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Planners to Consider Addition of Site Plan Review | Local news

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With the increase in residential developments that do not meet the requirements of having to be approved by planners and the influx of high-density subdivisions, members of the Crossville Regional Planning Commission on Thursday approved a resolution that would resolve the issues. two problems adding a site review process. .

Actions taken at the regular meeting in May do not set a plan, but require city staff to consider what best meets the needs of city residents through a plan review process. implantation.

Currently, developments that do not involve the division of property are not presented to the Planning Commission.

State law gives planners the power to require developers to submit a site submission and approval outside of the requirements of subdivision ordinances and regulations.

Several apartment complexes, grouped housing and / or larger subdivisions with minimum size lots are being installed. Some amenities such as sidewalks are missing from the amenities and proper repairs for fire equipment and school buses are missing.

Recently, city staff noted:

• Population densities higher than those of a standard subdivision, which can put strain on existing infrastructure such as roads, sewers and aqueduct; and,

• Several un-subdivided developments have experienced an increase in population density greater than ten percent compared to that of standard subdivided subdivisions;

As a result, these developments do not include:

• Appropriate returns and spacing;

• Open space for recreational area;

• Sidewalks;

• Utility easements;

• Fire hydrants for adequate protection against fire;

• Turnaround areas suitable for the circulation of fire trucks and school buses; and,

• Driveway to the public right-of-way.

Other items that could be included in the site plan review requirement could include:

•Car park;

• Landscaping features;

• Garbage collection areas; and,

• Impermeable area and stormwater management works required.

Last week’s action kicks off a study into what might be needed to protect the city’s citizens and infrastructure.

In the other items on the agenda, the following took place:

• APPROVED requested annexation and service plan for 8.79 acres in The Gardens Phase 8 Plat 4-A. The property will have access off the highway. 70 W. and Northside Dr. The service plan is a routine plan with planners recommending this plan and annex to City Council.

• APPROVED preliminary plan for a subdivision of 43 lots off Sparta Dr. identified as Sky View Meadow. This development will include approximately 1,500 feet of new roads and water bodies and 2,200 feet of new sewer lines. This site may require a deviation on maximum road gradients due to topography and any deviation will be included in the final plaque approval.

• APPROVED a subdivision of four lots identified as the Shaver division of the highway. 70 E. All city water and services are in place.

• APPROVED a 1,220 acre division identified as the Keener Family Division located on the highway. 70 N. outside city limits but within City Planning Area. There is an existing and functional septic tank. A waiver was granted not to require another soil test and a second waiver for the rest of the property so as not to have frontage to the road as required.

• APPROVED a proposed 1.853 acre division off a parcel identified as the Lantana Baptist Church division off Lantana Rd. The property is located outside of the city limits but within the planning area. Sewer is available for the property, but the property will continue to use the septic system in place.

• APPROVED for the minutes the Planner’s Report as follows: In house flats, Lloyd’s property, a simple subdivision along Bell Red submitted for review; regular meals in the house, The Gardens Phase 8, dish 4-A, pending fixed dish.

From July 1, 2020 to May 14, 2021, 34 planning elements were reviewed; 205 preliminary lots; 112 final lots; 91 new lots created; $ 3,450 in fees collected; 75,988 acres subdivided; and 2,780 new roads, water and sewer lines added.

Southlake City Council gives green light to site plan for Garden District residences

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The Garden District project was first proposed to city council in 2011. (Courtesy of Cooper & Stebbins)

Southlake City Council approved a proposed site plan for 58 residences and open green spaces inside the Garden District at a meeting on May 18.

In a 6-1 vote, council gave the green light to plans for two four-story buildings along Central Avenue in Southlake Town Square. Council member Ronnell Smith was the opposite vote. The project sparked conversations about the possibility of providing high-density housing options in the city’s downtown core.

While many residents and council members expressed their opposition to the density of the project, city attorney Allen Taylor Jr. stressed that council does not have the discretion to decide whether residences should be built on this property, because the zoning was decided in 2003.

The 2.2 acres are zoned as downtown, which allows for the construction of residential developments.

“We are required to follow the requirements of the zoning ordinance to comply with Texas law,” Taylor said. “And so the board really doesn’t have the discretion at this point to reconsider this. We can fix design issues, but we’re locked into use.

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The Conceptual Plan for the Garden District located at 301 and 351 Central Avenue was first presented to council in 2011, with a project of 10 buildings for a total of 140 units — 130 residences and 10 brownstones. In 2013, the concept plan was revised, reducing the number of buildings to three, for a total of 93 units — 60 residences and 33 brownstones.

The 33 approved brownstones are now almost complete.

Cooper & Stebbins developer Frank Bliss told council the 58 residential units on offer will appeal to the city’s affluent and working population with “world-class architecture.”

“[The site plan is] substantially in line with the concept plan, while at the same time allowing us to step up the quality of what we can deliver to this neighborhood, ”he said.

The site plan includes a public park, known as The Grove, and a private terrace adjacent to the existing Stebbins Park, known as The Terrace. It also includes pedestrian walkways throughout the neighborhood for accessibility.

“We’re not a developer looking for maximum density to see how much we can get down to the ground,” Bliss said. “We really want to create places, create experiences and really serve the Southlake community. “

The developer was unable to give an estimated timeline for the completion of the project, although Bliss has confirmed that the two buildings will be constructed in a single phase.

Council member Randy Robbins expressed disappointment with the current zoning of the land.

“I guess the word that would describe me tonight is just disappointment,” he said. “Disappointed that it took [the developer] 10 years to get here, and we’re grappling with the 2011 decision, and disappointed that you don’t commit – even if we approve something – to doing something in a timely manner [and] that we could be grappling with for another five or ten years without knowing what’s going on. “

According to the developer, once completed, the Garden District residences should be valued at more than $ 60 million, or $ 1 million per residence. Along with the nearly completed Brown Stones in the Garden District, the neighborhood’s total value is estimated to be over $ 100 million.

The Town Square residential program is expected to generate about $ 2.7 million in property taxes per year for Carroll ISD and more than $ 800,000 per year for the city after the residences are completed, according to documents presented by the developer to council.

“It’s one of those times when there’s a vote that might be a politically easy vote, but it’s not responsible voting. We will always do, as a council, what we need to do to protect the city’s fiscal responsibility, ”said Mayor John Huffman.

Wheeling Planning Commission Approves Site Plan for Marsh Wheeling Lofts | News, Sports, Jobs

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Photo of Eric Ayres Thomas Simons, left, senior vice president of Woda Cooper Companies, and Charles Garvick, president of Chadan Engineering, address members of the Wheeling Planning Commission on Monday.

WHEELING – Officials at the Marsh Wheeling Lofts offered by the Woda Cooper companies believe there is a healthy market for residential living in downtown Wheeling that is not at risk of being “oversaturated” by the abundance of projects moving forward .

Thomas Simons, senior vice president of the Woda Cooper Companies, and Charles Garvick, president of Chadan Engineering, appeared before the Wheeling Planning Commission on Monday evening for a site plan review for the Marsh Wheeling Lofts project.

The Woda project aims to build a new four-storey, 46-unit apartment complex on vacant land in block 900 of Main Street.

Planning Commissioner William Schwarz asked if developers are concerned that downtown Wheeling will be ‘saturated’ with residential properties, given that the Historic Wheeling-Pitt Lofts project is also advancing, promising to create 128 new ones. apartments only two. city ​​blocks.

“Do you think we ended up with too many vacant apartments in the city center? Schwarz asked.

“That’s a great question,” Simons said. “Obviously on the lending side we had to do a full market research analysis of the community we’re in. It’s the market rate – it’s not housing for workers like LaBelle Greene. With our waiting list at Boury Lofts, we don’t think there will be a problem, even with the Wheeling-Pitt building if this ends. We are very excited about these units.

The Woda Cooper Companies have spearheaded several successful housing projects in the city in recent years, including the award-winning Boury Lofts property and Stone Center Lofts downtown, as well as several phases of the LaBelle Greene worker housing complexes in South Wheeling and in Providence. Greene Seniors Apartments in North Wheeling.

Simons said they believe there is a strong market for downtown residential living in the friendly city, and Woda is working to fill that void with new apartments.

Planning Committee members inquired about parking for the Marsh Wheeling Lofts, as only five parking spaces were provided for in the plans. Wheeling’s director of construction and planning, Tom Connelly, said downtown residential and commercial buildings do not have to provide off-street parking as they do in other areas of the city. city ​​where zoning requirements differ.

“There is no parking requirement in the downtown area,” Connelly said, noting that parking garages and other public parking areas are available.

“We have an agreement with the town of Wheeling,” said Simons. “We will be renting 40 to 41 parking spaces in the parking garage on 10th Street. We have an agreement to enter into a 10 year lease with four additional extensions over the years for parking in the garage. We are at least 30 years old.

Planning Commission Vice Chairman Jeremy West asked the developers if core samples were taken to verify that the foundations are suitable for this development, noting that there appears to be some settlement on the surface terrain. where the lofts are to be built.

“I never remember a building there,” West said. “As far as I know, it has always been a parking lot. This lot, especially at the entrance, is really starting to flow.

Simons said he did two phases of soil sampling.

“We’ve done the geotechnical report for that already, and there’s backfilling in various places there,” Garvick added. “It’s not deep – maybe two to four feet in some areas – but that will all be sorted out during the construction phase.”

If all goes according to plan, the project is expected to start in July this year and end in September 2022.

Planning Commissioner Jeff Mauck noted that the loft site is located at a busy intersection that will become even busier in the future as work on Interstate 70 continues and the Wheeling Downtown Streetscape Project kicks off. Some commissioners expressed concerns about the availability of a staging area for construction materials and equipment.

“Why did you all choose the name Marsh Wheeling Lofts,” asked Dave Palmer, Wheeling City Councilor and member of the Planning Commission, saying he found it somewhat confusing since the building to the north of the site is there. old Marsh Wheeling Stogie building with the iconic sign still on top.

“We looked at this building years ago,” Simons said, noting that the Woda Group was interested in a rehabilitation project similar to their Boury Lofts development, but that plan did not materialize for a variety of reasons. “We’re not sure the building will still be there. We wanted to make sure that at least the name will be there. It’s just a historical name.

Palmer noted that if anyone wanted to develop the Marsh Wheeling Stogies building, they might be upset that the name had already been taken by a nearby apartment complex.

Nevertheless, the review of the site plan was unanimously approved. Attending an in-person meeting for the first time since last fall, Planning Commission members joked that they almost forgot how to vote electronically in the city council chamber after meeting via Zoom during so many months because of the pandemic.

“I think it will be an improvement to the gateway to our city, especially coming off the bridge,” Mauck said of the Marsh Wheeling Lofts project. “It will dress her very well. Hopefully this will be an inspiration to others in the area who already have businesses and buildings they own. “

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Westwood View Elementary sitemap gets final approval – this is what it will look like

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On Thursday evening, Westwood City Council unanimously approved a site plan for the new Westwood View Elementary building, a project related to the $ 264 million bond issue recently approved by Shawnee Mission.

Shawnee Mission will build a new school at 4935 Belinder Avenue, the former site of the Entercom radio tower that the district purchased in 2016.

Westwood Mayor David Waters said the city’s strong identification with elementary school means the new building is not just about ensuring children have the best possible education, but is about the future of the Westwood community.

“It’s a community affair,” Waters said. “This is not a piece of property, it really is the heart and soul of our community – and the future of our community in many ways.”

Site map details

Crews have already started demolishing the old radio station, and construction of the new school building is expected to start in the summer of 2021.

The district expects it to be completed by December 2022, when students at Rushton Elementary School will move into the current Westwood View building about a block from the old Entercom site while their school is in operation. rebuilt.

The gymnasium in the new building, in the center, will be able to withstand winds of 250 miles per hour. There will also be several outdoor spaces for students and staff, including the cafeteria patio on the right. Image via Shawnee Mission Papers.

Here are some details of the Westwood view Sitemap, as stated by the district architects at the meeting:

  • Several creative outdoor spaces including three outdoor classrooms and a patio next to the cafeteria for lunchtime visitors.
  • The parking lot, which is on the edge of Belinder Avenue, will be about three feet lower than Belinder. It is an effort to be a conscious neighbor and block surrounding residents from the light and noise that will be coming from the school.
  • Westwood View will accommodate approximately 550 students, nearly double the capacity of the current building.
  • Two soft play areas (like a grass play area with fall protection) and a hard play area that will likely be asphalt.
  • A field that can accommodate soccer and other sports and activities.
  • The gymnasium will be designed to withstand winds of 250 miles per hour and will also have an area where students and staff can retreat in the event of a tornado or other extreme weather conditions.
Westwood View Entrance
The entrance to the new school would face Belinder Avenue. Above, a rendering of the interior of the entrance. Image via Shawnee Mission Papers.

Residents’ concerns about traffic

Two residents, Jan Kyle and Jennifer Merrill, expressed concern about the additional traffic an elementary school would bring on Belinder Avenue.

Kyle said that while she and her husband voted in favor of the bond measure that the new Westwood View was a part of, they don’t think it’s owned by the old Entercom site.

They argued that he should have gone to Rainbow Boulevard on the former site of Westwood Christian Church.

Likewise, Merrill said she saw traffic increase on Belinder when a car is parked on the street – which she said residents do frequently as most of the driveways to homes in the area are the width of ‘one car.

As Rushton students make their way to the current school building in 2023, Merrill said she was concerned about the impact of traffic from two elementary schools on the community of Westwood.

“I’m very, very concerned about the foresight of what this will create in our little community,” Merrill said. “I’m all for school, as I said before. I am less than happy to have the parking lot and all the round trip traffic flow to Belinder.

Board member Jeff Harris said a traffic study had been conducted on the site and concluded that there would be no issues with the placement of Westwood View.

While there are likely to be changes with the new location, Harris said the pandemic has proven humans can adapt – and he has confidence in city staff to stay adaptable as challenges arise in the city. during this process.

Other council members shared similar sentiments, including council member Jason Hannaman who said that while he was upset he and the city could not please all residents, the same concerns would arise in any other place.

The city council unanimously approved the site plan, on the condition that an analysis of the mandates at 49th Terrace and Belinder Avenue be carried out on the first fall of the school’s opening.

The analysis will determine whether additional measures such as a crosswalk for child safety need to be implemented at the intersection.

The Town Planning Council agrees to the cancellation of the authorization for the RTÉ de Cairn site plan

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An Bord Pleanála has consented to a High Court order rescinding its authorization for Cairn Homes to build 614 residential units on former RTÉ land in Dublin 4.

Three residents of Ailesbury Road had filed a lawsuit challenging the expedited permission of the council for development proposed by Cairn Homes Properties near their homes.

They also challenged the constitutionality of the strategic housing provisions of the Planning and Development (Housing) and Residential Tenancies Act of 2016, providing for the acceleration of large housing estates.

After the board said in January it was ready to make concessions in the proceedings, a hearing date set later this year for the challenge was called off.

Following considerable engagement between the parties, Judge Richard Humphreys was invited Thursday to make consent orders.

These include an ordinance revoking the authorization of the board of directors.

The ordinances also provide for the general adjournment of proceedings relating to the constitutionality of the provisions of the law.

Leave granted

In July last year, the High Court allowed residents – Chris Comerford, John Gleeson and Pat Desmond, wife of businessman Dermot Desmond – to challenge the board’s decision to deal, under of the law of 2016, the authorization request from Cairn Homes Properties. Ltd.

Represented by Michael O’Donnell BL and Conor Quinn BL, tried by lawyer Nap Keeling, their case was against the Board of Trustees, the Minister for Housing, Planning and Local Government, Ireland and the Attorney General, with Dublin City Council and Cairn Homes as notice of the evenings.

The 2016 law allows developers seeking permission for developments of more than 100 units to seek permission directly from the board of directors, bypassing the local housing authority.

During the initial examination of the case, the council had agreed to consider the application for leave under the law but had not yet made a decision.

The residents’ case included allegations that some of the housing policy provisions of the 2016 law violated their rights under the Constitution and the European Convention on Human Rights.

When the board of directors subsequently granted leave, the High Court ordered that the challenge to the permission be merged with the earlier challenge.

Complaints from residents

In their action, the residents claimed, immediately adjoining the back wall of Ms. Desmond’s family home, and located “extremely close” to the family homes of the other two, is a property that was previously part of the RTÉ campus in respect of which Cairn Homes wanted to develop 614 residential units.

The proposed development includes 611 apartments in nine blocks up to 10 stories, three townhouses, two cafes, daycare and the change of use of an existing Regency villa to a private club and gym.

The claimants said the development is of a much higher scale and density than allowed under the City of Dublin development plan, will neglect and eclipse their homes and will be “Totally out of step” with an area of ​​low rise Victorian or Edwardian buildings. types of houses.

The development would impact not only the applicants’ properties, which include protected structures, but other protected structures and important public buildings in the area, including Montrose House, Mount Errol House and the prominent Scott Tallon building. Walker from the 1960s housing RTÉ studios, they claimed.

Site map approved for Ashwaubenon Chick-fil-A

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By Kevin Boneske
Editor-in-chief


ASHWAUBENON – The village sitemap review committee voted Tuesday, March 16 in favor of a sitemap for the construction of a 4,872 square foot Chick-fil-A restaurant in the Bay Park Square parking lot next to South Oneida Street.

Community Development Director Aaron Schuette said the independent restaurant will be built immediately south of the mall’s Anderson Drive entrance.

Schuette said the Chick-fil-A will have 88 indoor and 16 outdoor seats, and will have two drive-thru lanes, parking lots, signage and associated utilities.

He said he’s cleared to locate by Bay Park Square as part of the property’s planned unit development (PUD).

Upon reviewing the site plan, Schuette said staff discovered that the building’s current setback, as planned, was 27.7 feet from the South Oneida Street right-of-way, although the removal of the street is currently 35 feet.

As a result, he said a condition of approval requires Ashwaubenon Village Council to amend the PUD to reduce the setback to 25 feet along South Oneida Street.

Schuette said a reduced setback would help the Chick-fil-A project and two other buildings on the property currently within the 35-foot setback.

He said the two non-compliant buildings could have ended up inside the existing setback due to the reconstruction of South Oneida Street with the acquisition of an additional right-of-way.

Schuette said construction on the restaurant cannot begin until the board of directors approves the setback reduction at its April meeting.

Impact on traffic

Schuette said the popularity of Chick-fil-A is expected to increase traffic in the mall and that the two drive-thru lanes will have a capacity of 37 vehicles.

“As staff we were concerned about the traffic generated and the potential impact on South Oneida Street,” he said. “Chick-fil-A hired a group (for a traffic impact analysis). “

Schuette said no engineering design issues are expected to affect South Oneida Street with a new Chick-fil-A, although some improvements are recommended for the internal path in the mall, such as a turn lane at dedicated right in the restaurant.

“We expect this Chick-fil-A to be a little more popular than your standard fast food restaurant,” he said.

Schuette said that TADI, the company responsible for the traffic impact analysis, used traffic data from a Chick-fil-A at Brookfield located in a shopping center to make design recommendations for the Bay Park Square internal path.

“As a staff, we recognize that traffic will likely be an issue for the Chick-fil-A,” he said. “We expect it to be very popular, which is a good thing.”

Schuette said he expects there may be a traffic slowdown on South Oneida Street in the first three to six months after the restaurant opens, due to the popularity of the Chick franchise. -fil-A.

“If there are any safeguards on South Oneida Street that require assistance from public safety for traffic control, direction, etc., the cost would be borne by Chick-fil-A,” he said. he declared. “It’s similar to any other business requiring public safety assistance for a large event. “

Schuette said the conditions of approval also include the implementation of recommendations for improving crosswalks and traffic islands in the traffic impact analysis, as well as an agreement with Ashwaubenon Public Safety regarding responsibility for costs associated with necessary traffic control.

Administrator Gary Paul has said he hopes a restaurant like Chick-fil-A will set up near Bay Park Square.

“I think it’s a good addition to the mall,” he said. “I think we will be very happy with the turnout that will occur there. “

Third wall panel

In another action, the committee approved a third wall sign for Chick-fil-A, so the restaurant will be able to have signs on the north, east and south elevations.

Under the village code, wall panels may be permitted on three sides of a building with the approval of the committee.

Final site plan approved for Great Lakes Power Products new global headquarters in Madison Village – News-Herald

By Site plan

Great Lakes Power Products has taken one step closer to the start of construction of its new global headquarters in Madison Village.

The final site plan for the company’s 110,000-square-foot building was approved by the Madison Village Planning Commission at a meeting last week.

In formally expressing support, the commission provided administrative approval of the project for purposes such as zoning, development of a stormwater management plan and architectural overhaul, said village administrator Dwayne. Bailey.

Panel members voted unanimously in favor of the plan, which now goes to the Lake County government for further consideration. The county will review the company’s plan for items that include construction practices and compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act regulations.

Lake County will also issue building permits for the company’s project.

Great Lakes Energy Products, who is currently based at Mentor, intends to construct a new building on River Street, also known as Route 528. The project will be built on a property bordering the southeast side of the Interstate 90 interchange and Route 528, and extending south to Route 307.

“We spent a lot of time designing the building and developing this structure,” said Harry Allen Jr., president and founder of Great Lakes Power Products, at the December 21 meeting. “And at the end of the day, that’s going to be a huge plus for the Village of Madison and Lake County.”

The company will consolidate its current head office at 7455 Tyler Blvd. in Mentor with a service center, it operates at 3691 Shepard Road in Perry Township and relocates them to the new building in Madison.

Plans call for the company to create 50 full-time jobs with a total annual payroll of $ 3 million at Madison Village site.

The planning commission, in addition to giving its blessing to the final site plan, approved the subdivision of the land the company purchased to build its headquarters and accommodate other commercial developments. In the northwest corner of the company’s property bordering I-90 and Route 528, a new Love’s Travel Stop will be built. Love’s also received final approval of its project’s site plan at the December 21 meeting.

Great Lakes Power Products headquarters will occupy 15 acres and Love’s Travel Stop is under construction on 18 acres, Bailey said. Overall, the land purchased for development by Great Lakes Power Products consists of approximately 48 acres.

The subdivision stipulates how the property will be legally reconfigured for what’s built on it, Bailey explained.

“The boundaries need to be changed to accommodate the new public road that will be there and to create a site for Love’s and a site for Great Lakes Power,” Bailey said. “It is therefore the resubdivision of the land, the creation of new property lines and the new dedicated public road that will divide the property in two. “

Construction of lakes, based in the Township of Painesville, serves as the design-build company for Great Lakes Power Product’s new global headquarters. Bill Vondra, an engineer and consultant hired by Lakeland Construction for the project, attended the December 21 meeting.

Planning Commission chairman Mark Vest asked Vondra when the land would be inaugurated for the project.

“We will start moving the earth as soon as we can,” he said. “The big deal is the weather constraints and controlling soil runoff and all the good things to keep the environment happy.”

Vondra said some of the Army Corps of Engineers permits are in place for the Great Lakes Power Products and Love sites.

Great Lakes Power, founded in 1973, is a distributor, manufacturer and rebuilder of full lines of power transmission products and accessories. The company consists of 13 sites nationwide with a total workforce of around 160 employees, said Andrea Morris, vice president of Great Lakes Power Products, who is the daughter of Harry Allen Jr.

In February, the company received an economic incentive grant from Madison Village for the construction of its headquarters.

The grant contract says the company intends to spend around $ 9 million on the construction of buildings and grounds and $ 2 million on machinery, equipment, furniture and fixtures.

The grant allows the village to help the company finance the construction project, provided the company maintains a workforce of at least 50 full-time employees and a payroll of $ 3 million per year, for a period of one 10 year period.

Editor’s Note: This story was edited at 1:40 p.m. on December 29, 2020, to correctly indicate Lakeland Construction’s role in the project.