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Marina Village site plan obtains approval from Suisun Planning Commission

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SUISUN CITY – The Planning Commission on Tuesday approved the site plan and the architectural review request by a 4-0 vote for the construction of 160 apartments at the southeast corner of Marina Boulevard and Buena Vista Avenue.

There are two positions to be filled within the commission.

The Marina Village Apartments project is described as a 100% affordable housing development.

It will provide affordable rental housing reserved for households earning 30 to 70% of the region’s median income.

The development will include nine three-storey garden-style residential buildings, a community building and a laundry room.

The majority of public commentators were concerned about how the development would affect traffic in this area. Many motorists take Buena Vista Avenue to Marina Boulevard to access Highway 12.

During commuting and school hours, traffic may flow onto Buena Vista and Railroad Avenue.

The main access to the site will be located next to the management office, along the western edge of the site, linked to Boulevard Marina by an alley on the right only.

Secondary access to the site will be located at the northeast corner of the development, connecting to Buena Vista Avenue through a new driveway. An eastbound right-hand turn pocket is included in the proposed driveway on Buena Vista Avenue.

“Marina Boulevard already has a lot of traffic,” said George Guynn. “It will get more severe with 160 units and maybe three to four cars per unit.”

He suggested the city focus more on business development than housing.

Marina Village is the first project to be considered under the city’s new Good Neighbor Policy, designed to ensure that procedures in place are reasonably calculated to ensure that the premises remain calm, safe and clean. and the surrounding area.

“This project is only good for developers,” said Steve Olry. “I’d rather live next to a juvenile detention center (than this project). “

A traffic study found that the average vehicle delay on Marina Boulevard at Buena Vista Avenue is expected to exceed conditions by 5 seconds or more.

It offered two options for improvement:

• Maintain control of stops in all directions and add a pocket of northbound right turns.
• Build a traffic light.

Donna LeBlanc was concerned that there were only three designated waste areas. This was the number recommended by the services of the Republic.

Marina Village is a Solano affordable housing project that will be funded by federal and state funds, said Don Harris of Solano Affordable Housing.

“This is not a Section 8 project,” said Harris. “The income limits are checked every year. “

Learn more about the project on www.solanohousing.org.

Hartford Commission Approves Taphouse Site Plan | Business

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HARTFORD – The Planning Commission on Monday approved the site plan for the Rubi Falls Taphouse.

HARTFORD – The Common Council last week approved a developer agreement with YUMI Enterprises, paving the way for a faucet in the basement of the Millstream building.

The commission unanimously approved the site plan, which provided for the space of the outdoor patio which will be part of the tap room. The Rubi Falls Taphouse is located in the basement of the Millstream Building at 120 N. Main St.

City planner Justin Drew told the commission it’s about 800 square feet of space, where the business will have seating, umbrellas, and a bar with riverside seating.

“Because this affects the overall appearance of the building, it must be submitted to the Planning Commission,” said Drew.

“The staff think this looks very appropriate and will be very inviting,” he said.

The outdoor area of ​​the beer garden will be used for live music on weekends, depending on the sitemap application, as well as seating in general. The site plan also included a fence along the east side of the outdoor rest area and a raised planter to the east of the fence, near the river.

According to the commission’s discussions, the name Rubi Falls comes from the Rubicon River, in reference to the river and the falls adjacent to the new venture. A company representative at the meeting said that name is the one they are currently working with, but it is not yet officially finalized.

Rubi Falls Taphouse had a conditional use permit approved by the Planning Commission in November. Late last month, the joint council also approved a developer agreement for the property, under which the developer can receive up to $ 126,109 over five years from the city to help with the project.

Funding will come from the company’s own taxes, which the city will reimburse. The arrangement is feasible because the Millstream Building, where the business will be built, is in a supplementary tax financial district.

In a TID, the new tax increase created from a new development or redevelopment is fed back into the district in various ways, rather than being collected by tax jurisdictions.

With those items already approved, the site plan was the last step required for the faucet to continue development, according to Drew.

Hamburg Housing PUD receives final site plan approval

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December 10, 2021

By Mike Kruzman / [email protected]

Officials from the Canton of Hamburg have approved a new residential development.

The board of directors reviewed the final site plan for the development of the planned mixed unit of Murie Glen, as part of its meeting on Tuesday afternoon. The site is located on approximately 49 acres between the Mystic Ridge Subdivision to the west and Merill Road to the east. Access points would include Thompson Road, an existing upgraded private road and a proposed connection to an existing stretch of Shadbrush Trail, according to a note in the council meeting file.

Fifty-one single-family homes will populate the development, using the Open Space and Senior Housing Regulations, or ECHO. ECHO units will be reserved for residents aged 55 and over. Planning and Zoning Director Chris Madigan told the board that the parallel plan showed they could get closer to the number of units they wanted, but ultimately needed the PUD designation to build. the last. The parallel plan suggested that 47 units could fit. Madigan said that before and before his arrival, city council approved the additional 4 units because they felt the project met the exemplary qualifications needed to achieve the bonus density.

The project was submitted to the Board of Directors with a recommendation for approval, subject to 8 conditions. Madigan said these conditions are quite common, being related to things like trees and trails. Trustee Patricia Hughes had concerns about the private road easement and wanted to see a maintenance agreement, which Madigan said was currently with the township lawyer.

The board approved the final site plan 6-1, with Hughes voting against. Staff will now work with their attorney to deliver the final development agreement to the board for final approval.

DDRB approves sitemap for One Riverside – The Resident Community News Group, Inc.

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The Jacksonville Downtown Development Review Board has approved the site plan for the One Riverside development. The 18.84-acre mixed-use development will be on the former Times-Union Building site.

Fuqua Development’s plans include a grocery store, retail stores, a restaurant accessible from the Riverwalk, 271 initial residential units, and a parking garage. He also diverts and lights McCoy’s Creek and builds a public park between the creek and the CSX railroad. The width of the stream will also decrease from 40 feet to 80 feet.

The estimated cost of the project is approximately $ 182.2 million.

Ease of public access to the park and Riverwalk has been a key requirement of the DDRB and the Downtown Investment Authority. The park will also be accessible from the Riverwalk.

The project is expected to be built in two phases with a second residential complex after the stream diversion. The plans include several pedestrian and public art areas.

The pedestrian-friendly planning is in conjunction with the construction of the Jacksonville Emerald Trail.

DDRB board member Matt Brockelman said he believes the sitemap is a good balance of combining what’s desired with what’s practical.

“Sometimes it’s a little too easy for us to get stuck in the weeds,” he said. “I think we hit a pretty good balance. I don’t think we can stress enough the importance of this project for the riparian activation effort.

Council members asked for some minor adjustments to make sure the pedestrian areas and walkways were wide enough for what should be a lot of traffic.

Fuqua spokesperson Cyndy Trimmer said that wouldn’t be a problem and that they wanted to make One Riverside as pedestrian-friendly as possible.

The project includes approximately $ 31.5 million in incentives offered by the city. This bill is currently in the hands of the municipal council. If everything is approved, the grand opening could take place early next year after the old Times-Union building was demolished in April. The second phase could start around 2025.

By Kevin J. Meerschaert
News from the resident community

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Gaithersburg Approves Initial Site Plan for Novavax Campus

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Gaithersburg City Council unanimously approved a schematic development plan, or initial site plan, for the future Novavax corporate campus at 14 Firstfield Road on Monday.

The campus includes more than 600,000 square feet of office, laboratory, manufacturing, and research and development space in two buildings, according to the plan. It also provides a reception center, a central green space and a car park.

The campus is adjacent to the existing building at 700 Quince Orchard Road, where Novavax will also occupy space.

Sam Copelan, a city planner, told council Monday evening that the plan also includes a pedestrian bridge connecting the two buildings on the campus.

Copelan said about a third of Novavax employees will work on campus full time, another third will be remote and the rest will have a “hybrid” schedule both remotely and in person.

Gaithersburg executives have been optimistic about expanding Novavax’s presence in the city, as the company works to develop its own COVID-19 vaccine, joining the existing three.

Novavax has applied for emergency clearance for the use of the vaccine in the UK, Australia, Canada and New Zealand, and plans to do so in the US next year, a company executive told NPR last week.

Mayor Jud Ashman on Monday called the expansion of Novavax’s presence “a victory for the city of Gaithersburg”. The two new city council members elected last month, Lisa Henderson and Jim McNulty, were also enthusiastic.

“Prior to our election to the board, we talked a lot about the Gaithersburg world-class biotech corridor, and it will be a crown jewel of this corridor,” McNulty said.

Henderson said she was in awe of the beauty of the campus as depicted in the map and that she is delighted that it is within walking distance of a nearby shopping center.

“All the hard work that has been done, Jim and I can celebrate and enjoy the beauty of this,” she said.

Dan Schere can be contacted at [email protected]

Planners will review the revised site plan for 99 Main Street.

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The Genesee County Planning Council is expected to review on Thursday a revised site plan submitted by smartDESIGN Architecture for exterior modifications to 99 Main St., Batavia – the future site of the Buffalo Implants and Periodontics office.

The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. at County Building 2 on West Main Street Road.

According to documents submitted by project manager Todd Audsley, further changes in the design and elevation of the facade are required due to issues with product availability and subcontractors.

Specifically, the new plan calls for the construction of an “on-site built wood-frame storefront wrapped in exterior fracture metal, with a metal standing seam bypassing the line of the second story, which forms a small hood on the floor. above the recessed entrance ”.

The original concept was an aluminum storefront with a fabric awning over the recessed door.

County planning staff recommend approval of the overhaul as it still meets the design guidelines of the City of Batavia in the Central Business District (C-3).

The $ 1.1 million renovation and restoration of the historic three-story, 7,500 square foot building is part of the downtown New York State revitalization initiative. The dental office is on the first floor while the second floor is being developed for commercial offices and the third floor will consist of two two-bedroom apartments at market price.

Another reference to note on Thursday’s agenda is a site plan review and a special use permit application for an Amherst company to erect two wind turbines at 2311 Bennett Road in the town. by Darien.

Whitecap Electric, LLC, is looking to install a pair of wind turbines up to 2.5 megawatts each with a total height of approximately 450 feet. The bottom of the blade would be more than 30 feet above any obstruction within a 250 foot radius.

The $ 6 million project is intended to comply with the 5 megawatt cap for net metering in New York City and will be connected to the grid as part of the Community Distributed Generation (CDG) compensation scheme.

County planning staff recommend approval with changes focused on an appropriate decommissioning plan, visual impact study and bird analysis, stormwater pollution prevention plan, and application for verification of address 9-1-1 with the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office.

Photo: Revised facade design at 99 Main St., Batavia. Courtesy of the Genesee County Planning Department.

Gloversville Planning Board approves site plan for $ 20 million project

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Ken Kearney, owner of the Kearney Reality Group, discusses the site plan for the Glove City Lofts artist housing project at 52 Church Street in front of the Gloversville Planning Council on the night of Tuesday, December 7, 2021.

GLOVERSVILLE – The Gloversville Planning Council has approved the Kearney Realty Group’s 75-unit, 75-unit “Glove City Lofts” site plan at 51 Church Street as a result of ‘a public hearing Tuesday evening.

Tanyalynnette Grimes, President and CEO of Micropolis Development Group, was the only person to speak at the public hearing. She asked if the Glove City lofts, if built, would be used for “low-rental housing” or “Section 8” housing.

“Are there any clarifications [of the income levels of the prospective tenants of the building] in the site plans, since it is in a superimposed historic district, and with regard to the businesses of the city center? ” she asked.

Fulton County planner Sean Geraghty, who advises the planning council, said Kearney’s site plan request included clarification of the income requirements of potential tenants.

“If you want to come and review the application, you are more than welcome to do so. You can do it here in town or I have a copy at the county planning department, ”Geraghty said. “Generally speaking, public hearings are not question-and-answer sessions. This really is an opportunity for the public to tell the Planning Board something they don’t know about the application, but yes the applicants have been very thorough in explaining the types of tenants they will have in the application. these buildings and how they will qualify.

Ken Kearney, owner of the Kearney Realty Group, said his company would claim about $ 1.1 million in income-tested federal housing tax credits granted by the New York State Office for Homes and Community Renewal (HCR) to build the Glove City Lofts Complex.

Kearney explained the income rules required by the federal tax credit program used to help fund the project in October. He said he expects one-bedroom income-based apartments to cost around $ 665 in rent per month, while two-bedroom income-based apartments will cost around $ 775. He said “middle income” units will have higher rents, perhaps up to 20% more. He said the federal tax credit program doesn’t want any of the tenants to pay more than 30% of their income for rent.

After the public hearing, Kearney’s developer Parkview Development & Construction asked Gloversville town planning council to waive the city’s six-month requirement to begin construction after site plan approval , and to extend it to 18 months, in order to give the company enough time to obtain the financing necessary for the construction of the complex without having to come back several times to the town planning council for extensions.

The planning council consensus agreed to the extension of the deadline and the president of the planning council, Geoffrey Peck, requested that the 18-month deadline be entered in the minutes.

Following the hearing, Kearney said Glove City Lofts now had all of the local approvals it needed to build the project, including the correct zoning.

In July, it was revealed at a planning council meeting that the 3-acre lot at 51 Church Street had been zoned from commercial to a parcel zoned for manufacturing in 2015. The zoning issue presented a problem. potential for the major project, but city officials have since discovered that the zoning was changed in 2018.

Peck said the zoning change in 2018 did not go in the normal way, with the joint council bypassing the review by the city’s planning council.
“They just didn’t go through all the procedures,” Geraghty added.

“We made a note in the minutes of last month’s meeting [in November] this [the rezoning of 51 Church St.] had not been presented to the Planning Council under standard procedure, but the statute of limitations had expired, so it had become law, ”Peck said.

The Glove City Lofts project also requested $ 1 million as part of Gloversville’s request for the $ 10 million downtown revitalization initiative in 2021. On Tuesday evening, Kearney said he hoped Gloversville would win the DRI competition for the Mohawk Valley, which he says will be announced soon.

“If the DRI materializes, if the city succeeds, the other two [apartment building projects from my company that received DRI funding in other cities] in the Mohawk Valley, Oneonta and Rome… they were both priority projects in these [successful] DRI plans, ”Kearney said. “[Those DRI grant awards] brought these projects to the top for consideration by UNHCR [for the federal tax credits]. It is hope here.

Kearney has said in the past that the project in Gloversville could be delayed for a year if Gloversville does not receive the DRI, but on Tuesday night he said he believed he would win it.

“I have never been more optimistic about a DRI plan than with this one,” he said.

Site plan recommendations for the new Mount Forest grocery store will be presented to council

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NORTH WELLINGTON – The final recommendation report for a new Sobeys Motherland in Mount Forest will be presented to council on Monday.

The proponent and the applicant have submitted a revised site plan which includes a proposed intersection with signage, a revised internal parking lot design and a proposed separate entrance for horses and strollers from Industrial Drive. The proposed site plan was accompanied by an updated traffic report.

The revised presentation was provided in response to departmental and agency comments.

Planning staff have reviewed the revised site plan and found it to be in accordance with provincial policy and consistent with the Wellington County Official Plan.

The proposed site plan location is at 503 and 515 Main Street, where the beer store and Peavey Mart are located on the property and are expected to remain.

Similar to the previous version of the sitemap, the revised sitemap includes:

The proposed changes are as follows:

Stormwater management is the primary concern of the report, as stormwater drainage flows through the affected property.

Currently, the Applicant is working with Waste Management to secure a drainage easement across the property. The easement will need to be secured / permanently established prior to approval of the site plan for the grocery store and restaurant.

The board is to decide whether or not the developer should continue with the proposed development at Monday’s meeting.

Site map of the City OKs pharmacy, commercial use of the land in the north

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Mayor Gregg Hull shows the US and city flags of Rio Rancho. . Martinez, a Rio Ranchoan, asked Hull to send the flags and then presented them at the Rio Rancho board meeting on Thursday. Photo by Argen Duncan.

Rio Rancho board members approved a site plan for a prep pharmacy and opened land near the intersection of North and Unser boulevards for retail during their meeting Thursday night at the ‘city Hall.

They approved the site plan and the land use change unanimously, with Councilor Jeremy Lenentine absent and Mayor Gregg Hull therefore voting.

For the land use zoning change, the 2.2 acres in question are along Northern Boulevard just east of Unser Boulevard with Eric Road being the eastern boundary.

The lots to the immediate south, east and west are undeveloped R-1 lots, lower density single-family residential zoning, according to a city map. A mid-density single-family housing neighborhood and commercial development with a Walgreens pharmacy and Speedway gas station are across from north to north.

Entrepreneur and developer Dawn Davide said she has built homes nearby and invested in the area.

“And hopefully we can bring some development to this area which was never going to be a residential development anyway,” she said.

In their request to change the area, she and her business partner Linda DeFillippo said the change would bring more commerce to the city, while still allowing the busy intersection to remain consistent with existing businesses.

Sharon Alire, a resident of the neighborhood across the North, opposed the change of area.

“Heavy traffic is already a hindrance, and there are so many accidents just below this space where there is no left turn in our neighborhood,” she wrote in a comment letter. . “Adding more traffic to the retail space will only increase the traffic there.”

She was the only member of the audience to comment.

As for the site map, this is a new larger location for the Olive Tree Compounding Pharmacy at 1713 Wellspring Ave. It consists of three buildings, totaling approximately 7,600 square feet, with 46 parking spaces and five bicycle spaces on just over an acre of land.

The pharmacy, one of the few pharmacies in the state, according to architect Doug Heller, now has a smaller, rented location on Westside and Unser Boulevard. Heller said the larger building at the new site will have two tenants and the third building will be built in the future if the landlord finds the right tenant.

He said the pharmacy owner and Itsa Italian Ice owner, who were planning to go to the neighboring lot, agreed that they would have a common entrance to Itsa’s property. City Councilor Paul Wymer wanted approval of the site plan to be made conditional on this agreement being delivered in writing to the city.

The governing body approved this amendment and the plan.

In another case, the governing body approved the American Rescue Plan Act’s $ 360,000 set aside for a home repair program.

“We have an aging housing stock in Rio Rancho,” City Manager Matt Geisel said, adding that homes built in the 1960s often need repairs and many people have a fixed income.

The program would be administered by a nonprofit Homewise and would provide up to $ 25,000 per home in forgivable loans to homeowners with incomes equal to or less than 80% of the region’s median income. Geisel said the income limit would mean $ 38,000 for a household of one and $ 54,000 for a household of four, for example.

Deputy City Manager Peter Wells said the city will monitor Homewise’s use of the money and jointly develop a communications plan to let as many people as possible know about the opportunity.

If this effort is successful, Geisel said, he hopes to secure more funds and expand the program.

City Emergency Management Special Projects Coordinator Rose Martinez, left, accepts Region 6 Community Wide Readiness Award from Federal Emergency Management Agency from Zach Wachter, right , local preparedness coordinator with the New Mexico Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Martinez and the city’s volunteer community emergency response team won the honor for their work during the pandemic, managing COVID testing and vaccination sites, delivering meals to the elderly and those confined to home and manufacturing over 6,000 face masks for frontline workers. Mayor Gregg Hull holds up another plaque in the back. Martinez and CERT were selected from teams from five states. Photo of Argen Marie Duncan.


Planning Commission approves final site plan for Wawa in Gaithersburg

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Render from planning documents

The Gaithersburg Planning Commission has approved the final site plan for a future Wawa gas station and convenience store on Md. 355.

The project has aroused the ire of some in the community since it was proposed two years ago, including an unsuccessful legal challenge from a community group.

The Wawa, reportedly the first in Montgomery County, would feature a 5,060 square foot convenience store with an adjacent gas station at 405 N. Frederick Ave. (Md. 355), opposite Gaithersburg High School.

In October 2019, Gaithersburg City Council approved a schematic development plan, or initial site plan, for the Wawa.

But a month later, a group of residents and businessmen filed an administrative appeal in Montgomery County Circuit Court arguing that the development application was not in line with the master plan because the resort- service was not “light commercial use”.

Further, the applicants argued that the Wawa was not “compatible with the residential character” of the neighborhood.

The Circuit Court determined that the project was consistent with the master plan, but ruled that the Planning Commission should have allowed cross-examination.

The case went to the Special Court of Appeal, which ruled in March both that the development was consistent with the master plan and that opponents of the project had waived their right to cross-examination. The appeal court’s decision this spring got the project going.

A few residents opposed to the Wawa project continued to voice their opposition at Wednesday’s Planning Commission meeting.

Carol Johnson said Wawa should consider installing electric charging stations instead of gas pumps, as she believes the use of electric vehicles will eventually overtake the use of gasoline vehicles.

“I think the future is here, and it’s really kinda silly to put all that money on gas…” she said.

Phillip Hummel, a land use lawyer at Miles & Stockbridge, said Wawa had considered incorporating electric charging stations into the project, but the need to prioritize water management rain and sidewalk space took precedence.

“It’s something that has been taken into account. It just couldn’t be easily accommodated due to all the competing factors involved, ”he said.

Walter Umana, who lives near the future service station, said he was worried about potential noise and light pollution.

“It’s a very quiet area. Gaithersburg being the City of Trees, we want to make sure it retains that feel, and with the wildlife around us, we want to make sure nothing is disturbed more than it should be, ”he said. he declares.

Monica Lozada said she also lived near the future Wawa site and wanted to know if there would be security cameras at the facility. Lozada also requested that additional bike racks be included in it.

Wawa real estate project manager Chris Hoffman said there would be cameras both inside the convenience store and outside the building. The property will be monitored 24/7 by a security team, he said.

“If there was a situation that called for an immediate police response, or moderate unrest that we would like to bring to the attention of our internal security officials, store staff have the ability to call upon these resources. if necessary, ”Hoffman said. .

Planning commissioner Lloyd Kaufman said the final site plan only includes enough bike rack space for around two bikes. He said he wanted to see more space on the bike racks to accommodate Gaithersburg High School students who might be making their way to the Wawa during a break.

Mira Gantzert, project manager at Bohler Engineering, said adding more bike racks is something that can be discussed.

“We can potentially look at the west side of the building, where there’s an existing 8-foot sidewalk, and potentially have one or two additional bike racks against the building, but there’s still 4 or 5 feet for pedestrians to walk past, ”she said.

Kaufman, Planning Commission Chairman John Bauer, and Commissioners Phillip Wessel and Sharon Cantrell unanimously approved the final site plan.

Dan Schere can be contacted at [email protected]