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Layout plan for proposed warehouses in Berryville pending | Winchester star

By Site plan

BERRYVILLE — A developer’s project to build three 60,000 square foot commercial warehouses along Jack Enders Boulevard is on hold.

On Wednesday evening, the Berryville Area Development Authority (BADA) postponed review of a site plan for the second time. LGV Group LLC requested the deferral as it strives to meet Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) expectations.

As specified by an agreement between the localities, BADA advises the Clarke County Board of Supervisors and the Berryville City Council on land use issues involving an area targeted for possible annexation to the city.

The warehouses would be built on 12½ acres adjacent to Clarke County Business Park. The property is already zoned for business park uses.

Following a public hearing in early December, the authority initially postponed consideration of the site plan application because full details of how the warehouses would affect their surroundings were not yet available.

During the hearing, some residents of the nearby Berryville Glen subdivision expressed concerns that large trucks serving the warehouses could cause traffic and safety issues.

BADA continued the hearing until February 23, when it now aims to review the site plan.

“Hopefully everything will be ready by then,” said Berryville Community Development Manager Christy Dunkle, a BADA staff member.

Sterling-based LGV operates a business on nearby Station Road where metal windows and doors are made. The company aims to use one of the warehouses for assembly and storage and rent the other two.

LGV received initial feedback from DEQ on the warehouse layout earlier this month. The department requested more geotechnical testing, and it was done, property manager Lara Dunlap said in a recent letter to the authority.

Geotechnics refers to a component of civil engineering concerned with the materials of the earth, such as rocks and soil.

A DEQ representative “assured that they would have a formal review of the revised site plan (incorporating all geotechnical recommendations) completed by early February,” Dunlap wrote.

LGV is looking for tenants for the two warehouses it will not be using. Dunkle said she doesn’t know the status of that effort.

Next steps for the development of the Crewkerne key site

By Site development

A MAJOR housing project in Somerset can go ahead after the developer has received permission to move soil across the site.

Taylor Wimpey Exeter will spend the coming years delivering a total of 635 homes at the key Crewkerne site, which sits between the A30 Yeovil Road and the A356 Station Road.

The developer has obtained detailed permission to deliver the first 110 homes at the south end of the site in January 2021, with construction officially starting around Christmas.

South Somerset District Council must now agree to amend the original plans, allowing Taylor Wimpey to move material from the north end of the site to the south end so that the new access road can be delivered.

To allow the movement of materials through the site, a new haul road will be created between the A30 and the A356.

This will follow the route of the dorsal route crossing the site, the route of which was decided in May 2020.

Planning officer John Hammond told a virtual meeting of the council’s regulatory committee on Tuesday morning (January 18) that the changes would help ensure the new road was delivered in full within the next 18 months.

Chard & Ilminster News: The northern end of the key Crewkerne site, near the A30 Yeovil road.  CREDIT: Daniel Mumby.  Free to use for all BBC partners.

He stated in his written report: “There is merit in seeking to reuse materials from the same global site, given that the first access on Station Road will require backfilling of the ground given the difference in levels between the terrain and the road itself.

“Conversely, in relation to the access which will be taken on the A30, the ground is considerably higher than the road at the approved junction, which means that there will be a significant need for excavation of materials to create this junction and the internal routes. ”

Crewkerne resident Julie Chant worried whether the new haul road would harm the ecology of the site, asking for clarification on how badgers, dormice and otters would be protected.

She said: “This route will cut through the badger sets. I don’t think there’s enough clarity on how they’re going to protect all of these species.

“I understand that Taylor Wimpey has licenses from Natural England for the south site – but they are working on the whole site.

“Are all licenses in place for protected species and hedge removal? Everyone knew that ecology was the big thing on this site.

Colin Danks of Peter Brett Associates (representing the developer) assured Ms Chant that the impact of the road would be properly mitigated – and the construction would ultimately prevent further pollution in the town centre.

He said: “Ecology is an essential part of our process. There is a clear safety net with Natural England that would prevent any harm to badgers, otters or dormice.

“The aim of this app is to do just one thing: avoid having to drive heavy traffic through Crewkerne town centre. We need to move material, and doing it on site just makes sense. »

After approximately 45 minutes of debate, the committee voted to approve the plans by a margin of six to zero, with two abstentions (Councillor Adam Dance, due to technical difficulties, and Councilor Peter Gubbins, who elected not to not vote).

Taylor Wimpey said in December that he expects the first phase of homes on the site to be available for purchase by the fall.

Chard & Ilminster News: Crewkerne's key site in the context of the city.  CREDIT: LHC Group.  Free to use for all BBC partners.

Mr Hammond added that Somerset County Council was currently renegotiating its own legal agreement with Taylor Wimpey over funding for a new primary school.

He said in his report: “There is a separate agreement with the county council as the local education authority to provide a site for a first school, as well as capital to secure new buildings.

“Following its resolution to move to a two-tier education service for the area, the county council is separately seeking to revise this requirement to reflect the need for off-site education work funding and to remove the requirement for a school site.”

The county council’s controversial school reforms – which have successfully withstood judicial scrutiny by local parents – will be implemented in time for the new school year in September.

Gahanna-Jefferson Public Schools student high school, stadium site plan options

By Site plan

Three site plan options are being considered for the new $158 million Gahanna Lincoln High School, with a decision expected in February.

District officials, DLR Group and Construction Ruscilli met with neighbors near the high school, with the final meeting and options presented Jan. 12.

After further deliberations with the community at large and the senior facilities planning committee, Judy Hengstebeck, district communications coordinator, said Superintendent Steve Barrett plans to recommend a site plan to the school board in February.

Following:Gahanna-Jefferson will focus on building additions, relationships and staffing in 2022

She said Option 1, also called Option A, was an original design shown to the community.

She said Option 2 (B) is similar to a plan presented earlier, but in this design the building has been reversed so that the entrance faces the neighborhood rather than the rear of the building. Option 3 (C) is a new design.

The priorities the neighbors wanted in the design options included keeping the current stadium, keeping the school one room, maximizing sound/noise buffer, 3 story building, maximizing green space, retaining the veterans memorial, retaining the current auditorium, a buffer natural landscape, a traffic light, and moving the stadium to another location.

>> See the three options

Paul Lawton, architect of the DLR Group, said an effort had been made to come up with designs taking into account the neighbours’ objectives.

“A traffic light is beyond our design power,” he said. “I think moving the stadium totally offsite, at the time I think the context was sort of in the Blacklick area. It’s going to be pretty tough, but we made it in option C. A third one that was a bit out of our hands right now was guarding the auditorium. The other seven, however, we did our best to accommodate.

Keeping the stadium in its current location is option B(2), Lawton said.

“We kept the position of the current stadium,” he said. “What we did was we took the floor plan of the building and mirrored it from east to west and then moved it to the east side of this stadium so that the relationship between the stadium and the building remains the same. There are synergies there that we have tried to keep, and we think it works from that point of view. The one-class school, we have approached it. In this one, we moved it to the west of the stadium. Coming down Hamilton, you would see it at the back of those bleachers.

Lawton said the building would help act as a buffer against sound and noise in this plan.

As designers, he said, they try to minimize the footprint of the entire high school, so the building is 3 stories tall.

“The southern and northern parts are the gymnasiums and auditoriums, so these will naturally be 2 stories, but the main core of the building where the academic wings are – it’s a 3 story space,” Lawton said. “No. 5 (priority) is to maximize green space. As you know from the metrics we’ve shared, we have parking counts that we need to meet, based on code occupancy/gathering rates from the city to the auditorium/gym etc. We tried, of course, that’s our intention, we love greenery as much as you do, so we’ve done our best to maximize that.

He said all three options retain the veterans’ memorial.

This natural landscape area is increased along this eastern border in Option B.

“We think we did our best with the square footage of the building, the number of parking spaces we had to keep the stadium where they are,” he said. “The bus traffic is similar to the first diagram. We have tried to divide this traffic so that the buses come from the south, your student parking comes from west to north, and you have your staff parking and the deposit of relatives in the east.

The new option, Option C, is an attempt to move the stadium to another site.

“It was our attempt to get the best of both worlds,” Lawton said. “If we had a blank page, it might be close to what we would have found. We really did our best to achieve as many of these goals as possible: increase your border, separate parking and car traffic. This relocates the stadium to the southwest. All three have advantages and disadvantages. We intend to provide options and consider the district to present in the future. »

Frank Pinciotti, Ruscilli Construction project manager, said Option A would be to build the new stadium first.

“In this way, the current use of the stadium would only be affected by one year,” he said. “So the teams would find other places to play. We have to build the new building at the same time as we build the new stadium. »

He said options A and B would affect the use of the stadium for about a year, while the high school would be without a stadium for more than four years under option C, and it would cost about 3.5 million. dollars more.

Terry Rippl, a 44-year-old resident, said he thought the district answered questions well with the information available. He said he knew a school was near his home when he moved to the neighborhood.

“When there’s a football game and there’s a touchdown, we hear a roar,” Rippl said. “It’s not a big deal.”

He said he was satisfied with the maximization of green spaces.

Southwind Drive resident Judy Brown said she was surprised the district offered two other options.

“My preference is the one that doesn’t move the stadium, B. It looks like they’ve considered the requests,” she said.

The day after the meeting, resident Ginny Evans said she spent quite a bit of time thinking about the three proposals.

“I was pleased to see that the district listened to neighbors’ concerns and presented two additional options for the footprint design,” she said. “Personally, with the information I currently have, I would rule out Option A because no one should be as directly negatively impacted by having a stadium so close to their property as the neighbors of Saverne Place would be.”

At first, Evans said, she thought Option B sounded good.

“But upon further inspection and discussion, I realized that separating the student parking lot from the school building was not a good option,” she said. “Students would need to walk around the stadium to enter the school building, and the student parking lot is not visible from the building. I don’t think that’s a good thing as far as overall school security and logistics are concerned.

Evans said Option C appears to be the best long-term option.

“It’s a shame there won’t be a football stadium for four years, but when I focus on the overall lifespan of the new building/campus and general academic and safety issues, I think “they take precedence over short term athletics. program interruptions. Option C is also more expensive due to the time it takes to complete the whole project. However, although I don’t want to see the district spending money on unnecessary things (like moving the one room schoolhouse to High Street) I think it would be wise to spend the extra money doing what will give us the most benefit per relation to the life of the new building.

Pinciotti said there weren’t a lot of details in the schematic design phase.

“The next phase is called design development, when they get into the details – the walls, the partitions, the finishes – and get more detailed, but not to the extent that we could actually put it on the street and bid,” Pinciotti said. “We do another check of the cost of the development drawings of the design. This is evaluated. When this is approved, there may be a cost reduction exercise to remove certain things or specify certain things that are less dear.

Pinciotti said the next step would be construction documents.

“These, when they’re done, we can go out on the street and bid on them with some contractors and work out the actual costs,” he said. “There are these checks and balances along the way to make sure we don’t design the Taj Mahal when we can’t afford it.

Deputy Superintendent Jill Elliott said Gahanna Lincoln High School has about 2,400 students and a replacement Lincoln High School at the current site could accommodate 2,800 students.

Elliott said high school staff provided input in a variety of ways throughout the design process and will be more engaged in the coming months as the floor plan is finalized and the discussion moves to the spaces. interiors.

She said the goal is to open the new high school for the 2024-25 school year.

[email protected]

@ThisWeekMarla

Staffordshire Gypsy caravan site plan sparks 248 objections

By Site plan

Hundreds of people oppose plans for a gypsy caravan site on the edge of a rural village.

The proposed land at Radmore Lane, Gnosall, near Stafford, came nearly a decade after a previous application was turned down by Stafford Borough Council.

More than 260 people opposed the 2011 application, which was rejected because it had not been shown that there was a compelling need to develop the site in the middle of the countryside. It was also feared that the plans would lead to the loss of virgin land and detract from the appearance of the rural area.

More Stoke-on-Trent and Staffordshire headlines

Today, 248 people opposed the latest proposals for a private gypsy site for one family, with a day room and no more than two mobile homes and four traveling caravans.

Stone MP Sir Bill Cash, Gnosall Parish Council and campaign group Grid (Gnosall Resists Indiscriminate Development) are among the opponents.

Sir Bill said: ‘The proposed development is unsuitable and does not match the nearby homes and rural character of the area and would result in a loss of green land. This type of open country development would be visually detrimental to the surrounding area and would be highly visible in the local landscape.

“The proposed development would aggravate existing traffic problems on the A518 and the site would be accessed via an unlit junction on a section of the road which has a 60mph speed limit. The entrance to the site is around a sharp bend in Radmore Lane, which is a single lane country lane. It is unsuitable for heavy goods vehicles towing mobile homes and caravans.

The parish council said: ‘The claimant is already housed in Donnington so there are no welfare cases to consider. Even if such an argument were made, there are at least 36-39 Stafford Borough Council sites available.

“There is no compelling need demonstrated at this location. A pristine site in a rural area should not be used for a gypsy residential site. There are most likely suitable sites on brownfield sites or previously used land closer of urban areas (of) the borough of Stafford.

A resident of Glendower Close said: ‘It is a completely misguided proposition to try and enforce an award-winning scenic village. The proposed site is clearly visible from the A518 and will have a visual impact on anyone approaching the village of Gnosall.

“This is a development that will cause an intrusion into the green fields and countryside that separate Gnosall from Newport. There is no precedent for this utterly useless application and development and it will certainly be a permanent stain on the landscape for generations of the local community and anyone who drives in rural Staffordshire.

“We are traveling on the A518, passing the development project and we have observed a significant increase in traffic on this section of the A518. This is no doubt partly due to the increase in our local population using their vehicles.

“The site is rural farmland where sheep can safely graze without electricity, running water or human effluent disposal facilities. Installation of a septic tank would require drainage extending into adjoining farmland Additionally, there will be a significant increase in recycling waste collection from residents and visitors.

A Radmore Lane resident said: ‘Safety would be compromised on the adjacent road network due to the nature of the traffic the site would generate, inadequate turning arrangements at Radmore Lane and off the A518.

“Since 2011 there has been even more traffic on the A518 due to the Gnosall housing estates and there have been many more serious accidents which means there are even more reasons this time to refuse the application than in 2011. The increase in traffic makes this application dangerous for the community as well as the applicants and their families.

But seven letters of support were also sent to the council.

A resident of Coton said: “There is no difference between a few public transport vans towing a caravan and the dozens of big tractors towing huge trailers and various agricultural machinery that travels this road all the time. And caravans do not spread mud all over the road unlike tractors.

“If approval of this application means that their other fields in the center of the village on Station Road are left unoccupied, then I am in favor. If, however, their plan is to occupy both Radmore Lane and their fields on Station Road, then I oppose it.

And one Station Road resident said: ‘It should be allowed because it’s better to have this caravan site in a field outside the village than to have it in the fields which belong to travelers right in the middle of the village by Co-op.

“And the worries around trailers turning into Radmore lane causing danger on 518 – it’s no different than all the massive tractors with their huge trailers going up and down the lane all day and keeping traffic going, a transit with a trailer is no different.”

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Consolidated Restaurant and Nursing Facility Receive Site Plan Approval in the Netherlands

By Site plan

HOLLAND – Two new developments are progressing in South Holland.

The first, a mixed-use development that will serve as the new home of the Grand King Buffet and the Shanghai Grill and Bar, received its third site plan approval from the Holland Planning Commission on Tuesday, January 11.

Following:Shanghai Grill moves across the street to a mixed-use development

Following:Goog’s Pub announces it will return to Holland in a mixed-use development

The mixed-use development on 32nd Street will include a restaurant and banquet space, as well as residential apartments.

The 421 E 32nd St. site plan had previously been approved in 2019 and then again in 2020 after developers reduced the number of residential units. The latest iteration of the plan outlines a step-by-step process, with one building constructed in 2022 and another if finances permit.

The building planned for this year includes a 13,500 square foot restaurant and banquet center, as well as four apartments totaling approximately 5,500 square feet. In 2019, developers told the planning commission that the restaurant would consolidate the Grand King Buffet and Shanghai Grill and Bar, replacing existing locations at 661 E 24th St. and 442 E 32nd St.

The project applicant owns the two restaurants. Shanghai Grill and Bar opened in 2015, offering take-out and lunch and dinner options, including sushi.

The approximately 3-acre lot sits at the corner of 32nd Street and Hastings Avenue, a few lots from a similar mixed-use development at the old Goog’s Pub.

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The second phase will feature a mix of retail and apartment space in a 15,000 square foot addition. The plan is significantly larger than the 14,000 square foot total at 667 Hastings Ave. – where Goog’s Pub will reopen in a downsized space. This building will include nine residential apartments and a grocery and beverage market, in addition to the restaurant.

The Avenue at Holland, a planned retirement home for 16th Street, received unanimous site plan approval on Tuesday, January 11 from the Holland Planning Commission.

Commissioners also approved a site plan for a nursing home at 897 E. 16th St. The one-story facility, titled The Avenue at Holland, will have 100 patient rooms, two courtyards and a daycare on site for employees.

Construction on the 84,725 square foot facility is expected to begin in 2022, and the developers hope to open in late summer 2023.

— Contact journalist Cassandra Lybrink at [email protected]. Follow her on Instagram @BizHolland.

Botetourt County Receives State Grant for Greenfield Industrial Site Development | Local News

By Site development

Roanoke time

Botetourt County economic development officials welcomed the public funding announced Thursday to improve industrial site development in Greenfield.

Outgoing Governor Ralph Northam announced the grant as part of a $7 million expenditure to support industrial sites in Virginia. Other regional program grants included funding for Franklin and Pulaski counties and the city of Roanoke.

The $362,700 from the Virginia Economic Development Partnership’s Business Ready Sites program will be used to prepare 121 acres of land for occupancy in the county’s Industrial Center Park off US 220 near Daleville.

“Having industrial sites primed and ready is key to Botetourt County’s work to recruit future manufacturing employers to the community,” a county news release said.

“Speed ​​of access to business is one of the first things potential businesses turn to when looking to grow,” said Franklin County Economic Development Director Beth Simms.

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The Botetourt County Department of Economic Development has offered to use the state grant to update Greenfield’s environmental site assessment, survey and related engineering studies, the news release said.

In addition, the grant will support the construction of a sewer line, access road and grading involving the vacant site, located among the sprawling facilities officially known as Center Botetourt in Greenfield.

The gradually suburban, but mostly rural, county north of Roanoke sees Greenfield as the keystone to its business and economic future.

“Since 2016, nine manufacturers have announced plans to locate or expand in Botetourt County, involving over 1,000 new jobs and over $200 million in taxable investments. These manufacturers include: Munters, Maag Gala, Metalsa, Pratt Industries, Altec Industries, Canatal Steel USA, Constellation Brands, Eldor Corporation, and Arkay,” the county press release reads.

Botetourt County competed with 25 localities to receive a grant from the Business Ready Sites program, the county said.

“The purpose of doing this work now is that it is essential to prepare industrial sites for companies looking for locations for expansion projects before these companies call us to discuss our available sites,” said Botetourt County Director of Economic Development Ken McFadyen.

“The bigger the site, the better prepared we need to be when companies contact us,” he added,

“Communities whose sites are ready with all utilities in place and with at least grading plans are the ones that receive favorable attention from companies looking for locations for their expansion projects,” said said Botetourt County Administrator Gary Larrowe.

Other grants announced Thursday by the state’s Business Ready Sites program:

Franklin County, Summit View Business Park, $1,017,870

Pulaski County, New River Valley Business Park, $300,000

Roanoke County, Wood Haven Technology Park, $75,000

Consolidated Restaurant and Nursing Facility Receives Holland Site Plan Approval

By Site plan

The owner of the Grand King Buffet and Shanghai Bar and Grill plans to consolidate the restaurants into a new mixed-use development on 32nd Street.

HOLLAND – Two new developments are progressing in South Holland.

The first, a mixed-use development that will serve as the new home of the Grand King Buffet and the Shanghai Grill and Bar, received its third site plan approval from the Holland Planning Commission on Tuesday, January 11.

Following: Shanghai Grill moves across the street to a mixed-use development

Following: Goog’s Pub announces it will return to Holland in a mixed-use development

The mixed-use development on 32nd Street will include a restaurant and banquet space, as well as residential apartments.

The mixed-use development on 32nd Street will include a restaurant and banquet space, as well as residential apartments.

The 421 E 32nd St. site plan had previously been approved in 2019 and then again in 2020 after developers reduced the number of residential units. The latest iteration of the plan outlines a step-by-step process, with one building constructed in 2022 and another if finances permit.

The building planned for this year includes a 13,500 square foot restaurant and banquet center, as well as four apartments totaling approximately 5,500 square feet. In 2019, developers told the planning commission that the restaurant would consolidate the Grand King Buffet and Shanghai Grill and Bar, replacing existing locations at 661 E 24th St. and 442 E 32nd St.

The project applicant owns the two restaurants. Shanghai Grill and Bar opened in 2015, offering take-out and lunch and dinner options, including sushi.

The approximately 3-acre lot sits at the corner of 32nd Street and Hastings Avenue, a few lots from a similar mixed-use development at the old Goog’s Pub.

Subscribe: Learn more about our latest subscription offers!

The second phase will feature a mix of retail and apartment space in a 15,000 square foot addition. The plan is significantly larger than the 14,000 square foot total at 667 Hastings Ave. – where Goog’s Pub will reopen in a downsized space. This building will include nine residential apartments and a grocery and beverage market, in addition to the restaurant.

The Avenue at Holland, a planned retirement home for 16th Street, received unanimous site plan approval on Tuesday, January 11 from the Holland Planning Commission.

The Avenue at Holland, a planned retirement home for 16th Street, received unanimous site plan approval on Tuesday, January 11 from the Holland Planning Commission.

Commissioners also approved a site plan for a nursing home at 897 E. 16th St. The one-story facility, titled The Avenue at Holland, will have 100 patient rooms, two courtyards and a daycare on site for employees.

Construction on the 84,725 square foot facility is expected to begin in 2022, and the developers hope to open in late summer 2023.

— Contact journalist Cassandra Lybrink at [email protected] Follow her on Instagram @BizHolland.

This article originally appeared on The Holland Sentinel: Consolidated Restaurant and Nursing Facility Receive Site Plan Approval in the Netherlands

Rivian sitemap revealed | News

By Site plan

The long-awaited site plan for Rivian Automotive’s new multi-billion dollar electric car manufacturing plant in Stanton Springs North was released this week.

Rivian’s new site plan paints a stark picture of how unprecedented the massive plant will be when fully built, spanning 2,000 acres in Morgan and Walton counties.

“We’ve never seen anything like it here,” said Walton County Economic Development Manager Shane Short.

The vast green pastures of the former Verner and Bowden family farmlands in Rutledge will soon be covered in concrete, becoming the hub of industrial development heading into Rutledge town centre.

“Many of Rivian’s buildings will be built on former Verner family farmland and Bowden family farmland,” Short said. “This will help preserve some of the green spaces and wetlands closer to I-20 and US Highway 278. The plant will be approximately three miles from the town of Rutledge.”

According to the recently released site plan, approximately 13 million square feet of the Rivian plant will be built in Morgan County. The total project requires up to 20 million square feet of construction space.

Rivian’s new plant could be up to 20 times larger than Takeda Pharmaceutical’s Stanton Springs plant, which is 1 million square feet. Even Kia’s West Point, Georgia plant is just 2.2 million square feet.

For a visual comparison, 20 million square feet of building space equals 347 football fields. It would be three times bigger than Disneyland and four times bigger than Vatican City.

In addition to manufacturing warehouses and office buildings, roads, parking lots, access points and stormwater management areas will also be constructed in Morgan County for the project.

Rivian will invest up to $5 billion in the new plant, generate 7,500 jobs and produce 400,000 electric vehicles per year when fully operational. Details of the site plan were revealed after Morgan County Planning Director Chuck Jarrell filed two Developmental Regional Impact (DRI) statements with the Georgia Department of Community Affairs, as the requires the law for the project to go ahead.

Jarrell said the Joint Development Authority (JDA) expects to earn $100 million in local tax revenue each year from Rivian’s development, which will be split among Morgan, Walton, Newton and Jasper counties, as well as the City of Social Circle.

Jarrell also noted that Rivian’s development will affect 26 landowners who control 43 parcels of land in Morgan and Walton counties. Short said all owners involved voluntarily sold their land to the JDA, and no eminent domain was used to acquire land for the Rivian development.

The site plan also calls for major roadworks in and around the Rivian Automotive plant. Jarrell said a traffic study will be conducted in the near future to determine all the details.

Going forward, the site plan calls for the construction of a new exit off I-20 to Old Mill Road in Rutledge. Other improvements include widening US Highway 278 and connecting Old Mill Road to Highway 278.

Short believes the Rivian plant will bring significant benefits to the people of Morgan County and beyond, while becoming a force for environmental protection and stewardship.

“In all my years of economic development, this is the greenest company I have ever encountered. Their mission is to reduce the carbon footprint of our world,” Short said. “But we’re very excited about the jobs it will bring to the region…Rivian will provide generational career opportunities and benefits for thousands of families.”

Short and JDA members held a community meeting at Social Circle Middle School on Tuesday, January 11 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss the new site plan and other details of Rivian Automotive’s development. At press time, details of the reunion were not yet available.

Leaked site plan shows how Rivian could build up to 20 million square feet in Georgia

By Site plan

Rivian’s RS1 SUV model, which debuted at the 2018 Los Angeles Auto Show.

Electric car maker Rivian’s plans for a $5 billion assembly plant include nearly 20 million square feet of development in Stanton Springs, a 2,000-acre economic development megasite about 50 miles east from Atlanta.

As part of the landmark investment, the electric vehicle company could build a test track for its vehicles, wooded “adventure trails” and space for research and development, according to a leaked site plan. published on the Rivian Forum website. News of the sitemap was first reported by the Electrek green energy information site.

The logo of Savannah-based engineering firm Thomas & Hutton appears on the aerial render. Calls to the company have not been returned at press time.

The rumored sitemap closely matches what the company previously revealed about its assembly plant in a recent filing with the Georgian Ministry of Community Affairs, which requested a total of 20 million square feet of assembly and auxiliary buildings. But the documents offered more specific details about the campus, including 13 buildings, the adventure course and a test track.

Rivian wouldn’t be Georgia’s first car test track. The Porsche Cars North America headquarters next to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport includes a customer experience center with a test track. There are no details on what the adventure trail entails, such as whether it would be accessible to the public or only to Rivian workers or whether it would be pedestrian or a path to test the models of SUVs that Rivian plans to produce at the plant.

Other details on the site plan include 144 charging stations, a 100K SF event facility, outdoor amenity spaces and a 2.5M SF research and development facility. In one current filing with the state, Rivian also outlined road improvements for his project, including a new interchange at Old Mill Road and Interstate 20, as well as improvements and widening of the Interstate 278 interchange. The state previously announced plans to build a technical school on campus to train future workers.

California-based Rivian, founded in 2009, went public in November and has a market cap of more than $85 billion, but has yet to make a profit. Prior to its IPO, Rivian was a darling of the electric vehicle industry, attracting investment from Amazon, Ford and Cox Automotive. Experts say Rivian is part of a new generation of automakers aimed at an industry that is set to see tremendous growth over the next few years.

Rivian plans to hire 7,500 people. Once fully operational, state officials said Rivian would be able to produce up to 400,000 vehicles per year. Construction of the facility is expected to begin this summer with production expected to begin in 2024.

Site plan approved for housing development, seniors’ residence in Macomb Township

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A site plan was approved last month for Hampton Manor in Macomb. The area is on the north side of 24 Mile Road, west of Romeo Plank Road. The senior residence development would include an assisted living building and a memory care wing.

File photo by Patricia O’Blenes

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MACOMB TOWNSHIP – At its final meeting of 2021, the Macomb Township Planning Commission gave approval for a subdivision, seniors’ residence and more.

At the December 20 meeting, a revised final plan was recommended for approval for Wellington Estates. Planning director Josh Bocks said the plan was approved several months ago.

“Wellington West is the neighboring development that has also been approved,” he said. “From the time it was approved, Wellington Estates has acquired the property which is just south of this area.”

It is on the south side of 24 Mile Road, a quarter mile east of Romeo Plank Road. It is zoned urban single-family residential and has 146 lots. The applicant proposed to add three lots on the south side, bringing the total to 149 lots.

The commission also approved a planned unit development/general design for Freemont. It would be at the southeast corner of 21 Mile and Card roads.

Mario Izzi of MJC Companies said a purchase agreement had been reached with a gas station and a car wash. He is in the final stages of entering into a long-term lease agreement with Valvoline. It is possible that a daycare will be part of the development.

In other planning news, a site plan has been approved for Macomb’s Hampton Manor. The area is on the northwest corner of 24 Mile and Garfield Roads, just west of Macomb Lutheran North. The senior residence development would include an assisted living building and a memory care wing.

Regarding residents’ concerns about drainage and the Howard Drain, Engineer Jim Van Tiflin said the Macomb County Office of Public Works has strict building standards that must be adhered to.

“The township usually follows their standard because they are the ones dictating how much water they will accept down that drain,” he said.

The drain travels from approximately 24 Mile and Romeo Plank roads to 25 Mile and Hayes roads.

Resident Matt Dery said he was completely against the development.

“It’s a mess,” he said. “There are still additional changes to the proposed site plan, including the escape route, which is just across the fence from our homes in the supposed green space.”

After stating that there is a Hampton mansion in Shelby Township about five miles from the Macomb Township site, Dery asked the commission why there was a need for an additional similar property.

Also at the meeting, Supervisor Frank Viviano made a presentation, thanking members Nunzio Provenzano and Jasper Sciuto for their service to the township. It was their last meeting and they received an award from Macomb Township for their service. Provenzano served 15 years on the commission and Sciuto served for 14 years.

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Site map approved for Hy-Vee grocery store

By Site plan

By Kevin Boneske
Editor-in-chief


ASHWAUBENON – A site map for an Iowa-based supermarket chain having a retail grocery store inside the old Shopko in Bay Park Square was approved on Tuesday, Jan. 4 by the village sitemap review committee.

Community Development Director Aaron Schuette said Hy-Vee will maintain the existing 125,000 square foot building footprint with some facade upgrades.

He said there would be two drive-thru points on the north side of the buildings, one for a “click and choose” location, where groceries ordered online can be picked up, and the other for the pharmacy.

Schuette said the west side of the building facing Oneida Street will have a patio at the south end for a bar and food court.

He said an additional condition of approval requires Hy-Vee and Simon Property Group, which operates the mall, to continue working on the details of the parking lot.

Schuette said Hy-Vee will need to submit a separate sign permit application for review and modification of the unit’s planned development, if necessary.

“The revision of the site plan does not take into account the signage,” he said. “Signage will be authorized separately and all approvals beyond, if necessary. “

John Brehm, director of site planning at Hy-Vee, said in December that the company plans to open the grocery store this fall.

“Typical opening hours are 6 am to midnight,” Brehm said. “We anticipate that the store will employ 100 full-time and 300 part-time employees. “

The village council previously approved a Class B beer / Class B alcohol permit for a bar / dining room / patio at this location.

The company also applied for a Class A beer / Class A alcohol license to allow the sale of wine and spirits in the grocery store for off-premises alcohol consumption.

Conceptual Plan for Site South of Naval Base Recommended for Approval | Local news

By Site plan

The development of the Gordon House site in the face of opposition

By Site development

A city committee voted against a rezoning request to allow the construction of a condominium on the former site of a historic house.

The plan called for the construction of a four-storey condo at 514 Wellington Crescent, on the site of the former Gordon House.

This structure was built in 1909 and demolished in November 2020. At the time, neighborhood residents and heritage groups opposed the demolition.

The new 24,000-square-foot structure that the developers plan to replace it with would include eight units and underground parking.

Planning, real estate and development staff have recommended approval of the zoning change, but the proposal faces opposition due to building height, tree removal and related issues. to parking and access to the driveway.

A Heritage Conservation District (HCD) application for the neighborhood is also pending. If approved, new requirements could be placed on the development to ensure that the character and appearance of the neighborhood is maintained.

A public hearing on the development before the downtown community committee brought together the property owner, area residents and heritage advocates.

The committee rejected the zoning change request as it stands. The motion will now be considered by council.

Bruce County EMS Headquarters Plan in Port Elgin Gets Site Plan Approval

By Site plan

Content of the article

Bruce County has approved a site plan for a new nine-bay Emergency Medical Services (EMS) headquarters to be constructed adjacent to the Bruce County Public Library building at the corner of Concession 10 and from MacKenzie Road. in Port Elgin.

Content of the article

Saugeen Shores Town Planning Supervisor Jay Pausner told councilor meeting via Zoom on January 10 that approval of the site plan is contingent on a minor exemption request from Bruce County which will be heard on January 17. the Zoning By-law of the Town of Saugeen Shores. The county wants to increase the width of the lane from 10 meters to 18.5 meters and build three lanes that would not be permitted without a minor exemption.

Com. Dave Myette said the proposed EMS building is a “beautiful looking” development that will add to the first responder center in the area and possibly foster relationships with the nearby Saugeen Shores Police Department.

Mayor Luke Charbonneau said that not only will the new facility be located in Saugeen Shores, but it will also become the headquarters of Bruce County EMS.

“It is a really positive development for the Town of Saugeen Shores to have our Bruce County EMS senior management now located in Saugeen Shores…” said Charbonneau, adding that in addition to the employment benefits, this also makes Saugeen Shores “a bit of a hub” for EMS services in the region.

Last year, as plans for the new EMS HQ were underway, Bruce County Council accepted a recommendation from its Paramedic Services Committee to extend the two-year lease for its current building in the Green Street in Port Elgin. According to EMS staff, the 33-year-old rodent-infected building is overcrowded and unable to handle the length of the new ambulances.

The Bruce County website states that the Bruce County Paramedic Service employs approximately 100 full-time and part-time paramedics and operates a fleet of 15 vehicles – 12 ambulances and three supervision units stationed in six communities in County of Bruce – Walkerton, Chesley, Kincardine, Port Elgin, Wiarton and Tobermory – who are deployed when and where needed.

This vacant site, owned by Bruce County, at the southwest corner of Concession 10 and MacKenzie Road. in Port Elgin, will house the proposed Bruce County EMS headquarters, valued at $ 4 million. [Town of Saugeen Shores]

Sitemap and Service Agreement for Cedar Crescent Village

By Site plan

Content of the article

Within three months, developers of the Village of Cedar Crescent development must apply for planning permission for phase one of its multi-million dollar project on land in the waterfront town of Port Elgin, otherwise the city ​​could terminate or suspend an agreement that has just been approved by the councilors and force the developer to resubmit the plans and drawings for approval.

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Councilors for the town of Saugeen Shores approved site works, servicing agreements and lease amendments, and viewed new renderings – the third iteration – of Cedar Crescent Village (CCV) during a virtual committee of the entire meeting on January 10.

The CCV plan is very different from what council approved in principle two years ago – it’s smaller, moved farther from the beach and doesn’t include a banquet hall, volleyball courts or staffed tourist office.

The phased development on the former mini-golf, train station and flea market grounds includes the Whitefish Grille with a rooftop terrace, pavilion, two-story market, restrooms and commercial tenants, including an ice cream shop.

Planning supervisor Jay Pausner noted that the developers had not yet approved the terms of the report which were presented to councilors as staff recommendations. He said CCV’s target opening is August 2023.

Architect Grant Diemert’s latest renderings – which aimed for “coastal architecture” – show buildings in sandy white with pre-finished panels and slatted wood siding and metal siding and roofs.

The design misses the mark for Coun. Cheryl who said the City needs to ensure the project supports the overall character of the design.

“This is a legacy project and I think we need to get this design right…” Grace said, explaining her opposition to site works and the maintenance agreement.

Grace said the proposed design is not in keeping with the coastal character and vision she believes most residents of Saugeen Shores want.

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“I believe we can have growth and development without sacrificing what makes Saugeen Shores a special and beloved destination, whether for tourists or for those who want to make our town their forever home,” said Grace.

Grace also expressed concern over references to “Carney Lane retail outlets” and a reference to the carnival atmosphere in an architectural brief submitted by the developer.

She said the brief indicates that the vision presented by the group of community representatives should ideally “express the freedom and hedonistic temptations of carnival, as well as the stability and organizational structure of seaside Georgian Revival architecture.”

“I believe the majority of residents don’t want a carnival beach-side atmosphere like the references in the report to the Santa Monica Pier and locations in Florida, Grand Bend or Sauble Beach,” said Grace, adding that she hoped the developers would “submit a different design that reflects what citizens have been asking for from the start.

Grace said her vision resembled the Cobble Beach Golf development north of Owen Sound with its features of cedar shingles, gabled windows and soft colors reminiscent of Nantucket.

Deputy Mayor Don Matheson called it a ‘great’ design that has been scaled down and will modernize Port Elgin’s main beach

Deputy Vice Mayor Mike Myatt said he lost sleep over the development and he urges homeowners who will lose their view of the lake. He added that it would take a long time to mend a divided community, but the development would clean up the “eye sore” of Port Elgin’s waterfront.

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“It was a heartbreaking decision…I think once this is built we will have quite a successful development on our beachfront…” Myatt said.

Mayor Luke Charbonneau recognized the difficulty of defining the aesthetics of a private project on the public domain, because to some extent it is a matter of taste and public consultation.

Charbonneau noted the evolution of the design since it was first presented in 2019, calling it “radically” different from the bricks of the first design to an intermediate design and now the third major iteration to try to integrate the vision.

“I’m happy with the design. I know this will satisfy some and not satisfy others, but I’m confident it’s being done for good reason and solid justification and I’m absolutely confident it will be a nice set up on the main beach that will provide in the end the amenities that I’ve been hearing for so long that people want to see at the main beach…” said Charbonneau.

Staff said the City is responsible for providing parking outside areas leased to CCV, work that will be done in 2022-23. As the site will be a destination of choice, the City wants quality landscaping.

Pausner said CCV will pay a $150,000 “taxation” or contribution to the city to help pay for some of the future landscaping, pedestrian connectivity and active transportation on adjacent city lands.

The councilors voted 6 to 2 in favor of the works and site servicing agreement.
With advice. Grace, counselor. Matt Carr voted against approval. He had not responded to a request for comment within the time limits.

Architects renderings show the latest conceptual design for the village of Cedar Crescent on the Port Elgin waterfront.  City councilors approved site works and the servicing plan on January 10 for private development on City-owned land. [Diermert Architect Inc.]
Architects renderings show the latest conceptual design for the village of Cedar Crescent on the Port Elgin waterfront. City councilors approved site works and the servicing plan on January 10 for private development on City-owned land. [Diermert Architect Inc.]

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Rivian site plan unveiled reveals unprecedented size for historic development near Rutledge | News

By Site plan

The long-awaited site plan for Rivian Automotive’s new multibillion-dollar electric car manufacturing plant in Stanton Springs North was released this week.

Rivian’s new site plan paints a startling picture of the unprecedented scale of the massive factory when fully constructed, spanning 2,000 acres in Morgan and Walton counties.

“We’ve never seen anything like it here,” said Shane Short, Walton County economic development director.

The expansive green pastures of former Verner family and Bowden family farmland in Rutledge will soon be covered with concrete, becoming the hub of industrial development heading into downtown Rutledge.

“A lot of Rivian’s buildings will be built on former Verner family farmland and Bowden family farmland,” Short said. “This will help preserve some of the green space and wetlands closer to I-20 and US Highway 278. The plant will be approximately three miles from the town of Rutledge.”

According to the recently released sitemap, approximately 13 million square feet of the Rivian plant will be built in Morgan County. The total project requires up to 20 million square feet of construction space.

Rivian’s new plant could be up to 20 times the size of Takeda’s pharmaceutical plant in Stanton Springs, which spans 1 million square feet. Even the Kia plant in West Point, Georgia is just 2.2 million square feet.

For a visual comparison, 20 million square feet of construction space represents 347 football fields. It would be three times the size of Disneyland and four times the size of Vatican City.

In addition to manufacturing warehouses and office buildings, roads, parking lots, access points and stormwater management areas will also be built in Morgan County for the project.

Rivian will invest up to $ 5 billion in the new plant, generate 7,500 jobs and produce 400,000 electric vehicles per year when fully operational. Site plan details were revealed after Morgan County Planning Director Chuck Jarrell filed two Regional Impact Development (DRI) statements with the Georgia Department of Community Affairs, as the demands the law to move the project forward.

Jarrell said the Joint Development Authority (JDA) expects to earn $ 100 million in local tax revenue each year through the development of Rivian, which will be split among Morgan, Walton, Newton and Jasper counties, as well as the town of Social Circle.

Jarrell also noted that the development of Rivian will affect 26 landowners who control 43 plots of land in Morgan and Walton counties. Short said each landowner involved voluntarily sold their land to the JDA and no prominent estates were used to acquire land for Rivian development.

The site plan also provides for major road works in and around the Rivian Automotive plant. Jarrell has indicated that a traffic survey will be conducted in the near future to determine all the details.

As of now, the site plan calls for the construction of a new exit off I-20 to Old Mill Road in Rutledge. Other improvements include widening US Highway 278 and connecting Old Mill Road to Highway 278.

Short believes the Rivian plant will provide significant benefits to residents of Morgan County and beyond, and become a force for environmental protection and stewardship.

“In all my years of economic development, this is the greenest company I have ever come across. Their mission is to reduce the carbon footprint of our world, ”said Short. “But we are very excited about the jobs this will bring to the region… Rivian will provide career opportunities and generational benefits to thousands of families.”

Short and members of the JDA held a community meeting at Social Circle Middle School on Tuesday, January 11 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss the new site map and other details of Rivian Automotive’s development. At the time of going to press, details of the meeting were not yet available.

Kitty Hawk Planning Board Reviews Setbacks, Lot Coverage, and Retail Sitemap – The Coastland Times

By Site plan

At its last meeting in 2021 on December 16, the Kitty Hawk Planning Council reconsidered a proposed zoning change, reduced the setback distance for some commercial lots, changed the definition of lot coverage, and considered a retail business development site map.

Due to the absence of members, an earlier recommendation vote on a proposal to allow multi-family dwellings with a maximum density of 14 housing units per acre as a special use in planned commercial developments (PCD) s ‘is a tie at 2-2. City council sent him back for another review and recommendation ahead of a public hearing scheduled for January 10.

According to Planning and Inspections Director Rob Testerman, PCDs are intended to provide developers with design flexibility and greater land use efficiency. Currently, multi-family dwellings are permitted with a maximum density of 10 dwellings per acre in Districts BC-1 and BC-2.

The requirement with the current demand for at least five contiguous acres with no less than 500 feet of total road frontage on US Highway 158 or NC Highway 12 limits the demand to three areas: Home Depot and part of the Beachwoods Resort development. , the new 7 -11 and Promenade Sports Nautiques.

Commenting in favor of the change, real estate agent Eddie Goodrich explained that there would be no changes to the lot coverage, height requirements or decrease in parking and that the overall intention is to achieve a similar development goal in a different way.

“It’s more like two times 15 is 30 versus three times 10 is 30,” Goodrich suggested. “Same number of people, just a different way of doing it,” adding that units per acre really doesn’t mean much, it just allows smaller units to be allowed in the same box.

During discussion of the request, Testerman stressed that the number of rooms and permitted occupants would be governed by the Department of Health.

At the end of the discussion, the vote of approval failed with only two for and three against.

The next item on the agenda was a request to reduce the setback for commercial lots adjacent to any dedicated open space or recreational area of ​​an adjacent residential development.

Testerman explained that examples of where the change would apply include the commercial lands up to the Sea Scape Golf Course and, since it is a recreation area, the Harbor Bay Playground.

In support of the request, Ralph D. Calfee stated that the number of eligible sites is rather limited and that in these areas the buffer zone of adjacent residential uses is actually larger than expected, creating an unnecessary restriction for these. development of commercial sites.

The motion to approve this request was carried with a 5-0 approval vote.

A change to the definition of land cover was also passed with unanimous support, which will exempt 500 square feet of pool area from land cover calculations.

Currently, lot coverage – a measure of developed land use – includes areas covered by buildings, parking lots, driveways, roads, sidewalks, decks, and any concrete areas. or asphalt.

Testerman explained that in most cases there is a gap of a few inches between the top of the pool water and the adjacent level of the pool deck, allowing the pools to serve as a catch basin for some of the rainwater. And, while the current code could be interpreted to allow it to decree that swimming pools are exempt, incorporating the wording into the city code removes any subjectivity and will ensure consistency going forward.

Testerman also said that for stormwater clearance purposes, the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality did not count pool areas in the lot coverage.

Returning to the last item on the night’s agenda, a review of the sitemap of a retail business development drew concerning comments from a few neighboring residents.

The proposed plans provide for the improvement of a vacant lot at 5201 North Croatan Highway between Ambrose Furniture and Outer Banks Furniture. A 7,500 square foot two-story commercial building with a maximum height of 28 feet, both within the permitted height and land coverage requirements, will have access to Byrd Street. There is currently no plan to connect Byrd Street to US 158 and terminals are available to prevent through traffic.

While there have been comments from local residents that the development will cause flooding to their properties, during discussions it was pointed out that the property to be developed does not flood them and in fact collects some of the land. excess water from higher up the street which flows into this property.

Michael W. Strader Jr., director of engineering at Quible and Associates at Kitty Hawk, said he was aware of the flooding issues associated with the development of the property. He went on to say that the property is a bowl, but that there would be no runoff to other properties and some of the landscaping and engineering on the property would actually exceed the standards. state stormwater retention requirements.

At the end of the discussion, it was highlighted that the proposed development plans meet all applicable guidelines and a motion to approve the site plan received a 5-0 vote.

Each of the items on the evening’s agenda will be considered by the municipal council, which is not bound by the votes of the town planning council.

READ MORE NEWS HERE.

Site plan of a caravan for the popular seaside resort of Anglesey should be refused

By Site plan

Plans to set up a caravan site on a working farm near a popular Anglesey seaside resort could be rejected by planners.

A request for a change in agricultural land use to accommodate 10 touring caravans in Bunwerth, Trearddur Bay near Holyhead is to be discussed by the Anglesey Council planning committee next week.

Officers recommend that the proposal be denied.

READ MORE: First images of holiday lodge complex under development next to Conwy pub

In a report to committee members, the proposal was presented by two local councilors for consideration.

Planning Officer Gwen Jones, in her report, states that the application site includes agricultural land within an Area of ​​Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).

She adds, “As the existing screens on the site are empty or low in height, the northeast of the site would be most visible in views of a short stretch of the highway.

As the proposal is for white tourists, the local planning authority’s assessment is that the views of the site tend to be intrusive, although not all tourists would be fully visible. It is possible that part of everyone be visible indicating the extent of the proposed development.



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“A landscaping plan was provided with the planning request. The landscaping plan would reinforce the existing screening and it is anticipated in the assessment that it will take 5-10 years to become significantly effective.

She concludes her report by stating: “The proposal is not considered to include high quality development and that it would also be detrimental to the character and appearance of the area which is part of the AONB”.

The Rome subdivision is OK for the sitemap

By Site plan

A site plan review of a 50-lot first phase of a large residential subdivision of approximately 69 lots off Merrick Road, via Charles Anken Boulevard, known as Delta Luxury Townhomes, LLC, was approved by the Rome Planning Council at its monthly meeting on Tuesday, on condition that the developer agrees to install street lighting in the development in the future.

Steven Buck, owner of Buck Construction of Whitesboro, appeared before the board after members said at the December meeting that the project engineer had not provided evidence, since the November discussions, plans to install sufficient street lighting in the proposed residential subdivision for public safety. .

“Unfortunately, it is not in our budget to install the lighting, but we are committed to putting arrangements in place to facilitate the addition of a lighting district and fixtures to the project,” said Buck.

Last month, the project engineer explained how the site plan now included driving lights on each lot and that it would be “built into” the deed and rental agreements that residents would be required to light. these fires “during the hours of darkness”.

Buck mentioned Tuesday how the costs of building materials continue to rise, making the installation of lighting out of his budget for the project. He said his engineer altered the site drawings to indicate the installation of the lighting district conduit. Buck said he plans to work with National Grid to see if the gas and electric company would allow development to join the company’s “trench” as they dig trenches, but if they don’t. not, “we will provide a trench in the right-of-way of a solid conduit.

Buck and National Grid “are coordinating an effort to have a complete pipeline system where electricity can be supplied at any time in the future,” he said.

The plans continue to include outdoor lighting for installation in the home’s garages, Buck added. He also said the conduit could be tied to his next project to be submitted to town planning council and included on the February agenda, for the addition of 44 single-family lots.

City planner Garret Wyckoff said it was on the recommendation of the city’s Department of Community and Economic Development that the planning council approves the site plan for Delta luxury townhouses given the current escalation. material prices and that city codes do not require street lighting. Wyckoff said it was in the city’s best interest for the project to go ahead as it provides additional housing as the city grapples with a “lack of housing supply.”

Planning council vice-chairman Joseph Calandra said he would like to see the project “go ahead”, but recommended that a motion be made to approve the site plan, provided Buck adds street lighting once it is able to sell the units and make a profit. Then he could use the profits to reinvest in development, including adding lighting, Calandra added.

“Right now he (Buck) has a cash flow problem, but once he’s up and running we can recommend that he install street light – it’s a financial burden for him right now,” said Calandra.

Installing street lighting in the development would cost an additional $ 195,000, city officials said.

President Mark Esposito then asked how the city planning council or city might make the recommendation enforceable in the future.

City Assistant Corporation attorney James S. Rizzo said it would “not be a legal problem” to recommend that lighting be added in the future, because “there is nothing wrong with what the developer comes back for a status report “.

It was later indicated that Buck could give a status update during the licensing process in conjunction with the Planning Council, the Department of Public Works and the city codes office.

A motion to approve the site plan on the condition that Buck add street lighting to the development in the future was passed unanimously.

Also on the program:

• The review of the environmental quality of the site and the review of the site plan for a WellNow 4,375 square foot emergency care facility to be located at 1790, boul. Black River. have been deposited.

Project engineer Kevin Bamann explained that emergency care would be located next to the mall’s new Starbucks cafe. He explained that Caliber Commercial Brokerage, LLC of Rochester is developing the facility, along with Starbucks. The cafe’s sitemap was approved by the board in September for Randy Soggs, owner of Mohawk Acres Plaza.

Bamann said he, on behalf of Caliber Brokerage, was due to appear before the city’s Zoning Appeal Board next month to ask him to “line up” the reverse side of the emergency care building with Starbucks due to the existing water pipe.

As for Caliber taking over the development of WellNow and Starbucks, Bamann said Soggs sold the property to Caliber because the trading firm “made a lot of it (Starbucks) to other cities” and had to experience working with the company.

“From what I understand, WellNow is very responsive and Starbucks not so much,” Bamann said of explaining the sale.

As the board was still awaiting the SEQR review, Esposito proposed that the SEQR and sitemap be tabled, which were approved unanimously.

• A negative statement on a SEQR examination and preliminary plaque examination, requested by Pat Busyczak for a minor subdivision of two lots across from 6327 Lamphear Road, was unanimously approved. It is planned that the owner Busyczak will build a house on the second lot and sell it.

Easdales faces decision delay on £100m ex-IBM Greenock site development

By Site development

A PLANNING decision on a proposed £100million transformation of the former IBM site in Greenock has been postponed after the procedures followed by council officials were branded ‘incompetent’.

Inverclyde Planning Council yesterday voted 5-4 to carry out a visit to the Spango Valley site and demand a further briefing from council building officials about the candidacy of bus magnate businessmen Sandy and James Easdale , as reported by the Greenock Telegraph.

The decision came after a proposal by Councilman Councilor Jim McEleny to lift a council officer’s cap on new homes on the 270 to 420 site was rejected by Chief Legal Officer Jim Kerr.

A bid by developers for permission in principle for 450 homes has been deemed excessive by planning bosses because it exceeds the current limit for the entire Spango Valley site by 30 – only part of which is owned by the Easdale brothers.

FORMER IBM SPANGO VALLEY SITE

Cllr McEleny was told his motion was ‘incompetent’ with the Local Development Plan (LDP) and would render the other part of the site unviable for development by its owners, who opposed the Easdales’ request.

Mr McEleny argued that capping the app at 270 homes would ‘kill it like a stone’, as Sandy Easdale has publicly said in the Telegraph last month that the site would remain “derelict” with such a reduction in the number of properties.

Councilor McEleny – who described the development proposal as ‘exciting’ – said: ‘The fact is that the process followed by council officers has been incompetent.

“They should have reviewed the application for 450 homes outside the LDP and recommended denial and proceeded to a public hearing.

“It should have been both options.”

Chief legal officer Mr Kerr said changing a planning condition from 270 to 420 homes would be a ‘significant departure’ from the LDP, adding: ‘I don’t think we can go back.

HeraldScotland: Councilor Jim McElenyCouncilor Jim McEleny

Councilor McEleny retorted: “‘I don’t think’ is not a sufficient legal ground.

“We should give this candidacy every chance of succeeding and not put an end to it.”

Mr Jamieson replied: ‘The economic viability of the site is not a material planning consideration.’

The Easdales – who worked with delivery partner Advance Construction – have filed masterplans for a major development of 450 new homes, business space, a pub/restaurant and a ‘park and ride’ facility in the former IBM Halt station.

In a statement released last month, the Easdales said: “We have worked positively with council officials since the bid was submitted and understood that the officials were supportive of our bid.

“Therefore, it was surprising to read in the local media that council officials were now recommending that there be a 40 per cent reduction in the number of houses – as that was something they had specifically told us not to wouldn’t happen.”

Councilor Innes Nelson offered a site visit and another briefing of the elected members by council officers.

HeraldScotland: Spango Valley and former IBM site, Greenock.Spango Valley and former IBM site, Greenock.

Cllr Jim Clocherty proposed approval of the application as recommended by officials for 270 homes.

He said: “The frustration for me is that there is no master plan for the whole site.

“I know it’s not the applicant’s fault, but if we go for all the houses on offer, the other part of the site wouldn’t be viable, and that’s not LDP compliant.”

Organizer David Wilson asked if members approved the proposal with the recommendation of 270 homes, if the developers could appeal.

Mr Jamieson said: ‘It is within the gift of every applicant to appeal any decision of the planning council and it would be the Scottish Ministers who would consider the application.’

Councilors David Wilson, John Crowther, Jim McEleny, Robert Moran and Innes Nelson voted for a site visit and additional briefing before deciding on the application.

Councilors Jim Clocherty, Gerry Dorrian, Drew McKenzie and Ciano Rebecchi voted to approve the application with the recommendation of 270 new homes.

Sterling acquires Petillo, a leading specialist site development company

By Site development

THE WOODS, Texas – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Sterling Construction Company, Inc. (NasdaqGS: STRL) (“Sterling” or “the Company”) entered into a share purchase agreement and completed the acquisition of Petillo Incorporated and its related operating entities ( collectively “Petillo”) on December 30, 2021. Petillo is a leading provider of specialty site development solutions in the Northeast and Central Atlantic. Founded in 1994 by owner and CEO Michael Petillo, Petillo has experienced 29% compound revenue growth from 2017 to 2021 through continued expansion of its geographic footprint, customer base and service offerings. Petillo’s revenue and operating income in 2021 is expected to be approximately $ 212 million and $ 29 million, respectively.

“We are delighted to welcome the Petillo team, their culture and their capabilities to our electronics infrastructure solutions industry,” said Joe Cutillo, CEO of Sterling. “Their entrepreneurial spirit of delivering customer-centric solutions, coupled with their geographic footprint, will allow us to serve our major leading e-commerce customers across the East Coast with even more offerings than ever before. . Petillo’s capabilities along with our current Plateau capabilities will not only create one of the largest specialty site development companies in the United States, but will also add broader capabilities and service offerings to both end markets.

The aggregate consideration of $ 195 million paid on the Closing Date (the “Base Purchase Price”) consisted of $ 175 million in cash and 759,447 common shares of Sterling valued at $ 20 million. In addition, under the purchase agreement, if they have met the specified annual operating income growth thresholds and certain other conditions, the sellers are entitled to top-up payments not to exceed $ 20 million over the course of the years. next five years. The Company also entered into a five-year employment contract with Michael Petillo, which provides for five equal annual retention payments totaling $ 15 million.

Effective December 29, 2021, Sterling entered into a third amendment to its credit agreement (the “Amendment”) which, among other provisions, increased the Company’s existing term loans through a new additional term loan of $ 140 million with the same maturity as the existing term. Loans to finance part of the acquisition of Petillo. The amendment was led by BMO Capital Markets Corp, as principal arranger and joint bookrunner, and by BMO Harris Bank NA, as administrative agent. The balance of the base purchase price, as well as the costs associated with the acquisition, were funded from Sterling’s cash balance.

Stifel served as exclusive financial advisor and Jones Walker LLP served as legal counsel to Sterling on this transaction.

Conference call

Sterling management will hold a conference call to discuss this transaction on Thursday, January 6e at 9:00 a.m. ET / 8:00 a.m. CT. Interested parties can participate in the call by dialing (201) 493-6744 or (877) 445-9755. Please call ten minutes before the start of the conference call and request the Sterling call. Following the opening remarks from management, there will be a question and answer session. In addition, a slide presentation that will accompany management’s comments will be posted in the Investor Relations section of the Company’s website, available at www.strlco.com, where a simultaneous webcast of the Company is available. The call will also be available. If you are unable to listen live, the webcast of the conference call will be archived on the Company’s website for thirty days.

About Sterling

Sterling Construction Company, Inc. operates through a variety of subsidiaries in three segments specializing in heavy civil engineering, specialty services and residential projects in the United States (the “United States”), primarily in the southern United States. United States, Rocky Mountain States, California and Hawaii. , as well as other areas with strategic construction opportunities. Heavy Civil includes infrastructure and rehabilitation projects for highways, roads, bridges, airports, ports, streetcars, water supply systems, sewage and stormwater drainage. Specialty service projects include site development activities, multi-family home foundations, parking structures and other commercial concrete projects. Residential projects include concrete foundations for single family homes. From strategy to operations, we are committed to sustainable development by acting responsibly to protect and improve the quality of life of society. Caring for our employees and communities, customers and investors is The Sterling Way.

Joe Cutillo, CEO, “We build and maintain the infrastructure that allows our economy to run, our people to move, and our country to grow. “

Important information for investors and shareholders

Caution regarding forward-looking statements

This press release contains statements that are considered to be forward-looking statements within the meaning of federal securities laws. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control, which may include statements regarding: our projections or expectations regarding synergies and other benefits of the transaction; our business strategy; our financial strategy; our industry outlook; and our plans, goals, expectations, forecasts, outlook and intentions. All of these types of statements, other than the statements of historical fact included in this press release, are forward-looking statements. In some cases, forward-looking statements may be identified by words such as “may”, “will”, “could”, “should”, “expect”, “plan”, “plan”, “have the intention “,” “believe”, “estimate”, “predict”, “potential”, “pursue”, “target”, “continue”, the negative of these or other comparable terms. press release are largely based on our expectations, which reflect estimates and assumptions made by our management. These estimates and assumptions reflect our best judgment based on currently known market conditions and other factors. In addition, the assumptions management regarding future events may prove to be inaccurate. Management cautions all readers that the forward-looking statements contained in this press release are not guarantees of future performance, and we cannot assure any reader that such statements will materialize or forward-looking events and circumstances will occur. Although we believe these estimates and assumptions are reasonable, they are inherently uncertain and involve a number of risks and uncertainties that are beyond our control, including the possibility that the expected benefits of the transaction may not be fully realized. or may take longer to materialize than expected, the possibility that the costs or difficulties of integrating the Petillo business are greater than expected and our ability to hire and retain Petillo employees. Actual results may differ materially from those anticipated or implied in forward-looking statements because of these factors as well as other factors included in the “Risk Factors” section in our documents filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission and elsewhere in these documents. Other factors or risks that we currently believe are immaterial, that are not currently known to us, or that arise in the future could also cause our actual results to differ materially from our expected results. In light of these uncertainties, investors are cautioned that many of the assumptions on which our forward-looking statements are based are subject to change after the date on which the forward-looking statements are made. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are posted, and we assume no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements for any reason, whether as a result of new information, future events or developments, changed circumstances or otherwise, notwithstanding any change in our assumptions, changes in business plans, actual experience or other changes. These cautionary statements qualify all forward-looking statements attributable to us or to persons acting on our behalf.

Sterling Construction Acquires Petillo, a Leading Specialty Site Development Company – Form 8-K

By Site development

Sterling acquires Petillo, an industry-leading specialty site development company

• One of the largest specialist site development companies in the North East

• Expansion of geographic footprint to cover blue chip e-commerce customers in all major East Coast markets

•Positions Sterling to be an industry leader in the development of specialized electronic infrastructure sites

• Strong cultural alignment

• The pro forma total leverage ratio increases slightly from 2.14 to 2.35 times, remaining comfortably within our target range and providing ample liquidity

• First day accretive

Conference call with accompanying slideshow, Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 9:00 a.m. ET

THE WOODLANDS, TX – January 5, 2022 – Sterling Construction Company, Inc. (NasdaqGS: STRL) (“Sterling” or “the Company”) has entered into a stock purchase agreement and completed the acquisition of Petillo Incorporated and its related operating entities (collectively “Petillo”), on December 30, 2021. Petillo is a leading provider of specialty site development solutions in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. Founded in 1994 by owner and CEO Michael Petillo, Petillo has experienced compound revenue growth of 29% from 2017 to 2021 through the continued expansion of its geographic footprint, customer base and service offerings. Petillo’s 2021 revenue and operating profit are expected to be approximately $212 million and $29 million, respectively.

“We are thrilled to welcome the Petillo team, culture and capabilities to our Electronic Infrastructure Solutions business,” said Joe Cutillo, Sterling’s President and CEO. “Their entrepreneurial spirit focused on delivering customer-centric solutions, coupled with their geographic footprint, will allow us to serve our key, blue-chip e-commerce customers across the East Coast with even more offerings than before. Petillo’s capabilities along with our current Plateau capabilities will not only create one of the largest specialty site development companies in the United States, but will also add broader capabilities and service offerings to both end markets.”

The aggregate consideration of $195 million paid on the closing date (the “Base Purchase Price”) consisted of $175 million in cash and 759,447 common shares of Sterling valued at $20 million. In addition, under the purchase agreement, upon satisfaction of meeting specified annual operating profit growth thresholds and certain other conditions, the sellers are entitled to additional payments not to exceed $20 million. over the next five years. The Company also entered into a five-year employment contract with Michael Petillo, which provides for five equal annual retention payments totaling $15 million.

Effective December 29, 2021, Sterling entered into a Third Amendment to the Credit Agreement (the “Amendment”) which, among other provisions, increased the Company’s existing term loans with a new loan $140 million in additional term loans with the same maturity as the existing term loans. to finance part of the acquisition of Petillo. The amendment was led by BMO Capital Markets Corp, as joint lead arranger and joint bookrunner, and BMO Harris Bank NA, as administrative agent. The balance of the base purchase price, as well as acquisition-related costs, was funded from Sterling’s cash balance.

Stifel acted as exclusive financial advisor and Jones Walker LLP acted as legal advisor to Sterling on this transaction.

Conference call

Sterling management will hold a conference call to discuss this transaction on Thursday, January 6 at 9:00 a.m. ET/8:00 a.m. CT. Interested parties can participate in the call by dialing (201) 493-6744 or (877) 445-9755. Please call ten minutes before the start of the conference call and request the Sterling call. Following the opening remarks from management, there will be a question and answer session. Additionally, a slide presentation that will accompany management’s comments has been posted to the Investor Relations section of the Company’s website, which can be viewed at www.strlco.com, where a simultaneous webcast of the call will also be available. If you are unable to listen live, the webcast of the conference call will be archived on the Company’s website for thirty days.

About Sterling

Sterling Construction Company, Inc. operates through a variety of subsidiaries in three segments specializing in heavy civil, specialty service and residential projects in the United States (the “United States”), primarily in the southern United States, the Rocky Mountain States, California and Hawaii. , as well as other areas with strategic construction opportunities. Heavy civil engineering includes infrastructure and rehabilitation projects for highways, roads, bridges, airports, ports, light rail, water, wastewater and storm drainage systems. Specialized service projects include electronic infrastructure site development activities, foundations for multi-family homes, parking structures and other commercial concrete projects. Residential projects include concrete foundations for single family homes. From strategy to operations, we are committed to sustainability by operating responsibly to preserve and improve society’s quality of life. Caring for our people and our communities, our customers and our investors – that’s The Sterling Way.

Joe Cutillo, CEO, “We build and maintain the infrastructure that allows our economy to function, our people to move, and our country to grow.”

Important information for investors and shareholders

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains statements that qualify as forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control, which may include statements regarding: our projections or expectations regarding the synergies and other benefits of the transaction; our business strategy; our financial strategy; our industry outlook; and our plans, objectives, expectations, forecasts, outlook and intentions. All of these types of statements, other than statements of historical facts included in this press release, are forward-looking statements. In some instances, forward-looking statements may be identified by words such as “may”, “will”, “could”, “should”, “expect”, “plan”, “project”, “has intention to”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “estimate”, “predict”, “potential”, “pursue”, “target”, “continue”, the negative of such

terms or other comparable terms. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are based largely on our expectations, which reflect estimates and assumptions made by our management. These estimates and assumptions reflect our best judgment based on currently known market conditions and other factors. In addition, management’s assumptions regarding future events may prove to be inaccurate. Management cautions all readers that the forward-looking statements contained in this press release are not guarantees of future performance, and we cannot assure any reader that such statements will materialize or that forward-looking events and circumstances will occur. Although we believe these estimates and assumptions to be reasonable, they are inherently uncertain and involve a number of risks and uncertainties beyond our control, including the possibility that the expected benefits of the transaction may not be fully realized. or may take longer to materialize than expected, the possibility that the costs or difficulties of integrating Petillo’s business may be greater than anticipated, and our ability to hire and retain Petillo’s employees. Actual results may differ materially from those anticipated or implied by the forward-looking statements due to these and other factors included in the “Risk Factors” section of our filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. States and elsewhere in these documents. Other factors or risks that we currently believe are not material, that are not presently known to us, or that occur in the future could also cause our actual results to differ materially from our expected results. Given these uncertainties, investors are cautioned that many of the assumptions on which our forward-looking statements are based are subject to change after the date on which the forward-looking statements are made. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements for any reason, whether as a result of new information, future events or developments, change in circumstances or otherwise, notwithstanding any change in our assumptions, changes in business plans, actual experience or other changes. These cautionary statements qualify all forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf.

Company Contact:

Sterling Construction Company, Inc.

Ron Ballschmiede, Chief Financial Officer

(281) 214-0777

Contact with Investor Relations:

Equity Group Inc.

Jeremy Hellman, CFA

(212) 836-9626

Sterling acquires Petillo, an industry-leading specialty site development company

By Site development

Conference call with accompanying slide presentation, Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 9:00 a.m. ET

THE WOODLANDS, Texas, January 05, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sterling Construction Company, Inc. (NasdaqGS:STRL) (“Sterling” or “the Company”) has entered into a stock purchase agreement and completed the acquisition of Petillo Incorporated and its related operating entities (collectively “Petillo”), on December 30, 2021. Petillo is a leading provider of specialty site development solutions in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. Founded in 1994 by owner and CEO Michael Petillo, Petillo has experienced compound revenue growth of 29% from 2017 to 2021 through the continued expansion of its geographic footprint, customer base and service offerings. Petillo’s 2021 revenue and operating profit are expected to be approximately $212 million and $29 million, respectively.

“We are thrilled to welcome the Petillo team, their culture and their capabilities to our Electronic Infrastructure Solutions business,” said Joe Cutillo, CEO of Sterling. “Their entrepreneurial spirit focused on delivering customer-centric solutions, coupled with their geographic footprint, will allow us to serve our key, blue-chip e-commerce customers across the East Coast with even more offerings than before. Petillo’s capabilities along with our current Plateau capabilities will not only create one of the largest specialty site development companies in the United States, but will also add broader capabilities and service offerings to both end markets.”

The aggregate consideration of $195 million paid on the closing date (the “Base Purchase Price”) consisted of $175 million in cash and 759,447 common shares of Sterling valued at $20 million. In addition, under the purchase agreement, upon satisfaction of meeting specified annual operating profit growth thresholds and certain other conditions, the sellers are entitled to additional payments not to exceed $20 million. over the next five years. The Company also entered into a five-year employment contract with Michael Petillo, which provides for five equal annual retention payments totaling $15 million.

Effective December 29, 2021, Sterling entered into a third amendment to its credit agreement (the “Amendment”) which, among other provisions, increased the Company’s existing term loans with a new additional term of $140 million with the same maturity as the existing term loan. Loans to finance part of the acquisition of Petillo. The amendment was led by BMO Capital Markets Corp, as joint lead arranger and joint bookrunner, and BMO Harris Bank NA, as administrative agent. The balance of the base purchase price, as well as acquisition-related costs, was funded from Sterling’s cash balance.

Stifel acted as exclusive financial advisor and Jones Walker LLP acted as legal advisor to Sterling on this transaction.

Conference call

Sterling management will hold a conference call to discuss this transaction on Thursday, January 6and at 9:00 a.m. ET/8:00 a.m. CT. Interested parties can participate in the call by dialing (201) 493-6744 or (877) 445-9755. Please call ten minutes before the start of the conference call and request the Sterling call. Following the opening remarks from management, there will be a question and answer session. In addition, a slide presentation that will accompany management’s comments will be posted in the Investor Relations section of the Company’s website, which can be viewed at www.strlco.com, where a simultaneous webcast of the call will also be available. If you are unable to listen live, the webcast of the conference call will be archived on the Company’s website for thirty days.

About Sterling

Sterling Construction Company, Inc. operates through a variety of subsidiaries in three segments specializing in heavy civil, specialty service and residential projects in the United States (the “United States”), primarily in the southern United States, the Rocky Mountain States, California and Hawaii. , as well as other areas with strategic construction opportunities. Heavy civil engineering includes infrastructure and rehabilitation projects for highways, roads, bridges, airports, ports, light rail, water, wastewater and storm drainage systems. Specialty service projects include site development activities, multi-family home foundations, parking structures and other commercial concrete projects. Residential projects include concrete foundations for single family homes. From strategy to operations, we are committed to sustainability by operating responsibly to preserve and improve society’s quality of life. Caring for our people and our communities, our customers and our investors – that’s The Sterling Way.

Joe Cutillo, CEO, “We build and maintain the infrastructure that allows our economy to function, our people to move, and our country to grow.”

Important information for investors and shareholders

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains statements that qualify as forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control, which may include statements regarding: our projections or expectations regarding the synergies and other benefits of the transaction; our business strategy; our financial strategy; our industry outlook; and our plans, objectives, expectations, forecasts, outlook and intentions. All of these types of statements, other than statements of historical facts included in this press release, are forward-looking statements. In some cases, forward-looking statements may be identified by words such as “may”, “will”, “could”, “should”, “expect”, “plan”, “project”, “has intention to”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “estimate”, “predict”, “potential”, “pursue”, “target”, “continue”, the negative of these terms or any other comparable terminology. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are based largely on our expectations, which reflect estimates and assumptions made by our management. These estimates and assumptions reflect our best judgment based on currently known market conditions and other factors. In addition, management’s assumptions regarding future events may prove to be inaccurate. Management cautions all readers that the forward-looking statements contained in this press release are not guarantees of future performance, and we cannot assure any reader that such statements will materialize or that forward-looking events and circumstances will occur. Although we believe these estimates and assumptions to be reasonable, they are inherently uncertain and involve a number of risks and uncertainties beyond our control, including the possibility that the expected benefits of the transaction may not be fully realized. or may take longer to materialize than expected, the possibility that the costs or difficulties of integrating Petillo’s business may be greater than anticipated, and our ability to hire and retain Petillo’s employees. Actual results may differ materially from those anticipated or implied by the forward-looking statements due to these and other factors included in the “Risk Factors” section of our filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. States and elsewhere in these documents. Other factors or risks that we currently believe are not material, that are not presently known to us, or that occur in the future could also cause our actual results to differ materially from our expected results. Given these uncertainties, investors are cautioned that many of the assumptions on which our forward-looking statements are based are subject to change after the date on which the forward-looking statements are made. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements for any reason, whether as a result of new information, future events or developments, change in circumstances or otherwise, notwithstanding any change in our assumptions, changes in business plans, actual experience or other changes. These cautionary statements qualify all forward-looking statements attributable to us or to persons acting on our behalf.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220105005969/en/

contacts

Company Contact:
Sterling Construction Company, Inc.
Ron Ballschmiede, Chief Financial Officer
(281) 214-0777

Contact with Investor Relations:
Equity Group Inc.
Jeremy Hellman, CFA
(212) 836-9626

Bryan City Council asks staff to explain site development review process before approving new subdivision rezoning – WTAW

By Site development
Image of the Town of Bryan showing the location of the land that was rezoned during the City Council meeting on December 14, 2021.

Bryan City Council’s approval to rezone the land on the northwest side of town is just the first step for developers looking to build 300 new homes.

At the December board meeting, City Manager Kean Register was among the staff who explained the developer’s role in the site’s development review process.

This is after neighboring homeowners expressed concerns about increased traffic and possible flooding.

Deputy Director of Planning and Development Services Martin Zimmerman said the Planning and Zoning Commission (P&Z) will be seeking public comments following the site review process.

Zimmerman says after the staff review, P&Z will hold another public hearing before considering final action.

Developers who want to build homes generally north of the intersection of Sandy Point and Hilton Road plan to build a retention pond and they would be responsible for extending the water and sewer lines.

Click HERE to read and download background information from the Bryan City Council meeting on December 14, 2021.

Click HERE to read and download the ordinance that has been adopted.

Click below for comments from Kean Register and Martin Zimmerman.


The Farmer’s Rest Hotel in Dundas awaits site plan approval

By Site plan
The 175-year-old Farmer’s Rest Hotel at 207 King St. W. awaits site plan approval in 2022 for renovations planned for more than 15 years — the last two years and four months by its current owner. based in Ancaster.
  • The rear of the 175-year-old Farmer's Rest Hotel at 207 King St. W. awaits site plan approval in 2022 for renovations planned for more than 15 years - the past two years and four month by her current Ancaster-based owner.

Owners of the long-vacant Farmer’s Rest Hotel at 207 King Street West hope the City of Hamilton will approve a nearly two-year-old site plan application this year that is still under review by the municipality.

The proposal for a commercial unit on the ground floor and a residential unit on each of the other two floors of the 175-year-old heritage building was submitted in March 2020. Six different owners attempted to renovate the building over the last 16 years.

Daniel Cheatley, a consultant to the property’s current owner, said the group was awaiting site plan approval.

“We expect the project to move forward in 2022,” Cheatley said. “We may provide more updates once our sitemap is approved.”

A numbered company, including directors Erwin Gerl and Zachary Agnew of Ancaster, bought 207 King in September 2019 for $950,000.

A conditional heritage permit was issued in November 2020 for: the repointing of all masonry; installation of wood panels under large commercial windows; and the installation of new downspouts for stormwater management.

The structure was built in 1847 by Jesse Cooper as the Farmer’s Rest Hotel. It operated as a hotel, known as Cain’s Hotel after it was purchased by Patrick Cain in 1893, until 1910 when the building served as a hospital and later as an apartment building. It was designated under the Ontario Heritage Act in 1981.

‘Cove’ Development on Green Street Narrows in Amended Site Plan Proposal

By Site plan

WORCESTER – Plans for a large mixed-use development on Green Street in the former club area of ​​Sir Morgan’s Cove have been significantly reduced, according to documents filed with the Planning Council.

Gold Block Real Estate LLC has filed an amended sitemap with the board of directors. The developer planned a 13-storey, 380,580 square foot mixed-use building with 318 residential units, nearly 30,000 square feet of retail or restaurant space, and a 152-space parking garage.

The project overlooks the polar park.

The amended proposal almost halves the original plan; it was reduced to seven floors, 173 residential units, 16,000 square feet of retail space and 99 garage parking spaces.

The developer points out in the amended site plan request that much of the original concept of the “Cove” development remains, including plans for a bowling alley and bicycle parking spaces, but that the revised plan diminishes it. development impact.

The application notes that the remaining buildings on the site, which includes 85, 89, 99 and 103 Green St.; 2, Plymouth Street; 5 and 7 Gold Street; and part of 62 Washington St., will be demolished within the next 60 days. This includes the former Sir Morgan’s Cove club at 89 Green St.

Exterior features

The project will essentially replace the Green Street block between Plymouth and Gold streets. The modified site plan covers outdoor amenities, including a rooftop gathering space and restaurant terraces on the ground floor.

Gold Block is managed by Harry DiLeo, Thomas Keane and Christopher Archambault. Keane and DiLeo also manage Churchill James.

Four of the properties which are part of the new plan presented to the planning board next week were part of a deal that allowed the city to offload properties it had taken across a prominent estate as part of the Polar Park construction project. The properties at 85 Green St., 2 Plymouth St., 5 Gold St. and 7 Gold St. were ultimately not needed as part of the stadium. The city, through the Worcester Redevelopment Authority, made a deal to sell the properties to Churchill James for $ 3 million – the amount the city paid.

The proceeds from the sale were allocated to an initial reserve fund to repay the bonds for the rough project.

Neighbor of the polar park

Due to its proximity to the baseball stadium, the new project, if approved and built, will be included in the District improvement funding area created to finance the construction of the baseball stadium. The gradual increase in tax revenues generated by private development in the district will be used to cover debt service on bonds sold to finance the construction of the 10,000-seat stadium.

The planning board approved Gold Block’s original site plan proposal in May; At that time, residents and business owners in the area said they were concerned about the size and scale of the 13-story development, saying it could lead to a “walling” effect between the neighborhood and the stadium.

The developers have requested that the planning board review the new site plan at their next available meeting.

Worcester Planning Board approves site plan for redevelopment of the former Boys Club in Lincoln Square

By Site plan

WORCESTER – The planning council on Wednesday evening approved a site plan for the redevelopment of the old Boys Club building in Lincoln Square.

The unanimous vote clears the way for WinnDevelopment Co. to begin work on the restoration of the downtown historic landmark and the construction of an innovative addition that will be placed on a “podium” above the Johnson Tunnel.

Michael V. O’Brien, former city manager and executive vice president of Winn, said the goal is to start construction by the end of 2022 or early 2023.

John J. Spillane, an attorney representing Winn at the site plan review hearing on Wednesday, said the proposed adaptive reuse of the building would result in 80 residential apartments for the city’s over-55s; 16 apartments will be built in the old Boys Club structure, while 64 apartments – a combination of studios and one and two bedroom units – will be built in the new structure, which will be built next to the old building. on an abandoned section of Rue Prescott. A two-story glass structure will connect the two buildings. The new addition is what makes the project financially viable, he said.

What Winn presented to the planning council on Wednesday was slightly smaller than those responsible for the concept of around 95 units announced earlier this year. But Spillane said the project will retain an affordability component; he said it will be 85% affordable for residents with incomes ranging from 30% of the region’s median income to 60% of the region’s median income. The remaining 15% of the units will be offered at market rates.

O’Brien said he was proud of the project’s partnership with Preservation Worcester, and said the grand old building will be renovated with a sensitivity to historic preservation. He said the public spaces in the old building would be available for community use, and he said Winn would improve and maintain the World War I memorial in front of the building.

WORCESTER - The planning council on Wednesday approved plans to redevelop the former Lincoln Square Boys' Club into senior apartments and to build a new addition on an abandoned section of Prescott Street.

Richard Whitehouse of VHB, an engineer on the project, said the podium construction for the new addition will be based primarily on concrete columns that will straddle the walls of the Johnson Tunnel. The original feature of the city center will remain a city street, but will be narrowed slightly due to protective barriers that will be needed to protect the columns, Whitehouse said.

Stephen S. Rolle, deputy city development director, said the city was delighted that the project was starting to move forward – he said it was an important building in an important location that connects several different areas. He said the addition makes smart use of space that would otherwise be wasted, and he said the new building “doesn’t try to pretend to be the old building – it stands out.”

There were some minor concerns about traffic and the location of sidewalks, but Planning Council members said they were happy to finally see affordable senior housing arrive downtown and see the old building come back to life.

Earlier this year, the company agreed to pay the city $ 100,000 for “air rights” on Prescott Street and the tunnel.

Winn purchased the over 90-year-old, 48,000-square-foot property from the city in 2019 for $ 300,000, and initially planned to lease the building to a school for highly functional autistic students.

Lumber business owners seek to remove seven lots from existing site plan

By Site plan

MOVED: Site improvement plans at the Tuckerton Lumber Co. location in Surf City include relocating storage media and divesting seven lots from its site plan. (Photo by Ryan Morrill)

Counsel for the new owners of Tuckerton Lumber Co. said his clients’ plans to divest seven lots from the current site plan and relocate storage shelves are the only land use changes planned at the site. of Surf City, located on both sides of Long Beach Boulevard. in the district.

Tom Coleman, a lawyer with Raymond, Coleman and Heinhold based in Moorestown, outlined the plans in a November 9 letter accompanying a request to the Surf City Land Use Board to change the current sitemap.

“The purpose of this modified preliminary and final site plan request is to remove Block 5, Lots 8, 10, 11 and 12, and Block 12, Lots 14 and 16, from the conditions of site plan approvals. granted in 1991 and 1993 ”, according to Coleman’s letter.

Those six lots, along with Block 12, Lot 23 will no longer be used by the Tuckerton Lumber Co., he said in the letter.

The company will operate from block 12, lots 18, 20 and 22 and block 19, according to the application filed by Coleman.

In the summary of the request, Coleman stated that the amended site plan request was a requirement of the temporary occupancy certificate issued in conjunction with his client’s acquisition of the property from Tuckerton Lumber Co. and a letter of June from Kevin Quinlan, counsel for the council, indicating that the document was necessary to remove the lots which are no longer part of the use of the company.

When an application is submitted, the land use board clerk reviews it to ensure administrative compliance before forwarding it to the engineer and council attorney for review. During his examination of the file, Frank Little, borough engineer, judged it “technically incomplete”.

In a Dec. 8 letter to Quinlan and Board Secretary Christine Hannemann, Little noted that the lots removed from the sitemap “support commercial use by providing employees with parking, equipment storage and office space and no information was provided to the board as to the intentions for the use or future development of the plots listed above and no details were provided to support the continued use of the business. “

Little has requested, at a minimum, the applicant to amend the plans and the application to identify all prior approved uses on the site map, as outlined in previous resolutions and approved site plans, according to his letter.

Coleman could not be reached for further comment at press time.

The lots proposed for divestiture are part of two earlier approvals by previous land use boards, one from 1991 and the other from January 1993, according to a June letter from Quinlan to Coleman.

In his letter, Quinlan noted that the conditions for the approval of the 1991 site plan were specifically incorporated in the January 1993 resolution granting a special-reason exemption for Lot 14, Block 12, referring to ” a substantial portion of the lot in question has been used in conjunction with the Applicant’s lumber business for over 40 years.

Tuckerton Lumber Co. was sold to new owners after an amended list attracted buyers who would keep the historic business open. Investment group TLC Land Holding LLC and new store operators Tom Dwier and Keli Lynch took ownership in July.

The Surf City building and grounds at 200 Long Beach Blvd. and the Railroad Avenue company in Tuckerton that predated it since 1932 were both included in the multi-million dollar purchase. They will both be kept in business, “as usual,” with a view of possible additions “to the next level” and “no plans for anything residential,” the new owners said at the time of the sale. .

– Gina G. Scala

[email protected]

Jersey City Planning Council Approves Site Plan for Edge Works at SciTech Scity

By Site plan

Design drawings and site plan for Edge Works, an eight-story business incubation center that will serve as the centerpiece for SciTech Scite, have been approved by the Jersey City Planning Council.

The planning board also approved the subdivision of the land into plots for two other key components of SciTech Scity: Liberty Science Center High School and Fellows’ Village.

SciTech Scity, the 30-acre “City of Tomorrow” under development by Freedom Science Center, is expected to have a huge impact on Jersey City and the state when it opens in late 2023 or early 2024. Edge Works will play a big part in this.

Edge Works will include the Co-Creation Center, a state-of-the-art 40,000 square foot conference center and cutting-edge technology exhibition gallery, and the Works, 60,000 square feet of research and development labs, workspaces and coworking offices for startups and entrepreneurs, as well as skunkworks suites, product showcases, consumer testing laboratories and offices for certain companies established in sectors of particular importance to the collective future of the planet.

The components of SciTech Scity

It’s easy – and awesome – to list the parts of SciTech Scity (see the full story here):

  • On-board work: An eight-story, 100,000-square-foot business incubation center that includes a conference center and research and development space for startups and established businesses;
  • Liberty Science Center High School: It aims to be the best STEM high school in the country;
  • Village of scholars: Residential housing for innovators, scientists, entrepreneurs, STEM graduate students and anyone interested in being part of the SciTech Scity community;
  • Public municipalities: 4 acres of outdoor activations that encourage exploration, creativity, collaboration and innovation.

Liberty Science Center CEO Paul Hoffman said Edge Works would have a big impact.

“Edge Works will be a business optimizer, a new generation of innovation centers that maximizes business success and social impact,” he said. “Our goal is to bring together experts from multiple disciplines and harness science and technology to solve social problems and turn cutting-edge ideas into a reality that makes the world radically better. “

At the heart of the community, Edge Works will be interconnected with each of the elements of SciTech Scity: Liberty Science Center High School, Scholars Village and a Public Commons.

The planning board approval is the third recent major development for SciTech Scity.

On October 22, Governor Phil Murphy led a breakthrough at the site. It was also reported that Israel Sheba Medical Center, the largest hospital system in the Middle East and one of the top 10 hospitals in the world, will be Edge Works’ premier innovation partner and global tenant.

Subsequent phases of SciTech Scity may include expanded incubation spaces, wet labs, additional schools, a large university satellite campus, or other facilities to spur STEM innovation and job creation.

Traders in Bolton market are worried about the development plan of the “site”

By Site development

TRADERS continued to voice concerns about the possible disruption Bolton Council’s plans for market redevelopment could cause.

This comes after the authority released further details last week on plans to move a five-meter access road closer to the market and relocate waste units, which officials say will benefit the market. traders.

Bolton’s advice is hoping this will be a key aspect of a multi-million pound master plan to remake the area, but some traders have expressed skepticism about the long-term gains and disruption this work is likely to have. on their businesses.

Martin Farrimond, of Deli Boys, said: “This is going to have a significant effect on business as the area will become a construction site.

“The council must compensate the stand holders for the reduced business.”

He added: “The Bolton Market is of great value to the city, but the council doesn’t seem to understand that being a trader is a tough life.

“The proposed development also has value, but not at the expense of traders who throw in the towel, you can’t sell a product if you don’t get traffic.

“The Bolton Council is cutting back attendance in pursuit of their dreams.

“They have to take care of the market traders and compensate during this period of development.

“If they don’t, in the next few years there won’t be a Bolton Market, another broken piece of history.”

Mr Farrimond also added that the threat of parking fines could deter customers from visiting the market.

He said, “Why would customers pay parking fees when they can shop in large supermarkets and stores for free?

“This, combined with the pandemic, makes life very difficult for traders. ”

But the council said the plans will ultimately improve the trade.

A spokesperson said: “We are working to minimize the impact on the parking lot and for customers in the market.

“We will create a new public space that can be used for additional parking or for events and will also facilitate pedestrian access to markets, thus increasing footfall and commerce. ”

Site plan agreement for manufacturing plant in Palmerston conditionally approved

By Site plan

MINTO – A site plan agreement for a new manufacturing facility in the Palmerston Industrial Park was conditionally approved by city council on December 7.

In May, the board approved the purchase by the Hammond Manufacturing Company of Guelph of a 13-acre property at 215 Minto Road for $ 520,000.

In 2016, the property went through a provincial certification process and was considered a certified industrial site.

The company, which manufactures electrical and electronic enclosures and components for the North American and global markets, has announced development plans in stages, with a first-phase investment of between $ 15 million and $ 20 million.

Phase two would involve the construction of a second factory to be built on site to produce metal stampings.

“So this one is pretty exciting,” said Ashley Sawyer, Minto planning technician.

The site plan agreement is for the first phase, which measures approximately 100,000 square feet.

“It’s a one-story manufacturing plant with offices as well. Initially it will employ 25-30 people and there are plans to grow and hire more in the next phase, ”Sawyer told the board.

“The second phase is also proposed on the drawings and this site plan would be presented again for review at a later date. “

Sawyer said county planning staff, city staff and Triton Engineering have all reviewed the plan, “and we are now happy to recommend approval of the site plan deal.”

“We’re just waiting for the review of the County (Department) Road Traffic Impact Statement we received and just waiting for their comments,” Sawyer said.

“The owners will have one year from the date of occupancy of the building to complete all the work required in the site plan agreement, with the exception of the asphalt work, which will be required within the following two years. the paving of this part of Minto. Road, but at the end of the day we recommend approval, ”she said.

Council passed a motion to receive the planning technician’s report and conditionally approve the site plan agreement.

“It’s just great to see this happening,” said Mayor George Bridge.

Marina Village Site Plan Gains Suisun Planning Commission Approval

By Site plan

SUISUN CITY — The Planning Commission approved the site plan and architectural review application in a 4-0 vote Tuesday to build 160 apartments on the southeast corner of Marina Boulevard and Buena Vista Avenue.

There are two vacancies on the committee.

The Marina Village Apartments project is described as a 100% affordable housing development.

It will provide affordable rental housing reserved for households earning between 30 and 70% of the territory’s median income.

The development will consist of nine three-storey garden-style residential buildings, a community building and a laundry building.

The majority of public commentators were concerned about how the development would affect traffic in this area. Many motorists take Buena Vista Avenue to Marina Boulevard to access Highway 12.

During commute and school hours, traffic may be slow on Buena Vista and Railroad Avenue.

The main access to the site will be located next to the management office, along the western edge of the site, connected to Marina Boulevard by a right-hand driveway only.

Secondary access to the site will be located at the northeast corner of the development, connected to Buena Vista Avenue by a new driveway. An eastbound right-turn pocket is included at the proposed Buena Vista Avenue entrance.

“Marina Boulevard already has a lot of traffic,” said George Guynn. “It will get more serious with 160 units and maybe three to four cars per unit.”

He suggested the city focus more on commercial development than housing.

Marina Village is the first project to be reviewed under the city’s new Good Neighbor Policy, designed to ensure that reasonably calculated procedures are in place to ensure that the premises are kept quiet, safe and clean and surroundings.

“This project is only good for developers,” said Steve Olry. “I’d rather live next to a juvenile detention center (than this project).”

A traffic study found that the average vehicle delay on Marina Boulevard at Buena Vista Avenue is expected to exceed conditions by 5 seconds or more.

It offered two upgrade options:

• Maintain stop control in all directions and add a northbound right-turn pocket.
• Build a traffic light.

Donna LeBlanc was concerned that there were only three designated waste areas. This was the number recommended by the Services of the Republic.

Marina Village is a Solano affordable housing project that will be paid for with federal and state money, said Don Harris of Solano Affordable Housing.

“This is not a Section 8 project,” Harris said. “The income limits are checked annually.”

Learn more about the project at www.solanohousing.org.

Limerick students enjoy the learning-by-doing experience when developing the Opera site

By Site development

Students at UNIVERSITY of Limerick had the opportunity to gain real-time experience on one of Ireland’s most exciting construction projects.

UL civil engineering students took on the role of engineering consultants at Limerick’s Twenty Thirty Opera Square.

The 35 students based their integrated design project on development as part of their third year course.

The students had to complete the civil and structural design of the “One Opera Square” building at the Opera project site, a six-story office building above the basement on Michael Street.

Some of the tasks that needed to be performed included professional practice elements such as structural analysis, risk and health and safety assessments, surveying including geotechnical soil profiles, field testing and in the soil laboratory and the development of a mobility management plan for the Opera project. .

Course leader for the project, Declan Phillips, said: “UL’s Civil Engineering program uses an exclusively ‘learning by doing’ approach to prepare the next generation of engineers. This partnership with Limerick Twenty Thirty is a prime example.

Mr Phillips added: “Opera Square is one of the most anticipated and exciting projects underway in Ireland and it has been a huge advantage to be able to get our students to base their IDP on it. We have received great support from the Limerick Twenty Thirty team, Cogent Associates project managers and SISK entrepreneurs, and the experience students gain will be invaluable to them, especially as they prepare for their co-op internship.

If a civil engineering student had to choose a project they would like to work on, Opera would measure up because of its scale, complexity, and ambition. It was a great experience for them.

David Conway, CEO of Limerick Twenty Thirty, said: “We were delighted to help UL with this project. Opera Square has everything and more that civil engineering students would want to explore.

“These students will be the civil engineers of tomorrow and it is essential that the sector has the flow of graduates to support the activity, so it is important for us in this regard also to be able to support initiatives like this. UL’s civil engineering program has an excellent reputation and being one of our local universities, this is something we are delighted to have collaborated on.

After a presentation to the speakers and representatives of Limerick Twenty Thirty, awards were given for the best team design presentation, best site assessment, best geotechnical design and best structural design.

Marina Village site plan obtains approval from Suisun Planning Commission

By Site plan

SUISUN CITY – The Planning Commission on Tuesday approved the site plan and the architectural review request by a 4-0 vote for the construction of 160 apartments at the southeast corner of Marina Boulevard and Buena Vista Avenue.

There are two positions to be filled within the commission.

The Marina Village Apartments project is described as a 100% affordable housing development.

It will provide affordable rental housing reserved for households earning 30 to 70% of the region’s median income.

The development will include nine three-storey garden-style residential buildings, a community building and a laundry room.

The majority of public commentators were concerned about how the development would affect traffic in this area. Many motorists take Buena Vista Avenue to Marina Boulevard to access Highway 12.

During commuting and school hours, traffic may flow onto Buena Vista and Railroad Avenue.

The main access to the site will be located next to the management office, along the western edge of the site, linked to Boulevard Marina by an alley on the right only.

Secondary access to the site will be located at the northeast corner of the development, connecting to Buena Vista Avenue through a new driveway. An eastbound right-hand turn pocket is included in the proposed driveway on Buena Vista Avenue.

“Marina Boulevard already has a lot of traffic,” said George Guynn. “It will get more severe with 160 units and maybe three to four cars per unit.”

He suggested the city focus more on business development than housing.

Marina Village is the first project to be considered under the city’s new Good Neighbor Policy, designed to ensure that procedures in place are reasonably calculated to ensure that the premises remain calm, safe and clean. and the surrounding area.

“This project is only good for developers,” said Steve Olry. “I’d rather live next to a juvenile detention center (than this project). “

A traffic study found that the average vehicle delay on Marina Boulevard at Buena Vista Avenue is expected to exceed conditions by 5 seconds or more.

It offered two options for improvement:

• Maintain control of stops in all directions and add a pocket of northbound right turns.
• Build a traffic light.

Donna LeBlanc was concerned that there were only three designated waste areas. This was the number recommended by the services of the Republic.

Marina Village is a Solano affordable housing project that will be funded by federal and state funds, said Don Harris of Solano Affordable Housing.

“This is not a Section 8 project,” said Harris. “The income limits are checked every year. “

Learn more about the project on www.solanohousing.org.

Hartford Commission Approves Taphouse Site Plan | Business

By Site plan

HARTFORD – The Planning Commission on Monday approved the site plan for the Rubi Falls Taphouse.

HARTFORD – The Common Council last week approved a developer agreement with YUMI Enterprises, paving the way for a faucet in the basement of the Millstream building.

The commission unanimously approved the site plan, which provided for the space of the outdoor patio which will be part of the tap room. The Rubi Falls Taphouse is located in the basement of the Millstream Building at 120 N. Main St.

City planner Justin Drew told the commission it’s about 800 square feet of space, where the business will have seating, umbrellas, and a bar with riverside seating.

“Because this affects the overall appearance of the building, it must be submitted to the Planning Commission,” said Drew.

“The staff think this looks very appropriate and will be very inviting,” he said.

The outdoor area of ​​the beer garden will be used for live music on weekends, depending on the sitemap application, as well as seating in general. The site plan also included a fence along the east side of the outdoor rest area and a raised planter to the east of the fence, near the river.

According to the commission’s discussions, the name Rubi Falls comes from the Rubicon River, in reference to the river and the falls adjacent to the new venture. A company representative at the meeting said that name is the one they are currently working with, but it is not yet officially finalized.

Rubi Falls Taphouse had a conditional use permit approved by the Planning Commission in November. Late last month, the joint council also approved a developer agreement for the property, under which the developer can receive up to $ 126,109 over five years from the city to help with the project.

Funding will come from the company’s own taxes, which the city will reimburse. The arrangement is feasible because the Millstream Building, where the business will be built, is in a supplementary tax financial district.

In a TID, the new tax increase created from a new development or redevelopment is fed back into the district in various ways, rather than being collected by tax jurisdictions.

With those items already approved, the site plan was the last step required for the faucet to continue development, according to Drew.

The Modern Austin Receives Funding and Site Development Permit in Same Week

By Site development

AUSTIN, Texas, December 16, 2021–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Last week marked two major milestones for Austin-based Urbanspace Real Estate + Interiors’ 56-story condo tower, The Modern Austin Residences, located at 610 Davis St, Austin, TX . The Modern has closed construction financing and has a site development permit in hand, the final two steps required to proceed with this development.

This press release is multimedia. View the full press release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211214006119/en/

The Modern Austin Residences, a 56-story tower has closed its financing with Peregren Capital Group (Graphic: Binyan)

Kevin Burns, founder of local real estate and design firm Urbanspace, will develop the project with more than $300 million in funding from Peregren Capital Group. Although this deal marks Peregren’s first construction financing in Austin, co-founder and managing partner Tucker Hughes financed several condo deals in Austin before launching Peregren with co-founder Tripp Taylor. Two of these high-profile projects include The Seaholm Residences and The Independent, which were each sold by Urbanspace as their exclusive sales and marketing team. Hughes commented, “Kevin and the Urbanspace team know the Austin condo market better than anyone, and after working with them on Seaholm and The Independent, I was thrilled to have the opportunity to associate with them more prominently on The Modern.The design, lifestyle, location and views coupled with the experienced team Urbanspace has assembled make this a dream build for every future resident who will call home modern.”

Sales of the tower will begin in late Q1 2022. Consisting of floor plans ranging from 1 to 4 bedrooms, with prices ranging from $400 to $5M+, The Modern Austin has already surpassed 2,000 inquiries for its 346-fare market since the project was announced to market earlier this year. Kevin Burns remarked, “Although Austin’s development process was long, our team had the synergy and experience to keep this project on pace while taking our past experiences and creating a building that, we know, will be best in class. We are creating a new standard for condo living in Austin and with the owner always in mind. As a condo dweller myself for 20 years, I wanted to ensuring the team pays attention to every detail, and I’m privileged to work with such great partners. Urbanspace has worked with thousands of condo owners over the past two decades, and they know it’s our passion, which sparked interest as well as the Austin market in general.The Modern’s other partners and consultants include: Nelsen Partners – Design Architect, Page – Architect of Record and Flintco – General Contractor.

The Modern’s grand opening will take place immediately after SXSW, allowing Container Bar and Bungalow, which currently occupy the venues, to operate until mid-March. Bridget Dunlap, owner of Container Bar, will open a new concept in the basement of Modern. Urbanspace will open its third hospitality concept, yet to be named, but similar to its first, Codependent Cocktails + Coffee, on the ground floor. Their second hospitality concept, Bacalar, which will open in the first quarter of 2023, will be located down the street on the ground floor of 44 East Ave, another project for which Urbanspace Real Estate handled sales and development. marketing.

As part of the agreement between The Modern Austin Residences and the City of Austin, the project will contribute more than $1 million to the city’s Affordable Housing Fund, provide 21 affordable housing units on-site, and contribute more than $500,000 $ to the Trail Foundation.

For more information on Modern Austin Residences, please visit ModernAustinResidences.com

Images of modern Austin residences are available HERE. (Rendering image credit to Binyan)

About Urbanspace

Urbanspace Real Estate + Interiors was created out of Kevin Burns’ passion for living the urban Austin lifestyle. Born from an entrepreneurial vision to develop an on-the-ground real estate company that could uniquely provide turnkey solutions to the needs of downtown and urban core residents, Urbanspace paved the way for downtown development. as the first real estate in the urban core. service provider since 2000. Urbanspace has grown into a turnkey living solution, offering residential and commercial real estate brokerage services, condo project marketing, development, interior design, furniture showroom with over 100 lines, premium moving services and hospitality concepts. Leveraging the breadth of local knowledge, years of experience, a keen sense of international design and a shared desire to live the urban lifestyle, Urbanspace has been driving the growth of real estate and design of Austin’s urban core for more than two decades. For more information about Urbanspace Real Estate + Interiors, visit urbanspacelifestyle.com.

About Peregren

Peregren Capital Group is an institution-backed mortgage investment firm that invests across the United States, focusing on the Western, Central and Southern regions. Peregren was formed in early 2020 by Tucker Hughes and Tripp Taylor, both formerly of Bank OZK and Axos Bank, with a focus on various home equity investments including whole loans, mezzanine loans and preferred stock investments . The firm typically focuses on complex, large-scale loan opportunities of at least $100 million, with a preference for much larger positions. Peregren invests or lends on all types of property, including apartments, condos, SFRs, offices, retail, industrial, hotels and land developments. The founders bring two decades of construction and bridging lending experience to the business, with particular expertise in complex development and repositioning operations. Peregren’s managing partner, Tucker Hughes, was previously Country Head of Commercial Real Estate at Axos Bank and prior to that was Managing Director and Head of CRE Lending for Western and Central Regions at Bank OZK ( formerly Bank of the Ozarks). Peregren has offices in Dallas, TX and Los Angeles, CA. Additional information about Peregren can be found at peregren.com.

About Page

With roots dating back to 1898, Page provides architectural, interiors, planning, consulting and engineering services in the United States and around the world. The company’s diverse international portfolio encompasses the healthcare, education, government, and science and technology sectors, as well as municipal, corporate and urban housing projects. Page has more than 650 employees in offices in Austin, Dallas, Denver, Dubai, Houston, Mexico City, Phoenix, San Francisco and Washington, DC Learn more about the company at pagethink.com.

About Flintco

Flintco was founded in 1908 and has seven full-service offices in Austin, Denver, Houston, Memphis, Oklahoma City, Springdale, AR and Tulsa. We offer pre-construction, construction management, design-build, project and program management with self-execution capability, including concrete, miscellaneous steel, and foundation excavations. Flintco applies Lean principles and practices to improve historically low labor productivity rates in construction. Adopting a corporate initiative called Flintco 4 LIFE – Live Incident Free Everyday – informs our approach to safety and our culture. For more information about Flintco, please visit www.flintco.com

About Nelsen Partners

For more than 30 years, the leaders of Nelsen Partners have worked together on projects in the United States and around the world, providing architectural, interiors, planning and urban design services for projects ranging from developments mixed-use and planned urban centers, retail. developments, office buildings, residential towers, hotels, performance halls and restaurants.

With over 50 million square feet of design and construction work completed worldwide, Nelsen Partners’ breadth of experience and passion for design enables us to continue creating sustainable architecture and legacy developments. for our customers.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211214006119/en/

contacts

Media Contact: Lara Burns Boyda
[email protected]

A Houston-based developer had its site plan approved for a 239-unit condominium project at last week’s planning and zoning commission meeting.

By Site plan

Function illustration: Artist’s rendering of the condo project proposed by Johnson Design Group.

Posted: 12-142021

by Art Benavidez

Fredericksburg (Gillespie County) –A Houston-based development company had its site plan approved for a 239-unit condominium project at last week’s planning and zoning commission meeting.

The 13.74-acre property is an undeveloped parcel located at 802 and 812 Friendship Lane in the northwest part of town.

Jonathan Boursey with Urban planner United States intends to develop Fredericksburg Botanical in two phases.

Artist’s rendering of the interior of a condo unit.

VEI Consulting Engineersof Fredericksburg, published a site map that shows:

  • A mix of 171 one-bedroom units and 68 two-bedroom units/two-car garages ranging in size from 900 to 1,100 square feet.
  • dog park
  • Playground
  • Amenity Center
  • Two retention basins
  • A kitchen pavilion at the intersection of two interior streets
  • 61.5% Waterproof Coverage

The planned garage and surface parking total 392 spaces on the site plan. Access to the development would be from Friendship Lane and Sunrise Street.

All interior streets must be 26 feet wide.

Based in Houston Johnson Design Groupis on board the project.

The recommendation will now await city approval at an upcoming city council meeting.

VBX Project ID: 2021-8764


[email protected]

Hamburg Housing PUD receives final site plan approval

By Site plan

December 10, 2021

By Mike Kruzman / [email protected]

Officials from the Canton of Hamburg have approved a new residential development.

The board of directors reviewed the final site plan for the development of the planned mixed unit of Murie Glen, as part of its meeting on Tuesday afternoon. The site is located on approximately 49 acres between the Mystic Ridge Subdivision to the west and Merill Road to the east. Access points would include Thompson Road, an existing upgraded private road and a proposed connection to an existing stretch of Shadbrush Trail, according to a note in the council meeting file.

Fifty-one single-family homes will populate the development, using the Open Space and Senior Housing Regulations, or ECHO. ECHO units will be reserved for residents aged 55 and over. Planning and Zoning Director Chris Madigan told the board that the parallel plan showed they could get closer to the number of units they wanted, but ultimately needed the PUD designation to build. the last. The parallel plan suggested that 47 units could fit. Madigan said that before and before his arrival, city council approved the additional 4 units because they felt the project met the exemplary qualifications needed to achieve the bonus density.

The project was submitted to the Board of Directors with a recommendation for approval, subject to 8 conditions. Madigan said these conditions are quite common, being related to things like trees and trails. Trustee Patricia Hughes had concerns about the private road easement and wanted to see a maintenance agreement, which Madigan said was currently with the township lawyer.

The board approved the final site plan 6-1, with Hughes voting against. Staff will now work with their attorney to deliver the final development agreement to the board for final approval.

Untapped Potential in Air Taxi Landing Site Development

By Site development

Prior to Uber Air’s announcement that Melbourne had been chosen as the third official pilot city for its “flying taxi” fleet, Skyportz had argued that Australia was a global leader in the emerging clean, green and sustainable air taxi industry. electrical.

McKinsey predicts the industry will be worth more than $1 trillion by 2040 and the race to gain commercial type certification for these new planes is well underway.

Some of the biggest aviation companies in the world have flying prototypes, including Boeing, Bell, Airbus and Embraer.

Automakers such as Hyundai, Toyota and Rolls Royce are also in the running as well as new aviation disruptors such as Joby, Lilium, Volocopter, Archer and Electra Aero.

The investment in the leading aircraft amounts to almost $10 billion and there is no doubt that some of the more than 300 start-ups will be certified over the next few years.

However, the missing piece of the puzzle is where these planes will land.

To realize their potential, we need these planes to land in places where helicopters can’t – think of business parks, manufacturing centers, industrial lands, shopping malls, parking lots and possibly the rooftops of cities.

Skyportz has quietly amassed a stable of over 400 locations across Australia in partnership with various industrial and commercial property players such as Secure Parking.

These sites are ready to be activated as soon as land use planning rules allow it.

In a major boost for the booming industry in Australia, the Federal Government and the Victorian Government signed a Memorandum of Understanding this week to foster the long-term growth of the advanced air mobility industry for passengers and freight.

DDRB approves sitemap for One Riverside – The Resident Community News Group, Inc.

By Site plan

The Jacksonville Downtown Development Review Board has approved the site plan for the One Riverside development. The 18.84-acre mixed-use development will be on the former Times-Union Building site.

Fuqua Development’s plans include a grocery store, retail stores, a restaurant accessible from the Riverwalk, 271 initial residential units, and a parking garage. He also diverts and lights McCoy’s Creek and builds a public park between the creek and the CSX railroad. The width of the stream will also decrease from 40 feet to 80 feet.

The estimated cost of the project is approximately $ 182.2 million.

Ease of public access to the park and Riverwalk has been a key requirement of the DDRB and the Downtown Investment Authority. The park will also be accessible from the Riverwalk.

The project is expected to be built in two phases with a second residential complex after the stream diversion. The plans include several pedestrian and public art areas.

The pedestrian-friendly planning is in conjunction with the construction of the Jacksonville Emerald Trail.

DDRB board member Matt Brockelman said he believes the sitemap is a good balance of combining what’s desired with what’s practical.

“Sometimes it’s a little too easy for us to get stuck in the weeds,” he said. “I think we hit a pretty good balance. I don’t think we can stress enough the importance of this project for the riparian activation effort.

Council members asked for some minor adjustments to make sure the pedestrian areas and walkways were wide enough for what should be a lot of traffic.

Fuqua spokesperson Cyndy Trimmer said that wouldn’t be a problem and that they wanted to make One Riverside as pedestrian-friendly as possible.

The project includes approximately $ 31.5 million in incentives offered by the city. This bill is currently in the hands of the municipal council. If everything is approved, the grand opening could take place early next year after the old Times-Union building was demolished in April. The second phase could start around 2025.

By Kevin J. Meerschaert
News from the resident community

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Gaithersburg Approves Initial Site Plan for Novavax Campus

By Site plan

Gaithersburg City Council unanimously approved a schematic development plan, or initial site plan, for the future Novavax corporate campus at 14 Firstfield Road on Monday.

The campus includes more than 600,000 square feet of office, laboratory, manufacturing, and research and development space in two buildings, according to the plan. It also provides a reception center, a central green space and a car park.

The campus is adjacent to the existing building at 700 Quince Orchard Road, where Novavax will also occupy space.

Sam Copelan, a city planner, told council Monday evening that the plan also includes a pedestrian bridge connecting the two buildings on the campus.

Copelan said about a third of Novavax employees will work on campus full time, another third will be remote and the rest will have a “hybrid” schedule both remotely and in person.

Gaithersburg executives have been optimistic about expanding Novavax’s presence in the city, as the company works to develop its own COVID-19 vaccine, joining the existing three.

Novavax has applied for emergency clearance for the use of the vaccine in the UK, Australia, Canada and New Zealand, and plans to do so in the US next year, a company executive told NPR last week.

Mayor Jud Ashman on Monday called the expansion of Novavax’s presence “a victory for the city of Gaithersburg”. The two new city council members elected last month, Lisa Henderson and Jim McNulty, were also enthusiastic.

“Prior to our election to the board, we talked a lot about the Gaithersburg world-class biotech corridor, and it will be a crown jewel of this corridor,” McNulty said.

Henderson said she was in awe of the beauty of the campus as depicted in the map and that she is delighted that it is within walking distance of a nearby shopping center.

“All the hard work that has been done, Jim and I can celebrate and enjoy the beauty of this,” she said.

Dan Schere can be contacted at [email protected]

Development of Thatcham Traveler caravan site prevented by injunction

By Site development

An injunction has been granted to prevent the development of a Thatcham Traveler caravan site.

West Berkshire Council won the interim injunction that limits “any further unauthorized development to remain in place” at Lawrences Lane.

This limits the arrival of more caravans in the area and residential occupancy.

READ MORE : Abandoned 400-year-old chalet hidden behind trees sold for exorbitant amount

The controversial plans called for seven Traveler pitches with seven static caravans, seven-day rooms and seven touring caravans.

Nine reasons for refusing the plans were found by council bosses, including failing to provide a water supply and concerns about the site’s effect on a ‘sensitive rural area’.

There were also concerns about the “increased risk of accidents for road users” caused by a “non-compliant road”.

The plans received 287 letters of objection from members of the public.

West Berkshire Council issued an injunction in August to prevent unauthorized development on the land.

What does the injunction say?

The extension of the injunction, granted on December 8, states that “no residential occupancy will be permitted” beyond what was agreed in the previous order.

No more transportable structures or waste can be brought onto the site, including caravans.

The injunction also stops any other work being undertaken that would violate planning law.

Violation of the new order could result in contempt of court, punishable by fine, imprisonment or seizure of assets.

The order said the defendants had to leave the field by April 8, 2022 if they did not appeal.

West Berkshire Council said it “will continue to monitor activity on the site in relation to the new requirements set out by the court”.

The council will wait for the filing of the appeal against the refused planning application no later than February 8, 2022.



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“The case is not closed”

Councilor Richard Somner, executive member for planning, transport and countryside at West Berkshire Council, said ‘this order is the next big step in ensuring that no further unauthorized planning development takes place’.

“If the defendants are unsuccessful on appeal, this will also secure the end of residential occupation of the land within two months of the appeal being closed,” Cllr Somner said.

He added that “the council’s actions to date have been successful in limiting the extent and impact of unauthorized development on the site”.

He added: “Although the deal was not done, council acted quickly. The planning appeal process will now guide the next steps, the timelines of which will be advised by the council inspectorate. ‘town planning.’

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Planners will review the revised site plan for 99 Main Street.

By Site plan

The Genesee County Planning Council is expected to review on Thursday a revised site plan submitted by smartDESIGN Architecture for exterior modifications to 99 Main St., Batavia – the future site of the Buffalo Implants and Periodontics office.

The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. at County Building 2 on West Main Street Road.

According to documents submitted by project manager Todd Audsley, further changes in the design and elevation of the facade are required due to issues with product availability and subcontractors.

Specifically, the new plan calls for the construction of an “on-site built wood-frame storefront wrapped in exterior fracture metal, with a metal standing seam bypassing the line of the second story, which forms a small hood on the floor. above the recessed entrance ”.

The original concept was an aluminum storefront with a fabric awning over the recessed door.

County planning staff recommend approval of the overhaul as it still meets the design guidelines of the City of Batavia in the Central Business District (C-3).

The $ 1.1 million renovation and restoration of the historic three-story, 7,500 square foot building is part of the downtown New York State revitalization initiative. The dental office is on the first floor while the second floor is being developed for commercial offices and the third floor will consist of two two-bedroom apartments at market price.

Another reference to note on Thursday’s agenda is a site plan review and a special use permit application for an Amherst company to erect two wind turbines at 2311 Bennett Road in the town. by Darien.

Whitecap Electric, LLC, is looking to install a pair of wind turbines up to 2.5 megawatts each with a total height of approximately 450 feet. The bottom of the blade would be more than 30 feet above any obstruction within a 250 foot radius.

The $ 6 million project is intended to comply with the 5 megawatt cap for net metering in New York City and will be connected to the grid as part of the Community Distributed Generation (CDG) compensation scheme.

County planning staff recommend approval with changes focused on an appropriate decommissioning plan, visual impact study and bird analysis, stormwater pollution prevention plan, and application for verification of address 9-1-1 with the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office.

Photo: Revised facade design at 99 Main St., Batavia. Courtesy of the Genesee County Planning Department.

Amazon’s second plant begins site development in Schodack, neighbors still worried

By Site development

Zoning plans for a second Amazon facility at Schodack with 400 jobs have been approved by the city, and site work to clean up the 56-acre plot on Route 150 is underway. The 278,000-square-foot warehouse and truck terminal the company hopes to build is currently undergoing a final review by the city’s construction department.

Gary Ziegler, home inspector and code enforcement officer for Schodack, said the department is awaiting a response from engineers and some questions still remain unresolved.

The property has obtained a site development permit, according to Nadine Fuda, the city’s director of planning and zoning, who said a final approval from the building department could take two to three weeks depending on the process. of the exam. However, the site is already being cleaned up.

The planning department noted that Amazon aims to complete construction by fall 2022 and then hire around 400 people there.

The company’s existing distribution center employs approximately 1,000 full people.


Fuda said St. Louis-based general contractor ARCO was chosen to oversee the development of the property, but a local preparation company was added to the mix. Amazon leases the property to Scannell Properties, a private real estate development company headquartered in Indiana. Land records show that Scannell Properties purchased the land from Snook Materials Group LLC for $ 2.79 million.

Scannell Properties declined to comment on the construction. An Amazon spokesperson said the company could not comment on its potential plans.

This project marks Amazon’s second company in the region. The multinational giant built a 1 million square foot distribution center on Route 9 in 2020.

The soon-to-be-developed land is located close to highways 9 and 20 across from the Birchwood Estates neighborhood. The neighborhood owners association opposed the first construction but failed to block it.

Fuda said she had not received any recent complaints from the association or neighbors. Robert Jansing, a member of the Birchwood Association, however, said he and others remained “concerned” about the next distribution center.

Noisy land clearing, long-term effects on the city’s drinking water, and increased traffic and accidents are among the association’s concerns regarding the new facility. Jansing said lost tractor-trailers made illegal U-turns in the neighborhood, smashed lawns, caused property damage and woke residents from their sleep while slamming over speed bumps in the parking lot at night.

“No one expected to live sandwiched between two huge facilities when they bought their home,” Jansing said. “The owners are the ones who face the daily problems. Building another and dealing with construction noise for months is impractical, but safety and quality of life should not be compromised.

“The Association will continue to monitor the situation to ensure that the conditions for approval are met and will consult with representation if (the) need arises,” he added.

Gloversville Planning Board approves site plan for $ 20 million project

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Ken Kearney, owner of the Kearney Reality Group, discusses the site plan for the Glove City Lofts artist housing project at 52 Church Street in front of the Gloversville Planning Council on the night of Tuesday, December 7, 2021.

GLOVERSVILLE – The Gloversville Planning Council has approved the Kearney Realty Group’s 75-unit, 75-unit “Glove City Lofts” site plan at 51 Church Street as a result of ‘a public hearing Tuesday evening.

Tanyalynnette Grimes, President and CEO of Micropolis Development Group, was the only person to speak at the public hearing. She asked if the Glove City lofts, if built, would be used for “low-rental housing” or “Section 8” housing.

“Are there any clarifications [of the income levels of the prospective tenants of the building] in the site plans, since it is in a superimposed historic district, and with regard to the businesses of the city center? ” she asked.

Fulton County planner Sean Geraghty, who advises the planning council, said Kearney’s site plan request included clarification of the income requirements of potential tenants.

“If you want to come and review the application, you are more than welcome to do so. You can do it here in town or I have a copy at the county planning department, ”Geraghty said. “Generally speaking, public hearings are not question-and-answer sessions. This really is an opportunity for the public to tell the Planning Board something they don’t know about the application, but yes the applicants have been very thorough in explaining the types of tenants they will have in the application. these buildings and how they will qualify.

Ken Kearney, owner of the Kearney Realty Group, said his company would claim about $ 1.1 million in income-tested federal housing tax credits granted by the New York State Office for Homes and Community Renewal (HCR) to build the Glove City Lofts Complex.

Kearney explained the income rules required by the federal tax credit program used to help fund the project in October. He said he expects one-bedroom income-based apartments to cost around $ 665 in rent per month, while two-bedroom income-based apartments will cost around $ 775. He said “middle income” units will have higher rents, perhaps up to 20% more. He said the federal tax credit program doesn’t want any of the tenants to pay more than 30% of their income for rent.

After the public hearing, Kearney’s developer Parkview Development & Construction asked Gloversville town planning council to waive the city’s six-month requirement to begin construction after site plan approval , and to extend it to 18 months, in order to give the company enough time to obtain the financing necessary for the construction of the complex without having to come back several times to the town planning council for extensions.

The planning council consensus agreed to the extension of the deadline and the president of the planning council, Geoffrey Peck, requested that the 18-month deadline be entered in the minutes.

Following the hearing, Kearney said Glove City Lofts now had all of the local approvals it needed to build the project, including the correct zoning.

In July, it was revealed at a planning council meeting that the 3-acre lot at 51 Church Street had been zoned from commercial to a parcel zoned for manufacturing in 2015. The zoning issue presented a problem. potential for the major project, but city officials have since discovered that the zoning was changed in 2018.

Peck said the zoning change in 2018 did not go in the normal way, with the joint council bypassing the review by the city’s planning council.
“They just didn’t go through all the procedures,” Geraghty added.

“We made a note in the minutes of last month’s meeting [in November] this [the rezoning of 51 Church St.] had not been presented to the Planning Council under standard procedure, but the statute of limitations had expired, so it had become law, ”Peck said.

The Glove City Lofts project also requested $ 1 million as part of Gloversville’s request for the $ 10 million downtown revitalization initiative in 2021. On Tuesday evening, Kearney said he hoped Gloversville would win the DRI competition for the Mohawk Valley, which he says will be announced soon.

“If the DRI materializes, if the city succeeds, the other two [apartment building projects from my company that received DRI funding in other cities] in the Mohawk Valley, Oneonta and Rome… they were both priority projects in these [successful] DRI plans, ”Kearney said. “[Those DRI grant awards] brought these projects to the top for consideration by UNHCR [for the federal tax credits]. It is hope here.

Kearney has said in the past that the project in Gloversville could be delayed for a year if Gloversville does not receive the DRI, but on Tuesday night he said he believed he would win it.

“I have never been more optimistic about a DRI plan than with this one,” he said.

Site plan recommendations for the new Mount Forest grocery store will be presented to council

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NORTH WELLINGTON – The final recommendation report for a new Sobeys Motherland in Mount Forest will be presented to council on Monday.

The proponent and the applicant have submitted a revised site plan which includes a proposed intersection with signage, a revised internal parking lot design and a proposed separate entrance for horses and strollers from Industrial Drive. The proposed site plan was accompanied by an updated traffic report.

The revised presentation was provided in response to departmental and agency comments.

Planning staff have reviewed the revised site plan and found it to be in accordance with provincial policy and consistent with the Wellington County Official Plan.

The proposed site plan location is at 503 and 515 Main Street, where the beer store and Peavey Mart are located on the property and are expected to remain.

Similar to the previous version of the sitemap, the revised sitemap includes:

The proposed changes are as follows:

Stormwater management is the primary concern of the report, as stormwater drainage flows through the affected property.

Currently, the Applicant is working with Waste Management to secure a drainage easement across the property. The easement will need to be secured / permanently established prior to approval of the site plan for the grocery store and restaurant.

The board is to decide whether or not the developer should continue with the proposed development at Monday’s meeting.

Site map of the City OKs pharmacy, commercial use of the land in the north

By Site plan

Mayor Gregg Hull shows the US and city flags of Rio Rancho. . Martinez, a Rio Ranchoan, asked Hull to send the flags and then presented them at the Rio Rancho board meeting on Thursday. Photo by Argen Duncan.

Rio Rancho board members approved a site plan for a prep pharmacy and opened land near the intersection of North and Unser boulevards for retail during their meeting Thursday night at the ‘city Hall.

They approved the site plan and the land use change unanimously, with Councilor Jeremy Lenentine absent and Mayor Gregg Hull therefore voting.

For the land use zoning change, the 2.2 acres in question are along Northern Boulevard just east of Unser Boulevard with Eric Road being the eastern boundary.

The lots to the immediate south, east and west are undeveloped R-1 lots, lower density single-family residential zoning, according to a city map. A mid-density single-family housing neighborhood and commercial development with a Walgreens pharmacy and Speedway gas station are across from north to north.

Entrepreneur and developer Dawn Davide said she has built homes nearby and invested in the area.

“And hopefully we can bring some development to this area which was never going to be a residential development anyway,” she said.

In their request to change the area, she and her business partner Linda DeFillippo said the change would bring more commerce to the city, while still allowing the busy intersection to remain consistent with existing businesses.

Sharon Alire, a resident of the neighborhood across the North, opposed the change of area.

“Heavy traffic is already a hindrance, and there are so many accidents just below this space where there is no left turn in our neighborhood,” she wrote in a comment letter. . “Adding more traffic to the retail space will only increase the traffic there.”

She was the only member of the audience to comment.

As for the site map, this is a new larger location for the Olive Tree Compounding Pharmacy at 1713 Wellspring Ave. It consists of three buildings, totaling approximately 7,600 square feet, with 46 parking spaces and five bicycle spaces on just over an acre of land.

The pharmacy, one of the few pharmacies in the state, according to architect Doug Heller, now has a smaller, rented location on Westside and Unser Boulevard. Heller said the larger building at the new site will have two tenants and the third building will be built in the future if the landlord finds the right tenant.

He said the pharmacy owner and Itsa Italian Ice owner, who were planning to go to the neighboring lot, agreed that they would have a common entrance to Itsa’s property. City Councilor Paul Wymer wanted approval of the site plan to be made conditional on this agreement being delivered in writing to the city.

The governing body approved this amendment and the plan.

In another case, the governing body approved the American Rescue Plan Act’s $ 360,000 set aside for a home repair program.

“We have an aging housing stock in Rio Rancho,” City Manager Matt Geisel said, adding that homes built in the 1960s often need repairs and many people have a fixed income.

The program would be administered by a nonprofit Homewise and would provide up to $ 25,000 per home in forgivable loans to homeowners with incomes equal to or less than 80% of the region’s median income. Geisel said the income limit would mean $ 38,000 for a household of one and $ 54,000 for a household of four, for example.

Deputy City Manager Peter Wells said the city will monitor Homewise’s use of the money and jointly develop a communications plan to let as many people as possible know about the opportunity.

If this effort is successful, Geisel said, he hopes to secure more funds and expand the program.

City Emergency Management Special Projects Coordinator Rose Martinez, left, accepts Region 6 Community Wide Readiness Award from Federal Emergency Management Agency from Zach Wachter, right , local preparedness coordinator with the New Mexico Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Martinez and the city’s volunteer community emergency response team won the honor for their work during the pandemic, managing COVID testing and vaccination sites, delivering meals to the elderly and those confined to home and manufacturing over 6,000 face masks for frontline workers. Mayor Gregg Hull holds up another plaque in the back. Martinez and CERT were selected from teams from five states. Photo of Argen Marie Duncan.


Planning Commission Recommends Review of Site Plan 1 North Whittaker | News

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NEW BUFFALO — The New Buffalo Planning Commission approved a site plan for a proposed restaurant at 1 North Whittaker St. at a special meeting Nov. 16.

According to a report by City Building Officials staff Ted Hanson, the proposed site plan for the building at 1 North Whittaker in the Central Business District (which currently houses a pharmacy but is otherwise vacant) calls for its renovation to several future tenants. including a restaurant.

The request was made by Chicago real estate owner Damon Marano and presented by local architect William McCollum, who is also a member of the Planning Commission but recused himself from the 4-0 approval vote.

An earlier site plan for the building called for moving some exterior walls for an expanded outdoor seating area partially on city property, but the new proposal maintains the perimeter of the structure where it is while adding a series of “all around” windows to let light and enhance its appearance.

McCollum said some of the existing stone veneer will be retained, “but most of it will disappear.” He later said the pharmacy’s drive-thru would also remain in place.

McCollum said the restaurant will take up 50% of the first floor (in addition to a pair of retail spaces and the pharmacy indicating where it is unchanged), and another seating area in the basement for the restaurant and a prep kitchen have been added to the site plan.

Adding more seating requires 12 additional parking spaces, and McCollum said they are proposing that these be located in the 90-space parking lot across US 12 that has been included in plans for previous sites such as the Beer Church. Another option was to pave a nearby vacant area.

Planners noted that since they allowed other businesses to meet parking requirements using the land across US 12, it wouldn’t be fair to deny this for the property at 1 North Whittaker St. ..

McCollum later said more information about the restaurant would be released at a later date, but added that there would be a barbecue.

Also on November 16, the Planning Commission agreed to recommend changing the zoning of a single family home property at 6 South Willard St. from General Commercial to Residential Single Family R-1

Owners Tricia and Adam Bowden’s rezoning application noted that they are in an R-1 neighborhood.

Tricia noted at a November 16 public hearing at the request that four generations of her family have lived in the house since it was built in 1926 and that she plans to stay there for the rest of her life. She added that there is a small living room in the house, but it takes up less than 100 square feet and the small number of customers does not disturb the neighborhood.

And Planning Commission Chairman Paul Billingslea was re-elected to the position towards the end of the special meeting.

City Manager Darwin Watson noted that a joint meeting of the commission and city council was scheduled for Nov. 18 to kick off the process of reviewing and updating the zoning ordinance. He said the process includes the Planning Commission dealing with a recommendation and the City Council granting final approval.

Planning Commission approves final site plan for Wawa in Gaithersburg

By Site plan

Render from planning documents

The Gaithersburg Planning Commission has approved the final site plan for a future Wawa gas station and convenience store on Md. 355.

The project has aroused the ire of some in the community since it was proposed two years ago, including an unsuccessful legal challenge from a community group.

The Wawa, reportedly the first in Montgomery County, would feature a 5,060 square foot convenience store with an adjacent gas station at 405 N. Frederick Ave. (Md. 355), opposite Gaithersburg High School.

In October 2019, Gaithersburg City Council approved a schematic development plan, or initial site plan, for the Wawa.

But a month later, a group of residents and businessmen filed an administrative appeal in Montgomery County Circuit Court arguing that the development application was not in line with the master plan because the resort- service was not “light commercial use”.

Further, the applicants argued that the Wawa was not “compatible with the residential character” of the neighborhood.

The Circuit Court determined that the project was consistent with the master plan, but ruled that the Planning Commission should have allowed cross-examination.

The case went to the Special Court of Appeal, which ruled in March both that the development was consistent with the master plan and that opponents of the project had waived their right to cross-examination. The appeal court’s decision this spring got the project going.

A few residents opposed to the Wawa project continued to voice their opposition at Wednesday’s Planning Commission meeting.

Carol Johnson said Wawa should consider installing electric charging stations instead of gas pumps, as she believes the use of electric vehicles will eventually overtake the use of gasoline vehicles.

“I think the future is here, and it’s really kinda silly to put all that money on gas…” she said.

Phillip Hummel, a land use lawyer at Miles & Stockbridge, said Wawa had considered incorporating electric charging stations into the project, but the need to prioritize water management rain and sidewalk space took precedence.

“It’s something that has been taken into account. It just couldn’t be easily accommodated due to all the competing factors involved, ”he said.

Walter Umana, who lives near the future service station, said he was worried about potential noise and light pollution.

“It’s a very quiet area. Gaithersburg being the City of Trees, we want to make sure it retains that feel, and with the wildlife around us, we want to make sure nothing is disturbed more than it should be, ”he said. he declares.

Monica Lozada said she also lived near the future Wawa site and wanted to know if there would be security cameras at the facility. Lozada also requested that additional bike racks be included in it.

Wawa real estate project manager Chris Hoffman said there would be cameras both inside the convenience store and outside the building. The property will be monitored 24/7 by a security team, he said.

“If there was a situation that called for an immediate police response, or moderate unrest that we would like to bring to the attention of our internal security officials, store staff have the ability to call upon these resources. if necessary, ”Hoffman said. .

Planning commissioner Lloyd Kaufman said the final site plan only includes enough bike rack space for around two bikes. He said he wanted to see more space on the bike racks to accommodate Gaithersburg High School students who might be making their way to the Wawa during a break.

Mira Gantzert, project manager at Bohler Engineering, said adding more bike racks is something that can be discussed.

“We can potentially look at the west side of the building, where there’s an existing 8-foot sidewalk, and potentially have one or two additional bike racks against the building, but there’s still 4 or 5 feet for pedestrians to walk past, ”she said.

Kaufman, Planning Commission Chairman John Bauer, and Commissioners Phillip Wessel and Sharon Cantrell unanimously approved the final site plan.

Dan Schere can be contacted at [email protected]

Site map approved for Westlake Landings stores

By Site plan
A rendering of the future Westlake Landings Shoppes.

The Town of Westlake has approved the Konover South site plan to develop approximately 23,000 square feet of retail space within the community. The development company was approved to construct two multi-tenant shopping centers and a group of quick service restaurants which will be collectively known as the Shoppes of Westlake Landings. Construction is scheduled to begin in the spring of 2022 and be completed by the end of the year.

“We have already signed a handful of leases and are currently engaged with several other companies,” said Bob Bedard, senior vice president of development for Konover South. “We plan to be fully rented when it opens next year.”

Konover is primarily targeting service-oriented businesses and restaurants to fill the two centers – one of 7,065 square feet and the other of 9,450 square feet – as well as the catering module totaling 6,765 square feet. So far, leases have been signed with Heartland Dental, Verizon Communications, Go Green Dry Cleaner and Sauced BBQ and Whiskey Shack, a full-service restaurant and bar owned and operated by the Ralph Lewis family. The Lewis family have owned the Okeechobee Steakhouse for 75 years.

Lease negotiations for the two centers are underway for a hamburger concept, a smoothie shop and a fitness room. For the restaurant’s pod, lease details are being worked out with three national food and beverage chains.

The stores will be built at Westlake Landings, a 50-acre planned business park located near Seminole Pratt Whitney Road. Konover is under contract to acquire seven acres in the park. The closure is scheduled for the end of 2021.

“We are very excited to see business development progress in our new town,” said John Carter, vice president of Minto Communities, the lead developer of the 3,800-acre Westlake community approved for 4,500 homes and over 2. , 2 million square feet. commercial space. “As we continue to grow, our residents will need convenient access to service businesses. “

In September, Chaudhary Petroleum Group opened the first new retail business in Westlake since its incorporation in 2016. A new concept 7-Eleven and gas station off Seminole Pratt Whitney Road offers a take-out / dinner with make-to-order food, a wine cellar with selected wines and an iced tea and iced tea bar.

A second 7-Eleven is expected to open in the coming months, as Publix prepares to build a multi-tenant mall that will be anchored in a 50,000 square foot grocery store. A warehouse, self-storage facility and entertainment area are also planned at Westlake Landings.

The development vision for 24 Brock Street North in Dundas is still awaiting implementation of the site plan

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Unit sales are apparently continuing for a residential development vision at 24 Brock Street N., but no development application has been submitted to the City of Hamilton to begin a site plan review process.

“Staff have confirmed that they have not received a site plan application,” City of Hamilton spokeswoman Michelle Shantz said Nov. 25.

Sajid Rehmatullah of Sage Developments and owner North Brock Street Holdings have not responded to requests for comment since appearing at a Local Planning Appeal Tribunal hearing held in December 2018.

A new zoning was approved at the end of 2019, allowing a residential building of up to four floors, 51 units and 14 meters high. If the owner wishes to proceed with a development within these restrictions, they must submit a site plan application to the city and then meet the conditions before obtaining a building permit and starting construction. . If the owner wishes to build a larger building, he will need to apply for rezoning before submitting a site plan application.

Hamilton realtor Michael St. Jean said Nov. 9 that about 70 percent of the units in the vision have been sold and the owner hopes to launch a campaign to sell the remaining units by March 2022. St Jean did not respond to an update request by the deadline. .

Standard site plan conditions include the completion of several reports and studies, including but not limited to: archaeological assessments and possible mitigation or excavation measures; stormwater management; drainage; landscaping; tree management; wastewater assessment; site maintenance; water service evaluation; erosion plan; the siltation plan and construction plans as well as the exact dimensions and plans of any proposed construction. A slope stability study may also be required for the slope of the escarpment adjacent to the property.

External agencies, including utilities such as Bell and Alectra, Hamilton Conservation Authority and Niagara Escarpment Commission, and CN Rail would be distributed with any site plan submission and may have additional requirements to be met by the applicant.

CN Rail proximity requirements could include a development viability assessment, noise and vibration studies, and a storm water management study. Potential measures could include a protective wall or berm and mitigation of noise and vibration impacts.

CN Rail spokesman Mathieu Gaudreault confirmed that the company had not been approached regarding a residential redevelopment at 24 Brock Street N. as of Nov. 29.

According to a guide for new residential developments near railway tracks, developed by the Railway Association of Canada and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities, there can be challenges for residential construction near railway tracks.

“Residential development becomes much more difficult…when the context is a small infill site, such as those typically associated with the conversion of commercial or industrial properties,” the guide states. “In addition to their small size, these sites are often oddly shaped and do not readily accommodate standard mitigation measures such as a setback and berm.”

Whitewater Approves Site Plan Process for Rafit Road Property Redevelopment

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Beachburg – Despite the sale of a major real estate property along the Ottawa River, Joe Kowalski says he’s not retiring or stopping Wilderness Tours.

Summerhill Resorts, a Toronto-based company that operates vacation properties primarily in southern Ontario, purchases 133 hectares of land from White Water & Wild Land Tours Ltd., which operates the outdoor adventure recreation company Wilderness Tours, which includes white water rafting. Summerhill Resorts also acquired the neighboring Logos Land resort.

Wilderness Tours will continue to operate from the old River Run property upstream of the subject property.

“When we bought the River Run property seven or eight years ago, the plan was to move Wilderness Tours there over time,” said Mr. Kowalksi, owner of White Water & Wild Lands. “When COVID hit and devastated the tourism industry, it sped up the process. It was a health and safety decision. Safety has always been our first priority. It used to mean “safety on the river,” but now it includes safety on land. ”

He explained that the new location, located right at the foot of the rapids used for rafting, means far fewer buses for rafting participants.

He stressed that he would not be retiring.

“At 73, I am too young to retire,” he said.

He sees a bright future for Wilderness Tours.

“In addition to rafting, canoeing and kayaking, we are also expanding and improving our bike paths,” he said. “We work with the Beachburg Off-Road Cycling Association (BORCA). We are used to seeing cars pass by with kayaks on them, but now we see just as many with bicycles.

He said Summerhill Resorts is a very professional operation which, with the purchase of the former base of Wilderness Tours, “will kick start tourism in this area in the future.

“We couldn’t have asked for a better buyer,” he said.

The 133-hectare property in question now houses 62 trailer sites, six cabins, two beach cabins / houses, a lodge and the Rafters building with ancillary recreation facilities and outdoor spaces.

Mr. Kowalski and his brother Jack, who remains a partner in the business, founded Wilderness Tours in 1975. His son, Joel, and daughter, Katie, are also with the business.

“Joel is the manager of the river and Katie is in charge of the bike.”

Site plan agreement with the township

Whitewater Regional Council is in the process of entering into a site plan agreement with Summerhill Resorts Ltd. to accommodate the redevelopment of the property at 503 Rafting Road.

The request to enter into the site plan agreement is supported by detailed site development plans, a wastewater treatment assessment report, and a water source assessment and inspection to assess the ” adequacy of existing wells and water treatment equipment with the proposed development.

Phase 1 of the proposed redevelopment does not suggest any new development. Instead, redevelopment will occur on existing developed sites and the scale of development is generally considered to be less than the historic use of the property. Future phases of development that require work on the foundation site will require full engineering and environmental assessments.

Whitewater Area Planner Ivan Burton noted that while no below grade development is proposed at this time, the site plan agreement will formalize a site development plan and servicing.

“This will ensure the health and safety of the public,” he said.

The property is designated as Tourist Commercial (TC) in the Renfrew County Official Plan.

Atlantic Beach Planners and Council Approve Tackle Box Tavern Site Plan Changes | New

By Site plan

ATLANTIC BEACH – Planning and City Council moved quickly on Monday to approve changes to the Tackle Box Tavern site plan.

The Atlantic Beach Planning Council convened for a special meeting on Monday in the Town Hall meeting room at 1010 West Fort Macon Road, just before the council’s regular business meeting. The Board of Directors unanimously recommended that the Board approve a site plan change that was considered a minor change.

Later that night, the council agreed, unanimously granting approval to change the proposed open deck over the tavern to an enclosed space.

Planning and Zoning Director Michelle Eitner said at the Planning Council meeting local developer Fred Bunn, who works on the property, requested the change because they were unaware that it was not was not already in place in the sitemap.

“Because it’s not about being a full amendment, we don’t have to go back to reviewing the proposals with a joint meeting,” Ms. Eitner said. “We are speeding it up a bit because it is currently under construction… we want this construction to keep moving forward because construction can resume. “

The Tackle Box Tavern project is redeveloping an existing business in The Circle, an area that includes the property directly south of the Fort Macon Road / Atlantic Beach Causeway intersection and surrounding neighborhoods. The tavern is located at 107 Atlantic Blvd.

Mayor Trace Cooper said all business development in The Circle is subject to a major sitemap.

“We want to make sure that development is going the right way, whether it’s in The Circle or elsewhere, it requires these plans,” he said. “This is a project that is underway and we are delighted to see it come to fruition. “

Other projects are underway in the neighborhood, including the redevelopment of the council promenade, which is currently in the planning phase. Mr Cooper said during council comments that starting Tuesday, city staff are accepting applications from engineers and design firms for the promenade redesign competition.

Mr Cooper said on Monday that officials have already expressed interest in participating in the redesign of the city-owned promenade, which officials say is in poor condition and in need of replacement or repair.

“I’m excited to see what we get out of it,” Cooper said.

The first round of submissions is scheduled for Saturday January 15.

In other news at the council meeting, City Councilor Danny Navey said residents had raised concerns with him over recent coyote sightings in town.

The The North Carolina Wildlife Commission issued an advisory in late October this active coyote season is underway as young coyotes leave their parents’ territory.

City Councilor Austin Waters agreed the sightings were widespread.

“It’s not just one end of town,” Mr. Waters said, “they’re everywhere.”

Mr Navey said he believes the city should be proactive in addressing residents’ concerns about coyotes. The mayor has asked city manager David Walker to seek contact with an animal trapping service.

It also happened during the meeting:

  • The board received a report from the Director of Parks and Recreation, Morgan Gilbert, on activities at the Atlantic Beach Community Park during the summer. Ms Gilbert said the park’s mini-golf course had 14,935 paid golfers and 2,707 free golfers aged 6 and under. The mini-golf course remained open for a further month due to its success.
  • The board unanimously recommended that the Carteret County Board of Commissioners appoint Mr. Waters to represent Atlantic Beach on the County Beach Commission.
  • The board unanimously accepted an audit report for fiscal year 2020-2021 from the accounting firm Thompson, Price, Scott, Adams and Co. of Wilmington.
  • Council unanimously approved a sympathy resolution for the family of planning council member Norman Livengood. Mr. Livengood died on October 24.
  • The board unanimously approved the meeting agenda, including the minutes of the regular meeting on October 25th.

Contact Mike Shutak at 252-723-7353, email [email protected]; or follow us on Twitter at @mikesccnt.

Kings Park Village: owner targets landfill site plan of 50 homes

By Site plan

OWNERS of Kings Park Village would be interested in expanding into an adjacent former landfill site to build 50 new mobile homes.

Initial discussions have taken place between Cove Communities and Castle Point Council regarding the purchase of the land just east of the retirement village of Canvey.

The land was within the boundaries of the old Canvey Newlands landfill site which operated from 1954 to 1989.

However, the area where the 50 houses would potentially be located “was not part of the area in which the landfill took place,” a council report revealed earlier this year.

Mandated to ensure the viability of housing construction on the site, the report adds: “When operating the landfill, it was important to maintain a buffer zone … The allocation site therefore did not been formally used for the deposit of any illegal dumping of flies on occasion.

Now Cove Communities is looking to purchase council land that has been allocated for the development of 50 homes in the local plan.

“If the opportunity to expand Kings Park Village arose, we would be interested in working with the local council to implement their local plan,” said Rob Turner, resort manager at Kings Park Village.

The former Canvey Newlands landfill site is now known as Canvey Heights Country Park.

The 50-house site, locally referred to as HO31, is between Kings Park Village and Canvey Heights Country Park.

The landfill was used for biological waste, although it is likely that it was contaminated with non-biological waste as well over time, as less strict waste sorting regimes existed at that time and landfills did not. were not subject to modern regulations.

Experts carried out tests on the site to see if it would be safe for development and, according to a report from the council, “methane levels have remained below Environment Agency guideline values.”

The report gave the green light for the development of the land claim, saying that “the potential risks are identifiable and can be mitigated”, while adding that it would be necessary to undertake the remediation of the contaminated lands.

“It is expected that this allowance will be delivered as an extension to the neighboring village of Kings Park,” the report adds. “The council is in discussions with the owner-operator of Kings Park Village regarding the acquisition of the site.

Rezoning, approved site plan for Ashwaubenon gas station

By Site plan

By Kevin Boneske
Editor-in-chief


ASHWAUBENON – The rezoning of three Sports & Entertainment plots at B-3 Community Business to build a 5,200 square foot Holiday convenience store at the southwest corner of South Ashland Avenue and Mike McCarthy Way was approved on Tuesday, October 26 by the Village council.

Community Development Director Aaron Schuette said he would not have been in favor of rezoning the property if it had been located elsewhere in the Sports & Entertainment District.

“However, looking at the surrounding land uses – its location against South Ashland Avenue, the railroad, the surrounding land uses – it makes sense for this specific location (to rezone the property) to B-3 to facilitate the redevelopment of this property, ”he said.

Schuette said the project with an eight-dispenser fuel island and an accessory car wash would demolish an existing dilapidated warehouse.

“It’s going to clean up this site quite significantly,” he said.

Schuette said the overall village plan identifies commercial uses as permitted in this area.

He said the site would not have diesel pumps for semi-trailers, which was a concern of a neighboring landowner who raised during the public hearing the possibility of traffic jams in the area.

“It can have a diesel pump for diesel vehicles, but there won’t be pumps for semi-trailers,” Schuette said.

The council also approved a site plan for the project.

Schuette said two of the existing driveway access points on Mike McCarthy Way will be used for the convenience store, with a third driveway access point on South Ashland near the southern property line at approximately 200 feet south of the intersection with Mike McCarthy Way.

Jim Goeppner, director of real estate development for Holiday, said the two curbs along Mike McCarthy Way are designed to create the best flow of traffic for vehicles entering and exiting the property.

Exterior finishes requested in the site plan include stone-look paneling near the base extending to the corners of the buildings, a window system and a fiber cement wall panel system with concealed fasteners.

The conditions of approval for rezoning do not include any sale of products outside, with the exception of propane.

Village president Mary Kardoskee said she was happy other possible items for sale, such as bags of salt and firewood, were not left outside as the site is located at the main entrance to the Ashwaubenon Sports and Entertainment District.

Administrator Gary Paul said he was happy to see Holiday convenience store moving there.

“Overall I think it’s a good plan,” he said. “Everything is better than what currently exists. “

The site plan for Oscar Traynor road is adopted by municipal councilors

By Site plan

A new plan to make the Oscar Traynor Road site in Dublin 100% social, affordable and affordable has been adopted by city councilors.

Development of 853 homes has stalled for a year since advisers rejected a deal with developer Glenveagh that would have involved 50% going into the private market.

The councilors’ agreement was required because the development involves the cession of state-owned land and it was adopted by 36 votes to 23.

A new deal was made with Glenveagh that would phase out private housing and make it 40% social, 40% affordable and 20% rental with units sold by the developer to council and licensed housing organizations.

The proposal was accepted by Fianna Fáil, Greens, Fine Gael and most Labor advisers who said it was the best possible deal for much needed housing.

Sinn Féin, the Social Democrats, People Before Profit and some individual advisers voted against, saying the board should build the units directly.

However, deputy general manager David Dinnigan said the project would be delayed for at least four years if the board were to resume it and go through the procurement and approval processes.

He said rising construction costs would “eat away” any savings that could be made by hiring contractors directly.

Mr Dinnigan also said the council would have to pay for the infrastructure, which would drive up the price of rental units to cost and that it was uncertain whether the council could secure funding for a project in the same way. quality.

Some advisers have criticized the amount tenants would pay for rental accommodation starting at € 940 per month for a studio.

The affordable buying houses will sell for prices ranging from € 230,000 for one bed up to a maximum of € 320,000 for a three-bed.

Some advisers argued that these prices were not affordable and the amount of subsidies paid by the state was of concern.

Independent advisor John Lyons said that when developer profits and state subsidies such as the Affordable Purchase Program and the Serviced Site Fund are factored in, the full cost of outsourcing construction to a developer will be 121 million euros.

Advisor Lyons also said that the premium charged by the developer is € 68,000 per unit.

However, a spokesperson for Glenveagh said building the units would cost city council a lot more, not least because of inflation in construction costs over the past year.

Glenveagh construction costs are set at 2020 levels and stand at € 370,000 per unit once the € 14million payment to city council for the land is factored in, according to the spokesperson.

They said the council is currently citing its own construction costs at € 444,000 per unit – an additional € 74,000 per unit.

Aizawl Municipal Corporation Introduces New Rules for Site Layout and Slope Cutting – The New Indian Express

By Site development

Through PTI

AIZAWL: The Aizawl Municipal Company (AMC) introduced new rules to regulate site development, slope cutting, backfilling and clearing to mitigate landslides, shipwreck areas, falling rocks and other natural or man-made disasters.

Mayor Lalringenga Sailo said the AMC Site Development and Slope Modification Regulations were developed in 2017 to regulate and control cutting, backfilling, clearing and other slope settlement activities in the state capital, Aizawl, prone to landslides and other calamities mainly caused by unscrupulous people. men’s activities.

The regulations have been partially implemented as they were notified to the Official Gazette by the AMC on October 29 of this year, he said on Wednesday. Sailo said that Aizawl has experienced numerous landslides, which too often have caused loss of life and destruction of homes, community buildings and important infrastructure.

Human activities such as cutting slopes, backfilling, increasing the amount of groundwater entering slopes, and disposing of sewage and drainage on slopes in poorly controlled ways can greatly increase instability. slopes, he said.

According to Sailo, any person or government agency intending to construct a building requiring site development work will now need to obtain a site development permit in addition to a building permit.

However, digging an individual grave, excavating below grade finished for basements and footings of an ordinary building, or a semi-permanent or permanent building located in a low risk area landslide, AMC-controlled disposal sites, Department of Defense projects, exploratory excavations and emergency works necessary to preserve life or property under imminent threat of excessive erosion, among others, are exempt from regulation, he said.

Under the new regulations, land or site development is divided into two categories: developed site development (moderate, high or very high risk of landslide) and regular site development (risk of weak landslide).

Georgetown: Hines offers 336-unit multi-family development

By Site development

Illustration of the functionality: artist rendering of a building from the apartment project proposed by Meeks Partners.

Posted: 17-11-2021

by Art Benavidez

Georgetown (Williamson County) – A Houston-based global real estate developer’s site development plan for a 336-unit multi-family complex was approved at Tuesday’s Planning and Zoning Commission meeting.

The 14-acre property is undeveloped and is located at 1701 Wolf Ranch Parkway in the northwest part of town.

The Austin office of Hines Interest Limited Partnership is the spearhead of the development of Wolf Lakes Retreat.

The unit mix includes 192 one-bedroom units, 126 two-bedroom units, and 18 three-bedroom units.

The Austin office of Pape-Dawson Engineers, Inc. will be the civil engineer and the surveyor published a sitemap which showed:

  • 12 buildings, with buildings 1, 2, 3, 7 and 8 having areas of 11,377 square feet each
  • Buildings 4 and 5: 7505 sq. Ft. Each
  • Buildings 6, 9 and 10: 13,991 sq. Ft. Each
  • Building 12 (club house / rental): 9,830 square feet
  • Dog park
  • Eight covered garages offering a total of 62 parking spaces
  • 345 open parking spaces
  • 59 parking spaces
  • 481 parking spaces in total
  • 84 bicycle spaces

Sitemap.

Buildings 1, 2 and 3 will each have 30 units; buildings 4 and 5 will each have 24 dwellings; buildings 6 and 9 will each have 36 dwellings; buildings 7, 8 and 10 will each have 30 units.

Exterior materials for the buildings will include stone veneer, poured stone, foam stucco, decorative wooden brackets and shutters, metal railings, metal canopies and tiled roofs.

Houston-based architects Meeks Partners and landscaper Robinson and company, also in Houston, with a geotechnical engineer based in Austin Terracon Consultants, Inc. complete the project team.

This was the fourth review of this request. The request had already been considered by the committee at its meetings on May 18, July 6 and August 17.

VBX Project ID: 2021-7F46


[email protected]

389 St. Clair Rezoning, Site Plan Approved

By Site plan

photo by Renée Landuyt
The school administration building at 389 St. Clair will include 18 apartments, as well as eight townhouses built separately on the property.

CITY OF GROSSE POINTE — With the conditional rezoning of 389 St. Clair from a single family to a transition at Monday night’s council meeting, 18 apartments and eight townhouses are now slated for the property.

After tabling the issue at the August council meeting, developers, brothers Mark and Craig Menuck of Curtis Building, went back to the drawing board to incorporate council recommendations and community input.

Changes to their original proposal include reducing the number of apartments from 23 to 18; eliminating and combining smaller units to create units as large as 1,270 to 1,600 square feet; reduce the size of the building on the Notre-Dame side to create setbacks of 9 feet instead of 5 feet; provide more parking spaces per unit than originally planned; and incorporating additional green space.

Plans include four one-bedroom apartments, 13 two-bedroom apartments and one three-bedroom apartment, while all townhouses are over 2,000 square feet.

The site plan for the development was found to be consistent with the city’s master plan, according to city planner John Jackson.

“Although this site is not identified on the future land use plan as multifamily or transitional,” he said, “…(the site plan) speaks to some of the goals and objectives included in the city ​​master plan, such as preserving local historic assets like the school building and also providing alternative housing types and styles.

Demonstrated demand for use, Jackson said, can be seen in the fact that there are nearly 1,400 homes in the city that are only occupied by one or two people, while there are than 554 one-bedroom and two-bedroom units in the city. .

“The fact is that the houses are bigger than the population demands,” he said.

The planning commission, made up of members of the city council, unanimously recommended approval of the conditional rezoning on Monday, followed by the city council unanimously adopting the rezoning, along with the proposed site plan.

However, conditional rezoning will be revoked if developers fail to meet agreed criteria, such as sticking to a maximum of 18 apartments and eight townhouses; limit the height of the building to 35 feet, measured to the middle of the roof; maintain front yard setbacks the same distance as other Notre Dame homes, approximately 25 feet; and keep the side yard setback to the south a minimum of 9 feet and to the north a minimum of 22 feet.

Developers will also be required to pressure test the existing water line to ensure adequate water pressure in the existing neighborhood and new development, covering 100% of any improvements deemed necessary by the City, which could include the water main replacement along either Notre Dame or St. Clair.

“The zoning change is conditional on them building the project exactly as you approve of it on the site plan,” City Attorney Charles Kennedy said, “and there are timelines consistent with our code. zoning so they can do it.”

These deadlines include the requirement for the developer to obtain permits within one year, to begin construction within six months and to complete construction within two years.

“I have complete confidence in our ability to manage this process and work with the developer and get what we need,” said Mayor Sheila Tomkowiak. “…Best practice for old buildings is adaptive reuse, not filling landfills with century-old buildings and not building cheap houses so we look like a housing estate. That’s what would happen here.

In the jam-packed council chamber on Monday evening, many residents opposed the development, some of whom put up signs on the lawn indicating so.

“If you want to build apartments, do it in a different zoning,” said St. Clair resident Steve Cavera. “Don’t do it in the middle of this residential community. It’s the wrong place, not necessarily the wrong idea. For those of you in the audience who want more rentals, I don’t disagree with you, (but) pick the best place for it. It’s not the best place for it.

Concerns of St. Clair residents opposed to the development included apartment visitors filling up street parking, the type of tenants who might move into the city, and increased traffic on the streets.

Photo by Renée Landuyt
These signs opposing the apartment development were placed along the stretch of St. Clair between Jefferson and Maumee.

While a report by the Transportation Improvement Association stated that the apartments would generate 77 fewer vehicle trips per day than the current use of the administration building, opposing residents strongly disagreed with the statistics.

However, some residents supported the development.

“Studies have shown that we need more smaller units for seniors and single professionals and these will appeal to single professionals with the rents they are asking for,” said St. Light. “Removing the old building, I think, will disrupt the neighborhood far more than retaining and rehabilitating it.

“We have empty storefronts in The Village that could handle some foot traffic,” he added, “and it’s only a few blocks away and it’s a perfect location for that.”

According to City Manager Pete Dame, a financial report revealed the development will generate $227,000 in taxes per year, of which $65,000 will go to the City. Currently, the City does not levy any taxes on school property.

“The proposed development would support the value of the property,” Councilor David Fries said. “It would strengthen economic investment. It would provide a place to live for empty nesters and young professionals and, finally, it would preserve the architecture of 1906 and 1912.”

Ahead of the vote, several council members took the opportunity to tour a development in Plymouth where Curtis Builders has also converted a former school building into flats. Everyone said they were impressed.

“It’s truly remarkable how much the building’s history has added charm to the character of this development,” said Councilor Maureen Juip. “…(389 St. Clair) is truly a building that contributes to the character of our community of Grosse Pointe City and I am grateful that someone wants to continue to give it new life.”

Board of Directors Approves One Riverside Site Plan, Apartment Concept | Jax Daily Record | Jacksonville Daily Record

By Site plan

The Downtown Development Review Board is advancing plans for the residential / commercial replacement of the old Florida Times-Union building in Brooklyn, valued at $ 182.2 million by an Atlanta-based developer.

The board, which reviews downtown plans for zoning code compliance and design guidelines, met on November 10 and unanimously approved the final site plan for the development in several phases and the conceptual design of the 270 mixed-use apartments of the first phase.

Developer Fuqua Development LLC wants to demolish the TU building and build the One Riverside residential and commercial project on approximately 13.42 acres at 1 Riverside Avenue along the Saint John River.

Fuqua partnered with TriBridge Residential to develop the apartments.

The plan would also restore McCoys Creek and add a public park that will be owned by the city and maintained by the city. The park property is on the east side of the property.

City council committees are expected to hold their first votes Nov. 15-16 on a $ 31.59 million development incentive package.

The Downtown Investment Authority approved the deal, which includes a property tax refund of $ 28,419,169 and $ 3,174,971 in completion grants and expense credits, in September.

Fuqua plans to buy the property from the Morris family, based in Augusta, Georgia.

In addition to the apartments, the first phase of the project has over 45,000 square feet of retail space, including a grocery store, a seven-level parking garage with 502 spaces, and additional surface parking.

The second phase includes two mixed-use buildings along the restored creek with approximately 15,000 square feet of retail space; a restaurant by the river; a 125-unit multifamily residential building; and parking. This phase would not begin until at least 2025.


The site map of the One Riverside project

Design conditions

The design review committee voted 8-0 to approve the site master plan. The final version shows a pedestrian plaza added at the end of May Street.

In October, board members said the street seemed “dead end” before the Riverwalk was a problem.

The latest site plan also identifies a pedestrian bridge to allow people access from the development on McCoys Creek to the public park that council members said was not in the preliminary plan.

Cyndy Trimmer, Partner Lawyer at Driver, McAfee, Hawthorne & Diebenow, represents the Fuqua / TriBridge team of developers on the project.

Despite the DDRB’s previous concerns, Trimmer said the developer could not reduce the amount of surface parking along Leila Street inside the development to support the grocer. Leila Street crosses Riverside Avenue and is one of two access roads to the site.

Instead, plans include a pedestrian zone with space for public art that Trimmer says will make entering the site a “better experience” for pedestrians.

“We have the challenge of implementing these best urban design practices with market demand,” Trimmer said.


The pedestrian circulation scheme of the project.

Project walkability

The board as a whole addressed the possibility of walking inside development.

He listed four conditions in exchange for site plan approval: 10-foot sidewalks on the west side of Leila Street; a 12 foot sidewalk leading from the Downtown Riverwalk to the park; 10 designated parking spaces for the park; and a traffic calming plan for the crosswalk from Leila Street to Riverside Avenue.

Prosser is the project engineer.

The developers will have to report the residential design of the first phase to the DDRB for final review. The board of directors will analyze and approve the designs for the first retail phase and the second development phase as separate projects.

At the meeting, the council praised the architecture of the multi-family units.

Bill Schilling and Craig Davisson told TriBridge and architect Dwell Design Studio that they would like to see more color and accent in the parking garage screening before the final exam.

“Color is like fashion. It’s here today, gone tomorrow, ”Davisson said. “I would stay away from fashionable things. “

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Plano City Council to vote on lettuce greenhouse site plan “https://www.wspynews.com/content/tncms/live//Local News” wspynews.com

By Site plan

After a few months of delay, Plano’s city council plenary committee agreed to move a vote on the proposed site plan for a BrightFarms industrial greenhouse that would produce lettuce to the full city council for a vote. Mayor Mike Rennels said city council is not yet committed to much.

The proposed site from Eldamain Road to Corneils Road would be constructed in two stages and would have several greenhouses for lettuce production.

Rennels says negotiations are ongoing. It is expected that operating the city’s utilities at the site will cost around $ 5.1 million.

Rennels says bringing utilities to the site could be a boon to future development.

A BrightFarms representative previously told Plano City Council that the completed installation could create around 200 permanent jobs. Lettuce is grown in indoor pools so there would be no runoff. A sticking point for some Plano aldermen was the potential use of the facility’s water.

City council could vote on the site plan for the proposed greenhouse later this month.

The development of the Nelson Junction site is approaching

By Site development
Artist's impression of the development of Nelson Junction near Miter 10 Mega.

Provided

Artist’s impression of the development of Nelson Junction near Miter 10 Mega.

Development of the Nelson Junction site begins with the progress of plans for a large-format shopping center.

Nelson Gibbons Company, owner of the Annesbrook site, is starting the first clearing and infrastructure work, company chief executive Scott Gibbons said.

Colliers International real estate agency is marketing the development of Quarantine Rd on the vacant land of Miter 10 Mega, seeking tenants for the first stage of the project.

In the first stage, opposite Miter 10 Mega, there will be 10,948 square meters of shops with up to 11 tenants.

READ MORE:
* And action … site work begins for the development of Richmond West which includes the cinema
* Former Todd Property shopping center in East Auckland put up for sale by new owners
* The future of the Nelson Junction site is clearer, according to the new owners Gibbons Property Investments

Colliers was looking for tenants such as furniture, appliance, housewares, plumbing, lighting, home furnishings and lifestyle retailers. The size of buildings or sites will vary from 500 m² to 2500 m².

Gibbons said development of the site will begin early next year after completion of stormwater and other service updates, as well as site preparation. There was a wide range of interested potential tenants, including some from outside the Nelson area, some who were already in the area but were looking for a different location, and some from the food industry, he said. declared.

The proposed Nelson Junction development for the site of the former Honda automobile plant near the current Miter10 Mega Store.

The proposed Nelson Junction development for the site of the former Honda automobile plant near the current Miter10 Mega Store.

It was hoped that the first stage of development would be completed in early 2023. Gibbons envisioned that it would eventually include a mix of light industry, retail and home improvement businesses.

The 8 hectare property, which once housed the Honda factory, was touted as a future shopping and shopping center before Miter 10 Mega opened in 2006. In 2019, Gibbons Property Investments purchased the remaining 4.5 hectares of vacant land.

“There has been a lot of non-activity on the site,” Gibbons said. “We take our time to prepare the plans well. “

The Nelson Junction Development Plan.

The Nelson Junction Development Plan.

Gibbons said the site was a central location that should be attractive to buyers in the Tasman and Nelson areas. He believed there was a good demand for a home improvement and lifestyle center near the town of Nelson.

“The road restrictions inside and outside the city make this site very attractive and it is truly a pivotal location for these types of services, with a profile like no other.

Miter 10 Mega and empty land ready for redevelopment.

Martin de Ruyter

Miter 10 Mega and empty land ready for redevelopment.

The second stage of the project would see development on the ground closer to Speight’s Ale House. The Gibbons site shows that a large retail / commercial format is offered for this site and is being offered.

Gibbons has over 230,700 m² of properties in its portfolio, housing 150 tenants. Its portfolio is diversified into three key sectors: bulk retail, industrial and commercial real estate.

Colliers Nelson broker Geoff Faulkner, who markets the Nelson Junction development with Colliers national retail manager Leroy Wolland, said he expected strong interest in the center due to the strength economy.

“Nelson is in booming city mode. We have almost zero retail vacancy on Main Street and the CBD, and nearby Richmond has almost zero vacancy on Main Street, ”Faulkner said.

Wolland said there is no comparable complex with vacant space in Nelson Market and Miter 10 Mega is a huge asset to potential tenants.

“It’s a perfect choice for furniture, appliances, housewares, home furnishings, tiles, flooring, paint, plumbing, kitchen showroom, lighting, automotive retail and, possibly, marine retail. “

Dawsonville Planning Commission approves site plan for townhouse community

By Site plan

During the November 8 meeting of the Dawsonville Planning Commission, the commission approved the site plan for a townhouse community project to be built on Maple Street in Dawsonville.

According to the information package included with the application, Cook Communities has requested approval of a site plan for an attached single-family home located at 362 Maple Street. Gainesville attorney Jane Range spoke during the meeting with members of the planning committee on behalf of the plaintiff, explaining that the company is seeking permission to build 31 townhouses on the plot of ground.

“The property is zoned into the multi-family neighborhood and the townhouses are a permitted use in the neighborhood and they are seeking permission for 31 homes,” Range said. “Basically, approval of the site plan is all that was needed as it is already zoned with townhouses. ”

Range presented the site plan to the Planning Commission, explaining that the proposed development would be a single-entry road with a cul-de-sac, retention pond and the 31 townhouses. The proposed townhouses as presented at the meeting would be 1,600 square feet, three bedrooms, two and a half bathrooms and would meet the minimum requirements for the neighborhood.

She added that the designs of the proposed units have been changed in the current plan from previous ones to add more differentiation between the units, rather than all looking the same.

“The only problem that arose during the staff review was to do a bit of modulation up front and try to add more bricks.” The units are somewhat staggered so they don’t not form a single large line across the entire forehead – some [are] with shutters, some without shutters, slatted boards, straight boards and others with a window on the third floor to change the exterior appearance.

Anna Toblinski, Planning Commissioner of Station 4, asked the applicant if there will be a fence along the dividing lines of the proposed development. Keith Cook, the owner of Cook Communities, said his company typically adds a vegetated buffer zone all around their developments with staggered tree lines.

Station 3 Planning Commissioner Sandy Sawyer asked Cook if the development would have an association of owners. Cook responded that the development would have an HOA and all yards would be professionally landscaped.

During the presentation of the proposed development, the Director of Planning and Zoning, David Picklesimer, questioned the applicant regarding several conditions included in the zoning of the parcel, including the requirement that the development be identified as ” active adult community ”.

“They will be required to incorporate the verb for this community of active adult life; it will also have to be part of the alliances, ”said Picklesimer. “It’s R3 zoning with the zoning condition for active adult life and other conditions as well; the interior of houses should meet certain requirements.

Toblinski added that another of the conditions was that 20 percent of units must meet accessibility requirements for people with disabilities. Cook said that while his business typically has a few units that are accessible to people with disabilities, they generally leave it up to the owner to customize when they move in.

According to the notes of the urban planning director in the information file included with the request, “the R6 zoning has been approved with the following conditions: dedicate an additional right-of-way, the agreements must identify the project as an active adult, widen the road Of Maple Street South’s two-foot paved traffic, twenty percent of units must meet accessibility requirements for people with disabilities.

Picklesimer informed the Planning Commission that while the currently proposed units do not meet the stipulations set out in the zoning approval, the issue on the table at Monday’s meeting is only to approve the site plan, which only includes the layout of the lot and the configuration of the street. . For this reason, he said that the planning commission could take steps to approve or deny the site plan and that the applicant could work either to meet the conditions set out in the current zoning or to request a rezoning of the property. in order to allow different directives.

Range and Cook told commissioners they would work with Picklesimer to work out the details of how to meet the zoning requirements.

“We’ll go ahead and work with David again to see what we need to do about the active adult and if that will work and if we need any other zoning changes,” Range said.

The Planning Commission voted unanimously to approve the site plan for the proposed development. The application is expected to go to Dawsonville City Council with a public hearing on December 8, and council is expected to approve or deny the development on December 20.

City Council approves adjustments to Dome site development plan

By Site development

The idea is to create a public-private partnership to transform the old site of the Dome into a new entertainment venue and a surf park by the ocean.

VIRGINIA BEACH, Virginia – UPDATE | At a meeting on Nov. 16, city council voted to approve the Phase 1 and Phase 2 funding plan, as well as the $ 17.7 million offsite infrastructure projects. The action would move plans as well as previously requested adjustments on November 9.

ORIGINAL STORY | It’s been four years and it counts, and the Virginia Beach Oceanfront has yet to see the former Dome site transformed into a mixed-use, multi-site entertainment complex with a surf park.

At this stage, the project leaders reassess their approach. They are asking city council for $ 3 million for what they call phase 1 and $ 2 million for phase 2.

“There are no new demands in there. This is all the money that is already considered, allocated and budgeted for the project, “Deputy City Manager Taylor Adams said.” We are just changing when it can be used to account for the uncertainty in the market. of construction regarding the cost of commodities such as steel and concrete.

The concern is that fluctuating prices could cause the budget to be exceeded. Adams said they would come back to the board if they did.

Additionally, Adams stressed that unplanned projects must take place offsite. A request for at least ten infrastructure upgrades is expected to cost $ 17,729,147.

“The idea with this list is to ensure that we maximize the value of the project for both our residents and our guests,” Adams said.

Adams is expected to resubmit the requests to city council on November 16. This is when council members could vote.

There is some division within the board regarding the next steps.

Mayor Bobby Dyer seems focused on the rewards of development. “Trying to do the Oceanfront all year round,” he said.

City Councilor John Moss said he thought project managers were underestimating the risk: “I think if we knew all of this four years ago, all of these costs. I don’t know what the decision would have been.

Several years ago, music producer and Virginia Beach native Pharrell Williams made a commitment to join this project.

13News Now asked Adams if Pharrell was still involved. Adams told us that Pharrell was still listed as an investor on a disclosure slide for Tuesday’s presentation to the board.

In a letter to the city in September, the artist questioned a separate investment – his Something in the Water festival. Pharrell cited “toxic energy” in the direction of the city.

Whether inside or outside, it is clear that there is a clamor to move this project forward.

“A lot of our Oceanfront partners want us to bring our entertainment venue online as quickly as possible,” Adams said.

Venture Realty Group is the assigned developer.

Adams said construction likely won’t start until June of next year.

It is also likely that the works could start first on the place of entertainment, before the surf park.

The entire project, with combined municipal and private funding, is expected to cost around $ 330 million. However, this number could change in the future.

Set of audience on the site plan of a five-story building next to the library and historical museum

By Site plan

A public hearing on the site plan application for a five-story, 50-foot-high mixed-use building at the corner of Osborn Avenue and Court Street will be held on December 7 at 2:05 p.m.

The G2D Group of Huntington proposal currently includes 37 rental apartments on the second through fifth floors, downstairs office / conference rooms, a rooftop terrace for use by building residents and related improvements. site such as parking, lighting, landscaping and drainage. systems.

The developer has requested nine waivers from the Zoning Appeal Board, seeking relief from the zoning code requirements for minimum front, side and back yards, off-street parking setbacks, minimum parking space size , the size of the vegetation buffer zone and parking lot planting requirements and some lighting requirements.

The half-acre site is located in the recently adopted Railroad Avenue Urban Renewal Overlay District.

A public hearing on August 26 before the ZBA drew opposition from neighboring landowners – the Suffolk County Historical Society and the Riverhead Free Library – and members of the community.

On September 23, the ZBA granted six of the nine requested exemptions, denying requests for “upward lighting” in violation of the city’s “dark sky” code, exterior lighting more than 16 feet above the ground. ground and minimum size relief of parking spaces for all spaces. The applicant requested that all stalls be 9 by 20 feet instead of the required 10 by 20 feet. The panel allowed for a combination of 15 full-size stalls (10 by 20 feet) and 20 compact car-sized stalls (8 by 16 feet).

The deviations sought would not result in a draft tat disproportionate to the size of the property, the ZBA determined. “The building is significantly below the maximum coverage allowed by the code,” the board said in its decision.

The deviations will not result in an “unwanted change in neighborhood” and “to the extent that the deviations will contribute to a change in the character of surrounding properties or the neighborhood, the change is a change for which the city has expressly communicated a desire. and an intention by adopting their strategic plan and overlay zoning for the Railway Avenue Urban Renewal Zone, ”said the ZBA’s decision.

“The variation in demand will not have a negative impact on the physical or environmental conditions of the neighborhood / district, as the current neighborhood is dilapidated and unwelcoming,” the board wrote. “In fact, adding this building and its uses will improve the neighborhood. ”

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Planning Commission will vote on the site plan for the condos on the lake on Tuesday | News, Sports, Jobs

By Site plan

MARQUETTE – The Town of Marquette Planning Commission is about to vote on a proposed site plan for the construction of eight condominiums at the corner of Lakeshore Boulevard and Hawley Street.

The point, which does not require the approval of the Marquette municipal commission or a public hearing, is the main event on the agenda for Tuesday night’s town planning committee meeting, which is scheduled for 6 p.m. hours at the town hall.

The proposed site plan includes 96 residential units spread across the eight four-story buildings, new parking lots, site grading, landscaping and site improvements, according to planning commission documents. The exact location of the proposed development is 2401 Lakeshore Blvd., just north of BioLife across Hawley Street. The property is currently zoned as a multi-family residential.

The property is currently owned by Islander Beach and Tennis Club LLC, and the listed architect is Progressive AE, based in Grand Rapids.

The group first submitted a site plan in 2020, but withdrew its request at that time from the Planning Commission for consideration. They submitted amended plans for review on October 12.

According to city documents, the proposed development would impact 1.24 acres of wetlands, which would be required by the Michigan Department of the Environment, Great Lakes and Energy to be replaced by 2.29. acres of man-made wetlands created by the developer.

Islander Beach and Tennis Club LLC entered into a land agreement with the city in 2019 that allowed the city to acquire a 0.13 acre parcel that was “Necessary for the relocation of Lakeshore Boulevard”, as well as the 0.2 acre parcel needed for the Hawley Street stormwater management project, according to a previous Journal article. The club ceded the two plots to the city. In exchange for the land, the agreement allowed the club to prepare the plot at 2401 Lakeshore Blvd. for further sale and development.

Whether or not the site plan conforms to the city’s land use planning code and site plan review standards described in Sec. 54.1402 (E).

If the town planning commission finds that the site plan is compliant and votes to approve the plan, development can continue without the approval of the municipal commission.

The public is welcome to attend Tuesday’s meeting at Town Hall. Two public comment sessions will take place, one for agenda items and another for non-agenda items.

To download and view Tuesday’s planning committee agenda, visit https://marquette.novusagenda.com/Agendapublic/DisplayAgendaPDF.ashx?MeetingID=2315.

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Four cannabis companies receive special land use and site plan approval

By Site plan

Township of Monroe Logo

Four proposed marijuana businesses received special land use and site plan approval on Wednesday in a special public hearing by the Township of Monroe Charter Planning Commission.

The commission unanimously agreed to grant special land use and site plan approval to Anna Sloan, LLC and Telkaif, LLC for their marijuana producer project at 15600 South Telegraph Road; TC MI Ann Arbor 2, LLC and the marijuana supply hub offered by Party Stop Inc. at 1118 South Telegraph Road; the supply center offered by UM1, LLC and Monroe Premier Plaza Inc. at 14750 LaPlaisance Road; and the Adult Supply Center and Retailer offered by Brian Toma and Cepo, LLC at 15530 South Telegraph Road.

Consideration of the special approval of a land use / site plan for a marijuana supply center and adult retailer to be located at 1510 W. 7th Street, which was made payable to day of the special hearing, was filed until the December meeting of the commission, at the request of the owners of the proposed business.

Wednesday’s hearing was held at 5 p.m. because the commission expected it to last a long time, as happened in several of its recent meetings regarding potential cannabis companies. . But only a handful of residents attended the session, and only a few took turns on the podium to urge the commission to reject the proposals.

Mary Straub said she was “totally opposed … to each (any of these companies)”

“The Township of Monroe is a small township, why are (these companies) coming together in our township? Straub asked. “The town of Monroe doesn’t want it, Frenchtown doesn’t want it, Erie doesn’t want it; what attracts these people to our municipality? We don’t need it, we don’t want it, and that would be detrimental to the way of life of our community. “

Marjorie Cramer expressed concern about the potential odors that could be produced by these facilities.

“If you’ve ever smelled any of these things, they smell like a skunk,” she said. “We don’t want that smell in our town. If this is approved and the odors are not controlled, my question is, what kind of control will this commune have… for everyone? “

Kim Fortner, zoning officer for the township, said the township nuisance ordinance will be how it controls any potential odor issues among marijuana businesses.

“The nuisance ordinance is written quite vague, basically if it interferes with a reasonable person’s right to tranquility, we consider it to be contrary to the ordinance,” said Fortner. “The odor control plan that these establishments have given states that there will be no odor outside the buildings, so if you smell anything let us know and we can enforce the ordinance on them. nuisances … “

Regional vice president of local farm finance company GreenStone Farm Credit Services, Erin DuBois, submitted a letter to the planning committee opposing the five proposals that were considered on Wednesday. GreenStone has a branch at 15615 S. Telegraph Rd.

“… This special land use stands in stark contrast to the current physical environment of the region’s business objectives,” DuBois wrote. “The general nature of this area as it has evolved is far removed from any form of medical or retail establishment related to marijuana and other related recreational products. Creating a special zoning for a medical or recreational marijuana supply center would expand a use that is not normally seen in that area, or does it match the description of what the owners have valued with their major investments in that area? from the community of Monroe … “

Commissioner John Manor reminded residents that the Planning Commission is “very restricted” on how it reviews proposals, as it must view them strictly in terms of whether businesses “operate within the framework of our zoning and our ordinances as they exist “.

“We are not allowed to make personal or emotional decisions as to whether or not to approve them,” Manor said. “We’re here to determine if they’re legally within the ordinances and zoning limits that we currently have for our township. We appreciate where many of you are coming from, but frankly we’re very limited as to whether we approve or not approve these, with regard to the recommendations of the planning (of the township) (department) and of the engineers …

“The city council of elected officials that you elect can absolutely make arbitrary decisions, vote yes or no on things without having to cite a legal precedent as to why they do it. However, in a commission, we are bound by the rules and regulations. , and the zoning that we have this. “

Representatives from three of the four companies that received approval on Wednesday spoke at the public hearing, with all three saying they would comply with all recommendations, ordinances and other regulations set out by the township.

Greg Van Wynn, director of asset management and acquisitions for TC MI, said odor control is a top priority for his company as it seeks to establish a supply hub for medical marijuana.

“We will make it compulsory within our establishment not to let any odor come out of our establishment,” he said. “… The building will be completely under a slight negative pressure, so no smell will be able to leave our establishment. We take this opportunity very seriously, we are here to be a positive addition to this community and to be part of the business community here in Monroe Township. Personally, I will take this as a task for me to get involved with the other operators and licensees in this unit, to create a guild to see where we can come together to make positive investments with our time and energy and efforts in the community.

“We can’t wait to move forward.”

Neither Brian Toma nor any other representative of Cepo, LLC spoke or appeared to be present when their application was reviewed and ultimately approved. Manor has requested that a letter or email be sent to the entity asking them to do their utmost to be present and on time at any future hearing or meeting regarding the proposed business.

This article originally appeared on The Monroe News: Four cannabis companies receive special land use and site plan approval

Site plan approved for project anchored by national steakhouse chain

By Site plan

The West Des Moines City Council this week approved the site plan for a development that will include a Ruth’s Chris Steak House. Architectural rendering by BSB Design

A proposed development that will include a popular national steakhouse cleared a key hurdle this week when the West Des Moines City Council approved the site plan for the project.



Project developer CRG Residential, located in Carmel, Indiana, plans to construct a mixed-use building that will be anchored by Ruth’s Chris Steak House, a steakhouse chain based in New Orleans. The restaurant will occupy 15,000 square feet of space in the four-story building that will be located on the southwest corner of Jordan Creek Parkway and Ashworth Road, according to city documents.



The building, with a brick and fiber cement board exterior, will include an additional 8,000 square feet of commercial space and 199 multi-family residential units, according to city documents. Multi-family units and commercial space will wrap around a multi-level parking structure.



Development costs are estimated at $20-30 million.



City officials are working with CRG Residential to finalize a development agreement that could include an economic development grant of up to $2.3 million, according to a city document. The agreement could also include a breakdown of who will be responsible for infrastructure improvements.



Based on information provided to the board, items that could be part of the deal include:

  • The city is paying and building improvements to 76th Street between Ashworth Road and just north of Aspen Drive. The city would install traffic lights at Ashworth and 76th Street.
  • With the developer ensuring sidewalks around the development are installed, an east-west private street between Jordan Creek Parkway and 76th Street is constructed, and a regional underground retention pond is developed for the project site and the area of ​​the 76th street. The city would reimburse the developer for the cost of the work.
  • The developer initiating the process of installing streetlights around the development and ensuring that a power line along Ashworth Road between 76th Street and Jordan Creek Parkway is placed underground. The work would be done by MidAmerican Energy Co. and the city would reimburse the associated costs.



Work on the project site likely won’t begin for several weeks, according to city officials. The promoter does not yet own the property. Once the land is acquired, documents must be completed to bind the properties together. In addition, architectural plans must be revised, a process that can take up to four weeks.



Once site development begins, construction could take up to 18 months.

Site map approved for the project anchored by the national steakhouse chain

By Site plan

West Des Moines City Council this week approved the site plan for a development that will include a Ruth’s Chris Steak House. Architectural rendering by BSB Design

A development proposal that will include a popular national steakhouse lifted a key hurdle this week when West Des Moines City Council approved the project’s site plan.



The developer of the CRG Residential project, located in Carmel, Indiana, plans to construct a mixed-use building that will be anchored by Ruth’s Chris Steak House, a chain of New Orleans-based steakhouses. The restaurant will occupy 15,000 square feet in the four-story building that will be located on the southwest corner of Jordan Creek Parkway and Ashworth Road, according to city documents.



The building, with a brick and fiber cement exterior, will include an additional 8,000 square feet of commercial space and 199 multi-family residential units, according to city documents. Multi-family units and commercial space will wrap around a multi-level parking structure.



Development costs are estimated between 20 and 30 million dollars.



City officials are working with CRG Residential to finalize a development deal that could include an economic development grant of up to $ 2.3 million, according to a city document. The agreement could also include a breakdown of who will be responsible for infrastructure improvements.



According to information provided to the board, items that could be part of the deal include:

  • The city is paying for and building improvements to 76th Street between Ashworth Road and just north of Aspen Drive. The city would install traffic lights at Ashworth and 76th Street.
  • The developer ensures that sidewalks around the development are installed, a private east-west street between Jordan Creek Parkway and 76th Street is constructed, and a regional underground detention pond is developed for the project site and the 76th area. Street. The city would reimburse the developer for the cost of the work.
  • The developer initiated the process of installing streetlights around the development and ensured that a power line along Ashworth Road between 76th Street and Jordan Creek Parkway was buried. The work would be carried out by MidAmerican Energy Co. and the city would reimburse the associated costs.



Work on the project site is unlikely to begin for several weeks, according to city officials. The promoter is not yet the owner of the property. Once the land is acquired, documents must be completed to link the properties together. In addition, architectural plans need to be revised, a process that can take up to four weeks.



Once development of the site begins, construction could take up to 18 months.

Letter: The City Site Plan for the New City Hall Is a Huge Mistake, and City Leaders Already Know It | Opinion

By Site plan

What a beautiful saying that fits so well where we, the citizens of Cannon Beach, find ourselves today.

Before the pandemic, the city hall project was somewhere between stalled and slow, which is where the blue ribbon committee left it and where the city council should have left it. But then came the coronavirus.

City council meetings were closed except for electronic participation. What a smart time to push through a new city hall project with very little citizen oversight. Bruce could mix up his own Kool-Aid town building mix and serve it to a town council thirsty for his heritage. legacy.

Bruce once told me that he built a municipal building in almost every town he worked for. Clearly, this is his priority.

And just as clearly his priority is not to sit down individually or collectively with restaurants to get a sense of the impact on their businesses, their customers and their lives. Especially with the coronavirus still raging. Three times I asked Bruce if one of his financial plans included insurance to pay off tsunami obligations. He told me several times that the insurance would rebuild the city hall and I asked him several times what would replenish the tax revenue to pay off the loan.

Everything west of Hemlock will disappear along with much of the eastern side. Property taxes will dry up within a year. The tourist tax will be a distant memory. The proposed sales tax would not be there even if passed. And we will end up with a largely destroyed city and a largely destroyed city hall carrying a mortgage of somewhere between $15 and $25 million.

If the insurance is not there to pay off the mortgage, the city will start its next life in the bottom or in bankruptcy. Bruce refused to answer my questions about this for three years. I wonder why ??

People, there are far more important things in Cannon Beach to worry about than six people getting their names on a brass plaque on the corner of their imaginary town hall.

Put the coronavirus completely behind us. Restart a public process with citizen participation. Put the police in laptops so they have a safe environment and fund the fire department more reliably. Make smart business decisions.

City councils and city managers come and go. Some of us have been here for three, four or five decades, and some of us for less. We all deserve better than that. Vote No.

James Litherland

Barrel range

Planning Commission Approves Site Plan for Pearl Street Housing | News, Sports, Jobs

By Site plan

Garrett Neese / Daily Mining Gazette Houghton City Manager Eric Waara gives an update to the Planning Commission while President Tom Merz listens.

HOUGHTON – The Houghton Planning Commission approved the site plan review for a new apartment complex on Pearl Street at its meeting on Tuesday.

The new complex is located in a recently rezoned area from R-3 to R-4, which allows for more dense development and allows for tighter setbacks and less parking space.

Intended for students, the new complex will have 120 parking spaces for 153 beds, more than the 76.5 required by the R-4. To encourage students not to bring their own cars, the resort will either offer a carpool service or charge students extra for parking, project architect Barry Polzin said.

“Maybe you’re not going to have all the students, but you’re going to have a few more that say ‘OK I don’t need a car, I’m just going to leave it there'” he said. “… This is happening all over the world, so you might as well do it here too.” “

For bike racks, which have the same required number of 76.5, it will offer 180. Polzin said the space could also include a dedicated area in the garage for recycling.

About 23.3% of the site will be developed, above the 20% requirement, Waara said.

In an email, Planning Commission member Kristine Bradof suggested replacing non-native plants listed in landscaping with comparable native plants that would provide value to pollinators and birds. The Wild Ones Keweenaw Chapter, a local landscaping group, offered to help select the plants, Bradof wrote.

Polzin said the stormwater management plans took into account the sidewalk design changes that will accompany the College Avenue construction project. TL Rentals applied for a stormwater permit in April, but has yet to get approval from the Michigan Department of Transportation. The predominant problem would be runoff from the roofs, Polzin said.

“In fact, it might flow by gravity … a pump might be the easiest way to do it, but we haven’t entered details on that yet.” he said. “We are awaiting confirmation of how much will take.”

The commission approved the site plan, subject to the project receiving permits from MDOT. The vote was 5-0, with Jen Julien, a member of the Planning Committee, abstaining due to possession of a property nearby.

In another action, the commission:

– Heard by Waara, the town was sued by the company that owns the Econo Foods property. The lawsuit concerns the new Kentucky Fried Chicken which is slated to open next year on an outdoor plot in front of the Evangel Community Church building. At a sitemap review hearing in July, a landowner lawyer argued that KFC’s proposal violated an agreement with ShopKo, which was previously on the Evangel site.

– I learned from Waara that the city was looking for a new signpost for the fire station on Sharon Avenue last week, which it said violated several city ordinances. Waara said he and code enforcement officer Jeff Jepsen spent 10 hours between them reviewing the history of the sign, which is on city property. The Michigan Department of Transportation will also review the paper records on the sign, which falls under its definition of a billboard.

“We want to make sure we have all the facts before contacting the dealer, so that we can do it once and do it right” he said.

– Discussed the city’s master plan, which is due to be revised in 2023. President Tom Merz recommended continuing previous practices by asking subcommittees to review different chapters in public meetings before holding open houses . The Commission also discussed how to obtain public comments on the questions to be asked in the survey that will be sent out before the completion of the master plan.

The commission also discussed the advisability of developing a subzone plan for the city center.

Polzin suggested that a cart such as the one the city had considered would be unnecessary, as the city has most of the information it would need. Waara said a cart would be more useful in determining the fate of a particular site, but less so for the city center in general. Vice President Bill Leder asked if the blueprint subcommittee formed earlier this year should continue, as the pace of the review would not allow it to pursue its goal of updating two chapters at a time.

“Everyone will be involved, and those of us who were on the committee will obviously have comments based on our discussions.” he said. “But it’s hard for me to see the need for this committee to continue with this.

– I heard an update from Waara on repairs to the Lakeshore Center, where part of the wharf collapsed. The city, Michigan Technological University and the National Park Service will meet to discuss a long-term solution. Michigan Tech conducted an R / C underwater survey of Dee Stadium and Ranger Pier.

“Fortunately, there was nothing scary” he said.

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Guinness site development is on public consultation

By Site development

A “vision” for a 10-year redevelopment of part of the Guiness site in the city of Dublin is currently under public consultation.

The modernization of the famous 260-year-old brewery freed up 12.5 acres in the James Street factory in The Liberties.

A “Guinness Quarter” proposal was first announced by Diageo in 2017.

After what has been described as a “three year selection process”, Sean Mulryan’s Ballymore Homes was announced as a development partner in September 2020.

However, Ballymore Homes says there are no details available on the plan yet.

When Diageo first announced the project, it announced that there would be room for 500 homes, as well as 63,000 m² of offices, 5,000 m² of shops and 22,000 m² for hotels and businesses. Hobbies.

A company spokesperson said the plan had “started from scratch since then.”

Graphic shows what a redeveloped ‘Guinness Quarter’ could look like

It has been confirmed that there will be mixed tenure for the housing on the site and that the Iveagh Trust will manage the social units.

It will also be the country’s first development to be carbon neutral.

The development, estimated at around € 1 billion, would occupy around 25% of the Guinness site.

According to a statement posted on the Ballymore Homes website, the development in central Dublin will be “one of the most exciting regeneration programs in Europe”.

Mr Mulryan said Guinness has become a symbol for Ireland.

Oliver Loomes (left), CEO of Diageo Ireland and Sean Mulryan (right), CEO of Ballymore

“St James’s Gate has over 260 years of history and therefore we have a unique responsibility to ensure that when this famous gate opens it opens to a place that is synonymous with good times and memorable experiences”, did he declare.

The company says it hopes to have a master plan ready for submission to Dublin City Council next year.

However, local councilor Darragh Moriarty said the lack of details on the delivery of housing, offices and cultural spaces is “disappointing”.

“It’s just a public relations exercise. What do they want people to give their opinion on? They will have to seriously engage with the local population and stakeholders,” said the Labor Party adviser.

The public consultation begins tomorrow in the Digital Hub and is scheduled to continue daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. until November 5.

Site map modified OK for 2 new hotels in Anderson

By Site plan

October 27 — ANDERSON – Plans to build two new hotels in Anderson have moved forward with hopes of opening their doors within the next 18 months.

The Anderson Plan Commission voted unanimously on Tuesday for a modified main platform at the request of Amerilodge Group and New Born Logistics for the property east of the current Fairfield Inn.

The two hotels will have four floors, will have 92 rooms and will have parking for 96 vehicles.

One hotel should be a Tru by Hilton hotel and the second an Avid by IHG hotel.

Steve Aldridge of the Amerilodge Group said Anderson’s location was chosen because of the proximity to Hoosier Park Racing & Casino, the north side of Indianapolis and the potential for future economic development.

He said they hope to innovate by winter; construction normally takes 14-18 months.

Tim Stires, deputy director of Anderson’s municipal development department, said the development will require a special exception approved by Anderson’s board of directors on zoning appeals.

Stires said the modified main platform creates three properties for commercial development, with the two hotels occupying 5.2 of the 45.7 acres available.

Municipal development staff have recommended approval of the modified main property for development to be known as Scatterfield Commons.

Steve Servies of Servies Engineering & Surveying said the properties would drain north into a retention basin near Interstate 69.

The properties were dezoned for commercial use in 1994, with Fairfield Inn built in 2019 and the 64th Street extension east of Scatterfield Road completed about 10 years ago – and dead ends at the east end of the Sherwood Forest Subdivision.

The property was originally intended to be part of the baseball / softball training complex known as “The Farm” which was never developed.

Amerilodge Group is located in Michigan.

Amerilodge has several hotels in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio.

Follow Ken de la Bastide on Twitter @KendelaBastide, or call 765-640-4863.

Site Plan for Clear Lake Hy-Vee Approved by Planning and Zoning Commission | Govt. & Politics

By Site plan

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to reflect the exact total of Planning and Zoning Commission votes, and to clarify development plans for future lots.

On Tuesday evening, the Clear Lake Planning and Zoning Commission met to review the site plan for the proposed Hy-Vee grocery store in Clear Lake, as well as the larger Emerald Edge preliminary platform.

The preliminary platform proposed by Sukup Ag of Sheffield contains seven commercial lots and a subdivision all of which run along Route 18 between North 14th Street and North 20th Street.






The preliminary platform for the Emerald Edge development at Clear Lake.


The easternmost lot labeled “Commercial Phase 1 Lot 1” along North 20th Street and Highway 18 is where the proposed Hy-Vee and Convenience Store would be located.

The dish would also see the creation of two new streets, Jade Street and Hunter Place. Jade Street would run parallel to North 20th Street, but on the west side of the proposed Hy-Vee lot, connecting Hwy 18 with one entrance and exit to the right.

People also read …

Hunter Place is proposed to run east to west parallel to Highway 18, but on the north side of commercial lots three through seven.

Flory noted that there will likely be other projects developed in the other smaller commercial lots, and that the Planning and Zoning Commission may revisit it “soon” to discuss other projects under the development.

Jason Petersburg, project engineer for Veenstra & Kimm Inc., recommended that the Planning and Zoning Commission approve the preliminary platform.

The Planning and Zoning Board approved the preliminary Emerald Edge flat unanimously, 3-0.

The commission then reviewed the site plan specifically for the Hy-Vee grocery store.

The proposed development includes a 47,000 square foot Hy-Vee grocery store, an approximately 4000 square foot convenience store and parking on the 6.5 acre property. Flory noted in a previous meeting that Embree is expected to invest $ 8 million in the project.

Hy-Vee Grocery Comes to Clear Lake

On Monday, Clear Lake City Council met to review and make changes to its city renewal plan. One of those changes was to adapt to a new Hy-Vee grocery store.

Flory noted that the schedule for the Hy-Vee is still pending, but the developers hope to innovate “within the next 30 days” with the goal of opening in the fall of next year.

Petersburg recommended that the Planning and Zoning Commission approve the site plan for the Hy-Vee.

The Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously approved the Hy-Vee site plan, 3-0.

The Embree development group is based in Georgetown, Texas, and the letter of intent stated that the group was interested in building a new retail space in the Willow Creek area of ​​Clear Lake.

Zachary Dupont covers politics and business development for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at 641-421-0533 or [email protected] Follow Zachary on Twitter at @ZachNDupont

Development of the Covington IRS site is back on track with the hiring of a project manager; the dog park is advancing, more

By Site development

By Ryan Clark
NKyTribune journalist

The development of the IRS site is back.

After stopping and starting – and en route replaced the Covington City Manager – on Tuesday evening, the commissioners approved the hiring of JS Held, LLC, for project management services to “implement the master plan strategic for Covington’s central waterfront, ”read in city documents. .

They refer to the management of the 23-acre IRS site.

“This is a very important first step that we are taking in the redevelopment of the IRS site,” Mayor Joseph U. Meyer said at the regular legislative committee meeting.

The deal will result in brownfield redevelopment in the Covington Central Riverfront area, under the direction of the city manager and the director of economic development, the mayor said. The goal is to develop it into usable land that could support a mix of potential uses.

City Manager Ken Smith said he could provide weekly updates on the project to the Commission, if they so wish.

Over the summer, the commissioners chose to stop and completely rethink how they wanted to use the site.

The city bought the site in March for $ 20.5 million, and since then Covington has struggled to manage the project. They first entered into several demolition and design contracts when former general manager David Johnston recommended certain options; the Commission decided not to follow these recommendations.

In June, Johnston and the town went their separate ways. Perhaps it wasn’t a surprise, then, that the city decided to officially start over.

“No project is more important,” said Mayor Meyer at the time. “We only have a bite of an apple to get it right.”

The city received three responses to its call for tenders for management services. The payment of the contract, which runs from November 1 to October 31 of the following year, is illustrated in the agreement as follows:

First year of the contract: $ 371,217
Second year of contract: $ 367,545
Third year of contract: to be determined
Fourth year of contract: to be determined
Fifth year of contract: to be determined

Thus, the contract, which will run in six phases, begins with an initial period of one year, with the possibility of four one-year renewals. The potential term of the contract should not exceed five years or $ 738,762.

Under the contract, JS Held, LLC, “will act as owner trustee and oversee all aspects of real estate development on behalf of the city.”

The project will include scope development, tendering and coordination with the city; the demolition and remediation of the 23-acre brownfield site; and site engineering and construction of new public rights-of-way with utilities, the contract says.

A general description of the services required includes:

• Project development for all phases
• Management of the project and program development of all phases from the start
Upon completion
• Facilitate and manage all required services, activities and communications
necessary for the completion of the project on behalf of the city
• Selection of engineers, consultants and contractors
• Management of the negotiation and creation of contracts
• Supervision and coordination of engineering and design processes and
• Manage all engineering, design and inspection services related to the
redevelopment project

Director of neighborhood services, other employees

Commissioners approved the hiring of Deputy Warden of Neighborhood Services Brandon Holmes as Warden effective October 27, and Keith Bales as Deputy Warden of Ward Services, effective November 8.

The commissioners also approved the appointment of Gregory Paeth to the Covington Motor Vehicle Parking Authority for a four-year term, effective October 27, 2021 and expiring October 26, 2025.

Stormwater maintenance supervisor hired

The commissioners also approved the hiring of Todd Redman for the stormwater maintenance supervisor position, effective October 18.

The role is budgeted from the rainwater operating budget.

Map of the dog park presented

Ben Oldiges, Director of Parks and Recreation, presented the Commission with a plan for the construction of the city’s first dog park.

“This is a really exciting new initiative,” he said. “We’ve made pretty good progress on this project.

Oldiges said the idea had been floating around the city for about a decade, and when he was hired as manager in 2020, he made it one of his top priorities to make it happen.

The project would be hosted in Kenney Shields Park and paid for with CDBG funds and a $ 10,000 grant from the Northern Kentucky Association of Realtors.

Oldiges said they chose to target the location because of its lighting, safety, neighborhood setting, shade and water source.

“It’s a pretty solid foundation for a dog park,” he said, noting that the goal is to develop several in the city.

He said they hope to pave the way for winter 2021 or spring 2022.

Executive session

The commissioners ended Tuesday’s meeting by meeting in executive session to “discuss pending litigation,” the mayor said.

He also said that they would not meet again and that no further action would be taken.

Next meeting (there is no meeting next week because it is election day)

The next regular meeting of the Covington Commission will be a caucus meeting at 6:00 pm on November 9 at the City Building at 20 W. Pike St. in Covington. Meetings can be followed live on Fioptics channel 815, Spectrum channel 203, the Northern Kentucky Telecommunications Council (TBNK) website, TBNK @TBNKonline Facebook page, and TBNK Roku channels.

Propane installation on Kroemer Avenue obtains approval from town planning council after site plan review

By Site plan

A proposal to develop a liquid propane storage and distribution facility on Kroemer Avenue in Riverhead received preliminary site plan approval last week from the Riverhead Planning Board, which initially denied the application.

The planning council voted unanimously on a site plan that had been modified by the applicant, 48 Kroemer LLC, as a divided council rejected it on June 3, with the chairman of the planning council Stan Carey, who opposed the plan, citing objections from the Riverhead Fire District, the volume of LPG proposed for storage at the site, which is adjacent to a large existing propane facility and the orientation and location of the tanks storage offered by request. Carey was joined in opposition by members Richard O’Dea and George Nunnaro.

In July, the plaintiff filed a lawsuit challenging the council’s decision. The trial remains pending before the State Supreme Court.

In September, the applicant submitted another set of revised plans, reducing the number of 30,000 gallon storage tanks from eight to six, increasing tank withdrawals to a proposed industrial building and to the on-site rail branch.

Council decided that the revisions addressed the concerns of the Fire District and the Fire Marshal.

“They reduced the size of the project by about 20%,” Carey said in an interview on Friday. The applicant also accepted a condition in the resolution that no gas can be transferred between the new facility and a neighboring property. It was important to Carey and the others who initially opposed the approval, he said.

The board also received a note from the city attorney clarifying its responsibility to the fire district, as the fire marshal approved the plan, while the district fire commissioners opposed it.

“I’m asking for clarification that the city council, in their special permit, said the fire marshal and firefighters would provide security,” said Carey. Firefighters are still opposed to the project, he said. “So I wanted clarity. What did the city council mean by that?

The city council granted a special permit to 48 Kroemer LLC on September 15, 2020. The special permit allows use on the property. The resolution approving the special permit states: “The review of the site plan by the fire marshal and the fire department will ensure the safety of the LP facility. ”

The town’s lawyer informed the town planning council that “legally they have no say in the site plan”. It is returned to them for contribution, he said. “He basically said there was no legal reason to deny it because of the fire department,” Carey said.

Project architect Martin Sendlewski said yesterday that the claimant was happy to have taken the plunge.

“It is unfortunate that we had to reduce the LPG tanks by 25% even though the project originally met all the requirements,” Sendlewski said.

“What is more troubling is that the Riverhead Fire District has no confidence in the level of professionalism and expertise of Fire Marshal Craig Zitek,” he said. “Craig is very thorough and highly skilled.

He said the fire district should have accepted the fire marshal’s analysis rather than spending money on a third-party engineer to do the same job.

“We don’t understand this at all,” Sendlewski said.

The fire district attorney could not immediately be reached for comment.

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Site map modified OK for 2 new hotels in Anderson | Business

By Site plan

ANDERSON – Plans to build two new hotels in Anderson have moved forward with hopes of opening their doors within the next 18 months.

The Anderson Plan Commission voted unanimously on Tuesday for a modified main platform at the request of Amerilodge Group and New Born Logistics for the property east of the current Fairfield Inn.

The two hotels will have four floors, contain 92 rooms and have parking for 96 vehicles.

One hotel should be a Tru by Hilton hotel and the second an Avid by IHG hotel.

Steve Aldridge of the Amerilodge Group said Anderson’s location was chosen because of the proximity to Hoosier Park Racing & Casino, the north side of Indianapolis and the potential for future economic development.

He said they hope to innovate by winter; construction normally takes 14-18 months.

Tim Stires, deputy director of Anderson’s municipal development department, said the development will require a special exception approved by Anderson’s board of directors on zoning appeals.

Stires said the modified main platform creates three properties for commercial development, with the two hotels occupying 5.2 of the 45.7 acres available.

Municipal development staff have recommended approval of the modified main property for development to be known as Scatterfield Commons.

Steve Servies of Servies Engineering & Surveying said the properties would drain north into a retention basin near Interstate 69.

The properties were dezoned for commercial use in 1994, with Fairfield Inn built in 2019 and the 64th Street extension east of Scatterfield Road completed about 10 years ago – and dead ends at the east end of the Sherwood Forest Subdivision.

The property was originally intended to be part of the baseball / softball training complex known as “The Farm” which was never developed.

Amerilodge Group is located in Michigan.

Amerilodge has several hotels in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio.

To follow Ken de la Bastide on Twitter @KendelaBastide, or call 765-640-4863.

Jackson Zoning Board Approves Site Plan for Townhouses on Harmony Road

By Site plan

JACKSON – Members of the Jackson Zoning Board of Adjustment have granted preliminary and final major site plan approval to an application that proposed the construction of 202 townhouses on Harmony Road.

The Zoning Board approved a use waiver for the applicant, Hyson Estates LLC / Grand Harmony, in February 2020.

The applicant returned this year to seek approval of the site plan. Testimony was provided on August 18, and the request was presented at the October 20 board meeting, when the testimony ended and site plan approval was granted.

Following the conclusion of the testimony, a motion was made to grant preliminary and final approval of the major site plan and council members James Hurley, Toniann Comello, Michelle Russell, Lynne Bradley and Steve Costanzo voted “yes On the motion.

The 202 units will be spread over 10 buildings with 10 townhouses; six buildings with eight row houses; and nine buildings with six row houses. Evidence provided by representatives of the Applicant indicates that there will be 92 two-bedroom townhouses and 110 three-bedroom townhouses. They said 40 units will be designated as affordable housing.

Affordable housing is defined as housing that is sold or rented at below market rates to individuals and families whose income meets certain guidelines. New Jersey municipalities are under court order to provide affordable housing development opportunities within their borders.

Lawyer Adam Pfeffer and Engineer Bill Stevens represented the plaintiff at the October 20 meeting.

Stevens said the parking plan has been revised to ensure there will be sufficient parking in the development. He noted that there had been a discussion on this issue in August.

Initially, the driveway offered for each unit at the market rate was 18 feet wide, and each townhouse had a two-car garage and a two-car driveway.

Each driveway has been widened to 20 feet, so each market rate unit now offers 3.5 off-street parking spaces where 2.5 spaces are needed, Stevens said.

With respect to on-street parking, the applicant proposed 32-foot-wide roads in the development.

“This is done on purpose to allow open space and allow parking on either side of the street where it is available. However, according to the site map… the possibilities for on-street parking are certainly limited. However, we would like to continue to be allowed to have on-street parking where it is available, but it is not included in our parking tables, ”Stevens said.

The project requires 494 parking spaces. The applicant provides 711 parking spaces.

Affordable housing will be at the center of the 10-unit buildings.

“These units each have a parking space in front of the unit itself. The (residents) would then use off-street parking elsewhere on the site for any (other vehicles) they might have.

“The board was concerned with the location of some of the off-street parking that we provided. So we went in and revised the plan to add additional off-street parking near the 10-unit buildings to address that particular concern, ”Stevens said.

There will be a club house in the development with 44 parking spaces.

“The parking provided exceeds what is required for the clubhouse, but frankly it is our hope and our design for this project to be designed to be a walkable project.

“We think this is a special project and we hope that people will use the walking trails that we have added to this project and that the parking lot at the clubhouse will only be used in unusual circumstances,” said Stevens said.

As part of the request, improvements will be made to Harmony Road with regard to sidewalks and curbs, according to the testimony provided.

New apartments in Brighton receive site map extension

By Site plan

20 October 2021

By Mike Kruzman / [email protected]

An extension of the site plan has been granted for an apartment complex project in the city of Brighton.

Vistas at Uptown will be a 200-unit luxury apartment complex on Second Street in Brighton. Developer DTN Management initially received sitemap approval in 2018, then a one-year extension in 2019. In April 2020, DTN presented an amended sitemap with changes that were approved, but the pandemic caused delays. They were again before the Planning Commission last Monday, asking for a further one-year extension.

Brighton Community Development Director Mike Caruso said normally if construction does not start within 12 months the site plan becomes void, but his department believes significant work has been done. DTN demolished 6 houses, cleared the land, relocated utilities and has already invested approximately $ 500,000 in the project. Caruso said that in speaking with the city’s lawyers, they believed construction should continue to the point where it looks like a building will go up to prevent the site plan from being canceled.

John Woods of DTN has said he doesn’t want to make a habit of coming back for extensions, but the pandemic has posed problems. Rising lumber costs initially affected their ability to purchase lumber for wood-frame buildings. As lumber costs have come down, the current supply chain issues affecting the world are affecting them as well. Woods said they own and are engaged in this project, and are just looking for a comfortable window to start it. He expects to be able to begin foundation work in the spring.

The Planning Commission unanimously approved the 12-month extension, with several commissioners thanking Woods and DTN for their commitment to the City.

Savannah City Council approaches votes on Coastal Empire Fairgrounds site map

By Site plan

Savannah City Council could decide the future of the former Coastal Empire Fairgrounds ownership by the end of the month, according to Savannah City Manager Jay Melder.

The land has remained untapped since the 67-acre parcel at 4801 Meding Street was sold for $ 2.9 million in 2016.

Three companies are currently in the running to develop the property, and Melder said he hopes to have a recommendation that the board vote on at the October 28 board meeting.

Following:Project Fairgrounds set to transform community, but city isn’t listening to fears, neighbors say

“I think we are within reach of this, but I will not commit to it, but it is my hope,” said Melder, present an update on the board process at a board workshop on October 14.

The most recent request for proposals (RFP) was released in June 2020, with the board voting a few months later to accept proposals from the Savannah Bridge Development Team, Knott Development and the P3 Joint Venture Group.

The three groups presented their plans to council in July. The property’s potential concepts were also unveiled at open house events, which drew hundreds of residents from across the city.

The concepts encompass a wide variety of uses ranging from retail and commercial to housing, entertainment, and the film and television production space.

In his update to the council last week, Melder said the city is currently evaluating all proposers’ responses on 10 different obligations. These include traffic, parks and recreation, offices, zoning and parking, community plaza and green spaces. A proposal must satisfy all 10 elements in order to proceed to the next phase.

Following:Movie studios, shops, housing: this is what could happen at the Savannah Exhibition Center site

Foremost among these mandatory items is traffic, Melder said.

“We have neighborhood streets that have houses and driveways and we have limited rights of way on many streets that enter the property,” he said.

“We have seen a lot of traffic calming requests historically, especially on Meding Street, but all along this corridor and some challenges and issues historically, with the traffic volumes in the neighborhood.”

According to figures presented at the council workshop, the adjacent streets around the property register just over 8,000 vehicle movements per day. The Knott plan will increase this number to 19,769; P3 at 12,946 and Savannah Bridge at 20,968.

Melder said that with regard to traffic, the assessment plan will examine whether or not the surrounding streets can adequately handle the increase in the number of vehicles per day; whether or not the level of service of the surrounding traffic infrastructure would provide a reasonable level of service; and whether plans for residential and commercial uses are impractical or adversely affect neighborhoods and quality of life.

The P3 Joint Venture Group has a variety of uses for the former Coastal Empire Exhibition Center site.  Uses include sound stages, sports fields, residential and commercial uses.

Flood water and floodplain mitigation as well as zoning are also major concerns. The property has approximately 27 usable acres, of which 40 acres are in the floodplain.

For subscribers:Partnership, policy and projects: City of Savannah director Jay Melder talks about his first month

The site is currently zoned Conservation – Park and will have to go through the rezoning process for a certain amount of zoning change, regardless of which proposal comes to mind.

The next phase for proposals that meet the 10 mandatory elements will be the economic analysis. The economic analysis will be determined by the total increase in the appraised value of the property due to the planned improvements to the developments, plus the sealed purchase price, Melder said.

“If a proposal is found to be unreasonable or has inappropriately inflated its value, it will also be rejected at this point,” he said.

The best proposal will go through a planned development process.

The story

The future of the site, which is one of the city’s largest undeveloped properties, has been the subject of discussion among community members and administrations for several years.

The city first reviewed the property in 2015 under former mayor Eddie DeLoach. At that time, most council members advocated affordable housing for the site, as well as outdoor recreation.

The housing plans were scrapped after neighboring residents and District 5 Alderman Estella Shabazz objected to the idea. The property is located in District 5.

Following:Home for decades, residents of Clearview have had 60 days to move. Affordable options are rare

In 2017, the board unanimously rejected an offer from the private investment group of state representative Craig Gordon, Aerospace Studios, to purchase approximately 15 acres of the property to develop a film and television production studio.

Gordon, who was not a candidate for re-election to the Georgia General Assembly in 2020, is a senior partner of the P3 Joint Venture group currently vying to develop the site.

Billed as a “live, work, play, eat and learn” project, the initial concept of the Savannah Bridge development team is divided into eight sites.  The plan includes housing, a movie studio, retail, and food and drink.

In 2019, city staff recommended that council issue a request for proposals to get a nonprofit to take one to two acres for $ 1 and develop it as a recreation facility. public at the expense of the organization.

This idea met with opposition from locals and Shabazz and did not take shape.

“I understand that I am the sixth city manager to work on this project and I intend to be the last city manager and move this project forward,” Melder told council.

Katie Nussbaum is the city and county government reporter for the Savannah Morning News. Contact her at [email protected] Twitter: KnussSMN

New Civic Campus Site Master Plan Approved by Ottawa City Council

By Site plan

OTTAWA-

City Council approved a master site plan for the new Civic Campus of The Ottawa Hospital, which is scheduled to open in 2028.

The $2.8 billion, 50-acre hospital will be located on federal land between Dows Lake and the Central Experimental Farm. The area of ​​the planned site consists of 44% buildings and landscaping, 22% buildings with green roofs and 34% green spaces and landscaping.

The site plan has already been approved by the planning committee and by the National Capital Commission, which controls the federal territory where the new campus will be built.

The council voted 19 to 4 in favor of the site’s master plan, with councilors Rawlson King, Catherine McKenney, Jeff Leiper and Shawn Menard voting against.

Councilors also approved a plan under which the mayor would write to federal environment and agriculture ministers, area MP Yasir Naqvi and the NCC to ensure the long-term protection of the Central Experimental Farm. .

The site was the source of controversy with area residents protesting the proposed above-ground parking garage and use of green space. The search for a new home for the nearly century-old Civic was turned upside down in 2015 when the newly elected federal Liberal government decided to revise the former Conservative government’s plan to build the new site directly across from the old one. The NCC had recommended building the new campus at Tunney’s Pasture, but The Ottawa Hospital’s Board of Trustees unanimously rejected the idea.

Construction of the new campus is expected to begin in 2024, by which time the current Civic Campus will be 100 years old.

Council greenlights site master plan for new Civic Hospital

By Site plan

The goal is to commission the $2.8 billion facility by 2028.

Content of the article

City Council approved a site master plan for The Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic Campus, another hurdle now cleared in the hospital’s quest to get the $2.8 billion facility operational for 2028.

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By then, the current Civic on Carling Avenue will be over a century behind its opening date. Hospital officials and affiliates have emphasized the need and benefits of a contemporary, state-of-the-art regional hospital, and there appears to be little disagreement in this regard.

But the journey to Civic 2.0 has not been smooth, with controversy over site selection in the rear-view mirror, some lingering dissatisfaction over elements of the hospital plan, and debates to come over exactly how to link the hospital to the city’s light rail transit system. , and other aspects of the site.

City staff recommended approval of the master plan, concluding that it demonstrated that transportation, parking, LRT access, cycling and pedestrian infrastructure, built heritage and other matters “have been carefully considered and designed”. Some components will still need to be fine-tuned, staff said, as the hospital submits site plan control requests to implement the various phases of the project (the master plan outlines 10 extending to 2048).

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Staff will have delegated authority to approve such requests unless a ward councilor decides to revoke it, planner Sean Moore explained Wednesday. That said, staff have already committed to presenting the site plan control application for the hospital parking garage – part of the first phase of development – ​​to the planning committee for approval.

Council voted 19-4 Wednesday in favor of the master plan, with councilors Jeff Leiper, Shawn Menard, Rawlson King and Catherine McKenney opposing it.

“I think as a city we need to ask for better in this case,” Menard said, sharing his belief that the plan falls short when it comes to SLR integration and parking plans and that there are better alternative designs for the site footprint that would reduce the loss of trees and green space and improve the transit experience.

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Stephen Willis, the city’s general manager of planning, infrastructure and economic development, said the hospital’s architects carried out several iterations of the site layout, taking into account considerations such as the distance needed from to a railway line to avoid interference with medical instruments, geotechnical problems and protection. of trees currently on the site.

“Our staff regularly challenged them, as did the (National Capital Commission) staff, about their setup, and they presented this as the best arrangement for the needs of health care delivery in establishment,” Willis said.

For his part, Mayor Jim Watson refuted nearly every argument against the hospital’s current plan: the significant cost and other hurdles associated with burying the planned parking lot; TOH’s commitments to green and public spaces, tree preservation, and replanting five trees for every tree felled; the need for on-site parking for hospital users; and plan provisions for direct and weather-protected LRT connectivity, transport monitoring and a transport demand management plan.

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“I believe that after 14 years of planning, we are finally in a position to move this file forward and help bring this new world-class hospital to Ottawa,” said Mr. Watson. He told his fellow board members “there are municipalities across Ontario that would be happy to receive these coveted and scarce health care funds to build a hospital in their community.”

Ahead of the Planning Committee’s vote on the site’s master plan earlier this month, Joanne Read, TOH’s Executive Vice President and Chief Planning and Development Officer, was asked what would happen next. it was not immediately approved.

Ms. Read said she thought the project’s construction and completion timelines would be in jeopardy and was also concerned that TOH was the only one “knocking on the province’s door” over funding.

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Committee members tempered their approval of the site’s master plan by asking staff to work with TOH on elements of cycling infrastructure, tree planting and a substantial reduction in surface parking.

Regional Councilor Leiper also obtained approval to require certain conditions of a neighborhood traffic study and that the TOH fund recommended mitigation efforts based on this study.

Staff were also tasked with ensuring that the internal road network proposed for the new Civic could accommodate local transit services and that site lighting met certain conditions.

All board members, including Watson, approved a board proposal. Riley Brockington will ask Watson to write to federal cabinet ministers, new MP for Ottawa Center Yasir Naqvi and National Capital Commission Board Chair calling for federal legislation to ensure long-term land protection remains of the Central Experimental Farm and a new master plan for the farm.

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Naqvi pledged during the election campaign to introduce a law to protect the farm in perpetuity.

Paul Saurette, a member of the Dows Lake Residents Association’s special committee on the new hospital, called the committee members’ motions “very genuine and constructive attempts at problem solving” and said the association is looking forward to it. to partner with the city and the hospital for, for example, the planned neighborhood traffic study.

Karen Wright, president of the Civic Hospital Neighborhood Association, shared a similar mindset on Wednesday and said her association would remain engaged with any upcoming site plans. Already, she and other community association officials have met with the hospital to go over details of planned parking.

The site plan control app will be available on the city’s website in the coming weeks, according to Moore, the planner, and residents will have an opportunity to provide feedback.

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Rezoning, site plan approved for Maplewood Meats

By Site plan

By Kevin Boneske
Editor-in-chief


HOWARD – An application by T-Bone Investments to rezone two parcels along Milltown Road, from R-5 Rural Estate Residential to B-2 Highway Commercial, was approved last month by the Village council.

The Howard Plan Commission recommended the zoning change a week earlier, when it also supported a site plan for Maplewood Meats for the construction of a parking lot and the Evergreen Avenue connection proposed by the Department of Wisconsin Transportation and Milltown Road – part of which will be vacated by DOT and the Village – and reconfigure and expand the main parking lot west of Maplewood Meats.

Community Development Director Dave Wiese said the project is intended to stay ahead of the construction of the State Highway 29 / County VV interchange.

“The village will have to evacuate certain rights-of-way,” he said. “There are going to have to be some improvements. Things are going to have to be, obviously, buttoned up.”

Wiese said the project is consistent with the development of the region.

“Their long term plan was to develop the property,” he said.

Devin Winter of Excel Engineering spoke on behalf of the project last month, when he told the panel that the two parcels under zoning are on the north side of the existing Milltown Road.

“What is happening is that the requester more or less makes the connection from the project, or what is currently under construction as Evergreen (Avenue), by connecting to what is the existing Milltown Road for a connection to their existing parking lot. ” he said.

Winter said the part of Milltown Road vacated will be divided among the landowners.

“The north side would then be a trailer / truck parking lot (zone), with additional vehicle parking to the north – future expansion in the north for future expansion in the east,” he said. “And then, as part of that as well, there would be an extension of the parking lot of their main facility, which they currently have right now, and then resolving the grading and storm water issues as part of the project. . “

Village president Burt McIntyre said he was excited about the project.

“I know (Maplewood Meats) has been trying to grow for a while, and you want to get that cork out of the bottle,” he said.

Redlands Shopping Center’s New Site Plan Reduces Some Building Heights – Redlands Daily Facts

By Site plan

The vision for the mixed-use redevelopment of the Redlands Shopping Center site is becoming clearer, with developers now reducing some proposed building heights.

In a presentation to the Redlands Planning Commission on Tuesday, October 12, developer Village Partners Ventures LLC, shared plans for approximately 700 housing units with all previously offered fifth floor items removed, except for the restaurant on the roof.

Preliminary plans presented to the commission in April and city council in May called for up to 722 housing units and four-story buildings on average, although some parts have grown to five stories, mostly around a public square.

  • Ongoing plans for a mixed-use development on the Redlands Shopping Center site were presented to the Redlands Planning Commission on Tuesday, October 12, 2021. This artist rendering of State Street Village shows what the view is from the corner of Third Street and Redlands Boulevard would appear to be looking east. (Courtesy City of Redlands)

  • Ongoing plans for a mixed-use development on the Redlands Shopping Center site were presented to the Redlands Planning Commission on Tuesday, October 12, 2021. This artist rendering of State Street Village shows what the view is from the corner of Third Street and Redlands Boulevard would appear to face west. (Courtesy City of Redlands)

  • Ongoing plans for a mixed-use development on the Redlands Mall site were presented to the Redlands Planning Commission on Tuesday, October 12, 2021. This artist rendering of State Street Village shows what the view of State would look like Street from Paseo Comme. (Courtesy City of Redlands)

Kaitlin Morris, the builder’s development manager, told commissioners on Tuesday that after conversations with the community, “there is no particularly clear consensus regarding the elements of the fifth floor.”

In response, she added, “we wanted to be respectful and listen to this concern.”

The new plans call for the construction of five buildings, including a 7,500 square foot private amenity building with a swimming pool. In addition, the developers offer:

• 71,500 square feet of commercial floor for retail businesses and restaurants

• 12,500 square feet of office space

• a public square of half an acre

• an above-ground parking structure on five levels with 686 spaces surrounded by offices, shops and apartments

• two underground car parks with a total of 494 spaces

One of the structures would be a 14,500 square foot building at the southeast corner of East Citrus Avenue and Eureka Street for the CVS Pharmacy, which will need to be relocated from its current space to the mall.

The three-story elements of the buildings would be up to about 50 feet high, and the four-story parts would be 50 to 60 feet high, according to a report written to the commission. The tower elements and architectural projections on some of the buildings would rise to around 75 feet.

For reference, a flag pole at the corner of Vine and Cajon streets, the Redlands Liberty Pole, is 120 feet tall, according to the plaque at its base.

John Ellis, one of the architects on the project, told commissioners the plans were inspired by the city’s past and present.

“The architectural journey through this project has been very focused on the history of Redlands and respecting the tradition of most commercial buildings as well as municipal buildings,” he said, highlighting the inspiration found in the Fox Theater, AK Smiley Public Library, Brookside Post Office, Academy of Music building, and the smaller blocks that had been divided by Third and State Streets before the mall was built.

Landmarks welcoming people to the site would include tower elements, such as Third Street and Redlands Boulevard which has large balconies, and an Ellis called the “Lantern Building” on Eureka Street with a multi-story window.

Commission President Conrad Guzkowski questioned the need for large balconies, adding “they are prominent to say the least”.

Guzkowski also said the public square needs more grandeur, like a large water feature, and the CVS building needs more design work on the sides not facing the street.

Guzkowski said he was more than impressed with the team and the project, although they still have a few details to work on.

“It’s a remarkable compilation of work,” he said.

If the project is approved, the development would be built over several years, according to a written report. The first phase would consist of constructing buildings at the west end near Eureka Street and starting work on the new CVS site. A second phase would bring a new building to the northeast corner of the shopping center site. The final phase would be to move CVS and then construct the buildings at the southeast corner of the property.

Preliminary plans were shared in the spring when the developer requested the voter support exemption. U measurement development rules.

The two-decade-old Slow Growth Initiative imposes restrictions on development, including fees to mitigate impacts on infrastructure and services; prohibit the increase in admissible residential densities; and demand projects to make sure they don’t increase traffic.

The proponent requested that the transit-focused shopping center project be removed from the measure under an exemption for “development directly related to proposed Metrolink stations in the City of Redlands.”

The council granted this request in May.

The next step for the project is to go through the environmental review process, which will likely go to public review in November. The project could then return to the committee in December before moving on to the board for final approvals.

Site map for the approved condo development in Grand Oaks

By Site plan

By Alyssa Schnugg

News editor

[email protected]

Despite concerns expressed by several residents of Grand Oaks, the Oxford Planning Commission approved the Sitemap for the new Grand Oaks Village on Augusta Drive Monday.

The new phase of the planned unit development, Grand Oaks, will be a 21 unit common interest development, or condominiums. Each unit will be a three bedroom single family home with a two car garage.

The property is located on 6 acres in the Grand Oaks development between the Rosemont and Grand Ridge subdivisions, west of Augusta Drive.

Condominiums are listed as “special use” for the neighboring residential area in the Land Use Planning Code, which means that additional standards are attached to the use, but no Planning Commission approval is required. to authorize use.

Grand Oaks residents who spoke at the meeting on Monday were primarily concerned about traffic and on-street parking that the addition of 21 new homes could bring to Augusta Drive and Rosemont Loop.

Augusta Drive will be the only road entering and exiting the subdivision.

Kimberly Stewart, who lives on Augusta Drive, said traffic problems would not be an easy solution.

“If that was a simple solution – let’s paint some yellow stripes, let’s say speed bumps – it would have already been solved,” she told the planning committee. “I am pro-Oxford development. But I am also for protecting what we have. If you have infrastructure struggling to support existing development, why add more cars to a road that endangers the safety of residents, workers, and children? “

The planning commission reminded meeting attendees that its job was only to review the site plan for development and ensure it complied with city ordinances.

It was suggested that neighbors bring traffic and parking issues to the council of aldermen.

The site plan was approved by 6 votes to 1.


Chelsea Square final site plan set to be presented to Sylvan Township Council

By Site plan

The project for an 81-unit apartment complex called Chelsea Square is moving forward in the planning process with the Township of Sylvan.

A public hearing was held at the Township Planning Commission meeting on September 23 on the final site plan for the multi-family residential apartment complex. The developer has received recommended approval.

The final site plan will now need to be submitted to City Council for an official decision.

At the Township Board of Directors meeting on October 5, Sylvan Township Supervisor Kathleen Kennedy said the final site plan had been approved by the Planning Commission and the lawyer was currently working on a development agreement for review by the township board of directors.

There is no timeline for the final board review yet, but Kennedy said she expects it to be an upcoming board meeting of the canton.

According to the township staff report on the project, the site plan provides for 81 units of multi-family apartments at market price. The zoning of this new project will use two plots as a multi-family residence according to a consent judgment filed in December 2016.

The report states that the developer’s description indicates that the project is proposed to be built in a single phase and includes the construction of 17 buildings that will have access from Pielemeir Drive, which is a public road. The development would have public services provided by the Sylvan Township water and sewer system, and would also have an internal private road network unless accepted by the Washtenaw County Road Commission. The apartments will be owned and managed by Group 10 Development.

The development is proposed to be located on 16 acres of land. It is expected that there will be 37,800 square feet of open space while each apartment unit is expected to be approximately 1,300 to 1,500 square feet.

Cairn PLC begins development of the Cork site on a 472-unit project near the village of Douglas

By Site development

SITE development work has begun on a £150m+ new home development by developers PLC Cairn, on a valley site on the edge of Douglas village in Cork, close to a new school in being built by BAM.

Called Bayly, the 472-unit scheme on Carrigaline Road in Castletreasure is the first scheme of Cairn PLC founded in 2015 in Cork, having acquired a number of sites in Ireland via a €503 million portfolio sale to the Ulster Bank with Lone Star, Project Clear.

The Castletreasure site acquired by Cairn PLC was re-offered in 2016 for €25 million but is now being developed in 2021 by Cairn PLC for 472 units

Cairn bought around the same time another PLC, Glenveagh, which entered the Cork market; while Glenveagh has steadily expanded its presence and has recorded several hundred sales from Cork to date, notably to Blackrock and Maryborough Hill, Cairn has not, to date, made a move from concrete yards to Munster.

Cairn, which has stated its target of building 2,500 Irish homes by 2021, primarily in Dublin and Leinster, has 16 sites listed on its website, including Dublin, Kilkenny, Kildare and Wicklow, has two backstage sites in Galway and Castletreasure Liege.

After acquiring the sites from The Project Clear, Cairn quickly sought to sell three of its Cork sites, the Good Shepherd Convent in Sunday’s Well (now ravaged by fire and in new hands), a site in Victoria Cross and 52 acres in Castletreasure, Douglas, which had been partnered with Cork developers Frinailla, in a £30million bid.

Left unsold at its 2016 price guide of €25m (obtaining offers of around €18m via Savills agents), was the largest site, Castletreasure of 52-acre land opposite Douglas Golf Club , in a green valley. Frinailla had bought it at the height of the market, in the mid-2000s, to displace the Douglas GAA club from the village and finance the exchange through the sale of houses here as well.

Sisk contractors perform preliminary infrastructure and service work.  No main construction contractor has yet been appointed.
Sisk contractors perform preliminary infrastructure and service work. No main construction contractor has yet been appointed.

Cairn PLC obtained planning approval in October 2019 via a Strategic Housing Development (SHD) application with Meitheal Architects for this Castletreasure site, after an oral hearing covering some particular issues such as stormwater management.

    Site activity at Carr's Hill, Co Cork, where a new school is being delivered.
Site activity at Carr’s Hill, Co Cork, where a new school is being delivered.

The planning grant – one of the largest in the Cork region in recent years – is for 234 semi-detached and terraced houses, 160 flats and 78 duplexes, with 4.4ha of parkland and amenity space.

Giving the green light to construction, Bord Pleanala said the development on the edge of Douglas was a reasonable development and “would not seriously impair the residential or visual amenities of the area or nearby properties, would be acceptable in terms of design urban, height, and quantum of development.

Sisk contractors are on site, doing services, infrastructure, a bridge and a partial realignment of the road.

A sales agent has not yet been appointed, and it is unclear whether Cairn has pre-construction agreements in place for the program tranches.

Last night a spokesperson said: ‘Cairn is looking forward to bringing new homes to the market in Castletreasure in 2022 in what will be a multi-phase, multi-year development.

DETAILS: www.cairnhomes.com

Richmond Heights council committee approves Belle Oaks final site plan – including Meijer

By Site plan

RICHMOND HEIGHTS, Ohio – The City Council Planning and Zoning Committee on Tuesday (October 5) approved a final site plan for the Belle Oaks Market project at the Richmond Town Square shopping center, 700 Richmond Road.

The plan will now be passed for a full council vote next week.

The site plan, which received Planning Commission approval the night before, includes two big changes from the architects of the second phase plan Bialosky Cleveland, working for the California developer. DealPoint Merrill, showed the board last fall.

First, the design was drastically altered to accommodate a company that would become the largest in the $ 200 million development – Meijer, a chain of Midwestern super centers that sells food, fashion, electronics and more.

A stand-alone Meijer building will be constructed just south of the current Life Storage (formerly Macy’s) building, measuring 159,000 square feet, along with a garden center that can be outdoors or indoors.

The second change is the one that eliminates Regal Cinema from Belle Oaks. Regal, which had been part of the old Richmond Town Square for years, was originally to be kept as an entertainment option at Belle Oaks, a mixed-use development that will include shops and 798 luxury apartments, as well as amenities such as as a park, outdoor swimming pool, underground and above ground parking, and more.

The final Belle Oaks site plan, with the phase two buildings in white and the phase one buildings in gray. Wilson Mills Road is at the top left, while Richmond Road is at the top right. (Jeff Piorkowski, special for cleveland.com)

The Regal Cinema building, like the rest of the mall, will be demolished, likely in the first quarter of 2022.

In order to make way for the Meijer Building – which will include a large car park alongside the project which faces Wilson Mills Road – last year’s plan of a street cutting through the center of the development and heading towards Wilson Mills Road was amended.

The street, lined with apartment buildings, will now curve east around the Meijer Building before emptying into the eastern end of the development on Wilson Mills Road. Meijer will have its own separate entrance to Wilson Mills.

There will be two entrances / exits along Richmond Road as indicated on the previous plans. These entrances / exits will be located across from Hillary Lane (leading to and from the first phase of development north) and across from Geraldine Avenue.

The council’s amended plans seen on Tuesday were for the second phase of the project. The Council approved the plans for the first phase last year. On Tuesday, the council committee approved the entire package, consisting of the two phases.

In total, the project will include 24 acres of green space, which represents 35% of the 1.7 million square foot development area. Eight multi-family / commercial buildings will be constructed in the second phase. Other exterior buildings along Richmond Roads and Wilson Mills Roads remain options. The first phase will include five new buildings.

“This is a big hurdle to overcome and there is one more to come: a development deal,” said Ward 4 Councilor Mark Alexander, who chairs the Planning and Zoning Committee.

Besides a development agreement, in which taxes are distributed among the different parties involved, the city’s building commissioner Jim Urankar said developers must also submit lighting plans for council approval, separate landscaping and signage.

In addition, city council must approve every building constructed in Belle Oaks.

Alexander noted that the Meijer building planned for Belle Oaks will be different from those that currently exist, such as the store of Mentor at 9200 Mentor Ave.

“It’s a little different from the stores in Mentor, Avon – the stores that are in that area – where they’re really trying to break down the mass of their buildings, trying to implement different materials, adding glass components. , ”Said Brian Meng, associate director of Bialosky Cleveland.

“This is the prototype they are thinking of here as a reference. “

As part of the approved plan, the mall’s Firestone Complete Auto Care will be relocated to the area along Richmond Road just north of Walgreen’s.

When asked if Planet Fitness – still open at the mall site – would be part of Belle Oaks Marketplace, Meng said, “At the moment there really aren’t any tenants listed outside of Meijer, for phase 2. It could very well be moved indoors, but that’s under negotiation.

To see the sitemap as it was a year ago, visit the website Belle Oaks Marketplace website home page.

Read more of the Messenger of the Sun.

Cairn PLC starts the development of the Cork site on a 472 unit project near the village of Douglas

By Site development

SITE development work has started for a development of over 150 million euros of new homes by PLC developers Cairn, on a valley site on the outskirts of Cork village in Douglas, near a new school under construction by BAM.

Called Bayly, the 472 unit program on Carrigaline Road at Castletreasure is Cairn PLC’s first program founded in 2015 in Cork, having acquired a number of sites in Ireland through a € 503 million portfolio sale to Ulster Bank with Lone Star, Project Clear.

The Castletreasure site acquired by Cairn PLC was reopened in 2016 for 25 million euros but is being developed in 2021 by Cairn PLC for 472 units

Cairn bought around the same time another limited company, Glenveagh, entered the Cork market; While Glenveagh has continued to expand its presence and has recorded several hundred sales to date from Cork, notably to Blackrock and Maryborough Hill, Cairn has so far not made any concrete site relocations to Munster.

Cairn, which has announced its goal of building 2,500 Irish houses in 2021, mainly in Dublin and Leinster, has 16 sites listed on its website including Dublin, Kilkenny, Kildare and Wicklow, has two sites in the wings in Galway and Castletreasure Liege.

After acquiring the sites The Project Clear, Cairn quickly sought to sell three of its Cork sites, the Good Shepherd Convent in Sunday’s Well (now destroyed by fire and in new hands), a site in Victoria Cross and 52 acres to Castletreasure, Douglas, who had been associated with the developers of Cork Frinailla, in a offer of 30 million euros.

Unsold at its £ 25million 2016 price guide (obtaining bids of around £ 18million via Savills agents), was the largest site, the 52-acre Castle Treasure Lands across from the Douglas Golf Club, in a green setting. Frinailla had bought it at the peak of the market in the mid-2000s to move the Douglas GAA club out of the village and finance the exchange through the sale of houses here as well.

Sisk contractors perform preliminary infrastructure and service work.  No main contractor for the constructions has yet been appointed.
Sisk contractors perform preliminary infrastructure and service work. No main contractor for the constructions has yet been appointed.

Cairn PLC obtained planning approval in October 2019 via a Strategic Housing Development (SHD) application with Meitheal Architects for this Castletreasure site, after an oral hearing addressing some specific issues such as stormwater management.

    Construction site activity in Carr's Hill, Co Cork, where a new school is being delivered.
Construction site activity in Carr’s Hill, Co Cork, where a new school is being delivered.

The town planning grant – one of the largest in the Cork region in recent years – covers 234 semi-detached and terraced houses, 160 apartments and 78 duplexes, with 4.4 ha of parkland and amenity space.

In giving the green light for construction, Bord Pleanala said the development of the Douglas Edge was reasonable development and “would not seriously impair the residential or visual amenities of the area or property nearby, would be acceptable in terms of of urban design, height, and quantum of development.

Sisk contractors are on site, performing services, infrastructure, a bridge and partial road realignment.

No sales agent has been named yet, and it is unclear whether Cairn has any pre-construction deals for portions of the program.

A spokesperson said last night that “Cairn looks forward to bringing new homes to Castletreasure in 2022 in what will be a phased, multi-year development.”

DETAILS: www.cairnhomes.com

NCC Approves New Civic Site Plan and Requires LRT Connection

By Site plan

Content of the article

The National Capital Commission on Tuesday gave its blessing to the Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic Campus site plan, but insists the hospital include a “seamless, intuitive and weather-protected” link to the line. from nearby Trillium LRT.

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This connection for LRT commuters is one of the major unresolved issues with the $2.8 billion hospital development at the corner of Carling Avenue and Preston Street. The city’s planning committee gave its own approval to the site plan on Monday, but left open the question of the LRT connection.

It will be approximately 400 meters or a five minute walk from the Carling LRT station to the main hospital entrance.

City planners say an underground tunnel or an overhead walkway are “feasible” connections, but the decision on which to build is still two or three years away.

“Strong transit connectivity” was one of the top concerns the NCC heard from the public during its consultations at the hospital site, said NCC CEO Tobi Nussbaum.

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“We have identified several areas that will require further work, further elaboration, further discussion with the hospital,” Nussbaum said.

“I think we all recognize that seamless, integrated, weather-protected connections between the hospital and the future transit station are very, very important.”

Any new site design proposal must be submitted to the NCC for approval.

The hospital is slated to open in 2028 and aims to have 35% of its visitors arrive by public transit or active transportation, rising to 65% by its completion in 2048.

“We really want to do everything we can to help the hospital achieve this goal so that the focus on transit integration will be very important in the years to come,” Nussbaum said.

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The NCC is also pushing to improve pedestrian and cycle connections to the hospital.

The hospital site plan includes a four-story, 2,400-space parking garage with total on-site parking for 3,099 cars, two more than the minimum required by city zoning rules. The garage will be built with a green roof, complemented by trees and the NCC also wants to ensure that the roof will be well maintained and that public access will never be restricted. It also requires “the minimization of tree felling and extensive replanting” during construction. The loss of trees is another sore point for opponents of the hospital project.

The NCC’s approval sets the stage for a final vote on the site plan at Ottawa City Council on October 13.

(The NCC held its Annual Public Meeting on Monday evening, but a technical issue prevented it from being livestreamed as scheduled. Audio of the meeting can be found on the NCC’s Youtube channel.)

  1. A July file photo of the area near Carling and Preston, where The Ottawa Hospital's new Civic campus is to be built.

    Planning Committee Approves Site Master Plan for Future Civic Hospital

  2. Development renderings for the new Civic Hospital campus included an entrance for Dow's Lake station on the south side of Carling Avenue, though officials said they were investigating an overpass or underpass to pedestrians leading to the station from the north side of Carling.

    Funding and Transit Service Affect Key Considerations for Civic Hospital Access to the Trillium Line

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