Skip to main content

HARTFORD – The Planning Commission on Monday approved the site plan for the Rubi Falls Taphouse.

HARTFORD – The Common Council last week approved a developer agreement with YUMI Enterprises, paving the way for a faucet in the basement of the Millstream building.

The commission unanimously approved the site plan, which provided for the space of the outdoor patio which will be part of the tap room. The Rubi Falls Taphouse is located in the basement of the Millstream Building at 120 N. Main St.

City planner Justin Drew told the commission it’s about 800 square feet of space, where the business will have seating, umbrellas, and a bar with riverside seating.

“Because this affects the overall appearance of the building, it must be submitted to the Planning Commission,” said Drew.

“The staff think this looks very appropriate and will be very inviting,” he said.

The outdoor area of ​​the beer garden will be used for live music on weekends, depending on the sitemap application, as well as seating in general. The site plan also included a fence along the east side of the outdoor rest area and a raised planter to the east of the fence, near the river.

According to the commission’s discussions, the name Rubi Falls comes from the Rubicon River, in reference to the river and the falls adjacent to the new venture. A company representative at the meeting said that name is the one they are currently working with, but it is not yet officially finalized.

Rubi Falls Taphouse had a conditional use permit approved by the Planning Commission in November. Late last month, the joint council also approved a developer agreement for the property, under which the developer can receive up to $ 126,109 over five years from the city to help with the project.

Funding will come from the company’s own taxes, which the city will reimburse. The arrangement is feasible because the Millstream Building, where the business will be built, is in a supplementary tax financial district.

In a TID, the new tax increase created from a new development or redevelopment is fed back into the district in various ways, rather than being collected by tax jurisdictions.

With those items already approved, the site plan was the last step required for the faucet to continue development, according to Drew.