidies for the project or to characterize the proportion of public aid represented by the initial 53 million dollars.

The St. Paul’s Highland Park District Assembly Plant began production in 1925 and has manufactured a variety of military vehicles and equipment over the decades. The plant closed in December 2011, when the last Ford Ranger pickup, the plant’s sole product, ceased production in the United States.

Since then, the company has made significant clean-up efforts, demolishing the factory and cleaning up the pollution left by nearly a century of industrial production.

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Ford site development agreement reached, according to St. Paul and Ryan Cos.

By Site development

The Ryan Cos. has entered into a development agreement with the City of St. Paul that will bring 3,800 housing units, the state’s largest urban solar panel and 100% of the electricity from renewable or carbon-free sources to the Ford Motor Co vacant. site.

The plan – which must be approved by city council – relies on funding of $ 53 million in increase in municipal taxes.

It is a type of public investment that recycles new property taxes generated on the site to fund improvements in the same location – public infrastructure such as utilities, parks and water bodies in 40 future development blocks. Estate on bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River in the City District of Highland Park.

That number is less than half of the $ 107 million TIF requested in March by Minneapolis-based Ryan Cos. However, it does not fully encompass the additional TIF funds that will likely be needed to ensure that 20% of the housing on site is affordable.

“It wasn’t always clear that we would end up here on this stage,” Gov. Tim Walz said, introducing St. Paul’s Mayor Melvin Carter and officials to Ryan on Tuesday at a media event inside the hall. ‘an icy tent at the Ford site. “It’s an incredible part of the story that is on this piece of land.”

Minnesota Governor Tim Walz, left, St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter and Ryan Companies Northern Region President Mike Ryan shake hands and talk about the $ 92 million development of the Ford site at St. Paul’s Highland Park on November 12, 2019 (Pioneer Press / Scott Takushi)

Carter added, “After more than a decade of work, we are ready to make our grand vision for the Ford site a reality. The homes, jobs and public spaces we build here together will shape our city for generations to come.

As part of a master plan and zoning agreement signed in 2017, St. Paul City Council committed to providing a wide range of medium to high density housing on the outskirts of one of the neighborhoods. the city’s wealthiest, including affordable housing for the very poor – families earning 30 percent of the region’s median income, currently around $ 30,000 a year.

The $ 53 million from the TIF will finance more than half of the site’s $ 92 million in public infrastructure, with the remainder being private sector investment.

Affordable housing, which often draws funds from a variety of sources, can depend on additional TIF money on a project-by-project basis, said Ryan Cos. Vice president Tony Barranco.

“Our values ​​prioritized affordable housing at deeply affordable levels… sustainability, jobs and the preservation of Little League’s ball fields,” said Chris Tolbert, St. Paul City Council member.

SPRING CONSTRUCTION

Interior view of the Ford site in St. Paul’s Highland Park, looking west across the Mississippi River to the buildings at the Minneosta Veterans Home complex, November 12, 2019 (Pioneer Press / Scott Takushi)

Also in attendance at Tuesday’s event were representatives of the project’s new affordable housing partners – Project for Pride in Living, CommonBond Communities and Twin Cities Habitat for Humanity, including Habitat President Chris Coleman, former city mayor. .

Most of the city council members were in attendance, with the exception of Dai Thao, who Tolbert said was traveling for prior engagement, and Kassim Busuri.

RELATED: Ford Site Q&A: What Comes First, What About Ball Fields, More

Ryan officials have said if city approvals come together block by block, construction could begin in the spring and the first residents will move in three years later. The site’s infrastructure will be largely developed within five years.

The overall development plan will be presented to the municipal council before the end of the year.

On October 10, 2018, The Ryan Companies unveiled renderings and a general concept plan for the former Ford Twin Cities car plant in Highland Park, which will be converted into 3,500 housing units and 150,000 square feet of retail space. (Courtesy of Ryan Companies)

Ford opened the 122-acre Highland plant in 1925 to build Model T automobiles and closed it in 2011 as part of a national restructuring plan. The automaker chose Ryan Cos. as the main developer of the site in June 2018.

The overall goal is to create 3,800 housing units, 265,000 square feet of office space and 150,000 square feet of retail space.

Around 1,000 permanent jobs are envisaged on the site, in addition to the 14,500 construction jobs currently being developed. The plans call for 50 acres of open public space and over 1,000 trees.

Company officials said development would likely begin to unfold off Ford Parkway, starting with a civic plaza and through a series of single-family homes built along Boulevard on the Mississippi River.

When fully constructed over the next 10 to 20 years, the site is expected to add $ 1 billion in new property tax value to the city’s $ 23 billion tax base.

“This site has long been for us and for many one of the biggest redevelopments (opportunities)… in the country,” said Ryan Cos. Co-chair Mike Ryan. “Homes, jobs, nature, environment, sustainability, the ability to walk… I think what we’re going to accomplish here will have a longevity that’s hard to envision given the somewhat barren site today. “

TIF’s demand unveiled in March – $ 107 million in tax evasion to fund the site’s infrastructure, parks and other public spaces – has not been welcomed by many critics who have questioned why a new development in one of the city’s wealthiest neighborhoods would need a public subsidy. .

Some business leaders were concerned that the additional public investment would simply allow Ford to increase the selling price, knowing that taxpayers would actually bear the additional costs.

Ryan said his development team “never had to guess” the city’s political priorities, from parks to affordable housing. “Honestly, I got a little hungry in my stomach,” he said. “You have had great success in our discussions to make us accept more risks. “

100 PERCENT RENEWABLE ENERGY

On October 10, 2018, The Ryan Companies unveiled renderings and a general concept plan for the former Ford Twin Cities car plant in Highland Park, which will be converted into more than 3,500 housing units, 265,000 square feet of office space and 150,000 square feet of retail space. (Courtesy of The Ryan Companies)

Barranco said reaching this point has been “hard, difficult to put all of these pieces together” and thanked a long list of city employees and partners, including former council chairman Russ Stark, the head of the city. Resilience Mayor, Deputy Mayor Jaime Tincher and Melanie McMahon, Tolbert’s legislative aide.

The company is working closely with Xcel Energy to ensure that 100% of the electricity used on-site comes from renewable sources, including a new seven-acre solar panel that will likely be the state’s largest for an urban area.

“When we told them to think outside the box, they took the box and threw it away,” Barranco said.

The land – which spans 40 future city blocks – still belongs to Ford Motor Co. Barranco said Ford had provided the flexibility on the schedule to put a development program in place, but officials at Ryan Cos. didn’t want to say when the sale would be finalized. .

“They gave us time for this to happen,” he said.

Also on Tuesday, the St. Paul’s Center for Economic Inclusion released a written statement celebrating Ford’s sitemap and congratulating the mayor, city council and Ryan Cos. for a plan that prioritizes the development of mixed revenues across the site.

“Collectively, our regional leadership was not lacking in the drive to achieve equity, but in infrastructure,” said Tawanna Black, Founder and CEO.

Exclusive | HS2 plans to sell £ 1billion Euston for site development

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High Speed ​​2 Ltd (HS2 Ltd) is seeking to recoup more than £ 1 billion from the sale of On-Site Development (OSD) above its Euston terminus in order to reduce the cost of the project, New civil engineer can reveal.

Instead of paying the money into the treasury, HS2 Ltd suggested that the proceeds from the sale could be fed back into the Euston program.

Harnessing this money would also allow HS2 Ltd to reduce the cost of delivering the London terminal. Several former HS2 executives – including former chairman Sir Terry Morgan – have suggested reducing the cost of the project by removing the Euston terminus.

Selling plans for the site to developers are spelled out in an unedited version from HS2 President Allan’s Cook’s Inventory report New civil engineer understand. A redacted version of Inventory was released by the government in September.

A company spokesperson has now confirmed that HS2 Ltd expects to make “north of £ 1 billion” by selling the land above Euston station.

The redacted version of Inventory The report states that “HS2 has identified development opportunities with profit value across the route,” including a development portfolio comprising “on-site development opportunities at stations and depots (including including Euston) ”as well as retail advertising and parking lots.

The plans are part of a recalculation of the costs and benefits of the scheme as the estimated budget has increased from £ 56bn to £ 88bn (at 2019 prices).

HS2 Ltd’s plan to reset funding arrangements would involve renegotiation with the Ministry of Transport and the Treasury. It is understood that the £ 1bn from the sale of Euston’s OSD was previously due to go to the Treasury.

The redacted version of Inventory report adds, “It is important to recognize that HS2 creates great increases in value in the places it serves and in the assets it creates. Other funding and funding possibilities should be considered in addition to the ongoing cost and schedule activities.

“We must continue to explore opportunities with the private sector, local authorities, development agencies and other local stakeholders to help finance in return for future income. Along with maintaining cost pressure, HS2 Ltd, along with the government, is expected to take further steps to add value to its assets, especially around land and properties in city centers.

New civil engineer revealed last week that costs associated with developing the new HS2 terminus at Euston are expected to exceed £ 2bn, up from £ 1.5bn at the start of the year when budget contingencies are included.

The overhaul of the existing Network Rail station and surrounding area, which is planned by Lendlease, could also cost up to £ 2 billion more than originally thought, sources familiar with the project have said. . The developer has previously said the project will have a development value of around £ 5.8bn when completed, but official costs for the project have yet to be released.

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Real Estate Insider: Don’t Expect Joe Louis Arena Site Development Anytime Soon

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The US Department of Housing and Urban Development contradicts developer Emmett Moten Jr.’s claim last week that the department is demanding the demolition of the United Artists Theater, attached to the United Artists Building, for the $ 56 million redevelopment of the 18 floors. tower overlooking the Grand Circus park.

“We’ve been looking for ways to use it, and you can’t use it for anything,” Moten told the Detroit City Council’s Standing Committee on Planning and Economic Development Thursday. “They won’t shut down this project unless the building collapses.”

the Detroit News first reported Response from HUD.

Marta Jauniza, Chicago Public Affairs Specialist for the HUD, sent me the same statement she sent to The News: “The HUD did not impose a condition requiring the theater to be demolished. The borrower’s proposal was to demolish the theater.

A loan for the project would be provided through HUD’s 221 (d) (4) program, which provides a 40-year multi-family construction loan that requires departmental assessment of market, demand and other issues.

However, it may be a question of speaking of generalities.

John Graves, one of Moten’s Bagley Development Group LLC investors, said Gershman Mortgage, which is expected to provide around $ 34.5 million in senior debt for the project tentatively scheduled for 2021, believes it will not demolish the theater would put it in jeopardy financially.

He provided a letter from Adam Hendin, vice president of Gershman’s office in Clayton, Missouri, outlining the mortgage company’s position. Hendin confirmed on Tuesday morning that he wrote the October 2 letter to Moten.

The letter states that the theater is removing possible parking spaces for residents, making “the project less attractive and less marketable to potential tenants”, and that “the theater building is dilapidated and not an attractive building to live in. to the side”.

Further, the letter states: “If the theater building is renovated and becomes operational again, Gershman is concerned that this adjoining commercial and public use will disrupt residential tenants and therefore make the project less attractive and less marketable as a running business. .

The letter says that “the development has been presented to Gershman and the HUD in such a way that the adjoining theater is demolished.”

“As part of the demolition approval by Gershman and HUD, we will need the appropriate approvals from the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO),” the letter said. “It was recently brought to Gershman’s attention that there are plans not to demolish the theater. Not demolishing the theater is a significant change from the funding request that has been submitted and approved to date, and this change will put 221 (d) (4) funding at risk. ”

Detroit City Council’s Standing Committee on Planning and Economic Development last week recommended approval to establish an obsolete property rehabilitation district and property tax allowances totaling $ 2.43 million. in dollars – about $ 175,000 for the OPRA and $ 2.25 million for the NEZ, according to Tracey Lynn Pearson, deputy director of media relations to Mayor Mike Duggan.

Developer briefs Virginia Beach City Council on Dome site development conditions

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Virginia Beach city officials and developer Venture Realty presented details of their deal on Oct. 29 to city council members.

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va .– The Virginia Beach Development Authority and developer Venture Realty Group briefed city council members on Tuesday afternoon on the conditions for revitalizing the former Dome site into an epicenter of entertainment.

The city and Venture Realty met with City Council on October 29 to brief members on what lies ahead for the site, including a construction schedule and improvements to the original plan.

“We wanted to give our friends and neighbors in the city of Virginia Beach regionally a reason to come back to their Cceanfront,” Mike Culpepper, a representative for Venture Realty told board members. “We want to take the positive energy and goodwill of Something in the Water and inject it into a vibrant and dynamic development 24/7.”

The city council approved a Term sheet without development commitment in January. Venture Realty and city staff negotiated a ten month period to create the terms of the full development agreement.

Now the deal must be approved by city council and the Virginia Beach Development Authority.

RELATED: City Council to Discuss Potential Dome Site Deal

RELATED: Dome Site Project Goes Forward, Adds to Changing Seaside Scene

RELATED: Virginia Beach Provides Update on Potential Dome Site Deal

RELATED: Virginia Beach and Developer Reach Deal on Old Dome Site

Plans are in place to fully construct a multi-use residential and entertainment complex on the property between 18th and 20th Streets. This epicenter will include a Wavegarden Surf Park, a state-of-the-art live entertainment venue that 3,500 people can fill, shops, restaurants and hundreds of residential units.

The entire project is estimated at around $ 325 million. The city will invest around $ 230 million to develop the surf park, commercial offices, as well as residential and commercial spaces, while around $ 95 million will go to the public parking lot and place of entertainment. City officials estimate that the park will generate $ 8 million per year, which will be reinvested in public schools, the general fund and the tourism fund.

“This [is] an entertainment opportunity for the public and this will generate significant tax revenues for schools and for public safety, ”said Councilor Louis Jones.

Originally, this idea came from Pharrell Williams who wanted to develop a surf park near the Oceanfront. He partnered with Venture Realty to make this a reality.

You can find out more about the project here.

Caspar hosts public forum on plant site development plans – Fort Bragg Advocate-News

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A public forum on the future of the Fort Bragg factory site hosted by the Mendocino Institute and the Fort Bragg factory site symposium committee drew a full house at the Caspar Community Center on June 21.

Guest speaker Ignacio Chapela, associate professor at UC Berkeley and researcher in microbial biology and mycology, was invited to incorporate the challenges of the plant site into his science presentation. Mendocino TV recorded the event for a replay.

Michelle Blackwell – Correspondent George Reinhardt comments on the presentation to the public forum on the development plans for the plant site.

Cal Winslow, President of the Mendocino Institute, opened the event with a brief introduction. He was concerned that Koch Industries, which bought Georgia-Pacific in 2005, would sell the property piece by piece and abandon the plant site without the cleanup being completed. Winslow has said he would like the 400-acre headlands to be treated as common property, where people come first rather than developers and real estate interests.

Jim Tarbell, vice president of the Mendocino Transit Authority and longtime active member of the community, provided an update on the Skunk Train and Harvest Market plot purchases as well as the Town of Fort Bragg amendment. at the Local Coastal Plan to rezone the property from industrial use to other uses.

Michelle Blackwell – Correspondent Guest speaker Ignacio Chapela listens to questions and comments after his presentation at the plant site development plan public forum on June 21 at the Caspar Community Center.

Chapela expressed his hope that as a foreigner he could facilitate issues that might be difficult locally. Chapela described the mill site problem as a “nasty problem”. A “nasty problem,” according to Chapela, is something not everyone can agree on.

He then gave a seven-part presentation on its application and study of science, the monetization of the environment, and the interconnectivity of humans with the flora and fauna that share it.

Chapela’s presentation touched on the needs of the environment, the barriers that prevent people from overcoming them and the ability of people to break free from these barriers.

“Here and now, plan for a cleared headland and you won’t make any compromises,” Chapela said, adding, “Life isn’t going to end anytime soon. As the multiplicity of life forms dwindle, it isn’t. that every form of life is necessary, but it is desired.This is not a world that can function or survive, but a world that we desire.

“I can live in a world without trees,” he said, “but I don’t want to. “

For more information about the Mendocino Institute, visit mendocinoinstitute.org. To review the presentation, visit mendocinotv.com/2019/06/14/public-forum-on-the-future-of-the-fort-bragg-mill-site/.

Limerick opera site development plan ‘fundamentally flawed’

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Michelle Hayes, Hayes attorneys photo: Cian Reinhardt

THE proposed development of the Opera site is “unsustainable, fundamentally flawed and materially contravenes planning guidelines”.

That’s according to An Taisce Limerick president Michelle Hayes in a submission filed with An Bord Pleanála on the 3.7-acre opera site project.

Ms Hayes also disputes that the proposed development of 180 million euros does not contain adequate housing, “rather comprising offices with smaller areas for commercial activity, including an AirBnB-type aparthotel and a small number of residential units, 16 apartments in total containing 34 bedrooms.

The proposed 15-story tower, she suggests, “is reminiscent of the 15-story Ballymun towers that had to be demolished due to anti-social behavior, drug crimes and social unrest.”

Miss Hayes then cautioned in her submission to An Bord Pleanála of the ramifications that the enormous cost of this development on an “excessive” scale will have for the rest of the Council’s other strategies and commitments, including housing.

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“The development includes a 15-story tower, 65 meters high, facing the Abbey River. It will have a major negative and oppressive visual impact, irreversibly damage the skyline, is out of scale and out of character, and will completely eclipse Bank Place, The Quays, Abbey River, The Hunt Museum, The Hospital Barrington, the Locke Bar, etc. , “she claims.

“The proposed development is unsustainable, fundamentally flawed, materially contravenes planning guidelines, including Urban Development and Building Heights – Guidelines for Planning Authorities, December 2018, the National Spatial Planning Framework 2040, creates significant adverse environmental effects, lack of imagination and vision, has severely damaging visual impact, is poorly thought out and, if allowed, would permanently and irreparably damage the character of the area and create a real and substantial obstacle to good planning and development sustainability of the city of Limerick as a whole.

Ms Hayes also maintained in her submission this week that the proposed development is not sustainable and will lead to a substantial increase in traffic jams, especially at peak times, and a negative environmental impact on the city “with only 55 additional parking spaces. intended for such massive development “.

“This will result in a larger carbon footprint, burning of fossil fuels etc. and is not in line with climate action and change policy.”

Southeastern NC Gets Grant for Employment Sector and Site Analysis

By Site analysis

Southeast North Carolina, an 18-county regional economic development group, has received approval for federal funding to review industrial sectors and industrial real estate within its territory, according to a recent announcement.

The organization, which includes the Wilmington area, has received approval for a $148,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration (EDA), officials said in a news release.

Southeastern North Carolina will contribute 20% of $37,000 of the total project cost of $185,000.

The EDA grant project, called Southeast Regional Industrial Sector Analysis, has four components: an industrial sector analysis; an industrial site analysis; an incubator development strategy; and efforts to refine the group’s regional marketing and revamp the Southeastern North Carolina website, last updated in 2011.

Southeast North Carolina plans to launch the project Sept. 1, Steve Yost, president of Southeast North Carolina, said this week. It is expected to be completed in September 2020.

Part of the overall industrial sector assessment of the organization’s 18 counties could have a component to focus on the Wilmington micro-region, which includes New Hanover, Pender, Brunswick and Columbus counties.

Columbus County was recently included in the Wilmington Micro-Area Strategic Marketing Plan released earlier this year.

“Throughout the history of this organization, the Greater Wilmington area has always been a core feature of the Southeast region…It’s one of our urban engines; the other urban driver being Greater Fayetteville,” Yost said.

The study will provide a more comprehensive overview of commercial and industrial sectors in the 18-county territory, Yost said.

“Health care is probably the biggest [employment sectors] in southeastern North Carolina now, which was not the case 10 years ago,” Yost said. “So that [study] is going to look at all the dynamics and trends happening across all industries, including the ones we’re now targeting for marketing. »

Findings from the study will help the organization adjust any marketing focus for the entire 18-county region, or parts of the region, if necessary, he added.

Southeastern North Carolina, which was founded in 1994 and is currently celebrating its 25th anniversary, launched its first industry cluster strategy in 1999 and updated those plans most recently in 2006.

Since its inception, the organization has helped generate more than $2.1 billion in announced capital investments, as well as more than 14,000 new announced jobs and helped recruit 148 companies, according to the statement.

Since the last cluster analysis in 2006, the concentration of the cluster has increased from 11 to 18 counties. Yost said this was also before the group started looking at micro-regions.

“Updates are especially important right now because of the dramatic changes that have been made to the region’s footprint in recent years,” said Joe Melvin, Business Development Manager for Southeast North Carolina. , in the press release.

Its entire region has seen growth in the number of residents and employers, as well as new additions to regional assets and infrastructure, officials said.

“Modern economics being what it is, we need to ensure that we base all of our assumptions on the most accurate, up-to-date and relevant information available,” Melvin added in the statement.

In addition to a focus on industrial sector analysis, Yost said, there are plans to hire a site selection consultant to help review the area’s industrial real estate inventory to identify strengths, gaps and needs with sites and properties.

Another element of the four-part project is to bring together policies and best practices for an incubator development strategy to support job growth in small businesses and startups.

“We are grateful that the U.S. Department of Commerce recognizes that successful regional economic development begins with a thorough assessment of assets and opportunities,” Yost said in the statement.

The assessment involves integrating the latest data into a “credible framework” on how the region’s economy fits in with domestic and global trade trends, officials added in the statement.

“We look forward to engaging our county, state, university and private partners in this important effort, which will inform the region’s recruitment strategies for the next five to 10 years,” Yost said.

Southeastern North Carolina Gets Employment Sector Grant, Site Analysis

By Site analysis

Southeastern North Carolina, an 18-county regional economic development group, has received approval for federal funding to review industrial sectors and industrial real estate in its territory, according to a recent announcement.

The organization, which includes the Wilmington area, has received approval for a $ 148,000 grant from the US Department of Commerce’s Economic Development Administration (EDA), officials said in a press release.

Southeastern North Carolina will contribute 20% to the tune of $ 37,000 of the total project cost of $ 185,000.

The EDA grant project, called Southeast Regional Industrial Sector Analysis, has four components: an industrial sector analysis; an industrial site analysis; an incubator development strategy; and efforts to refine the group’s regional marketing and revamp the Southeast North Carolina website, last updated in 2011.

Southeastern North Carolina plans to launch the project on September 1, Southeast North Carolina President Steve Yost said this week. It is expected to be completed in September 2020.

Part of the overall industrial sector assessment of the organization’s 18 counties could include a component focused on the micro-region of Wilmington, which includes New Hanover, Pender, Brunswick and Columbus counties.

Columbus County was recently included in the organization’s strategic marketing plan for the micro-region of Wilmington, released earlier this year.

“Throughout the history of this organization, the Greater Wilmington region has always been an essential part of the South East region… It is one of our urban engine areas; the other urban engine being the Grand Fayetteville, ”said Yost.

The study will provide a more comprehensive overview of the business and industry sectors in the 18-county territory, Yost said.

“Health care is probably the most important [employment sectors] in southeastern North Carolina now, which it wasn’t 10 years ago, ”Yost said. “So that [study] will look at all the dynamics and trends that are happening across all industries, including those we are now targeting for marketing. “

The study’s findings will help the organization adjust, if necessary, any marketing targets for the entire 18-county region, or parts of the region, he added.

Southeastern North Carolina, which was founded in 1994 and is currently celebrating its 25th anniversary, launched its first industry cluster strategy in 1999 and last updated those plans in 2006.

Since its inception, the organization has helped generate more than $ 2.1 billion in announced capital investments, as well as more than 14,000 new jobs announced, and has helped recruit 148 companies, the statement said.

Since the last pooled analysis in 2006, the focus of the group has increased from 11 to 18 counties. Yost said that was also before the group started looking at micro-regions.

“Updates are particularly important at this time because of the dramatic changes that have been made to the region’s footprint in recent years,” said Joe Melvin, business development manager for Southeast North Carolina , in the press release.

His entire region has seen growth in the number of residents and employers, as well as new additions to regional assets and infrastructure, officials said.

“With the modern economy being what it is, we need to make sure that we base all of our assumptions on the most accurate, up-to-date and relevant information available,” Melvin added in the statement.

In addition to focusing on industrial sector analysis, Yost said, plans are to hire a site selection consultant to help review the region’s industrial real estate inventory to identify strengths, gaps and the needs of sites and properties.

Another element of the four-part project is to bring together policies and best practices for an incubator development strategy to support the employment growth of small businesses and startups.

“We are grateful that the US Department of Commerce agrees that successful regional economic development begins with a thorough assessment of strengths and opportunities,” Yost said in the statement.

The assessment is to incorporate the latest data into a “credible framework” on how the region’s economy fits into domestic and global trade trends, officials added in the statement.

“We look forward to involving our county, state, academic and private partners in this important effort, which will inform the region’s recruiting strategies for the next five to ten years,” said Yost.

Penguins and Developers Reveal New Plans and Timeline for Civic Arena Site Development

By Site development

Pittsburgh Penguins CEO David Morehouse opened a public meeting Wednesday with a brief speech about the new “Centre District” project planned for Lower Hill. “What we’re going to do here is we’re going to build something big and we’re going to do well and do good in the community by doing it,” Morehouse said. The development would sit on the 28 acres formerly hosted by the Civic Arena. Currently, this area is made up of several parking lots and other mostly unused spaces. The development team said they worked closely with the Community Collaboration and Implementation Plan (CCIP) to build something that benefits both downtown Pittsburgh and the Greater Hill District. The new development team announced Wednesday includes Buccini/Pollin Group, which will serve as lead developer, and Intergen, a minority-owned development partner. The project will include a mix of residences, retail, office, entertainment and catering. It will also include retail, parks and green spaces. The project is expected to attract more than $750 million in private investment, more than 4,000 construction jobs and 3,000 permanent jobs, in addition to $25 million a year in tax revenue to benefit the city, schools of the city, county and commonwealth. “It’s not just any type of development. It’s a Hill District – Pittsburgh story,” said architect Vaki Mawema. Penguins general counsel Kevin Acklin, who helped work on previous iterations of the Civic Arena site when he was on staff with the city of Pittsburgh, has high hopes for the development project. “This is the biggest development the city of Pittsburgh has ever seen on this scale, and not just on this scale of development, but trying to make up for the mistakes of the past, trying to reconnect the neighborhood. Trying to create opportunities for African American developers and workers,” Acklin said. But some Lower Hill residents question whether the project provides enough affordable housing. Several people said they feared a repeat of Bakery Square, which they described as a situation in which affordable housing has been promised but not delivered.” We have the Hill District Community Plan which calls for 30% of all billed homes in the Lower Hill District to be affordable to families at a median income of 50% and that no unit offered is at that rent level,” said Carl. Redwood, of the Hill District Consensus Group. Redwood distributed flyers on Wednesday at the s of the event, which stated that the Greater Hill District Master Plan called for making at least 30% of units affordable housing for households earning less than 50% of the region’s median income. But under plans released Wednesday, only 20% of housing will be considered affordable and only at rates of 80%, 70% and 60% of the region’s median income. Developers told skeptical residents that the 20% had been agreed in 2014 by several Lower Hill stakeholders. But Redwood said his group was not invited to the table for those meetings, which followed the original blueprint from previous years. The hill, who may want to afford it, may not and may not be able to stay here, so it seems that you are building to attract, instead of building for the people who are already here, ”asked a wife to a developer. As concerns persist, developers said the number of affordable homes is still negotiable and said this was just the first of many public meetings.

Pittsburgh Penguins CEO David Morehouse opened a public meeting Wednesday with a brief speech about the new “Centre District” project planned for Lower Hill.

“What we’re going to do here is we’re going to build something big and we’re going to do well and do good in the community by doing it,” Morehouse said.

The development would sit on the 28 acres once housed by the Civic Arena. Currently, this area is made up of several parking lots and other mostly unused spaces.

The development team said they worked closely with the Community Collaboration and Implementation Plan (CCIP) to build something that benefits both downtown Pittsburgh and the Greater Hill District.

The new development team announced Wednesday includes Buccini/Pollin Group, which will serve as lead developer, and Intergen, a minority-owned development partner.

The project will include a mix of residential, commercial, office, entertainment and dining venues. It will also include retail, parks and green spaces.

The project is expected to attract more than $750 million in private investment, more than 4,000 construction jobs and 3,000 permanent jobs, in addition to $25 million a year in tax revenue to benefit the city, schools in city, county and commonwealth.

“It’s not just any type of development. It’s a Hill District – Pittsburgh story,” said architect Vaki Mawema.

Penguins general counsel Kevin Acklin, who helped work on previous iterations of the Civic Arena site when he was on staff with the city of Pittsburgh, has high hopes for the development project.

“This is the biggest single development the City of Pittsburgh has ever seen on this scale, and not just on this scale of development, but trying to make up for the mistakes of the past, trying to reconnect the neighborhood. Trying to create opportunities for African American developers and workers,” Acklin said.

But some Lower Hill residents question whether the project provides enough affordable housing. Several people said they feared a repeat of Bakery Square, which they described as a situation in which affordable housing was promised but not delivered.

“We have the Hill District Community Plan which calls for 30% of all billed homes in the Lower Hill District to be affordable to families at a median income of 50% and no proposed unit to be at that level of rent,” Carl said. Redwood, of the Hill District Consensus Group.

Redwood handed out flyers at the event on Wednesday, which said the Greater Hill District Master Plan called for making at least 30% of units affordable housing for households earning less than 50% of the city’s median income. region.

But according to plans released Wednesday, only 20% of housing will be considered affordable and only at rates of 80%, 70% and 60% of the region’s median income.

Developers told skeptical residents that the 20% was agreed upon in 2014 by several Lower Hill stakeholders. But Redwood said his group was not invited to the table for those meetings, which followed the original blueprint from previous years.

“People here on the hill, who may want to afford it, may not be able and will not be able to stay here, so it looks like you are building to attract, instead of building for the people who are already here. , ” a woman asked a developer.

As concerns persist, developers said the number of affordable homes is still negotiable and said this was just the first of many public meetings.

Development of former GM site, Edge-on-Hudson, progress

By Site development
  • The first townhouses are taking shape on the old GM site.
  • Nelson Byrd Woltz’s work will include a public waterfront promenade.

Editor’s Note: We don’t want to leave you hanging. “What’s New” is designed to update our previous coverage and keep you up to date with important projects around the Lower Hudson Valley.

PROJECT: Edge-on-Hudson, a major mixed-use development, aims to build a new waterfront community, comprising 1,177 residential units, a 140-room boutique hotel, 135,000 square feet of retail space, 35,000 feet squares of office space and parks. Toll Brothers is in charge of building the first 15-acre phase of the 70-acre development.

SITE: The former General Motors assembly plant site at 199 Beekman Ave., Sleepy Hollow. The site is located along the Metro-North Railroad Hudson line, between Tarrytown and Philipse Manor stations.

RECENT NEWS: Leading Edge-on-Hudson developers – SunCal in California and Diversified Realty Advisors in New Jersey – recently retained landscape architects Nelson Byrd Woltz to design the parks and walkways in Edge-on-Hudson, including including a public waterfront promenade that will link the Westchester RiverWalk to the south of the property to the historic lighthouse and Kingsland Point Park to the north.

Nelson Byrd Woltz is the lead designer of the Plaza and Gardens of Hudson Yards, a $ 25 billion mixed-use development in Manhattan.

“We’re committed to building a world-class community in Edge-on-Hudson, and that requires top talent,” David Soyka, senior vice president of SunCal, said of the landscape architecture firm.

Townhouses began to take shape on the former General Motors assembly plant site.

In addition to Hudson Yards, Nelson Byrd Woltz is involved in projects such as the Rothko Chapel in Houston and the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts.

FOLLOWING: The first set of luxury townhouses, known as the Toll Brothers Brownstones Collection, are currently under construction. Once they are completed, potential buyers can take a tour of the model units. Meanwhile, visitors can get a feel for the project through a 360-degree virtual reality tour available at an on-site sales gallery. In addition to 72 luxury townhouses, 46 condominiums and 188 rental apartments will be built in the first phase.

PRICE POINTS: Townhouses, ranging from 2,400 square feet to over 3,000 square feet, will cost around $ 1.2 million and more, according to Toll Brothers.

Follow Akiko Matsuda on Twitter: @AskAkiko, on Instagram: @amatsudanyc, on Facebook: @AkikoJournalist.

EDGE-ON-HUDSON: Townhouse sales begin development at former GM site

PHASE ONE: Toll Brothers to build homes at GM site

REVITALIZATION: Sleepy Hollow Explores Edge-on-Hudson as an Actor of Change

The development of the Ford site: high-end houses have a place and a role

By Site development

Some St. Paul residents, grieved by the affordable housing shortage, have expressed concern over plans by site developer Ford to allocate sites along the cliffs of the Mississippi River for upscale single-family residences (“planners of St. Paul Reject Single Family Homes in Project Ford, ”March 9,“ Ryan’s Plan for Ford Site Moves 6 to 1 by St. Paul Council, ”April 11).

But 10 percent of the 3,800 housing units offered for the Ford site must be reserved for households at 80 percent or less of the region’s median income, with 10 percent for households at 30 percent or less of the median income in the area. the region. The city had approved a tax increase financial grant to include low-cost housing in the overall plan.

But there is another aspect of the bluff site plans that aligns with both the developer’s financial outlook as well as the city’s tax agenda. In any given year, Saint Paul’s property tax collections represent approximately 35 percent of the city’s general revenue. Much of the city’s real estate is owned by the state or by non-profit organizations (colleges, churches, etc.). These properties do not pay property taxes but still require services. The city’s other income comes from royalties, fines, sales, etc., but the share of property tax in the city’s budget is under constant pressure.

Minneapolis receives about 41 percent of the property taxes paid by residential and commercial-industrial property in the city. The rest goes to the county, school district, and special districts (e.g., metropolitan council, mosquito control district, etc.).

Because Minnesota law limits how cities can generate income, they must plan for and protect certain land uses that generate more tax revenue than costs to provide municipal services to affected properties. The difference is used to subsidize neighborhoods that require more services than they can afford.

Minneapolis and St. Paul are unusual among industrial cities in 19th-century Northeastern America for their relative abundance of desirable residential neighborhoods within city limits. These neighborhoods have attracted and retained middle and upper-middle class households who have sufficient financial means to settle in the suburbs if they so wish. This has happened regularly in most cities in the North East, which face serious fiscal headaches.

In addition, cities like St. Paul and Minneapolis that have supported and preserved prosperous neighborhoods have simultaneously retained commercial and office activities that serve those neighborhoods. When purchasing power goes away, neighboring businesses fall back or move.

In Minneapolis, there are hundreds of upscale homes in the city’s Chain of Lakes neighborhood, along Minnehaha Parkway, near Lake Nokomis and Lake Hiawatha, and along West River Road, homes that have been well maintained and reinvested over the years to make them even more attractive today than they were a century ago, with market values ​​to match. The same is true in St. Paul, along East River Road, Summit Avenue, Crocus Hill and Linwood, Merriam Park, some of Ramsey Hill, Mac-Groveland and Highland Park.

Between 2010 and 2017, the population of Minneapolis increased by 10% and that of Saint-Paul by almost 8%. These cities must be doing something right.

I live in southwest Minneapolis, south of Lake Harriet. Near my house is a block bounded on the west by Thomas Avenue, on the north by W. Lake Harriet Parkway, on the east by Sheridan Avenue, and on the south by W. 49th St. This block contains 27 single family homes with a combined current assessed value (market) of $ 26,763,500 and total taxes due in 2019 of $ 442,463, or an average of $ 16,875 per home.

In contrast, a somewhat typical block in a low-income residential neighborhood in northern Minneapolis, bounded by Logan Avenue, 16th Avenue N., Morgan Avenue N., and 15th Avenue N. contains 15 homes. A house, owned by the Minneapolis Housing Authority, is exempt from property tax. The 14 homes for which the appraiser’s market value and tax liability data are available have a combined value of $ 1,875,600 and property taxes due in 2019 of $ 28,265, or $ 2,019 per home.

Most of my neighbors can afford to move elsewhere if they wish. But they stay where they are and continue to pay high taxes. The rest of the city benefits.

Bottom Line: A few high end homes along the river cliff at the west end of the Ford site would likely yield a positive bottom line for the town of St. Paul.

John S. Adams is Professor Emeritus of Geography, Planning and Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota.

Next steps in the development of the Expo site: signing the contract, speeding up the entry process

By Site development

The next big steps for the team that was selected last week by the University of Massachusetts to lead the redevelopment of the former Bayside Expo grounds on Columbia Point in Dorchester: Negotiate and sign a final lease and expedite a “Strong stakeholder and community contribution process” to showcase future uses of the highly valued waterfront property.

The UMass board of directors and the UMass Building Authority voted unanimously last Thursday to approve the recommendation of an Accordia Partners research team, led by Boston real estate executives and financiers, Richard Galvin and Kirk Sykes, as the developer of a deal that could bring the university up to $ 235 million over time, according to people familiar with the financial data.

The nomination came after an 18-month bidding process that reduced the number of interested developers to a pool of six and then two finalists.

Sources familiar with the process say the Galvin-Sykes deal was chosen because it offered the strongest financial plan to pay for a 99-year land lease. The group also brings to the table a diverse group of investors and includes the option for UMass Boston to elect to lease a portion of the 20-acre site for its own future use. Their initial offering also includes $ 25 million in “infrastructure commitments,” which the development team says is a first step towards creating a public-private money pool to target various congestion points and transit centers near the point.

There is not yet a concrete redevelopment plan in place at this point in the process. The Galvin-Sykes team will lead community engagement in a planning process that will likely begin this year. Officials who briefed the reporter on the contents of their winning proposal last week said it would include a mix of uses, including housing, office or labs, retail and dining options, and the possibility for UMass to use part of the site.

UMass acquired the former Bayside Expo Center in 2010 for $ 18.7 million after its former owners confiscated the site in a foreclosure during the 2008-09 recession. Since then, the university has mainly used the waterfront land for parking at its Dorchester campus. The property was briefly included in Boston’s 2024 failed bid to bring the Summer Olympics to the city. When that offer was dropped, Robert Kraft’s sports group entered closed-door talks with UMass to lease the site and build a professional football stadium at the site. This plan was scuttled amid the negative reluctance of elected officials and scorers.

The first indications of the main lines of this new agreement with the partners of Galvin-Sykes are that UMass will make much more money in this transaction, while reserving the right to use part of the Bayside plot for its own. future use.

Galvin is the founder, CEO and president of CV Properties, LLC, which has “developed and acquired over 4.5 million square feet of office and residential projects valued at $ 2.5 billion,” according to the website of his company. Recent projects in Boston include the D Street hotels next to the Massachusetts Convention and Exhibition Center in South Boston; and 451 D Street, a nine-story office building in South Boston.

Sykes is senior vice president of New Boston Real Estate Investment Funds. Former chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, he is chairman of Urban Strategy American Fund, LP, specializing in “the creation of mixed-use urban developments.”

State Senator Nick Collins, who had urged UMass officials to seek a wide range of proposals from the wider development community in 2017, said last week that he was pleased with the new direction and developer choice.

“Today marks the next step in a process that the community, elected officials and officials of UMass have worked hard to initiate,” said Collins. “The open bidding process for Bayside has resulted in great teams competing for a chance to partner with UMass to create something special on Dorchester Bay. “

Robert Griffin, co-head of US capital markets for Newmark Knight Frank, the commercial real estate company hired by the UMass Building Authority to find a suitable private partner for Bayside, said there was a strong appeal for the site.

“We had a lot of people interested,” he told The Reporter. “Most markets saw this as some sort of next type of seaport, given the proximity to the Red Line, eight minutes from Kendall Square, a market with no vacancies right now in laboratories and offices in Cambridge – and Longwood Medical Center. region, same thing.

Griffin added, “At the end of the day we had six very serious contenders and we brought it down to two. Most people were focusing on something that would bring credit to the neighborhood, to the school, to the community, hoping to have a plan that would attract the kind of talent that would provide jobs to the area. Jobs for students at UMass, internships and maybe something that would synergize with the programs there, be it the wonderful nursing school they have or something in the life sciences, because there are so many of these kinds of requirements right now. “

Some ‘head office’ type companies have been reviewing the site, Griffin said, many with lab and tech space in mind, but Bayside’s mixed use potential has peaked.

Michael Byrne, executive general manager of Newmark’s Knight Frank office in Boston, said the UMass Boston campus is a priority for soliciting community feedback.

“In the third round, we actually had the chancellor [Katherine] Newman provides his vision as a sort of mission statement for developers to help guide their work and refine their pricing, ”he said. “So throughout the process, the needs of the campus were brought to the fore and the ability to relate to them.”

UMass spokesman Jeff Cournoyer said that “the process of visualizing exactly what the mix will be” on the site is yet to come. “

The advisory group, led by UMass Building Authority chairman Victor Woolridge, a seasoned real estate executive, worked with Newmark to select the developer. In doing so, they looped through every local elected official and met with both the Columbia-Savin Hill Civic Association and the John W. McCormack Civic Association throughout the process, Cournoyer said. Columbia Point’s existing master plan was also considered in the selection.
“It will really be up to the developer to work through a complete and robust community process from a design perspective,” Byrne said. “From a campus engagement perspective, we can definitely talk about campus rights in the future…. Simply put, the campus will retain as many rights as possible over future opportunities to develop on its own – for housing or for other academic needs in the future.

Details were slim last week, but the team said the terms were for a 99-year ground lease for the Bayside site. on campus and at university from a financial standpoint, ”Cournoyer said. “There were other elements taken into consideration, of course: the feasibility of making this project happen, the commitment to this stakeholder process and the community contribution process that we discussed, the diversity and hiring practices and vendors and suppliers, etc. “

Infrastructure commitments also played an important role. The winning group “went out of their way to make a specific infrastructure commitment,” he said. “We all know it takes real money spending to help solve some of these connectivity issues between the hotline and campus, whether it’s a new gateway or rather and [Kosziusko] Circle too.

City Councilor Frank Baker, whose district includes the Columbia Point campus, was thrilled by the news. “This could potentially unblock the transportation issues we’ve had for years, while also putting UMass on a solid financial footing to plan for the future of the campus,” he told The Reporter. “For me that’s one of the big things. The campus will be great, we will be able to walk there, our children will have access to vocational training and internships, but transportation is important.

Also heard on campus last week: Voices were raised against the Bayside deal.

In a statement on Wednesday, the Staff Faculty Union at UMass Boston expressed disapproval, citing concerns about the rise in parking fees and last year’s UMass Amherst maneuver to buy Mount Ida College in Newton. , which many on the Boston campus see as undermining the Dorchester campus.

“The Mount Ida deal was done behind closed doors, and we see a similar lack of transparency with the plans for the Bayside lot,” said Marlene Kim, president of the Staff Faculty Union. “Students, staff and faculty have had no influence on major decisions affecting our campus. “

It is still unclear exactly what type of public review process will accompany the redevelopment project. Since the university owns the site, it will likely remain exempt from the typical large-project review run by the city’s Boston Planning and Development Agency (BPDA).

In an interview with The Reporter last year, BPDA director Brian Golden expressed confidence that UMass and its development partner will include the city in their efforts to plan what he called a “mammoth” plot. with “enormous potential”.

Potential development plans for ‘Block 7’, ‘Liner Site’ in Eau Claire | News

By Site development

Eau Claire (WQOW) – Two vacant lots in downtown Eau Claire will soon be used to their full potential.

The most recent renderings for the proposed developments for “Block 7” and the former “Coating Site” are being reviewed by the Eau Claire Redevelopment Authority.

Pablo Properties proposed a four-story office building, a new home for the Eau Claire Children’s Museum and a public square with underground parking for “Block 7”. The company also wants to build a container yard, using re-used shipping containers for retail businesses and restaurants, for the “line site”.

Merge Urban Development wants to bring a 240-unit residential building, retail and restaurant spaces, as well as a new children’s museum.

Commonweal Development is also looking to build, offering housing, a new Eau Claire children’s museum and a four-story office building on the “ship site”. The company also wants to build an elevated walkway, connecting the two sites.

Finally, Monarch Ventures is only looking to develop the ‘Liner Site’, where it seeks to build a multi-purpose complex with a restaurant, apartments and event space.

Eau Claire director of community development Scott Allen told News 18 that the conversion of “Block 7” and “Liner Site” have the potential to bring millions of dollars in investment downtown.

The Redevelopment Authority will decide at its meeting on Tuesday morning which idea best suits Eau Claire.

Bethesda Neighbors Appeal Judge ruling in case challenging WMAL site development plan

By Site development

VIA MONTGOMERY COUNTY PLANNING DEPARTMENT

Groups of Bethesda citizens are heading to a state appeals court with a lawsuit challenging approval of a 309-home development on an expanse of open land in north Bethesda.

In a June ruling, a Montgomery County judge upheld the planning council’s decision to approve a preliminary plan for the Toll Brothers project. Now, the Maryland Special Court of Appeal will consider whether the planning board wrongly granted the developer’s request to cut down some large trees and clear 5.6 acres of forest.

Toll Brothers has proposed to build 159 single-family homes and 150 townhouses on the approximately 75-acre property east of Greentree Road and just north of Beltway. For more than 50 years the site has been empty except for a set of WMAL radio transmission towers, but it has long been slated for future development, Circuit Court Judge Gary wrote in his opinion. E. Bair.

The development plans have raised various concerns among surrounding residents, who are shocked by the loss of forest and the prospect of increased traffic congestion.

Doug Bonner, vice president of the Bradley Boulevard Citizens Association, said he and his neighbors were particularly concerned about the addition of cars on Fernwood Road, which is already slipping back during rush hour.

“We are not at all opposed to the development of this property. I think we have recognized that development can and must happen. We are simply opposed to this particular plan and the number of houses being considered for this development, ”he said.

Many also want Toll Brothers to provide more recreational space in the project.

They opposed the planning council’s decision to excuse Toll Brothers of meeting the county’s forest conservation standard, allowing them to preserve 10.75 acres instead of the 15.16 required by law. Much to their dismay, Toll Brothers also obtained permission to remove 34 “specimen trees,” mature trees that would otherwise be protected by county law.

The proponent argued that he could not meet forest conservation standards as he had to build major road links that passed through stands of trees. Noise abatement structures and wetland protection will claim space on the WMAL property, and Toll Brothers is also dedicating 4.3 acres to the county for a potential school site, leaving less for the development project.

In light of these challenges, the planning board excused the developer from meeting all of the forest conservation requirements and Bair upheld the decision.

“The petitioners ask the Court to reassess the evidence and come to a different conclusion from that of the Council, which is simply not the role of the Court in appealing a decision of an administrative body,” said he wrote.

Michele Rosenfeld, who represents the Bradley Boulevard Citizens Association, West Fernwood Citizens Association, Wyngate Citizens Association and individuals challenging the WMAL plan, said it will likely be months before the appeals court hears the arguments in the case.

Community groups filed a court challenge last year after the Montgomery County Planning Council approved Toll Brothers’ preliminary plan on August 3, 2017.

The call was first reported in the Montgomery Newsletter, a real estate newsletter accessible only by subscription.

The development plan for the Central Bank site is launched

By Site development

Real estate companies Hines and the Peterson Group have been granted a building permit for the Central Plaza project in the heart of Dublin city center.

Hines issued a joint statement on Wednesday welcoming An Bord Pleanála’s decision regarding the former central bank’s site on Dame Street.

Hines senior managing director Brian Moran said the company was “delighted” that the project was given the green light.

“With the building permit now granted, this means that this exciting downtown project will accommodate more than 1,300 office workers,” he said.

The project will also create more than 300 new full and part-time retail and hospitality jobs in the five buildings that make up the Central Plaza complex.

As part of the “sensible restoration” of the building’s interior which is “already well underway,” the former Central Bank headquarters will offer 73,100 square feet of commercial office space over eight floors.

The facility will also include open-plan and breakout meeting spaces to create a “modern environment that will be a highly desirable place to work.”

Impression of the Central Plaza, formerly the Central Bank building

The entrance hall of the 6m high building will be accessed via a grand staircase accessible from the square to a 15m wide glazed facade with double height revolving doors.

“When completed, Central Plaza is expected to become one of the most vibrant and vibrant areas in the city center with the creation of 33,000 square feet of shops, restaurants and cafes at street and basement level.” , Hines said.

New streetscape

The existing plaza is also being enlarged to create a ‘dynamic new streetscape’ towards College Green and along Fownes Street and Cope Street, creating a link between Grafton Street, College Green, Trinity College and Temple Bar.

“Central Plaza is part of a comprehensive master plan that includes the adjacent properties 6-8 College Green, 9 College Green, as well as the Dame Street ancillary and commercial buildings,” the company said.

The 12,500 square foot office component at 6-8 College Green was pre-let to Amtrust Financial last year, which will begin occupying the space in the third quarter of this year.

The 10,000 square foot ground floor business unit in 6-8 will also be completed during this period, and the scaffolding on this building will be removed in the coming weeks.

Hines hired BNP Paribas as a rental agent for the commercial and hotel offer for Central Plaza. It said it was “attracting significant interest” from major international and domestic retailers as well as food and beverage operators.

BAE Westover site development planning begins

By Site development

Elan Planning, Design and Landscape Architecture of Saratoga Springs is receiving a federal grant of $ 200,000 to determine what to do with the former BAE Systems site in Westover that was vacated and cleaned up following the 2011 floods.

“The Agency” announced the hiring of the company to conduct a feasibility study on the 27-acre site.

Lisa Nagel, director of Elan, calls the Main Street site, just west of Johnson City, a “blank canvas” as the company seeks to make the site attractive to a developer.

Photo: Bob Joseph / WNBF News

Before a developer is wooed to the location, there must be work to mitigate potential future flooding. Nagel says they will be examining where the water came from during the historic 2006 floods and the 2011 flooding that ultimately left the site a wasteland after serving as a manufacturing plant for the US Airforce for decades. decades. The Broome County Industrial Development Agency, now known simply as the “Agency,” currently owns the property.

Elan will also be looking at what would work well at the site near the Vestal campus of Binghamton University and the soon to be opened Johnson City School of Pharmacy with easy access to Highway 17 and Highways 81 and 86 and site preparation costs. For the development.

A plan could be ready by October.

The development plan for the Muhlenberg hospital site is moving forward

By Site development
The facade of Muhlenberg Hospital in Plainfield in 2009. The hospital closed in 2008 after 131 years of operation.

PLAINFIELD – Plans to redevelop the long-vacant 10.8-acre Muhlenberg Hospital site at the intersection of Park Avenue and Randolph Road took another step forward this week.

In a 5-2 vote, city council members on Monday approved a financial deal with developer Muhlenberg Urban Renewal LLC of Bloomfield that will bring the city more than $ 10 million in revenue over 30 years.

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Councilors Bridget Rivers and Diane Toliver voted against the ordinance. The project has already been approved by the city’s planning council, officials said.

Several residents have spoken out against the $ 56 million mixed-use project that provides 120 market-priced luxury one- and two-bedroom apartments as well as a 186,000 square foot medical complex.

2008 Statehouse protests to save Muhlenberg Hospital in Plainfield.  The state approved the hospital to close later that year.

A resident expressed concern that Centennial Hall meeting space would be destroyed as part of the redevelopment plan.

A resident of Carlton Avenue said she was opposed to anything other than a hospital on the Muhlenberg property.

Alan Goldstein, a resident of Madison Avenue, asked if the agreement made provisions for employment of residents or businesses in the city. He said that otherwise he would not approve of the plan.

Carlos Sanchez, deputy city administrator for economic development, said 40 percent of the project is reserved for Plainfield contractors, subcontractors and suppliers. In addition, the project provides for 200 construction jobs and when completed, around 600 jobs are expected to be made available to city residents.

“It’s in the deal, it’s black and white,” Sanchez said.

A Hillside Avenue resident, a retired teacher who lives about 20 homes from the Muhlenberg property, said the hospital has always been a good employer and a good neighbor.

She believes Plainfield doesn’t need more apartments and noted that it’s not near a transit hub that would encourage people to move in. She also thinks the 120 apartments with high-end granite countertops won’t suit an area that’s primarily single-family homes.

Lilas Borsa said the hospital was one of the reasons she moved to Plainfield in 2000.

“We have enough apartments that have already been built or are in the process of being built. I don’t know how many more apartments we can build,” Borsa said, adding that the city should attract doctors and hospitals. , or put a park on the site.

City Councilor Cory Storch asked what has been done to market the property.

Sanchez said the city started working on the project in early 2014. He said consultants had been hired to review the best use of the property and that there had been around seven meetings with residents before that the city does solicit requests for proposals.

He said the city is still looking to bring a medical item back to the property, but New Jersey is not issuing any certificates of need for new hospitals, and none are planned for the next 15 to 20 years.

With the tenders, the city received six concepts and Muhlenberg’s urban renewal plan was deemed the best for the site.

“It is not a hospital and we understand that,” Sanchez said, adding that a hospital on the site is simply not feasible or supported by the market.

He added that every year the hospital building continues to deteriorate. If the city does not move forward with the proposal, the building will remain empty and become a danger to the safety of the community.

The deal calls for Muhlenberg Urban Renewal to pay the city $ 442,968 per year in lieu of property taxes. Residential units on site are expected to be completed within 18-30 months of receiving approvals. The deadline for medical practices is 18 to 60 months after approvals.

The state approved the hospital shutdown in 2008, about five months after Solaris Health Care System, which owned the 396-bed acute care facility with JFK Medical Center, announced plans to shut it down.

Toliver said a municipal complex on the site would have been a good idea. She asked why this had not been taken into account.

“It’s not that we haven’t looked at it,” Sanchez said, adding that a new municipal complex would cost more than $ 90 million, a price the city cannot afford, while leaving the existing city hall, annex and municipal court buildings empty and developers would consider housing only for these sites.

“It’s a great idea, but it’s not the right place,” Sanchez said.

But Toliver said the city’s existing municipal buildings are old and work to update them could ultimately reach $ 90 million anyway.

“It’s like you choose your battle,” Toliver said. “Repair, repair and repair, these buildings are old and we are constantly investing money in them.”

Editor-in-Chief Suzanne Russell: 732-565-7335; [email protected]

Development of the Superfund website – NH Business Review

By Site development
EPA task force seeks to encourage and promote brownfield redevelopment

In May, the Environmental Protection Agency set up a task force to review the Superfund program and make recommendations to speed up the process of cleaning up and remediating contaminated sites, reducing the financial burden on parties involved in the cleanup process, encourage private investment, promote community redevelopment and revitalization, and build and strengthen partnerships.

The Superfund task force published its recommendations on July 25. They include a number of measures consistent with the stated objectives, many of which apply only to EPA or parties that are actively engaged in the process of remediating contaminated sites.

An important set of recommendations apply to investors and developers, however, and can create substantial business opportunities.

“Superfund” is a bit of a misnomer. There isn’t really a “fund” that is used by the government to clean up groundwater contamination. It’s actually the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, better known in the industry as CERCLA. He created the framework for cleaning up hazardous waste sites. It imposes responsibility on the parties that caused the contamination in the first place and casts a very wide net.

The problem is that sometimes the person or company causing the problem is no longer around to pay for the cleanup. CERCLA imposes liability on owners of contaminated property, even if they did not cause the contamination. This means investors and lenders have been reluctant to buy contaminated properties due to the potential risk that they could be required to pay for costly cleanups.

States and federal government have set up brownfield programs to encourage investment and development in contaminated sites and to allay some fears of being forced to pay substantial clean-up costs. But these programs have not been very well funded over the years, and investors remain cautious about continued purchases through the program.

During and after the 2008 financial crisis, commercial real estate investors had little reason to continue investing in brownfields, given the availability of other less risky alternatives.

However, with the boom in commercial real estate in recent years, interest in development opportunities for properties with contamination issues has increased, despite the potential risks. Now the EPA is seriously considering ways to encourage these investments.

The agency is looking at ways to encourage private investment by exploring Environmental Liability Transfer (ELT) approaches and other risk management tools during cleanups by conducting stakeholder outreach activities that include professionals industry to discuss their products and the industry climate, parties that have used an ELT or other risk management tools; contractors who have successfully participated in ELTs, and States to discuss their experiences with ELTs.

The task force also recommends creating a national task force to identify creative uses of insurance, annuities, indemnification and other tools for third parties interested in buying or selling cleanup risk. . It also encourages the use, where appropriate, of comfort/status letters or settlement tools to provide certainty to encourage or reassure parties considering using an ELT or other tools.

To address buyer risk concernsthe task force wants the EPA to identify opportunities and update the model good faith purchaser labor agreement to incentivize installation.

Expect EPA to conduct outreach with third-party investors who may provide private financing or otherwise be involved in transactions involving contaminated or previously contaminated property to identify specific liability issues. acting as a barrier to investment or other opportunities in such transactions. This would involve lenders determining standard language to include in prospective buyer contracts to facilitate financing.

The task force also seeks to identify investment opportunities and public-private partnership structures for successful arrangements that would benefit local communities as a whole. Among the recommendations in the report are a series of actions designed to help municipalities and local governments have tools to promote the development of sites that would otherwise sit idle (and off the tax rolls). Local governments should make every effort to participate in these types of outreach programs to promote property reuse.

Of course, this all sounds good in a workgroup report. The proof will be in the implementation. But it’s clear that the opportunity is there for companies and communities to knock on the EPA’s door and demand a review of projects that might have been previously unthinkable. Looks like someone might be listening.

Robert R. Lucic is chairman of the litigation department at the Manchester-based law firm Sheehan Phinney.

Santa Cruz Neighbors Oppose “Mysteries” Site Development Plans – Santa Cruz Sentinel

By Site development

SANTA CRUZ >> Long a talking point for its unusual architectural design, a historic Westside residential property at 515 Fair Ave. is now attracting the attention of the neighborhood for its planned development.

On Wednesday morning, Santa Cruz Zoning Administrator Eric Marlatt will review a development project for the so-called ‘Court of Mysteries’, also known as the ‘Red Castle’ and ‘Yogi Temple’ site, built in the mid-1900s. The owners’ proposal includes the restoration of its historic features and the construction of new housing units.

San Francisco owners Douglas Harr, partner of technology consultancy firm StrataFusion, and artist Artina Morton plan to build new residences closer to their property line than city codes typically allow, an issue that helped spark an opposition effort between neighbors and the city’s letter-writing campaign.

Morton said the couple went door-to-door with neighbors in 2016 when they bought their land, inviting questions, concerns and comments. Since then, neighbors who accepted their invitation and expressed concerns have generally been appeased, Morton said.

“We’ve been true to exactly what we do from the start. We haven’t changed it at all, ”Morton said.

Tom Horn, a resident of the property in question since 1979, is among the opposition organizers. He said his main concerns were issues of fairness, neighbor privacy and fire safety. The city offers exceptions to zoning and building codes to provide incentives for developers seeking to preserve and enhance historic properties.

“So far too much attention has been paid to pushing the applicant to restore the existing ‘historic structure’ and too little attention to the impact of the proposed project on the neighborhood and neighboring properties, and we hope to change that, “Horn said, reading a prepared statement.

The city’s Historic Preservation Commission approved the project proposal at its July 19 meeting, and the plans align with the city’s general plan goal of providing incentives for renovation and maintenance. historic properties. According to the Zoning Meeting Agenda Report, since no other city-designated historic parcels are in the area, the exceptions provided for the increased housing density at 515 Fair Ave . will not set a precedent for the neighborhood.

“The project will improve the neighborhood through the upkeep, security and maintenance of the lot, and will not have a negative impact on neighboring properties,” according to the zoning administrator’s report.

The owners hope to give prominence to the existing “Yogi Temple” building in the center of the lot, while building behind it a new two-story residence, where they will live, and a grandmother’s unit above the garage. Separately, the project proposes to divide part of the property into a new plot, with the construction of a condominium duplex and another granny unit above the garage in an area otherwise zoned for single-family homes. The owners said they could initially lease the units, but have long-term plans to house close family friends as investors, adding that their plans do not exceed the density of development that would be allowed if their property was divided into four single family homes.

The first floor of the primary residence would be constructed within 5.5 feet of the backyards of the residential properties on Getchell Street. The city code generally requires a 20 foot buffer zone. The condominiums would also approach the neighboring property line, shared with a 10-foot-wide driveway to the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses.

Harr said he and his wife are trying to work with the city and its neighbors on any issues that arise.

“The majority of the feedback we receive is really positive. People are thrilled that someone is finally coming to take care of the property, ”said Harr. “In the past there has been graffiti and other damage to really cool monuments. People are delighted that someone is there to take care of the place and restore it to its beauty. We are delighted to do so.

IF YOU ARE GOING TO

What: Zoning Administrator meeting.

When: 10 a.m., Wednesday.

Where: Santa Cruz City Hall, 809 Center St.

At issue: 515 Fair Ave. Development of three condominiums.

Newark Riverfront Stadium Site Development Design Released

By Site development

Design details have been published on the site redevelopment of Riverfront Bears & Eagles Stadiumthe former home of Newark Bear.

Bears & Eagles Riverfront Stadium opened in 1999 as the home of the Bears, then the Independent Atlantic League. The Bears were greeted with strong attendance numbers in their early years – and big names such as Jose Canseco, Rickey Henderson and Jose Lima adapted to the team – but an eventual drop in attendance did not. could be stopped, even after the change of club. to the Can Am League for the 2011 season. The final version of the Bears folded after the 2013 seasonand all assets were liquidated, leaving the city with an asset with a debt of 14 million dollars. From there, the baseball stadium hosted the high school, Rutgers University, newark and New Jersey Institute of Technology baseball.

In a plan that has been in the works for some time, Lotus Equity will demolish the stadium. This will pave the way for a mixed-use development on the site, including apartments and offices. More from Bloomberg:

Lotus Equity Group has appointed four architectural firms to collaborate on the design of the 2.3 million square foot (214,000 square meter) development, which would also include retail stores and open space, according to preliminary plans. The site of the former Bears & Eagles Riverfront Stadium is within walking distance of trains to Manhattan and the campuses of Rutgers University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology.

“We want to bring in different experts,” Ben Korman, chief executive of New York-based Lotus, said in an interview. “We wanted to harness the knowledge around us and, to some extent, around the world, for a quality middle-class neighborhood. Each will bring their own sensibility, but ultimately work together to make it work.

Lotus completed its purchase of the property last November and is set to begin construction sometime in 2018. Minno & Wasko Architects and Planners will serve as the official architect for the development project, along with Michael Green Architecture, Ten Arquitectos and The UPA is also involved in the project.

Rendered courtesy PAU.

RELATED STORIES: Bears & Eagles Riverfront Stadium Closure; Plan to demolish Newark’s Riverfront Stadium continues; Newark’s Riverfront Stadium sold to developer; Bears’ demise leaves Newark with more rough debts; Newark Bears to liquidate its assets


About Zach Spedden

Zach Spedden is a Ballpark Digest contributor. He earned a journalism degree from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in February 2014 and a Master of Arts in Emerging Media from Loyola University Maryland in September 2015. Zach resides in Baltimore.


St. Paul continues Ford site development despite opposition

By Site development

A huge field of dirt in the St. Paul’s Highland Park neighborhood could one day house up to 7,200 people and be the workplace of a thousand or more.

This vision of the former Ford assembly plant, which excites some and alarms others, won key approval from the city’s Planning Commission on Friday.

“The Ford site represents a unique development opportunity,” Mayor Chris Coleman said in a statement after the commission unanimously recommended the plan. “This well-thought-out plan lays the foundation for a vibrant and vibrant community on the banks of the Mississippi River.”

City council will likely review the plan in the fall. The document, which will frame the zoning and development of the 122-acre Ford property, continues to face opposition from residents who argue the city has downplayed community concerns.

Neighbors for a Livable St. Paul, a group of residents opposed to the plan, said St. Paul staff left comments on documents presented to the planning commissioners. They asked the Planning Commission to delay its vote and ask a third party to review the community input.

“The public and decision makers need accurate information. … This is something that will affect the Highland neighborhood and the city for decades to come,” said Charles Hathaway, who lives in the area and is a member of the group.

A “technical glitch” caused city staff compiling comments to miss some emails, both for and against the plan, said Mollie Scozzari of the Department of Planning and Economic Development. A resident alerted the city to the missed messages, and Scozzari said a staff member found them in a separate inbox.

The planning commissioners voted 9 to 7 not to delay their decision. Several commissioners said city staff shared the missing comments with them a few weeks ago and they had plenty of time to review the comments.

St. Paul staff have been gathering feedback from residents on the site for the past decade. The plan they arrived at has a mix of uses and building heights, with two stories closest to the Mississippi River and rising to eight or 10 stories near Cleveland Avenue. It includes a grid of streets that would connect to surrounding roads and pockets of green space that would dot the site, including a stormwater feature that resembles a stream.

Ford, which still owns the property, is expected to bring the site to market this year or early 2018 and the city expects development to take 15 to 20 years.

Some Highland Park residents are concerned about the housing density and traffic congestion the plan could create. Other neighbors – who have started their own group, Sustain Ward 3 – agree with the plan’s vision, which they say is an environmentally friendly design that will encourage the use of public transport.

Two city committees recommended the plan and said in a memo that Highland Park already has many single-family homes and needs more multi-family housing as the city’s population grows. And the site developer would make more money if they were able to add more accommodation to the site, said lead planner Merritt Clapp-Smith, which could reduce the potential need for government subsidies.

The Planning Commission agreed to some changes to the plan on Friday, including limiting the width of buildings to 500 feet in a bid to encourage developers to add courtyards or space for public amenities. They also agreed to increase the number of housing units permitted on the five blocks along Mississippi River Boulevard, which could reduce density elsewhere on the site.

“You have the most desirable property on the entire site,” said Commissioner Kris Fredson, who did not want hard limits on the number of people who could live along the boulevard.

Eric Adams’ support for Pfizer site development hinges on more affordable housing

By Site development

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams is pushing for changes to a proposed apartment development on land in South Williamsburg formerly owned by Pfizer, asking the city council to reject zoning changes on the land without more affordable housing in planned apartment buildings.

After protesters shut down a hearing on the Pfizer and Bedford Armory projects hosted by the borough president at Brooklyn Borough Hall, Adams sent his recommendations on the land’s future to the city council.

Adams recommended that the city refuse rezoning unless certain changes are made by the project’s developer, the Rabsky Group. Specifically, Adams called for project approval “to be conditional on a special affordable housing bonus permit or other legal mechanism that commits an additional 21,300 square feet of affordable housing at an average rent based on 60% of the median income of the zone”.

Adams also wants Rabsky to agree in writing to build what he called an “appropriate” number of two-, three-, and four-bedroom apartments to provide enough units for rent-burdened households who, according to his recommendation, “are more likely to need family-sized unit types.”

The Pfzer development as it currently stands would consist of 1,146 apartments and 25% of them would be reserved as affordable.

Activists opposed to the development of the Broadway Triangle have long argued that every proposed rezoning of the land has favored the area’s Orthodox Jewish population over the neighborhood’s black and Latino populations. The Rabsky Group itself is no stranger to controversy, first after refusing to disclose how much affordable housing it would include in its Rheingold Brewery development plan, then insisting on returning just 20% affordable units.

Adams also wrote that he wants to see changes to the city’s housing lottery that would make it easier for rent-overloaded families to qualify for affordable housing offered by the city, by changing rules around “the strict rent ratio -income requirement not to exceed 30% of income for payment of annual rent.” The BP says the current rules too often disqualify poor families who already spend well over 30% of their annual income on rent.

Churches United For Fair Housing, an activist group opposed to the rezoning plan, welcomed Adams’ decision to reject it in its current form. “This proposed plan should be rejected at every stage of the ULURP process. It will continue the trend of exclusive housing development in our city’s most segregated neighborhood. This plan is anti-black and anti-Latino and we are appalled that this project is still under study.”

The Planning Commission will hold a public meeting on July 26 to consider planning approval.

Bettendorf Approves Credit Union Site Development Plan | Government and politics

By Site development

The Bettendorf City Council approved the site plan for the Middle Road branch of the University of Iowa Community Credit Union, paving the way for more development in the city.

The proposed 5,600 square foot development is located at 4060 Middle Road, just south of Woodfield Drive and north of Lindquist Ford.

This is the second development project approved by City Council for the Crown Pointe 12th Addition.

Greatest Grains intends to install a 12,000 square foot store on the land adjacent to the credit union.

Built to Suit, Inc. is the developer of the project.

Community Development Director Bill Connors said the building will resemble the Credit Union’s 53rd Street location.

Jim Kelly, the credit union’s senior vice president of marketing, said the branch was for expanding its customers.

In the first 10 months of the year, its membership grew by 45% in Scott County.

With the Greatest Grains project raising concerns from neighbors about potential traffic issues, 3rd Ward Alderman Debe LaMar also asked how the city would handle increased traffic from the property.

Greatest Grains and the University of Iowa Credit Union will also share an aisle.

Connors said the project meets the city’s requirements and the city has been in communication with both projects about those concerns.

The same traffic problems were addressed by the Planning and Zoning Commission, which unanimously approved the project.

Connors told the planning commission that a traffic light was not warranted at this time, but could be reconsidered in the future.

Possible development of yet-to-be-defined Avon site draws nearly unanimous opposition at community meeting – Pasadena Now

By Site development
Left: David Reyes, director of urban planning, describes the general plan of the city. / Right: More than 200 District 4 residents attended a meeting about the development of the former Avon Distribution headquarters on East Foothill Boulevard on Wednesday evening.

The possibility of building a new development that could include Home Depot at the former Avon distribution site on East Foothill Boulevard drew an overwhelmingly hostile response from the nearly 200 citizens gathered at the Pasadena City College Community Education Center Wednesday night .

The meeting was hosted by Vice Mayor Gene Masuda, who said it would be the first of many meetings to take place as concrete development plans emerge.

The nearly 14-acre site, which opened in 1947 and closed in 2013, is one of the largest development sites in the city, said planning director David Reyes, who pointed out that ‘there were “no current plans for anything on the site, and no requests for anything were submitted.

Reyes admitted meeting with representatives from Home Depot, a development team and land use attorney Richard McDonald last week.

Outlining the current 2015 20-year master plan, Reyes said Pasadena currently is shifting development more toward transit-oriented neighborhoods and developing less than in previous years.

Additionally, Reyes said, the city created a new zoning designation — known as R&D Flex Space and Parks — for high-tech companies. The new designation, as the name suggests, aims to attract high-tech companies to the area. Reyes admitted, however, that the city won’t be able to attract 14 acres of high-tech tenants, “But we’re hoping to get at least some,” he said.

Avon’s website

The Avon site, due to its size and location, would earn a floor area ratio of 1.25, which means that with its size of 590,000 square feet, a total of 750,000 square feet of development would be permitted, in any number of commercial, retail, or residential configurations.

To qualify for the FAR rate, the flexible R&D space in development must be greater than the commercial component, Reyes said, which would make it difficult to have an R&D space consistent with Home Depot’s size needs.

The R&D designation allows for a number of uses by a wide range of industrial uses such as light manufacturing, research and development, desktop and incubator creative industries, and limited ancillary commercial and office uses, Reyes added.

Reyes noted that big-box retail is not permitted in the East Pasadena D2 subzone. But, he noted that the Avon site is D1, and would allow for a development the size of a Home Depot store.

Any development application, Reyes said, would require CEQA and EIR compliance which would require at least two public scoping meetings), design review with a minimum of three public meetings, Planning Commission decision with a minimum of two public meetings, and a minimum of three public meetings of the municipal council.

Attorney Richard McDonald confirmed at the meeting that Home Depot is “part” of the buyers, who are currently doing their due diligence and looking at various development options.

McDonald also pointed out that the development team, in addition to talking to Home Depot, is also talking to Caltech, as well as Innovate Pasadena, in hopes of creating new qualified R&D spaces, “from 2000 to 20,000 square feet,” he said.

“We’re trying to find the best use of space for R&D spaces,” McDonald said.

The development team, whose members McDonald’s refused to disclose, citing solicitor-client privilege, also retained local architect Stefanos Polyzoides who is trying to create scenarios that would work in Big Retail. Pos and small high-tech spaces.

“We looked at large retailers and small retailers, mixed-use and residential as well,” McDonald said. “We are not done looking at various scenarios, including restaurants and small-scale retail developments.”

A show of hands at the meeting showed almost unanimous opposition to a Home Depot store on the site.

Vice Mayor Masuda said he would withhold judgment on any development at the site until official plans have been submitted.

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The Planning Commission considers the proposed development of the site

By Site development

HARRISON TOWNSHIP – A local businessman plans to expand his reputation in the local boat sales and service business with a proposed new marina development on vacant land at the northeast corner of Metropolitan Parkway and Prentiss Street.

At a Harrison Township Planning Commission meeting on May 19, Tom Raguso, owner of Sundog Marina/Sun Sport Marine on South River Road, presented his vision for a 795-foot piece of frontage just outside West of Lake St. Clair Metropark.

Raguso was joined by Ted Whittlesey, a commercial realtor with Whittlesey Development in New Baltimore.

But some nearby residents have expressed concerns about the boat sales and service facility, namely altering the habitat and natural look of the area, as well as increased traffic and noise. .

Prentiss Street resident Chris Lanzon suggested that a traffic study be carried out so that the commission can get a better idea of ​​the impact of the proposed development on the area.

“Prentiss (a dirt road) currently sees probably more traffic than any other side street in Harrison Township,” he said, adding that the proposed plan would result in both more commercial traffic and vehicles towing large boats. “And the speed limit is not enforced. I have a friend who lives around the corner (at Helzer Street), and he gets three to four cars in his ditch a year. And the traffic during the summer turns everything into a bowl of dust.

Others in attendance told individual stories of why they chose to move to Harrison Township. Due to the abundance of green spaces and relatively few shopping malls, they believe this new development would diminish the natural beauty of the area, increase road wear, decrease wildlife in the area, bring an increase in noise pollution and creating a hazard for children waiting for the school bus at Prentiss Pointe Apartments.

Justin Saputo, a resident of nearby Nautical Lane, echoed that sentiment and suggested Raguso consider using an already vacant building.

Saputo added that many people living in residential neighborhoods west of Metropolitan Parkway often use its street instead of Prentiss Street due to its rocky condition, with many traveling far beyond the city limit. displayed speed.

“My wife and I moved to Harrison Township not because it’s ‘Boat Town USA’, but because it’s ‘Small Town USA’,” he said. “There is something far more than commercial to lose.”

Raguso, a resident of Harrison Township for 24 years, rented the site where Sundog/Sun Sport currently operates for around 10 years. He said it was time to expand.

“It’s time to take the showroom to the next level,” he said. “We run a very first class operation, a very professional operation.”

Entry into Sun Sport’s sales and service area would be outside of Prentiss. Recommendations to the plan also included a “No Through Traffic” sign and a “No Right Turn” sign at the exit of the establishment.

The marina would have a nautical theme and meet landscaping and fire department requirements. Scheduled hours of operation are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

John DeWald of Principal Associates in Southfield, the company selling the land, said there are four lots for sale on this site, up to the adjacent cul-de-sac, ranging from 1.2 to 1.5 acres. Lot prices range from $250,000 to $350,000.

He said the site, zoned commercial, is large enough to accommodate a large chain of box-type stores like Costco.

The Planning Commission has cast its vote for the go-ahead to begin construction of the new sales and service center until its June 16 meeting.

The Council approves the development plan for the site of the former hospital

By Site development

City Council approved the housing development proposal on the site of the former Civic Hospital on Scollard Street during Monday night’s meeting.


City Council approved the proposed housing development on the site of the former Civic Hospital on Scollard Street during Monday evening’s meeting. The vote passed 7 to 3, with some councilors still concerned about the lack of a registered site condition record for the property. PHOTO BY LIAM BERTI

After more than a year of careful deliberation and review, City Council voted to go ahead with the proposed housing development on the site of the former Civic Hospital.

The proposal passed Monday night’s Council meeting by a 7-3 vote, setting the stage for the development to move closer to grand opening.

“We have all witnessed it, we have all experienced it; it was a long process,” the adviser said. Dave Mendicino. “At the end of the day, the Ontario Municipal Board made its decision and that’s the direction they want us to take.

Council originally decided on the rezoning and official plan amendment for the site last year. But after area residents appealed the city’s decision to the OMB, the development went through a full hearing process.

The OMB finally approved the proposal on May 30, but included new recommendations and changes to the original plan.

Site plans from ARG Devco, a Sudbury developer, outline 48 homes to be built on the 5.3-acre Scollard Street property, including 11 singles, eight semi-detached homes and 29 condominiums.


For more information on the proposal process, click here: http://www.baytoday.ca/content/news/details.asp?c=66722

Three separate public presentations were made on the issue ahead of the Council’s vote on Monday evening. First, councilors heard from Penelope and Mickey Wallace, who appealed the city’s initial approval to the Ontario Municipal Board.

Rick Miller, who made the second presentation on behalf of Miller and Urso Surveying, was involved throughout the development proposal process. He and his associate, Celia Teale, responded to concerns raised by Council and area residents.

Most notably, the issue of the site being considered a brownfield site was a point of contention that Miller clarified. Under the definition, a brownfield is a designation given by the provincial government to identify vacant properties where past industrial or commercial activities may have left behind chemical contamination or pollution.

During Council’s initial vote, the issue of potential contaminants was not raised and was eventually revealed during the OMB hearing, which upset some councilors and local residents.

However, according to Miller, the site was designated a brownfield because a building was simply being demolished, not because the site was contaminated.

The city, the developer and the Department of the Environment have said they do not consider the site to be unsafe or contaminated. Miller said his company sent 13 samples of the site’s rubble to New Jersey for testing, all of which came back completely clean and raised no contamination concerns.

In the end, councilors Sarah Campbell, Mark King and George Maroosis all voted against the proposal on Monday evening, mainly because the site condition record was not yet on file with the ministry.

“As far as the residents are concerned, it should have at least been done and we should see it on the register; I don’t know when it will be done,” Campbell said. “Obviously it needs to be done, but I won’t approve anything until I see it in the register.”

“This process, it was one of the worst, I thought,” she added.

Another area of ​​contention was the exemption from site plan control for detached houses and semi-detached units in the planned development.

During committee discussions last week, city planning director Beverly Hillier said the OMB never considered issuing site plan control for these two areas, so that the city requested that they be exempted from the site plan control agreement.

Miller elaborated on this argument by saying that site plan control is already underway for development under the subdivision agreement and said the city requiring site plan control would simply be a “take cash”.

Miller also emphasized that the OMB’s decision is final and should be accepted as is.

The lengthy process visibly frustrated a few advisers on Monday night, with several members saying the miscommunication throughout the matter was disappointing.

“I’m not very happy with the process on our part,” the adviser said. Maroosis spoke about running the city throughout the case. “I accept the decision of the OMB, but I’m not convinced that we had the right to go around and interpret things.”

Com. Mac Bain, on the other hand, made it clear that the proper process had been followed and the project had now been given the green light at all levels of review it had been subjected to.

“If I was a promoter, I’d be really hard pressed to think about coming to North Bay if every time they want to do something, we’re going to hit them for it,” Bain said. “I want to say to the developer and other developers: North Bay is open for business.

“It’s all above the table, we’re not making any special offers here, the developer will hopefully move on and we’ll put people to work,” he concluded.

Now that Council has cleared the proposal, the property only needs to undergo an Environmental Site Assessment Study and submit a Record of Site Condition proving that the land is in an appropriate condition.

The proponents are reportedly nearing completion of the first phase of the environmental assessment and plan to begin preparation and servicing work on the property as early as this fall.

Data center construction: site development, permits and zoning

By Site development

Shawn Mills is a tech entrepreneur, founding member and president of Green House Data. You can find him on Twitter at @tshawnmills.

SHAWN MILLS
Greenhouse data

This series of articles follows the process of developing a new data center, focusing on how small operators can build energy-efficient facilities without the resources of large companies. Previous entries have included planning for expansion, selecting a site, finding incentives and deciding if a real estate and / or design partner is right for you and designing your new facility.

Once the design wheels are spinning, it’s time to work with state and local governments on site development, permits, and zoning. A lot of people are moaning about the politics involved, but it can actually be a rewarding chance to engage your community and also improve business relationships.

Check under each stone for incentives

After selecting a site, you should contact the local government to see if there are any additional development incentives. In the case of Green House Data, it has been very enjoyable to work with the Cheyenne Town Building and Development Office. We’ve all heard stories about the permit process and jumping through hoops to get there. In the Compass Data Center building series here on Data Center Knowledge, meetings seem woefully boring. They certainly can be. Mr. Curtis also makes an important point when he describes the process as not being decided on technical merits, but on a subjective basis. The technical aspects of the building are definitely discussed, but often this process is as much about forging relationships as it is about tackling the nuts and bolts.

Choosing a location with “incentive” data centers can work your way again here. These estates want your business and they will do whatever they can to partner up. To start with, Cheyenne’s economic development entities like Cheyenne LEADS and the Wyoming Business Council helped us acquire the land at a very competitive price. Because we’re aligned with our business goals (we want a new facility, they want more jobs and industries), local managers can actually help everything go easier when they are working, even though the State and city allow it. This strong working relationship has helped us overcome schedule challenges and has been invaluable in helping us sort through documentation, ensure meetings are productive, and keep track of many details of this great project.

Stay on top of the planning

Whether you have a sympathetic or indifferent local government, you should always be prepared to tackle lengthy documents and meetings. Missing deadlines can cost you weeks because everything is on a schedule. Each municipality will have different processes, but there are frequently some overall similarities. In Cheyenne, it goes more or less as follows, including the expected timelines:

  • Annexation: If necessary, land adjacent to existing towns may need to be annexed (up to 5 months)
  • Decking: Platting is the subdivision of plots. The process can be divided into preliminary and final stages (3-5 months)
  • Zoning: Different areas of cities are zoned for different purposes like residential, industrial, etc. If the area needs to be changed for your use, this requires public notice, application, multiple commissions / council approval (3 months)
  • Sitemap: Site plan reviews are typically required for new construction and analyze access, parking, landscaping, drainage report, traffic survey, setbacks, etc. If you request an exemption, an additional period applies (10 days to 6 weeks)
  • Examination of the construction plan: Construction plans are subject to a specific service and are chargeable. They can be revised at any time during the development process and must include a ‘plot plan’, an extended site plan (3 weeks minimum)
  • Examination of the construction plan: The technical drawings of the development site are checked by a separate office (2 weeks minimum)
  • Classification permit: If the site requires grading, a separate permit should be obtained and the plans should be reviewed. This involves a request and costs (2 weeks minimum)
  • Passage permit: For development within the city right-of-way, a separate permit is required, with its own application and fees.
  • Building permit: This must be obtained before starting any construction, can only be issued to a licensed contractor, and requires application, fees and approval of the construction plan and site plan.
  • Sign the permit: If you plan to erect road signs, a separate application and permit is required.
  • Site map Certificate of conformity: Once the site plan is approved, you can obtain this certificate, which allows you to obtain a certificate of occupancy.

Phew! It’s a long list, and while many steps may overlap, it takes a long time. With almost every step requiring its own application, licensing, and review process, there are plenty of dates to follow. Most of the exam sessions involved take place on specific dates due to public notice or other factors, which means that it’s critical that you stay on top of your schedule.

Codes: the key to approval

For construction and site plans, local building codes will be critical to your success. The required codes are likely listed on your municipality’s website, and most cities adhere to international building codes (including residential / mechanical / plumbing / electrical and so on).

As you have designed your facility with your development partners, you should have a good understanding of building code requirements, which often conflict with your infrastructure needs. Home inspectors and permit approvers focus more on the safety of people than on the efficiency of your building. Be sure to discuss many of your features with your designers so you can explain your reasoning to the authorization and inspection teams.

Now that you’ve won the permitting process, it’s finally time to start building! Our next entry will finish things off as we innovate and begin construction.

Industry Perspectives is a Data Center Knowledge content channel highlighting thought leadership in the data center industry. See our guidelines and submission process for more information on how to participate. Check out previously published Industry Insights in our Knowledge Library.

Village Baseline Study: Site Analysis Report for Lawra – Jirapa, Ghana

By Site analysis

Abstract

The baseline study of Doggoh village in the CCAFS Jirapa-Lawra reference site in Ghana took place from July 26-28, 2011. Focus group discussions were conducted separately for men and women.

The village of Doggoh is located in a Sudanese savannah characterized by a considerable population of trees, and the agricultural system it practices involves cultivation among trees. The land is cultivated by individuals but owned and administered by the community through a traditional system of local chiefs. Average land productivity is low and the community can only produce enough to feed themselves for 3 months of the year, resulting in the need to forage for food from other sources for 9 months of the year. To survive, people depend on remittances.

Trees are communally managed with community sanctions against those who violate accepted practice. Nevertheless, the sale of firewood puts pressure on the tree population. There are signs of landscape degradation where vegetation has been removed and the ground is bare. The community depends on boreholes for its domestic water supply and takes for granted the value of wetlands and rivers, which have remained effectively unmanaged.

Participants identified 22 organizations in the village, with 12 operating beyond the locality, 3 operating within the locality and 7 operating within the community. Seventeen organizations contribute to food security and 14 others promote the management of natural resources. Organizations and radio are the most important sources of information.

Quote

Onyango, L.; Iddrisu, Y.; Mango, J.; Kurui, Z.; Wamubeyi, B.; Bawayelaaza Nyuor, A.; Naab, B. Village Baseline Study: Site Analysis Report for Lawra – Jirapa, Ghana. CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Copenhagen, Denmark (2012) 33 pp.

Village Baseline Study: Site Analysis Report for Lawra – Jirapa, Ghana