Skip to main content

Lumber business owners seek to remove seven lots from existing site plan

By Site plan

MOVED: Site improvement plans at the Tuckerton Lumber Co. location in Surf City include relocating storage media and divesting seven lots from its site plan. (Photo by Ryan Morrill)

Counsel for the new owners of Tuckerton Lumber Co. said his clients’ plans to divest seven lots from the current site plan and relocate storage shelves are the only land use changes planned at the site. of Surf City, located on both sides of Long Beach Boulevard. in the district.

Tom Coleman, a lawyer with Raymond, Coleman and Heinhold based in Moorestown, outlined the plans in a November 9 letter accompanying a request to the Surf City Land Use Board to change the current sitemap.

“The purpose of this modified preliminary and final site plan request is to remove Block 5, Lots 8, 10, 11 and 12, and Block 12, Lots 14 and 16, from the conditions of site plan approvals. granted in 1991 and 1993 ”, according to Coleman’s letter.

Those six lots, along with Block 12, Lot 23 will no longer be used by the Tuckerton Lumber Co., he said in the letter.

The company will operate from block 12, lots 18, 20 and 22 and block 19, according to the application filed by Coleman.

In the summary of the request, Coleman stated that the amended site plan request was a requirement of the temporary occupancy certificate issued in conjunction with his client’s acquisition of the property from Tuckerton Lumber Co. and a letter of June from Kevin Quinlan, counsel for the council, indicating that the document was necessary to remove the lots which are no longer part of the use of the company.

When an application is submitted, the land use board clerk reviews it to ensure administrative compliance before forwarding it to the engineer and council attorney for review. During his examination of the file, Frank Little, borough engineer, judged it “technically incomplete”.

In a Dec. 8 letter to Quinlan and Board Secretary Christine Hannemann, Little noted that the lots removed from the sitemap “support commercial use by providing employees with parking, equipment storage and office space and no information was provided to the board as to the intentions for the use or future development of the plots listed above and no details were provided to support the continued use of the business. “

Little has requested, at a minimum, the applicant to amend the plans and the application to identify all prior approved uses on the site map, as outlined in previous resolutions and approved site plans, according to his letter.

Coleman could not be reached for further comment at press time.

The lots proposed for divestiture are part of two earlier approvals by previous land use boards, one from 1991 and the other from January 1993, according to a June letter from Quinlan to Coleman.

In his letter, Quinlan noted that the conditions for the approval of the 1991 site plan were specifically incorporated in the January 1993 resolution granting a special-reason exemption for Lot 14, Block 12, referring to ” a substantial portion of the lot in question has been used in conjunction with the Applicant’s lumber business for over 40 years.

Tuckerton Lumber Co. was sold to new owners after an amended list attracted buyers who would keep the historic business open. Investment group TLC Land Holding LLC and new store operators Tom Dwier and Keli Lynch took ownership in July.

The Surf City building and grounds at 200 Long Beach Blvd. and the Railroad Avenue company in Tuckerton that predated it since 1932 were both included in the multi-million dollar purchase. They will both be kept in business, “as usual,” with a view of possible additions “to the next level” and “no plans for anything residential,” the new owners said at the time of the sale. .

– Gina G. Scala

[email protected]

Jersey City Planning Council Approves Site Plan for Edge Works at SciTech Scity

By Site plan

Design drawings and site plan for Edge Works, an eight-story business incubation center that will serve as the centerpiece for SciTech Scite, have been approved by the Jersey City Planning Council.

The planning board also approved the subdivision of the land into plots for two other key components of SciTech Scity: Liberty Science Center High School and Fellows’ Village.

SciTech Scity, the 30-acre “City of Tomorrow” under development by Freedom Science Center, is expected to have a huge impact on Jersey City and the state when it opens in late 2023 or early 2024. Edge Works will play a big part in this.

Edge Works will include the Co-Creation Center, a state-of-the-art 40,000 square foot conference center and cutting-edge technology exhibition gallery, and the Works, 60,000 square feet of research and development labs, workspaces and coworking offices for startups and entrepreneurs, as well as skunkworks suites, product showcases, consumer testing laboratories and offices for certain companies established in sectors of particular importance to the collective future of the planet.

The components of SciTech Scity

It’s easy – and awesome – to list the parts of SciTech Scity (see the full story here):

  • On-board work: An eight-story, 100,000-square-foot business incubation center that includes a conference center and research and development space for startups and established businesses;
  • Liberty Science Center High School: It aims to be the best STEM high school in the country;
  • Village of scholars: Residential housing for innovators, scientists, entrepreneurs, STEM graduate students and anyone interested in being part of the SciTech Scity community;
  • Public municipalities: 4 acres of outdoor activations that encourage exploration, creativity, collaboration and innovation.

Liberty Science Center CEO Paul Hoffman said Edge Works would have a big impact.

“Edge Works will be a business optimizer, a new generation of innovation centers that maximizes business success and social impact,” he said. “Our goal is to bring together experts from multiple disciplines and harness science and technology to solve social problems and turn cutting-edge ideas into a reality that makes the world radically better. “

At the heart of the community, Edge Works will be interconnected with each of the elements of SciTech Scity: Liberty Science Center High School, Scholars Village and a Public Commons.

The planning board approval is the third recent major development for SciTech Scity.

On October 22, Governor Phil Murphy led a breakthrough at the site. It was also reported that Israel Sheba Medical Center, the largest hospital system in the Middle East and one of the top 10 hospitals in the world, will be Edge Works’ premier innovation partner and global tenant.

Subsequent phases of SciTech Scity may include expanded incubation spaces, wet labs, additional schools, a large university satellite campus, or other facilities to spur STEM innovation and job creation.

Traders in Bolton market are worried about the development plan of the “site”

By Site development

TRADERS continued to voice concerns about the possible disruption Bolton Council’s plans for market redevelopment could cause.

This comes after the authority released further details last week on plans to move a five-meter access road closer to the market and relocate waste units, which officials say will benefit the market. traders.

Bolton’s advice is hoping this will be a key aspect of a multi-million pound master plan to remake the area, but some traders have expressed skepticism about the long-term gains and disruption this work is likely to have. on their businesses.

Martin Farrimond, of Deli Boys, said: “This is going to have a significant effect on business as the area will become a construction site.

“The council must compensate the stand holders for the reduced business.”

He added: “The Bolton Market is of great value to the city, but the council doesn’t seem to understand that being a trader is a tough life.

“The proposed development also has value, but not at the expense of traders who throw in the towel, you can’t sell a product if you don’t get traffic.

“The Bolton Council is cutting back attendance in pursuit of their dreams.

“They have to take care of the market traders and compensate during this period of development.

“If they don’t, in the next few years there won’t be a Bolton Market, another broken piece of history.”

Mr Farrimond also added that the threat of parking fines could deter customers from visiting the market.

He said, “Why would customers pay parking fees when they can shop in large supermarkets and stores for free?

“This, combined with the pandemic, makes life very difficult for traders. ”

But the council said the plans will ultimately improve the trade.

A spokesperson said: “We are working to minimize the impact on the parking lot and for customers in the market.

“We will create a new public space that can be used for additional parking or for events and will also facilitate pedestrian access to markets, thus increasing footfall and commerce. ”

Site plan agreement for manufacturing plant in Palmerston conditionally approved

By Site plan

MINTO – A site plan agreement for a new manufacturing facility in the Palmerston Industrial Park was conditionally approved by city council on December 7.

In May, the board approved the purchase by the Hammond Manufacturing Company of Guelph of a 13-acre property at 215 Minto Road for $ 520,000.

In 2016, the property went through a provincial certification process and was considered a certified industrial site.

The company, which manufactures electrical and electronic enclosures and components for the North American and global markets, has announced development plans in stages, with a first-phase investment of between $ 15 million and $ 20 million.

Phase two would involve the construction of a second factory to be built on site to produce metal stampings.

“So this one is pretty exciting,” said Ashley Sawyer, Minto planning technician.

The site plan agreement is for the first phase, which measures approximately 100,000 square feet.

“It’s a one-story manufacturing plant with offices as well. Initially it will employ 25-30 people and there are plans to grow and hire more in the next phase, ”Sawyer told the board.

“The second phase is also proposed on the drawings and this site plan would be presented again for review at a later date. “

Sawyer said county planning staff, city staff and Triton Engineering have all reviewed the plan, “and we are now happy to recommend approval of the site plan deal.”

“We’re just waiting for the review of the County (Department) Road Traffic Impact Statement we received and just waiting for their comments,” Sawyer said.

“The owners will have one year from the date of occupancy of the building to complete all the work required in the site plan agreement, with the exception of the asphalt work, which will be required within the following two years. the paving of this part of Minto. Road, but at the end of the day we recommend approval, ”she said.

Council passed a motion to receive the planning technician’s report and conditionally approve the site plan agreement.

“It’s just great to see this happening,” said Mayor George Bridge.

Limerick students enjoy the learning-by-doing experience when developing the Opera site

By Site development

Students at UNIVERSITY of Limerick had the opportunity to gain real-time experience on one of Ireland’s most exciting construction projects.

UL civil engineering students took on the role of engineering consultants at Limerick’s Twenty Thirty Opera Square.

The 35 students based their integrated design project on development as part of their third year course.

The students had to complete the civil and structural design of the “One Opera Square” building at the Opera project site, a six-story office building above the basement on Michael Street.

Some of the tasks that needed to be performed included professional practice elements such as structural analysis, risk and health and safety assessments, surveying including geotechnical soil profiles, field testing and in the soil laboratory and the development of a mobility management plan for the Opera project. .

Course leader for the project, Declan Phillips, said: “UL’s Civil Engineering program uses an exclusively ‘learning by doing’ approach to prepare the next generation of engineers. This partnership with Limerick Twenty Thirty is a prime example.

Mr Phillips added: “Opera Square is one of the most anticipated and exciting projects underway in Ireland and it has been a huge advantage to be able to get our students to base their IDP on it. We have received great support from the Limerick Twenty Thirty team, Cogent Associates project managers and SISK entrepreneurs, and the experience students gain will be invaluable to them, especially as they prepare for their co-op internship.

If a civil engineering student had to choose a project they would like to work on, Opera would measure up because of its scale, complexity, and ambition. It was a great experience for them.

David Conway, CEO of Limerick Twenty Thirty, said: “We were delighted to help UL with this project. Opera Square has everything and more that civil engineering students would want to explore.

“These students will be the civil engineers of tomorrow and it is essential that the sector has the flow of graduates to support the activity, so it is important for us in this regard also to be able to support initiatives like this. UL’s civil engineering program has an excellent reputation and being one of our local universities, this is something we are delighted to have collaborated on.

After a presentation to the speakers and representatives of Limerick Twenty Thirty, awards were given for the best team design presentation, best site assessment, best geotechnical design and best structural design.

Marina Village site plan obtains approval from Suisun Planning Commission

By Site plan

SUISUN CITY – The Planning Commission on Tuesday approved the site plan and the architectural review request by a 4-0 vote for the construction of 160 apartments at the southeast corner of Marina Boulevard and Buena Vista Avenue.

There are two positions to be filled within the commission.

The Marina Village Apartments project is described as a 100% affordable housing development.

It will provide affordable rental housing reserved for households earning 30 to 70% of the region’s median income.

The development will include nine three-storey garden-style residential buildings, a community building and a laundry room.

The majority of public commentators were concerned about how the development would affect traffic in this area. Many motorists take Buena Vista Avenue to Marina Boulevard to access Highway 12.

During commuting and school hours, traffic may flow onto Buena Vista and Railroad Avenue.

The main access to the site will be located next to the management office, along the western edge of the site, linked to Boulevard Marina by an alley on the right only.

Secondary access to the site will be located at the northeast corner of the development, connecting to Buena Vista Avenue through a new driveway. An eastbound right-hand turn pocket is included in the proposed driveway on Buena Vista Avenue.

“Marina Boulevard already has a lot of traffic,” said George Guynn. “It will get more severe with 160 units and maybe three to four cars per unit.”

He suggested the city focus more on business development than housing.

Marina Village is the first project to be considered under the city’s new Good Neighbor Policy, designed to ensure that procedures in place are reasonably calculated to ensure that the premises remain calm, safe and clean. and the surrounding area.

“This project is only good for developers,” said Steve Olry. “I’d rather live next to a juvenile detention center (than this project). “

A traffic study found that the average vehicle delay on Marina Boulevard at Buena Vista Avenue is expected to exceed conditions by 5 seconds or more.

It offered two options for improvement:

• Maintain control of stops in all directions and add a pocket of northbound right turns.
• Build a traffic light.

Donna LeBlanc was concerned that there were only three designated waste areas. This was the number recommended by the services of the Republic.

Marina Village is a Solano affordable housing project that will be funded by federal and state funds, said Don Harris of Solano Affordable Housing.

“This is not a Section 8 project,” said Harris. “The income limits are checked every year. “

Learn more about the project on www.solanohousing.org.

Hartford Commission Approves Taphouse Site Plan | Business

By Site plan

HARTFORD – The Planning Commission on Monday approved the site plan for the Rubi Falls Taphouse.

HARTFORD – The Common Council last week approved a developer agreement with YUMI Enterprises, paving the way for a faucet in the basement of the Millstream building.

The commission unanimously approved the site plan, which provided for the space of the outdoor patio which will be part of the tap room. The Rubi Falls Taphouse is located in the basement of the Millstream Building at 120 N. Main St.

City planner Justin Drew told the commission it’s about 800 square feet of space, where the business will have seating, umbrellas, and a bar with riverside seating.

“Because this affects the overall appearance of the building, it must be submitted to the Planning Commission,” said Drew.

“The staff think this looks very appropriate and will be very inviting,” he said.

The outdoor area of ​​the beer garden will be used for live music on weekends, depending on the sitemap application, as well as seating in general. The site plan also included a fence along the east side of the outdoor rest area and a raised planter to the east of the fence, near the river.

According to the commission’s discussions, the name Rubi Falls comes from the Rubicon River, in reference to the river and the falls adjacent to the new venture. A company representative at the meeting said that name is the one they are currently working with, but it is not yet officially finalized.

Rubi Falls Taphouse had a conditional use permit approved by the Planning Commission in November. Late last month, the joint council also approved a developer agreement for the property, under which the developer can receive up to $ 126,109 over five years from the city to help with the project.

Funding will come from the company’s own taxes, which the city will reimburse. The arrangement is feasible because the Millstream Building, where the business will be built, is in a supplementary tax financial district.

In a TID, the new tax increase created from a new development or redevelopment is fed back into the district in various ways, rather than being collected by tax jurisdictions.

With those items already approved, the site plan was the last step required for the faucet to continue development, according to Drew.

Hamburg Housing PUD receives final site plan approval

By Site plan

December 10, 2021

By Mike Kruzman / [email protected]

Officials from the Canton of Hamburg have approved a new residential development.

The board of directors reviewed the final site plan for the development of the planned mixed unit of Murie Glen, as part of its meeting on Tuesday afternoon. The site is located on approximately 49 acres between the Mystic Ridge Subdivision to the west and Merill Road to the east. Access points would include Thompson Road, an existing upgraded private road and a proposed connection to an existing stretch of Shadbrush Trail, according to a note in the council meeting file.

Fifty-one single-family homes will populate the development, using the Open Space and Senior Housing Regulations, or ECHO. ECHO units will be reserved for residents aged 55 and over. Planning and Zoning Director Chris Madigan told the board that the parallel plan showed they could get closer to the number of units they wanted, but ultimately needed the PUD designation to build. the last. The parallel plan suggested that 47 units could fit. Madigan said that before and before his arrival, city council approved the additional 4 units because they felt the project met the exemplary qualifications needed to achieve the bonus density.

The project was submitted to the Board of Directors with a recommendation for approval, subject to 8 conditions. Madigan said these conditions are quite common, being related to things like trees and trails. Trustee Patricia Hughes had concerns about the private road easement and wanted to see a maintenance agreement, which Madigan said was currently with the township lawyer.

The board approved the final site plan 6-1, with Hughes voting against. Staff will now work with their attorney to deliver the final development agreement to the board for final approval.

DDRB approves sitemap for One Riverside – The Resident Community News Group, Inc.

By Site plan

The Jacksonville Downtown Development Review Board has approved the site plan for the One Riverside development. The 18.84-acre mixed-use development will be on the former Times-Union Building site.

Fuqua Development’s plans include a grocery store, retail stores, a restaurant accessible from the Riverwalk, 271 initial residential units, and a parking garage. He also diverts and lights McCoy’s Creek and builds a public park between the creek and the CSX railroad. The width of the stream will also decrease from 40 feet to 80 feet.

The estimated cost of the project is approximately $ 182.2 million.

Ease of public access to the park and Riverwalk has been a key requirement of the DDRB and the Downtown Investment Authority. The park will also be accessible from the Riverwalk.

The project is expected to be built in two phases with a second residential complex after the stream diversion. The plans include several pedestrian and public art areas.

The pedestrian-friendly planning is in conjunction with the construction of the Jacksonville Emerald Trail.

DDRB board member Matt Brockelman said he believes the sitemap is a good balance of combining what’s desired with what’s practical.

“Sometimes it’s a little too easy for us to get stuck in the weeds,” he said. “I think we hit a pretty good balance. I don’t think we can stress enough the importance of this project for the riparian activation effort.

Council members asked for some minor adjustments to make sure the pedestrian areas and walkways were wide enough for what should be a lot of traffic.

Fuqua spokesperson Cyndy Trimmer said that wouldn’t be a problem and that they wanted to make One Riverside as pedestrian-friendly as possible.

The project includes approximately $ 31.5 million in incentives offered by the city. This bill is currently in the hands of the municipal council. If everything is approved, the grand opening could take place early next year after the old Times-Union building was demolished in April. The second phase could start around 2025.

By Kevin J. Meerschaert
News from the resident community

(No evaluations for the moment)
Loading…

Gaithersburg Approves Initial Site Plan for Novavax Campus

By Site plan

Gaithersburg City Council unanimously approved a schematic development plan, or initial site plan, for the future Novavax corporate campus at 14 Firstfield Road on Monday.

The campus includes more than 600,000 square feet of office, laboratory, manufacturing, and research and development space in two buildings, according to the plan. It also provides a reception center, a central green space and a car park.

The campus is adjacent to the existing building at 700 Quince Orchard Road, where Novavax will also occupy space.

Sam Copelan, a city planner, told council Monday evening that the plan also includes a pedestrian bridge connecting the two buildings on the campus.

Copelan said about a third of Novavax employees will work on campus full time, another third will be remote and the rest will have a “hybrid” schedule both remotely and in person.

Gaithersburg executives have been optimistic about expanding Novavax’s presence in the city, as the company works to develop its own COVID-19 vaccine, joining the existing three.

Novavax has applied for emergency clearance for the use of the vaccine in the UK, Australia, Canada and New Zealand, and plans to do so in the US next year, a company executive told NPR last week.

Mayor Jud Ashman on Monday called the expansion of Novavax’s presence “a victory for the city of Gaithersburg”. The two new city council members elected last month, Lisa Henderson and Jim McNulty, were also enthusiastic.

“Prior to our election to the board, we talked a lot about the Gaithersburg world-class biotech corridor, and it will be a crown jewel of this corridor,” McNulty said.

Henderson said she was in awe of the beauty of the campus as depicted in the map and that she is delighted that it is within walking distance of a nearby shopping center.

“All the hard work that has been done, Jim and I can celebrate and enjoy the beauty of this,” she said.

Dan Schere can be contacted at [email protected]