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Planners will review the revised site plan for 99 Main Street.

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The Genesee County Planning Council is expected to review on Thursday a revised site plan submitted by smartDESIGN Architecture for exterior modifications to 99 Main St., Batavia – the future site of the Buffalo Implants and Periodontics office.

The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. at County Building 2 on West Main Street Road.

According to documents submitted by project manager Todd Audsley, further changes in the design and elevation of the facade are required due to issues with product availability and subcontractors.

Specifically, the new plan calls for the construction of an “on-site built wood-frame storefront wrapped in exterior fracture metal, with a metal standing seam bypassing the line of the second story, which forms a small hood on the floor. above the recessed entrance ”.

The original concept was an aluminum storefront with a fabric awning over the recessed door.

County planning staff recommend approval of the overhaul as it still meets the design guidelines of the City of Batavia in the Central Business District (C-3).

The $ 1.1 million renovation and restoration of the historic three-story, 7,500 square foot building is part of the downtown New York State revitalization initiative. The dental office is on the first floor while the second floor is being developed for commercial offices and the third floor will consist of two two-bedroom apartments at market price.

Another reference to note on Thursday’s agenda is a site plan review and a special use permit application for an Amherst company to erect two wind turbines at 2311 Bennett Road in the town. by Darien.

Whitecap Electric, LLC, is looking to install a pair of wind turbines up to 2.5 megawatts each with a total height of approximately 450 feet. The bottom of the blade would be more than 30 feet above any obstruction within a 250 foot radius.

The $ 6 million project is intended to comply with the 5 megawatt cap for net metering in New York City and will be connected to the grid as part of the Community Distributed Generation (CDG) compensation scheme.

County planning staff recommend approval with changes focused on an appropriate decommissioning plan, visual impact study and bird analysis, stormwater pollution prevention plan, and application for verification of address 9-1-1 with the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office.

Photo: Revised facade design at 99 Main St., Batavia. Courtesy of the Genesee County Planning Department.

Gloversville Planning Board approves site plan for $ 20 million project

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Ken Kearney, owner of the Kearney Reality Group, discusses the site plan for the Glove City Lofts artist housing project at 52 Church Street in front of the Gloversville Planning Council on the night of Tuesday, December 7, 2021.

GLOVERSVILLE – The Gloversville Planning Council has approved the Kearney Realty Group’s 75-unit, 75-unit “Glove City Lofts” site plan at 51 Church Street as a result of ‘a public hearing Tuesday evening.

Tanyalynnette Grimes, President and CEO of Micropolis Development Group, was the only person to speak at the public hearing. She asked if the Glove City lofts, if built, would be used for “low-rental housing” or “Section 8” housing.

“Are there any clarifications [of the income levels of the prospective tenants of the building] in the site plans, since it is in a superimposed historic district, and with regard to the businesses of the city center? ” she asked.

Fulton County planner Sean Geraghty, who advises the planning council, said Kearney’s site plan request included clarification of the income requirements of potential tenants.

“If you want to come and review the application, you are more than welcome to do so. You can do it here in town or I have a copy at the county planning department, ”Geraghty said. “Generally speaking, public hearings are not question-and-answer sessions. This really is an opportunity for the public to tell the Planning Board something they don’t know about the application, but yes the applicants have been very thorough in explaining the types of tenants they will have in the application. these buildings and how they will qualify.

Ken Kearney, owner of the Kearney Realty Group, said his company would claim about $ 1.1 million in income-tested federal housing tax credits granted by the New York State Office for Homes and Community Renewal (HCR) to build the Glove City Lofts Complex.

Kearney explained the income rules required by the federal tax credit program used to help fund the project in October. He said he expects one-bedroom income-based apartments to cost around $ 665 in rent per month, while two-bedroom income-based apartments will cost around $ 775. He said “middle income” units will have higher rents, perhaps up to 20% more. He said the federal tax credit program doesn’t want any of the tenants to pay more than 30% of their income for rent.

After the public hearing, Kearney’s developer Parkview Development & Construction asked Gloversville town planning council to waive the city’s six-month requirement to begin construction after site plan approval , and to extend it to 18 months, in order to give the company enough time to obtain the financing necessary for the construction of the complex without having to come back several times to the town planning council for extensions.

The planning council consensus agreed to the extension of the deadline and the president of the planning council, Geoffrey Peck, requested that the 18-month deadline be entered in the minutes.

Following the hearing, Kearney said Glove City Lofts now had all of the local approvals it needed to build the project, including the correct zoning.

In July, it was revealed at a planning council meeting that the 3-acre lot at 51 Church Street had been zoned from commercial to a parcel zoned for manufacturing in 2015. The zoning issue presented a problem. potential for the major project, but city officials have since discovered that the zoning was changed in 2018.

Peck said the zoning change in 2018 did not go in the normal way, with the joint council bypassing the review by the city’s planning council.
“They just didn’t go through all the procedures,” Geraghty added.

“We made a note in the minutes of last month’s meeting [in November] this [the rezoning of 51 Church St.] had not been presented to the Planning Council under standard procedure, but the statute of limitations had expired, so it had become law, ”Peck said.

The Glove City Lofts project also requested $ 1 million as part of Gloversville’s request for the $ 10 million downtown revitalization initiative in 2021. On Tuesday evening, Kearney said he hoped Gloversville would win the DRI competition for the Mohawk Valley, which he says will be announced soon.

“If the DRI materializes, if the city succeeds, the other two [apartment building projects from my company that received DRI funding in other cities] in the Mohawk Valley, Oneonta and Rome… they were both priority projects in these [successful] DRI plans, ”Kearney said. “[Those DRI grant awards] brought these projects to the top for consideration by UNHCR [for the federal tax credits]. It is hope here.

Kearney has said in the past that the project in Gloversville could be delayed for a year if Gloversville does not receive the DRI, but on Tuesday night he said he believed he would win it.

“I have never been more optimistic about a DRI plan than with this one,” he said.

Site plan recommendations for the new Mount Forest grocery store will be presented to council

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NORTH WELLINGTON – The final recommendation report for a new Sobeys Motherland in Mount Forest will be presented to council on Monday.

The proponent and the applicant have submitted a revised site plan which includes a proposed intersection with signage, a revised internal parking lot design and a proposed separate entrance for horses and strollers from Industrial Drive. The proposed site plan was accompanied by an updated traffic report.

The revised presentation was provided in response to departmental and agency comments.

Planning staff have reviewed the revised site plan and found it to be in accordance with provincial policy and consistent with the Wellington County Official Plan.

The proposed site plan location is at 503 and 515 Main Street, where the beer store and Peavey Mart are located on the property and are expected to remain.

Similar to the previous version of the sitemap, the revised sitemap includes:

The proposed changes are as follows:

Stormwater management is the primary concern of the report, as stormwater drainage flows through the affected property.

Currently, the Applicant is working with Waste Management to secure a drainage easement across the property. The easement will need to be secured / permanently established prior to approval of the site plan for the grocery store and restaurant.

The board is to decide whether or not the developer should continue with the proposed development at Monday’s meeting.

Site map of the City OKs pharmacy, commercial use of the land in the north

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Mayor Gregg Hull shows the US and city flags of Rio Rancho. . Martinez, a Rio Ranchoan, asked Hull to send the flags and then presented them at the Rio Rancho board meeting on Thursday. Photo by Argen Duncan.

Rio Rancho board members approved a site plan for a prep pharmacy and opened land near the intersection of North and Unser boulevards for retail during their meeting Thursday night at the ‘city Hall.

They approved the site plan and the land use change unanimously, with Councilor Jeremy Lenentine absent and Mayor Gregg Hull therefore voting.

For the land use zoning change, the 2.2 acres in question are along Northern Boulevard just east of Unser Boulevard with Eric Road being the eastern boundary.

The lots to the immediate south, east and west are undeveloped R-1 lots, lower density single-family residential zoning, according to a city map. A mid-density single-family housing neighborhood and commercial development with a Walgreens pharmacy and Speedway gas station are across from north to north.

Entrepreneur and developer Dawn Davide said she has built homes nearby and invested in the area.

“And hopefully we can bring some development to this area which was never going to be a residential development anyway,” she said.

In their request to change the area, she and her business partner Linda DeFillippo said the change would bring more commerce to the city, while still allowing the busy intersection to remain consistent with existing businesses.

Sharon Alire, a resident of the neighborhood across the North, opposed the change of area.

“Heavy traffic is already a hindrance, and there are so many accidents just below this space where there is no left turn in our neighborhood,” she wrote in a comment letter. . “Adding more traffic to the retail space will only increase the traffic there.”

She was the only member of the audience to comment.

As for the site map, this is a new larger location for the Olive Tree Compounding Pharmacy at 1713 Wellspring Ave. It consists of three buildings, totaling approximately 7,600 square feet, with 46 parking spaces and five bicycle spaces on just over an acre of land.

The pharmacy, one of the few pharmacies in the state, according to architect Doug Heller, now has a smaller, rented location on Westside and Unser Boulevard. Heller said the larger building at the new site will have two tenants and the third building will be built in the future if the landlord finds the right tenant.

He said the pharmacy owner and Itsa Italian Ice owner, who were planning to go to the neighboring lot, agreed that they would have a common entrance to Itsa’s property. City Councilor Paul Wymer wanted approval of the site plan to be made conditional on this agreement being delivered in writing to the city.

The governing body approved this amendment and the plan.

In another case, the governing body approved the American Rescue Plan Act’s $ 360,000 set aside for a home repair program.

“We have an aging housing stock in Rio Rancho,” City Manager Matt Geisel said, adding that homes built in the 1960s often need repairs and many people have a fixed income.

The program would be administered by a nonprofit Homewise and would provide up to $ 25,000 per home in forgivable loans to homeowners with incomes equal to or less than 80% of the region’s median income. Geisel said the income limit would mean $ 38,000 for a household of one and $ 54,000 for a household of four, for example.

Deputy City Manager Peter Wells said the city will monitor Homewise’s use of the money and jointly develop a communications plan to let as many people as possible know about the opportunity.

If this effort is successful, Geisel said, he hopes to secure more funds and expand the program.

City Emergency Management Special Projects Coordinator Rose Martinez, left, accepts Region 6 Community Wide Readiness Award from Federal Emergency Management Agency from Zach Wachter, right , local preparedness coordinator with the New Mexico Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Martinez and the city’s volunteer community emergency response team won the honor for their work during the pandemic, managing COVID testing and vaccination sites, delivering meals to the elderly and those confined to home and manufacturing over 6,000 face masks for frontline workers. Mayor Gregg Hull holds up another plaque in the back. Martinez and CERT were selected from teams from five states. Photo of Argen Marie Duncan.


Planning Commission approves final site plan for Wawa in Gaithersburg

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Render from planning documents

The Gaithersburg Planning Commission has approved the final site plan for a future Wawa gas station and convenience store on Md. 355.

The project has aroused the ire of some in the community since it was proposed two years ago, including an unsuccessful legal challenge from a community group.

The Wawa, reportedly the first in Montgomery County, would feature a 5,060 square foot convenience store with an adjacent gas station at 405 N. Frederick Ave. (Md. 355), opposite Gaithersburg High School.

In October 2019, Gaithersburg City Council approved a schematic development plan, or initial site plan, for the Wawa.

But a month later, a group of residents and businessmen filed an administrative appeal in Montgomery County Circuit Court arguing that the development application was not in line with the master plan because the resort- service was not “light commercial use”.

Further, the applicants argued that the Wawa was not “compatible with the residential character” of the neighborhood.

The Circuit Court determined that the project was consistent with the master plan, but ruled that the Planning Commission should have allowed cross-examination.

The case went to the Special Court of Appeal, which ruled in March both that the development was consistent with the master plan and that opponents of the project had waived their right to cross-examination. The appeal court’s decision this spring got the project going.

A few residents opposed to the Wawa project continued to voice their opposition at Wednesday’s Planning Commission meeting.

Carol Johnson said Wawa should consider installing electric charging stations instead of gas pumps, as she believes the use of electric vehicles will eventually overtake the use of gasoline vehicles.

“I think the future is here, and it’s really kinda silly to put all that money on gas…” she said.

Phillip Hummel, a land use lawyer at Miles & Stockbridge, said Wawa had considered incorporating electric charging stations into the project, but the need to prioritize water management rain and sidewalk space took precedence.

“It’s something that has been taken into account. It just couldn’t be easily accommodated due to all the competing factors involved, ”he said.

Walter Umana, who lives near the future service station, said he was worried about potential noise and light pollution.

“It’s a very quiet area. Gaithersburg being the City of Trees, we want to make sure it retains that feel, and with the wildlife around us, we want to make sure nothing is disturbed more than it should be, ”he said. he declares.

Monica Lozada said she also lived near the future Wawa site and wanted to know if there would be security cameras at the facility. Lozada also requested that additional bike racks be included in it.

Wawa real estate project manager Chris Hoffman said there would be cameras both inside the convenience store and outside the building. The property will be monitored 24/7 by a security team, he said.

“If there was a situation that called for an immediate police response, or moderate unrest that we would like to bring to the attention of our internal security officials, store staff have the ability to call upon these resources. if necessary, ”Hoffman said. .

Planning commissioner Lloyd Kaufman said the final site plan only includes enough bike rack space for around two bikes. He said he wanted to see more space on the bike racks to accommodate Gaithersburg High School students who might be making their way to the Wawa during a break.

Mira Gantzert, project manager at Bohler Engineering, said adding more bike racks is something that can be discussed.

“We can potentially look at the west side of the building, where there’s an existing 8-foot sidewalk, and potentially have one or two additional bike racks against the building, but there’s still 4 or 5 feet for pedestrians to walk past, ”she said.

Kaufman, Planning Commission Chairman John Bauer, and Commissioners Phillip Wessel and Sharon Cantrell unanimously approved the final site plan.

Dan Schere can be contacted at [email protected]

Site map approved for Westlake Landings stores

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A rendering of the future Westlake Landings Shoppes.

The Town of Westlake has approved the Konover South site plan to develop approximately 23,000 square feet of retail space within the community. The development company was approved to construct two multi-tenant shopping centers and a group of quick service restaurants which will be collectively known as the Shoppes of Westlake Landings. Construction is scheduled to begin in the spring of 2022 and be completed by the end of the year.

“We have already signed a handful of leases and are currently engaged with several other companies,” said Bob Bedard, senior vice president of development for Konover South. “We plan to be fully rented when it opens next year.”

Konover is primarily targeting service-oriented businesses and restaurants to fill the two centers – one of 7,065 square feet and the other of 9,450 square feet – as well as the catering module totaling 6,765 square feet. So far, leases have been signed with Heartland Dental, Verizon Communications, Go Green Dry Cleaner and Sauced BBQ and Whiskey Shack, a full-service restaurant and bar owned and operated by the Ralph Lewis family. The Lewis family have owned the Okeechobee Steakhouse for 75 years.

Lease negotiations for the two centers are underway for a hamburger concept, a smoothie shop and a fitness room. For the restaurant’s pod, lease details are being worked out with three national food and beverage chains.

The stores will be built at Westlake Landings, a 50-acre planned business park located near Seminole Pratt Whitney Road. Konover is under contract to acquire seven acres in the park. The closure is scheduled for the end of 2021.

“We are very excited to see business development progress in our new town,” said John Carter, vice president of Minto Communities, the lead developer of the 3,800-acre Westlake community approved for 4,500 homes and over 2. , 2 million square feet. commercial space. “As we continue to grow, our residents will need convenient access to service businesses. “

In September, Chaudhary Petroleum Group opened the first new retail business in Westlake since its incorporation in 2016. A new concept 7-Eleven and gas station off Seminole Pratt Whitney Road offers a take-out / dinner with make-to-order food, a wine cellar with selected wines and an iced tea and iced tea bar.

A second 7-Eleven is expected to open in the coming months, as Publix prepares to build a multi-tenant mall that will be anchored in a 50,000 square foot grocery store. A warehouse, self-storage facility and entertainment area are also planned at Westlake Landings.

Whitewater Approves Site Plan Process for Rafit Road Property Redevelopment

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Beachburg – Despite the sale of a major real estate property along the Ottawa River, Joe Kowalski says he’s not retiring or stopping Wilderness Tours.

Summerhill Resorts, a Toronto-based company that operates vacation properties primarily in southern Ontario, purchases 133 hectares of land from White Water & Wild Land Tours Ltd., which operates the outdoor adventure recreation company Wilderness Tours, which includes white water rafting. Summerhill Resorts also acquired the neighboring Logos Land resort.

Wilderness Tours will continue to operate from the old River Run property upstream of the subject property.

“When we bought the River Run property seven or eight years ago, the plan was to move Wilderness Tours there over time,” said Mr. Kowalksi, owner of White Water & Wild Lands. “When COVID hit and devastated the tourism industry, it sped up the process. It was a health and safety decision. Safety has always been our first priority. It used to mean “safety on the river,” but now it includes safety on land. ”

He explained that the new location, located right at the foot of the rapids used for rafting, means far fewer buses for rafting participants.

He stressed that he would not be retiring.

“At 73, I am too young to retire,” he said.

He sees a bright future for Wilderness Tours.

“In addition to rafting, canoeing and kayaking, we are also expanding and improving our bike paths,” he said. “We work with the Beachburg Off-Road Cycling Association (BORCA). We are used to seeing cars pass by with kayaks on them, but now we see just as many with bicycles.

He said Summerhill Resorts is a very professional operation which, with the purchase of the former base of Wilderness Tours, “will kick start tourism in this area in the future.

“We couldn’t have asked for a better buyer,” he said.

The 133-hectare property in question now houses 62 trailer sites, six cabins, two beach cabins / houses, a lodge and the Rafters building with ancillary recreation facilities and outdoor spaces.

Mr. Kowalski and his brother Jack, who remains a partner in the business, founded Wilderness Tours in 1975. His son, Joel, and daughter, Katie, are also with the business.

“Joel is the manager of the river and Katie is in charge of the bike.”

Site plan agreement with the township

Whitewater Regional Council is in the process of entering into a site plan agreement with Summerhill Resorts Ltd. to accommodate the redevelopment of the property at 503 Rafting Road.

The request to enter into the site plan agreement is supported by detailed site development plans, a wastewater treatment assessment report, and a water source assessment and inspection to assess the ” adequacy of existing wells and water treatment equipment with the proposed development.

Phase 1 of the proposed redevelopment does not suggest any new development. Instead, redevelopment will occur on existing developed sites and the scale of development is generally considered to be less than the historic use of the property. Future phases of development that require work on the foundation site will require full engineering and environmental assessments.

Whitewater Area Planner Ivan Burton noted that while no below grade development is proposed at this time, the site plan agreement will formalize a site development plan and servicing.

“This will ensure the health and safety of the public,” he said.

The property is designated as Tourist Commercial (TC) in the Renfrew County Official Plan.

Atlantic Beach Planners and Council Approve Tackle Box Tavern Site Plan Changes | New

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ATLANTIC BEACH – Planning and City Council moved quickly on Monday to approve changes to the Tackle Box Tavern site plan.

The Atlantic Beach Planning Council convened for a special meeting on Monday in the Town Hall meeting room at 1010 West Fort Macon Road, just before the council’s regular business meeting. The Board of Directors unanimously recommended that the Board approve a site plan change that was considered a minor change.

Later that night, the council agreed, unanimously granting approval to change the proposed open deck over the tavern to an enclosed space.

Planning and Zoning Director Michelle Eitner said at the Planning Council meeting local developer Fred Bunn, who works on the property, requested the change because they were unaware that it was not was not already in place in the sitemap.

“Because it’s not about being a full amendment, we don’t have to go back to reviewing the proposals with a joint meeting,” Ms. Eitner said. “We are speeding it up a bit because it is currently under construction… we want this construction to keep moving forward because construction can resume. “

The Tackle Box Tavern project is redeveloping an existing business in The Circle, an area that includes the property directly south of the Fort Macon Road / Atlantic Beach Causeway intersection and surrounding neighborhoods. The tavern is located at 107 Atlantic Blvd.

Mayor Trace Cooper said all business development in The Circle is subject to a major sitemap.

“We want to make sure that development is going the right way, whether it’s in The Circle or elsewhere, it requires these plans,” he said. “This is a project that is underway and we are delighted to see it come to fruition. “

Other projects are underway in the neighborhood, including the redevelopment of the council promenade, which is currently in the planning phase. Mr Cooper said during council comments that starting Tuesday, city staff are accepting applications from engineers and design firms for the promenade redesign competition.

Mr Cooper said on Monday that officials have already expressed interest in participating in the redesign of the city-owned promenade, which officials say is in poor condition and in need of replacement or repair.

“I’m excited to see what we get out of it,” Cooper said.

The first round of submissions is scheduled for Saturday January 15.

In other news at the council meeting, City Councilor Danny Navey said residents had raised concerns with him over recent coyote sightings in town.

The The North Carolina Wildlife Commission issued an advisory in late October this active coyote season is underway as young coyotes leave their parents’ territory.

City Councilor Austin Waters agreed the sightings were widespread.

“It’s not just one end of town,” Mr. Waters said, “they’re everywhere.”

Mr Navey said he believes the city should be proactive in addressing residents’ concerns about coyotes. The mayor has asked city manager David Walker to seek contact with an animal trapping service.

It also happened during the meeting:

  • The board received a report from the Director of Parks and Recreation, Morgan Gilbert, on activities at the Atlantic Beach Community Park during the summer. Ms Gilbert said the park’s mini-golf course had 14,935 paid golfers and 2,707 free golfers aged 6 and under. The mini-golf course remained open for a further month due to its success.
  • The board unanimously recommended that the Carteret County Board of Commissioners appoint Mr. Waters to represent Atlantic Beach on the County Beach Commission.
  • The board unanimously accepted an audit report for fiscal year 2020-2021 from the accounting firm Thompson, Price, Scott, Adams and Co. of Wilmington.
  • Council unanimously approved a sympathy resolution for the family of planning council member Norman Livengood. Mr. Livengood died on October 24.
  • The board unanimously approved the meeting agenda, including the minutes of the regular meeting on October 25th.

Contact Mike Shutak at 252-723-7353, email [email protected]; or follow us on Twitter at @mikesccnt.

Kings Park Village: owner targets landfill site plan of 50 homes

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OWNERS of Kings Park Village would be interested in expanding into an adjacent former landfill site to build 50 new mobile homes.

Initial discussions have taken place between Cove Communities and Castle Point Council regarding the purchase of the land just east of the retirement village of Canvey.

The land was within the boundaries of the old Canvey Newlands landfill site which operated from 1954 to 1989.

However, the area where the 50 houses would potentially be located “was not part of the area in which the landfill took place,” a council report revealed earlier this year.

Mandated to ensure the viability of housing construction on the site, the report adds: “When operating the landfill, it was important to maintain a buffer zone … The allocation site therefore did not been formally used for the deposit of any illegal dumping of flies on occasion.

Now Cove Communities is looking to purchase council land that has been allocated for the development of 50 homes in the local plan.

“If the opportunity to expand Kings Park Village arose, we would be interested in working with the local council to implement their local plan,” said Rob Turner, resort manager at Kings Park Village.

The former Canvey Newlands landfill site is now known as Canvey Heights Country Park.

The 50-house site, locally referred to as HO31, is between Kings Park Village and Canvey Heights Country Park.

The landfill was used for biological waste, although it is likely that it was contaminated with non-biological waste as well over time, as less strict waste sorting regimes existed at that time and landfills did not. were not subject to modern regulations.

Experts carried out tests on the site to see if it would be safe for development and, according to a report from the council, “methane levels have remained below Environment Agency guideline values.”

The report gave the green light for the development of the land claim, saying that “the potential risks are identifiable and can be mitigated”, while adding that it would be necessary to undertake the remediation of the contaminated lands.

“It is expected that this allowance will be delivered as an extension to the neighboring village of Kings Park,” the report adds. “The council is in discussions with the owner-operator of Kings Park Village regarding the acquisition of the site.

Rezoning, approved site plan for Ashwaubenon gas station

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By Kevin Boneske
Editor-in-chief


ASHWAUBENON – The rezoning of three Sports & Entertainment plots at B-3 Community Business to build a 5,200 square foot Holiday convenience store at the southwest corner of South Ashland Avenue and Mike McCarthy Way was approved on Tuesday, October 26 by the Village council.

Community Development Director Aaron Schuette said he would not have been in favor of rezoning the property if it had been located elsewhere in the Sports & Entertainment District.

“However, looking at the surrounding land uses – its location against South Ashland Avenue, the railroad, the surrounding land uses – it makes sense for this specific location (to rezone the property) to B-3 to facilitate the redevelopment of this property, ”he said.

Schuette said the project with an eight-dispenser fuel island and an accessory car wash would demolish an existing dilapidated warehouse.

“It’s going to clean up this site quite significantly,” he said.

Schuette said the overall village plan identifies commercial uses as permitted in this area.

He said the site would not have diesel pumps for semi-trailers, which was a concern of a neighboring landowner who raised during the public hearing the possibility of traffic jams in the area.

“It can have a diesel pump for diesel vehicles, but there won’t be pumps for semi-trailers,” Schuette said.

The council also approved a site plan for the project.

Schuette said two of the existing driveway access points on Mike McCarthy Way will be used for the convenience store, with a third driveway access point on South Ashland near the southern property line at approximately 200 feet south of the intersection with Mike McCarthy Way.

Jim Goeppner, director of real estate development for Holiday, said the two curbs along Mike McCarthy Way are designed to create the best flow of traffic for vehicles entering and exiting the property.

Exterior finishes requested in the site plan include stone-look paneling near the base extending to the corners of the buildings, a window system and a fiber cement wall panel system with concealed fasteners.

The conditions of approval for rezoning do not include any sale of products outside, with the exception of propane.

Village president Mary Kardoskee said she was happy other possible items for sale, such as bags of salt and firewood, were not left outside as the site is located at the main entrance to the Ashwaubenon Sports and Entertainment District.

Administrator Gary Paul said he was happy to see Holiday convenience store moving there.

“Overall I think it’s a good plan,” he said. “Everything is better than what currently exists. “