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Board of Directors Approves One Riverside Site Plan, Apartment Concept | Jax Daily Record | Jacksonville Daily Record

By November 11, 2021December 4th, 2021Site plan

The Downtown Development Review Board is advancing plans for the residential / commercial replacement of the old Florida Times-Union building in Brooklyn, valued at $ 182.2 million by an Atlanta-based developer.

The board, which reviews downtown plans for zoning code compliance and design guidelines, met on November 10 and unanimously approved the final site plan for the development in several phases and the conceptual design of the 270 mixed-use apartments of the first phase.

Developer Fuqua Development LLC wants to demolish the TU building and build the One Riverside residential and commercial project on approximately 13.42 acres at 1 Riverside Avenue along the Saint John River.

Fuqua partnered with TriBridge Residential to develop the apartments.

The plan would also restore McCoys Creek and add a public park that will be owned by the city and maintained by the city. The park property is on the east side of the property.

City council committees are expected to hold their first votes Nov. 15-16 on a $ 31.59 million development incentive package.

The Downtown Investment Authority approved the deal, which includes a property tax refund of $ 28,419,169 and $ 3,174,971 in completion grants and expense credits, in September.

Fuqua plans to buy the property from the Morris family, based in Augusta, Georgia.

In addition to the apartments, the first phase of the project has over 45,000 square feet of retail space, including a grocery store, a seven-level parking garage with 502 spaces, and additional surface parking.

The second phase includes two mixed-use buildings along the restored creek with approximately 15,000 square feet of retail space; a restaurant by the river; a 125-unit multifamily residential building; and parking. This phase would not begin until at least 2025.


The site map of the One Riverside project

Design conditions

The design review committee voted 8-0 to approve the site master plan. The final version shows a pedestrian plaza added at the end of May Street.

In October, board members said the street seemed “dead end” before the Riverwalk was a problem.

The latest site plan also identifies a pedestrian bridge to allow people access from the development on McCoys Creek to the public park that council members said was not in the preliminary plan.

Cyndy Trimmer, Partner Lawyer at Driver, McAfee, Hawthorne & Diebenow, represents the Fuqua / TriBridge team of developers on the project.

Despite the DDRB’s previous concerns, Trimmer said the developer could not reduce the amount of surface parking along Leila Street inside the development to support the grocer. Leila Street crosses Riverside Avenue and is one of two access roads to the site.

Instead, plans include a pedestrian zone with space for public art that Trimmer says will make entering the site a “better experience” for pedestrians.

“We have the challenge of implementing these best urban design practices with market demand,” Trimmer said.


The pedestrian circulation scheme of the project.

Project walkability

The board as a whole addressed the possibility of walking inside development.

He listed four conditions in exchange for site plan approval: 10-foot sidewalks on the west side of Leila Street; a 12 foot sidewalk leading from the Downtown Riverwalk to the park; 10 designated parking spaces for the park; and a traffic calming plan for the crosswalk from Leila Street to Riverside Avenue.

Prosser is the project engineer.

The developers will have to report the residential design of the first phase to the DDRB for final review. The board of directors will analyze and approve the designs for the first retail phase and the second development phase as separate projects.

At the meeting, the council praised the architecture of the multi-family units.

Bill Schilling and Craig Davisson told TriBridge and architect Dwell Design Studio that they would like to see more color and accent in the parking garage screening before the final exam.

“Color is like fashion. It’s here today, gone tomorrow, ”Davisson said. “I would stay away from fashionable things. “

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