Skip to main content
All Posts By

Betty A. Crane

The Twinsburg urban planning commission favors the layout of industrial buildings

By Site plan

TWINSBURG — Despite intense opposition from several Old Mill Road residents, the city’s planning commission favored a final site plan for two large industrial buildings on the north side of the road, just east of Darrow Road.

At its May 16 meeting, the committee sent a positive site plan recommendation to City Council for what is being called Project Gumbo, which involves erecting 299,000 and 156,000 square foot buildings on the north and the west of many houses.

Scannell Properties has proposed development of the 33.5 acres east of Siffron in the I-2 Limited Industrial Zoning District, and is working to finalize the purchase of an adjoining 1.5 acre residential property.

Emotions ran high at a handful of meetings because nearby residents said the project would negatively impact their lives and possibly reduce the value of their properties.

“These plans have been reviewed by a number of local, state and federal professionals and approvals have been given,” planning committee chairman Marc Cohen said.

“We have to rely on these professionals for information so that we can make decisions. Although I wish the development was smaller than what is offered, Scannell followed all procedures, codes and regulations.

The panel vote was 3 to 1 in favor of the sitemap, with Michael Walker voting “no” and Cohen, Steve Shebeck and David Kleinman voting “yes”. Kraig Shipley was absent.

Some revisions to the original plans were described by Matt Weber of Weber Engineering, including reducing the width of a building’s facade from 240 to 210 feet, eliminating an 18-foot-tall barrier wall, and relocation of a port lane for trucks.

“We worked within the guidelines presented to us,” Weber said. “We have completed studies, received approval from multiple regulatory agencies, and received or applied for wetland permits from the US Army Corps of Engineers.”

Some of the infrastructure improvements proposed by Scannell are the addition of an Old Mill turning lane at Darrow, changing the signage at the intersection, landscaping to conceal buildings from neighboring houses and sidewalks along of Old Mill.

City planner Lynn Muter said Summit County officials said they would support lowering the speed limit to 35 mph on the Old Mill Township side, and Twinsburg Township administrators said they would support that.

Neighboring residents have expressed concerns about truck and car traffic accessing the property from Old Mill Road, fumes from trucks, how the project will affect their water wells and nearby wetlands and streams, bright lighting and noise.

The main theme expressed by residents is that the industrial development “is not harmonious with the surrounding neighborhood”. They were particularly critical of Old Mill Road, rather than Darrow, being the access point to the property.

City officials explained that the reason access is not possible from Darrow is that no easements were obtained to extend East Summit Commerce Park Drive east from Darrow when the installation of Siffron was built.

Weber said Scannell tried to buy a small parcel from Siffron so that the two proposed buildings could be located farther west, but that attempt failed.

ADDING STORAGE

The panel approved a final site plan for a 2,000 square foot storage building behind Summit Sound & Security at 8027 Darrow Road, south of Old Mill Road and north of Darrow Road Plaza.

TLJ Cos. LLC wants to erect the addition on its 0.75 acre lot in the C-2 Community Commercial Zoning District. Summit Sound occupies 3,000 square feet of the existing building, with Subway occupying the remaining 1,788 square feet.

Thirty-two parking spaces are available for Summit Sound and Subway, including 13 on-site and 19 on the adjacent Havana’s Cigars property. There is a shared access drive off Darrow Road for both properties.

A side lot setback waiver was granted by the Zoning Appeal Board.

The planning committee changed its next meeting date from June 20 to June 27 because the city will observe the old date as the June 19 holiday.

Contact the newspaper at [email protected]

Preliminary site plan for Empire Parkway site approved in Macedonia

By Site plan

MACEDONIA – A preliminary site plan for the first of a handful building to be built on 125 acres on Empire Parkway, which includes land where Bedford Anodizing once stood, was approved by the city’s planning commission on 16 may.

ARKO National Construction representative Russell Clark said the company plans to build a 353,400 square foot (310 by 1,140 ft) warehouse/distribution center south of East Highland Road and east west of the Norfolk Southern Railroad tracks.

At its March 21 meeting, the planning committee approved the clearing of the site. Clark said the trees were felled but not removed. He noted that the specification building would house two as yet unknown tenants.

Empire Parkway would be extended and access to other future buildings would be via a driveway leading to Empire Parkway past the initial building.

When the building is complete, Clark explained that car parking will be provided on the north and south sides and truck parking on the west side, with 39 loading docks on the west side and 11 on the north side. A total of 104 parking spaces are planned.

City planner Brian Frantz said a waiver from the zoning appeals board would be required regarding the number of parking spaces, and the building’s proposed 40-foot height meets zoning code requirements.

Stormwater management ponds are planned on the west and northeast sides, and Clark said the developer will add landscaping. “We look forward to working with the city on a successful project that brings economic development,” he noted.

Frantz said photometry and detailed landscaping plans must be submitted prior to final site plan approval, and approvals from the Ohio EPA and/or the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are required for areas. wetlands and impacts on watercourses.

Last July, the city council approved a tax increment financing agreement with Macedonia Empire LLC to redevelop the site.

The city benefited from nearly $1.5 million through a cooperative effort between the city, the Summit County Land Bank, the county tax office, and state and federal regulatory agencies to redevelop the property.

The city acquired the property in October 2019. It was state-owned under forfeited land status and was included in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure process.

The plant carried out metal finishing work and ceased operations in June 2013.

OTHER BUSINESS

The panel approved a final site plan for a new Don Basch Jewelers store on Fairway Drive, construction of a pavilion and gazebo at Specialty Lubricants on Corporate Park Drive, and signage for IHOP at 613 E. Aurora Road.

The Basch building will be north of Route 82, west of Fairlane Drive and behind the First Watch/AT&T building. The company plans to move from its current location on the north side of Route 82, east of Fairlane Drive and next to the Winking Lizard.

The 6,500 square foot building will be erected on the west side of the lot, with the entrance and parking lot on the east side. It will include spaces for merchandise, repairs and offices, as well as a community hall and kitchen.

A flagpole is planned near the building entrance, with trees, evergreens and shrubs as landscaping around the property.

A mound on the north side of the parking lot was eliminated from the plans, the height of a tower at the entrance to the building was reduced to 32 feet, and Frantz said additional landscaping is recommended along Route 8 and north of the parking lot.

A usage gap and a handful of setback/forward width gaps were granted by the BZA.

The specialty lubricants pavilion will measure 30 feet by 26 feet and 10 feet in height and will be erected in front of the building adjacent to the parking lot.

A crosswalk will cross a paved driveway to the front lawn, and a sidewalk will be installed between the paved driveway and the pavilion/gazebo.

Signage for the IHOP restaurant, which sits on the site of the former Pizza Hut, includes three wall signs totaling 61 square feet and one floor monument sign totaling 40 square feet. Frantz said the signage meets zoning code standards.

Contact the newspaper at [email protected]

Vista revised to Uptown site plan in Brighton approved

By Site plan

May 20, 2022

by Tom Tolen / [email protected]

The footprint of the Vista at Uptown luxury housing project near Brighton city center has just become noticeably smaller, while at the same time the number of units has increased significantly. The development is to be located between N. Second St. and Mill Pond. The project developers are Lansing’s DTN Development Group

Last night Brighton City Council approved the amended site plan for the revamped development by a 5-1 vote, with council member Renee Pettengill the only one not voting.

Vista at Uptown is a development proposal that has been on the books since 2018 but was delayed for at least two years when the COVID pandemic hit. John Woods, representing Lansing’s DTN Brighton LLC, told the board that despite COVID the company remained committed to the project and believed in Brighton’s future. He said, in his words, “The economy has changed with COVID and costs have gone up, but we’re still committed to the project.”

Developers originally proposed 199 apartments over four floors with a 110,000 square foot footprint and a parking structure. This then grew to 205 apartments. The most recent revised plans call for 235 housing units, but on a smaller footprint of around 80,000 square feet. Woods says they will be able to accomplish this by placing the parking structure below ground level. This will make 190 underground parking spaces and 180 surface spaces. Two other changes will be to have two rooftop courtyards instead of one and to move the swimming pool.

After his presentation, Woods told WHMI that the project’s estimated costs had skyrocketed due to COVID and inflation, from the initial $40 million to around $60 million. The high-end development — with 1- to 3-bedroom apartments costing $1,300 and up — these numbers are preliminary, the developer says — will feature a patio, pool, outdoor kitchen and grill, fitness centers, conference rooms, foyers, club rooms and bocci ball fields. The luxury apartments will range from 500-foot studios to 1,300-square-foot 3-bedroom units. Woods says the company intends to begin work on the foundation this fall and hopes the project will be completed in the spring of 2024.

NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR FINAL APPROVAL OF THE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

By Site plan

NOTICE OF APPLICATION

NOTICE OF APPLICATION

For

FINAL APPROVAL OF THE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

A request has been filed by Danny Veri of Livonia Builders G2, LLC 18261
Shelley Pond Ct., Northville, MI 48168
for the approval of the final site plan at construction
twenty-five single-family residences
on a site of approximately 10.5 acres as
“cluster development” on the following described parcels of land:

TAX CODE: # 06-06-13-275-036, 06-06-13-275-044, 06-06-13-275-034
Machnik Drive, Chelsea, MI 48118

The final site plan application will be reviewed by the Chelsea Planning Commission on
Tuesday, June 21, 2022 to 7:00 p.m. at the Chelsea City Council Chambers at 311
S. Main St. The meeting will also be accessible to members of the public via Zoom.
The information will be posted on the City of Chelsea website (www.city-chelsea.org).

Signed and written comments regarding the application will be accepted before the
Planning Commission meeting, and will be read at the meeting upon request. comments
should be addressed to the Chelsea Planning Commission, 305 S. MAIN ST. ST. 100,
Chelsea, Michigan 48118.

A public hearing on the site plan will take place, if requested in writing by any property
owner or occupant within three hundred (300) feet of the property line being
considered.

Persons requiring reasonable accommodations for disabilities in order for the hearing to be
which are accessible to them, are asked to inform the chairman of the Chelsea Planning Commission
no later than five (5) working days before the date of the hearing of this disability.

CHELSEA PLANNING COMMISSION
Sarah Haselshwardt, Secretary

The Outer Banks Voice – KDH board approves Wawa site plan

By Site plan

KDH Board Approves Wawa Site Plan

By Michelle Wagner | Outer Banks Voice May 17, 2022

No timetable set for local construction

Kill Devil Hills will host the first Wawa convenience store in North Carolina after city commissioners approved a site plan May 16 for one of its stores at 1900 N. Croatan Highway, located on the west side of the city. highway just south of BB&T and across from the old Kmart.

The site, which was unanimously approved under certain conditions, will include a 6,000 square foot convenience store, eight gas pumps and 52 parking spaces. The plan was put together by Arista Development on behalf of Wawa, which also has its eye on several other sites in North Carolina, according to its external public relations supervisor, Jennifer Wolf. In an email to The Voice written after the board vote, Wolf said there was currently no timeline for the store to be built in Kill Devil Hills.

Wawa operates more than 850 convenience stores (600 of which offer gas) in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Florida and Washington, D.C. The chain is known for its made-to-order meals, its freshly brewed coffee, hot breakfast sandwiches and other Wawa brand items.

“Overall the package we got is extremely comprehensive, it’s well designed, it’s very detailed – how each post hole is going to be drilled and where each piece of wire goes,” the Kill Devil mayor said. Hills, Ben Sproul, before the vote. . “We want people here in the public and people in the neighborhood to know that we have your best interests at heart, we do our best for the community at all times. You certainly have a quality engineering team that put this package together.

Several residents who live on nearby streets spoke during the public comment portion of the meeting, expressing concerns, including Wawa’s plans to install a vinyl fence as a neighborhood buffer. “A vinyl fence won’t provide any barrier against noise, lights or anything else,” one resident claimed.

When presenting the site plan, however, Deputy Director of Planning Cameron Ray said the claimant had since revised the site plan to replace the vinyl fence with a shadowbox fence to take into account the load of the wind and other maintenance issues.

For his part, Kill Devil Hills commissioner Terry Gray said he would like to see the candidate go further.

“I urge the developer to look at the closing of Lowe’s and try to go further and help buffer residences,” Gray asserted. He said in the future he would like to see city ordinances strengthened to require buffering that provided more of a sound barrier in situations similar to the Wawa project, where commercial establishments adjoin residential properties.



NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING TO REVIEW PLANS FOR OUTSIDE BANKS EVENT CENTER
Dare County, North Carolina
Dare County Visitor Center

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Visitors Bureau will hold a public meeting to review plans for an Outer Banks Events Center. The meeting will be held on Monday, June 6, 2022 from 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. at the Keeper’s Galley building in Haven on the Banks, 115 Dove Street, Nags Head North Carolina 27959.

Still in the conceptual phase, the Events Center is intended to provide a suitable and flexible space for year-round events, concerts, sports, meetings, smaller trade shows, galas and many more. other uses. Learn more about visitor and resident benefits and how the event center is planned to complement the new Soundside Promenade being designed.

The staff will be at your disposal to answer all your questions. For more information, please see our Event Center FAQ Page.



Site plan committee reviews proposed office conversion and subdivision

By Site plan

By Lorilyn C. Lirio

Olympia’s site plan committee is considering two requests for development projects – one is to use the existing building and the other is a proposal to subdivide 1.4 acres into nine lots with eight single-family homes.

Office space

In a meeting on Wednesday May 11, LDC Principal Engineer Ross Jarvis provided a brief overview of the client’s proposal for a building at 720 Lilly Road, SE, Olympia.

The site includes two buildings with 36 parking spaces.

He said the Montessori school uses one of the buildings; the other is a bank.

As indicated in the narrative description submitted to the site committee, the Montessori building would remain on its land.

The developer plans to split the second building in two and use it as a dental clinic and office space.

The drive-thru that is on the east side of the building will be removed and a new exit door installed.

No additional buildings will be established, Jarvis added.

Olympia planner Casey Schaufler asked Jarvis to submit the binding site plan amendment, which outlines their drive-thru plan.

“Some of the parking requirements may depend on whether or not you meet a threshold of 50% of the package’s rateable value,” Schaufler said when explaining why he had to request their plan with drive-thru.

“If you have a project that meets this threshold, you will have additional requirements for parking islands that must be installed on site,” Schaufler added.

He also recommended referring to the building’s binding 1997 site plan. “It shows the proposed building for the school and the bank. We need to see an actual outline.

Housing estate

At the same meeting, the Site Plan Committee heard a proposal from JSA Civil on behalf of a client who seeks to subdivide 1.4 acres into nine lots and construct eight single-family home parcels at the south end of Decatur St. at about 18and Avenue SW, just northwest of the offices next to the Auto Mall west of Olympia.

The project also proposed a new connection between the sidewalk and the pedestrian path on Decatur Street to provide expanded pedestrian amenities for residents of the project and adjacent neighborhood.

BADA approves plan for two warehouses along Boulevard Enders | Winchester star

By Site plan

BERRYVILLE — Only two new warehouses will be built along Jack Enders Boulevard.

On Wednesday evening, the Berryville Area Development Authority (BADA) approved a site plan for LGV Group LLC to build the warehouses on 12½ acres adjacent to Clarke County Business Park.

The company initially proposed to develop three warehouses there.

Originally owned by Brent Mercke, the property was already zoned to accommodate types of businesses suitable for small industrial parks.

BADA advises the Clarke County Board of Supervisors and Berryville City Council on land use issues involving an area targeted for possible incorporation into the city.

Her unanimous vote, following a motion by Kathy Smart seconded by Diane Harrison, ends more than six months of indecision on the project.

Based in Loudoun County, LGV operates a business on Station Road in Berryville where metal windows and doors are manufactured.

Each of the three warehouses initially proposed was to comprise 60,000 square feet. LGV planned to occupy one and lease the other two.

The review of the site plan has been postponed several times. Officials asked for more information on how the warehouses would affect their environment. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) also reviewed the project.

To address the DEQ’s concerns about stormwater runoff, LGV decided not to build one of the warehouses. This will reduce the amount of impermeable surface on the site from 8.2 acres to around 6 acres, documents show.

One of the warehouses to be built will include 60,000 square feet. LGV plans to occupy this warehouse, which will be closest to the boulevard, according to Berryville Community Development Director Christy Dunkle.

The other warehouse will be 85,000 square feet and will be leased, Dunkle said in his understanding.

A stormwater management system will be installed on the property, she said.

The approved site plan will also establish a larger buffer zone between the property and the adjacent subdivision of Berryville Glen. Dunkle said landscaping pads will be installed.

The LGV “responded to the (local) requirements of the buffer zone”, she stressed.

The company did not say when construction would begin, it said.

Lucan Commercial Development Receives Conditional Site Plan Approval

By Site plan

Content of the article

Lucan-Biddulph City Council has conditionally approved the site plan for a planned large new shopping center at the north end of Lucan.

Content of the article

Conditional site plan approval was granted at the May 3 council meeting at the Glenns Shopping Center at 315 Main Street on a 3.73-hectare (9.24-acre) parcel of land at the far end north of Lucan (north of the community center). The land is now used for agriculture.

As Middlesex County planner Dan FitzGerald explained in his report to council, site plan approval allows “the construction of a large format commercial development primarily for retail, restaurants , professional offices and commercial services in the form of a gas station and an automatic car wash. ”

The project proposes a commercial development of 5,087.49 square meters consisting of five separate buildings.

According to the FitzGerald report, “Municipal services currently do not exist on the property and access is maintained via Main Street. As a condition of development, the developer would be required to extend municipal services to the property through Main Street.

Certain conditions and provincial approvals must still be met for the site plan agreement to be signed. Responding to the con. To Daniel Regan’s concerns about traffic on Highway 4, FitzGerald said there will be a requirement for two left turn lanes on Highway 4 in the development.

Com. Jaden Hodgins asked if the sidewalks off Highway 4 leading to the property are part of the project. Public Works Director Jeff Little said sidewalks are not part of the project and will need to be addressed in the future.

Torrington P&Z approves school construction project site plan, with conditions

By Site plan

TORRINGTON — Members of the Planning and Zoning Commission and city planner Jeremy Liefert have approved the city’s $180 million school construction project, although concerns remain about traffic and sustainable practices such as the solar panels.

The School Building Committee requested special exception permits and site plan approval for middle and high school buildings and new administrative offices for the school district, replacing the aging Torrington High School, which will be demolished once the new construction is completed.

Amy Samuelson, representing the SLAM Collaborative, the developer of the project, answered a number of questions regarding traffic issues raised by the police sergeant. Dustin Baldis.


“There are traffic issues that have yet to be resolved with the Winthrop Street intersection,” Liefert said, referring to reports and comments from Baldis.

“There still has to be traffic analysis, and there still has to be a solution. But I think we are in a good position at this point,” Liefert said.

Baldis requested that all bus traffic entering and exiting school property during construction enter the school campus using the back or “north route,” according to Liefert.

Commission member Starley Arias asked how these buses would affect nearby neighborhoods.

“I understand the buses will be coming from the back of the school; (this area has) been closed and not used,” he said. “There’s a little condo neighborhood there, plus the cul de sac neighborhood up the hill. They haven’t seen any bus traffic, but now we’re using it as a method to get students to high school during construction. … Trafficking could cause problems for these communities.

Building committee co-chairman Ed Arum said no other traffic would be allowed except for buses. “The buses come, the doors are closed, and when school is over, the buses come back to pick up the kids,” he said. “No one else is allowed to go there.”

Baldis’ biggest concern, according to Liefert, is traffic at the three-way intersection on Winthrop Street and Major Besse Drive. Even with the diverted buses, incoming and outgoing vehicles and pedestrians using crosswalks could cause traffic jams and other hazards, Baldis said.

“Sergeant. Baldis said there would be traffic jams at the three-way intersection and something should be done now rather than later,” Liefert said.

In his own memorandum of approval, the planner set out a condition that all traffic issues must be resolved before the certificate of occupancy is issued.

“We recommend that the claimant stay in contact with Officer Baldis and resolve these issues,” he said.

Arum said he and the committee would continue discussions with Baldis. “We have met the sergeant several times and we will continue to meet him,” he said. “We also meet the bus drivers.”

Arias also asked if solar panels and other “sustainable systems” for the new building were being considered.

“You said you designed the school to have solar panels, but they’re not in the design,” he said. “Or (are there) backup generators; a sustainable system for the school in case of bad weather.

Samuelson said the buildings had a generator that would provide power in an emergency. “That includes all lighting, security systems, alarm systems, access control and many other things,” she said. “As a measure of sustainability, we designed the building with the possibility of putting solar panels on the roof, and sized the roof to accommodate these (panels).”

Arias said, “Our state is evolving to be more sustainable, to be a green state,” he said. “I want to be sure that any future projects we approve are consistent with these goals.”

Arum said the building committee did not put solar panels in this design. “We don’t want to install the panels until the building is complete,” he said. “We want to make sure we have enough money to build a school for the children of Torrington.”

Glen Carbon holds hearing over gas station site plan

By Site plan

At one of two public hearings on Monday, the Glen Carbon Planning and Zoning Commission heard a preliminary plan and site plan for a proposed gas station and convenience store.

The commission struggled to assemble a quorum but eventually voted in favor of the site plan with four variants and a possible fifth variant for parking should the village staff deem it necessary.

The preliminary platform and site plan was for The Game Gas Station and Convenience Store. The new plans would completely redevelop the current gas station which sits just off Route 157 at Glen West Drive and south of Interstate 270. The preliminary flat proposes taking the current five lots on the site and redesigning them. -flat in all three lots, totaling 2.39 acres.


Dan Koziatek, a civil engineer with Civil and Environmental Consultants, and owner Bobby Patel represented the project. Koziatek also served as a spokesperson.

He said the project will be carried out in two phases. First, the existing 3,500 square foot convenience store and gas pumps will remain open while crews dig the ground for the new store and pumps behind or west of the current store. The new gas storage tanks will go to the southeast corner of the site while a new buried storm water retention pond will go to the southwest corner. If the village grants final approval, construction could begin as early as July.

When the new store is complete and the pumps are ready for use, a demolition crew will then level the old store and pumps and remove the old storage for remediation. The new convenience store and liquor store would be approximately 6,000 square feet and include a gas awning. Access to and from the site will only be from The Game Drive, not 157.

“The biggest challenge of this project has been access [to and from Route 157]”said Koziatek. He said they had met with the village’s building and development committee about adding an in/out fee on 157, but it was opposed.” Ultimately, what was clear from their perspective was that the sidewalk cuts must remain on The Game Drive.”

At one point, Scott Slemer, the village’s director of public works, stepped in with a future IDOT project that will affect the width of the road.

“The village advanced by making a [agreement] for this intersection, so we have this design,” Slemer said. “There will be another lane and a sidewalk that will be put in place further to the west.

He said the village applied for a Congestion and Air Quality Mitigation (CMAQ) grant, but failed to obtain it. They will resubmit, and Slemer said there’s a strong chance the village will get the funds next time around.

“More than likely this whole intersection will be under construction in 2026,” Slemer said.

The developer, Ma Tulja, Inc., submitted the following deviations:

• Not providing “street trees” along The Game Drive, which has approximately 226 linear feet of frontage requiring six street trees. The developer says that due to the large driveways and paved areas along The Game Drive, the waiver is requested to place these trees along 157 and the west side of the site instead.

• Request that said street trees be within 10 feet of the back of the sidewalk. Due to the creek that runs along the western boundary of the property and the wide driveways required for tanker trucks that haul fuel, “street trees” should be placed five feet from the back of the sidewalk along the 157

• No sidewalks along The Game Drive Due to a future Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) development plan to widen the road and change its overall elevation, it is impossible to design a site that will connect the proposed and existing roads while providing a sidewalk that meets the requirements of the village. The IDOT project is currently not funded

• Allow a 25 foot setback from the stream bank without disturbance. The existing creek along the western boundary would be rerouted to align with an existing culvert under The Game Drive and remove any invasive species along that segment of the creek. The west driveway of the site is located 15 feet into the buffer zone. Erosion control devices would be installed to protect the bank

This project will be presented to the full board in time for the May 24 meeting or at one of the meetings next month.

Tribal Council approves $75 million for ‘theme show’ and site development at exit 407

By Site development

One of the world’s largest amusement park companies, based in France, Puy du Fou, is teaming up with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to create a “theme show” centered on Cherokee history on the property of 200 acres under development by Kituwah LLC, off Interstate 40 at Exit 407 in Sevier County.

The Cherokee Tribal Council voted May 11-1 to appropriate $75 million for the project, including $45 million budgeted for attraction construction and $30 million for site development costs on the entire 80-acre section of the property slated for Phase 1 development. The Puy du Fou project is expected to control 4-5 acres when it opens in 2024.

“This project in Tennessee developed with EBCI means a lot to us: it will initiate our presence on American soil, where there are so many great stories to tell”, Nicolas de Villiers, President & Artistic Director of Puy du Fou . “As lovers of history and cultural roots, we are proud and honored to partner with the EBCI Tribe to achieve this goal.”

Twice voted “Best Theme Park in the World”, Puy du Fou operates an original flagship park in France that attracts more than 2.3 million visitors each year and only follows Disneyland Paris for the most in the country. The park features multiple shows, vintage villages, and more than half a dozen on-site resorts custom designed and built with authenticity as the focal point. The company now has attractions in Spain, the Netherlands, the UK and China.

This would be its first foray into the US market, and under the agreement, Kituwah LLC would have first right of refusal on any future US projects.

“We are excited to take the first steps towards developing this world-class attraction that will help sustain our nation economically while creating a new platform to share dimensions of Cherokee history that many have never heard” , Tribal Council Chairman Richard French said in a statement.

The concept

The tribe’s relationship with Puy du Fou at exit 407 will be similar to its relationship with Caesar’s Entertainment at its casinos. The tribe will own the property, building and business through a newly formed company called Cherokee Rose, which in turn is owned by Kituwah LLC, but Puy du Fou will design and operate the attraction.

The attraction itself will consist of a 125,000 to 175,000 square foot “retail entertainment” dining and entertainment space, with an immersive show that will be the first of its kind in the United States, said Matthew Cross, CEO of OE Experiences, the Knoxville-based experience development company that represented Kituwah and The 407 in their global search for ideal partners.

“The closest example would be something like Titanic over there in Pigeon Forge where you walk around a themed space, but it’s much more about immersion and the authenticity of actually being there,” said said Cross. “And those sets are complemented by live actors, which is sort of Puy du Fou’s signature.”

“The vocation of Puy du Fou is to tell stories in an innovative, original and rooted way,” said Manon Rigaudeau, Puy du Fou’s international press officer. “This new immersive show is the embodiment of this vocation: it will plunge visitors into the heart of a moving epic, from the Appalachians to the plains of Champagne.

Puy du Fou is one of the only companies in the world to create its own creative design and operate the attraction, allowing it to “seamlessly integrate” guest experiences into the space.

The show itself will present the “authentic and heartbreaking” story of Cherokee heroism during World War I through a “fully immersive” show that will take guests on a “patriotic and moving journey for the whole family”, according to a news. Release.

“These were Cherokees who actually participated on behalf of the Allies, and this experience will put you in the thick of the action as someone who travels overseas with them and has that experience,” Cross said. “Our goal, as is the goal of any experience, is for it to be highly transformative. This is going to be a very emotional yet very positive story, and we hope everyone comes away with a sense of admiration for a story that many people don’t know and which, in my opinion, deserves to be told.

Council debate

During a May 5 Tribal Council discussion, Big Cove representative Teresa McCoy said the proposal met with a favorable reception from Big Cove residents when she discussed it with them at a meeting. She said she was also “comfortable” with the decision, despite the steep price tag.

“If we give the information to our people, they will read it and make their own decisions and take away the fear of us sitting here and handing out $75 million, because it’s scary,” she said. . “He is.”

Birdtown representative Albert Rose was the only one to vote against the project. He disputed that the tribe, not Puy du Fou, would pay to build the attraction and wondered what the return on investment would be. His instinct is that it’s not a good deal, he says.

“Commercial games, you’re going to get a pretty quick return,” he said. “This, I don’t know when I was going to get it back.”

Registered member Ernest Tiger also spoke out against the proposal.

“I just think the money could be better spent,” he said. “Why not spend $75 million and buy every member of the tribe a house?”

Progress on the 407

Buc-ee’s, the first company to announce its partnership with Kituwah, is currently working to vertically build what will be the world’s largest convenience store when it opens next summer. The entire 80 acres of Phase 1 is now the subject of letters of intent from restaurants, retail chains and concepts looking to build there. Although these letters are not binding, Cross expects the Puy du Fou announcement to prompt these companies to make their own public commitments. In December, the Tribal Council voted to allow another of its LLCs, EBCI Holdings, to proceed with construction of a sports betting bar on the property.

In addition to work at Buc-ee, fine grading has begun for the construction of a Marriott Courtyard owned by Kituwah LLC. The tribe hopes to see this facility open in 2023, but achieving that goal will be “challenging” given current supply chain issues, Cross said.

Cross said he doesn’t anticipate any zoning issues with the development, as the property was designated as a tourism improvement district before the tribe purchased it in 2019. However, he said the developers are discussing the how the current labor shortage might impact development plans and considered potential solutions, including labor housing, and also assessed infrastructure needs in the community.

“Many new timelines all start at the same time after a milestone like this, but we pay a lot of attention to the City of Sevierville, Sevier County, and the Tennessee Department of Transportation regarding area infrastructure and which is necessary to support not just our development, but the community itself.

Edinburgh International Book Festival unveils new sitemap for years to come

By Site plan

The Edinburgh International Book Festival has announced the locations of its upcoming events.

The festival will be held at the Edinburgh College of Art, before moving to a brand new city center and the University of Edinburgh site in 2024.

Building on the success of last year’s hybrid program, this year will see the current site expand, with increased capacity and number of sites. Last year was the first year the Book Festival has moved since its inception in 1983, beginning its long-term partnership with the University of Edinburgh.

As part of the partnership, the event will move to the Edinburgh Futures Institute in 2024, a landmark development based on the site of the former Royal Infirmary on Lauriston Place.

READ MORE: The centenary of the birth of Hugh MacDiarmid – and the Scottish renaissance

The University of Edinburgh said it was transforming the building into a space for multidisciplinary collaborations and partnerships.

Organizers say the institute will provide the Book Festival with a variety of accessible indoor and outdoor venues as well as the necessary facilities to host a hybrid program of live and in-person events. They say the venue provides ample space to create the atmospheric literary gathering place that audiences and authors have long enjoyed for socializing, connecting and sparking ideas.

Festival director Nick Barley said: “We are extremely excited to return to Edinburgh College of Art in August, where we can bring back the buzz of Edinburgh’s best festival years. We’ll build on what we offered last year and look forward to sharing how this charming and welcoming site can provide unforgettable experiences for audiences and authors alike.

“We have worked closely with the University of Edinburgh over the past two years and are delighted that our new permanent home will be the Edinburgh Futures Institute from 2024, a historic building with a ‘green village’ outdoor space. very important campaign which is developed for the enjoyment of all and of which our festival city can be proud.

He continued: “It creates extraordinary and game-changing opportunities for the book festival, but more importantly – for the first time in our festival’s history – it helps us plan a number of years in advance.

“The new site will allow us to continue to rebuild our world-renowned program, while placing accessibility, sustainability and innovation at the heart of what we do with a very important outdoor ‘green village’ space.”

READ MORE: The Catalan arts festival will take place across Scotland this spring

Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh, Professor Peter Mathieson, said: “I am delighted that the University of Edinburgh is deepening its partnership with the Edinburgh International Book Festival.

“We will provide world-class venues, and our students and staff will be an integral part of the festival programme, sharing and discussing ideas with audiences in Edinburgh and around the world. We look forward to welcoming book festival-goers to Edinburgh College of Art for the next two years.

“When the festival then moves to the Edinburgh Futures Institute from 2024, it will help realize the inscription engraved on its wall: ‘Patet Omnibus’, which stands for ‘Open to All’.”

This year’s hybrid festival will take place from August 13-29.

Approved Site Plan for Don Sol Restaurant

By Site plan

Posted May 10, 2022 7:55 PM

Last updated on May 11, 2022 09:08

Written by Greg Sapp

Premier Local News 2022

Members of the Effingham City Plan Commission on Tuesday approved a site plan for a Don Sol Mexican restaurant, which will be located at 1303 Avenue of Mid-America.

The restaurant will be located along the south side of the Avenue of Mid-America, north of TGI Friday’s and will relocate the fountain north of the Thelma Keller Convention Center. The 6,385-square-foot building will feature a pick-up window, but no walkway.

The Commission voted to recommend that City Council rezone the properties at 801,805, 807, and 809 North Keller Drive from the R-2 single-family residential zoning to the B-1 Ward shopping area. Some residents who live in the Hickory Hills Subdivision, west of these properties, have asked what could be developed on the lots if rezoning is granted. They also said that, if the properties are developed commercially, what arrangements could be made so as not to affect their standard of living. Buffers, berms, fences, plantings and other landscaping were all suggested. City council will likely consider the proposed rezoning at its May 17 meeting.

The Commission recommended that Council approve a subdivision of the Oak Pointe subdivision so that the land north of Kohl’s could be developed as a residence on Lake Pauline. A subdivision flat for the 4th addition to the HGI subdivision, essentially the Don Sol site, has also been recommended for approval.

Developer Scott Conant has asked the Commission to withdraw his application to rezone a property near Effingham Country Club and to delay his application for a flat of the property.

Brian Hayes and Dave Storm were re-elected Chair and Vice-Chair of the Planning Commission for another year, and Ken Wohltman was welcomed as a new member of the Commission.

05/10/2022 | Sitemap for Triple Crown Estates Development Advances

By Site plan
Phases one and two of the new Triple Crown Estates development are shown in a rendering above. Image courtesy of Vista Design Inc.

SNOW HILL – As construction on the first phase begins, plans for the second phase of a new development off Route 589 are also progressing.

Last week, the Worcester County Planning Commission reviewed the site plan for the second phase of Triple Crown Estates, the residential community built next to Ocean Pines.

“This project has been approved for a very long time,” attorney Mark Cropper said. “It’s just a continuation of what was originally approved with no major changes.”

Cropper presented the site plan for Phase Two of Triple Crown Estates to the commission last Thursday. The project, which received initial approval in 2015, at one time included duplexes but was adjusted in 2020 and is now made up of 60 single-family homes.

Phase one, which is currently under construction, consists of 30 units while phase two, which was under review last week, will also consist of 30 units.

ocean city live cams

The homes will be connected to Ocean Pines via an extension of King Richard Road and will not be accessible via Route 589 or Gum Point Road.

“The only access is from Ocean Pines,” Cropper said.

Planning commission member Ken Church said he had received calls from residents of Gum Point Road who said they had seen construction vehicles on their street.

Cropper said the vehicles were not associated with Triple Crown Estates, but were instead related to the county’s sewer installation along Gum Point Road.

“I have been told that any activity that has been observed has nothing to do with the construction of the subdivision,” Cropper said.

He added that, as proposed, the second phase of the planned residential community (PRC) was consistent with the county’s overall plan and plans for the project had not changed since the duplexes were converted to single-family homes in 2020.

“If the RPC did not comply with the compensation plan, zoning regulations and other guidelines, it would never have been approved to begin with,” he said.

The commission voted unanimously to forward the RPC to County Commissioners with a favorable recommendation.

The Urban Planning Commission approves the plan for the implementation of the project in the city

By Site plan

May 10 – A final site plan has been approved for the second phase of an age-limited development along US 15 in Frederick that is expected to have nearly 400 units.

The city’s Planning Commission voted unanimously on Monday to approve the combined preliminary plan and final site plan for Section 2 of the Bloomfields community, being developed by Natelli Communities.

The community – on the east and south sides of Willowbrook Road and west of US 15 – will add 207 detached single-family homes and 186 townhouses and villas.

The entire Bloomfields community is bordered by Sundays Lane to the north, Willow Road to the south, US 15 to the east and Willowbrook Road to the west, according to a Planning Commission report prepared by city staffers.

The first section of the community, with 229 single-family homes and 79 townhouses/villas, was approved in November 2020, according to the staff report.

The developer is trying to take much of the design from Section 1 and has tried to focus on how the units are oriented around small parks and other areas that can be destinations for residents, said Michael Natelli, of Natelli Communities, to the commission.

The commission granted an amendment to allow noise walls in a section of the neighborhood to be up to 12 feet high – above the 6 feet allowed by the city’s land management code – to help limit the noise from nearby freeway.

Natelli said the developer would try to keep the fences under 12 feet if possible, but asked for some flexibility in the requirements.

The wall in this area will need to be further away from the homes it would protect, requiring a higher height to be effective, he said.

The project will include five types of single-family homes and two models of villas, according to the staff report.

Bloomfields was annexed to the city in two parts, according to the staff report: 286 acres in September 2009, then 252 acres in September 2012.

A previous master plan called for up to 1,200 units, 1.3 million square feet of retail or office space, and a 15-acre school site.

A preliminary plan and a final site plan for the first residential phase were approved prior to the cessation of project activities.

A new annexation resolution was passed in 2017 after Natelli Communities announced plans to create an age-restricted community.

A master plan was approved in October 2018 for 1,500 non-residential units and amenities.

The project includes 45 acres of public park and open space, including 15 acres that the city will transfer to the county for a school site and 15 acres for public park that will include a portion of the Tuscarora Creek Trail and a shared-use trail. There is also land for a future water tower.

The final 15 acres will be a linear park along US 15 that will be part of the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Scenic Byway, according to the staff report.

Planning Commission approves the plan for the implementation of the project in the city | Real estate and development

By Site plan

A final site plan has been approved for the second phase of an age-limited development along US 15 in Frederick that is expected to total nearly 400 units.

The city’s Planning Commission voted unanimously on Monday to approve the combined preliminary plan and final site plan for Section 2 of the Bloomfields community, being developed by Natelli Communities.

The community – on the east and south sides of Willowbrook Road and west of US 15 – will add 207 detached single-family homes and 186 townhouses and villas.

The entire Bloomfields community is bordered by Sundays Lane to the north, Willow Road to the south, US 15 to the east and Willowbrook Road to the west, according to a Planning Commission report prepared by city staffers.

The first section of the community, with 229 single-family homes and 79 townhouses/villas, was approved in November 2020, according to the staff report.

The developer is trying to take much of the design from Section 1 and has tried to focus on how the units are oriented around small parks and other areas that can be destinations for residents, said Michael Natelli, of Natelli Communities, to the commission.

The commission granted an amendment to allow noise walls in a section of the neighborhood to be up to 12 feet high – above the 6 feet allowed by the city’s land management code – to help limit the noise from nearby freeway.

Natelli said the developer would try to keep the fences under 12 feet if possible, but asked for some flexibility in the requirements.

The wall in this area will need to be further away from the homes it would protect, requiring a higher height to be effective, he said.

The project will include five types of single-family homes and two models of villas, according to the staff report.

Bloomfields was annexed to the city in two parts, according to the staff report: 286 acres in September 2009, then 252 acres in September 2012.

A previous master plan called for up to 1,200 units, 1.3 million square feet of retail or office space, and a 15-acre school site.

A preliminary plan and a final site plan for the first residential phase were approved prior to the cessation of project activities.

A new annexation resolution was passed in 2017 after Natelli Communities announced plans to create an age-restricted community.

A master plan was approved in October 2018 for 1,500 non-residential units and amenities.

The project includes 45 acres of public park and open space, including 15 acres that the city will transfer to the county for a school site and 15 acres for public park that will include a portion of the Tuscarora Creek Trail and a shared-use trail. There is also land for a future water tower.

The last 15 acres will be a linear Park along US 15 which will be part of the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Scenic Byway, according to the staff report.

City Council approves site plan for 224-unit development

By Site plan

Posted on Monday, May 09, 2022

Owen Sound City Council has approved a site plan application to permit the construction of 6 purpose-built 4-storey multi-unit residential buildings totaling 224 units, as well as a common amenity building, a parking area, landscaping and a network of sidewalks at 1144 1st West Ave.

The development proposal comes from Hansa Financial & Property Management Inc.

The property is the location of the former BCK Foundry where propellers were cast for Canadian-built vessels until it closed in 1996. The factory buildings were removed in the early 2000s and ownership of 8 acres has since been vacant.

The site is a former brownfield site with fully serviced utilities, access to public transit, and walking distance to amenities in the city’s riverside district, making it ideal for developing strong, livable communities that promote the long-term prosperity and social well-being. -be.

More information on this and other projects is available on the City’s website at www.owensound.ca/development.

For more information, please contact Amy Cann, Planning and Heritage Manager at 519-376-4440 ext. 1232 or by email at [email protected]

Fast facts:

  • The Application for Site Plan Approval proposes the construction of six (6) purpose-built four-storey multi-unit residential rental buildings with a total of 224 units at 1144 1st Ave W.
  • A number of studies, including a site condition report and a traffic impact study, were submitted in support of the applications.
  • The proposal is consistent with the policies of the City’s 2021 Official Plan and meets the requirements of the City’s Zoning By-law

-30-

Site Development Manager – Data Center

By Site development
This opportunity is with a market leader in the critical data center developer / wholesaler / colo provider space. This company provides data center solutions tailored to the requirements of their customers’ critical operational facilities. They ensure the reliability of critical installations for most of the world’s largest organizations, including the Hyperscale market.

Data Center Strategy and Site Development Manager – Ashburn, VA
This position is also available in: Santa Clara CA, Portland OR, Denver CO, Chicago IL, Charlotte NC, Atlanta GA, Dallas TX and Toronto ON.

Our client is looking for a Site Development Manager. The ideal candidate will have extensive experience leading data center and infrastructure development efforts, including ownership due diligence and licensing, site and facility design, utility interconnection, finances and taxes. The candidate should also understand municipal issues as they relate to site strategy and land acquisition.

Responsibilities:

  • Lead infrastructure development activities, including negotiation of land deals and support agreements
  • Develop and manage project budgets
  • Assist in the development and management of project budgets and participate in data center site localization efforts
  • Managing due diligence and permitting efforts, optimizing utility and network interconnections, collaborating with design and construction teams
  • Negotiate data center development transactions, including supporting legal real estate procedures
  • Maintain strategic relationships with stakeholders in the region
  • Collaborate with the sales team to offer custom build opportunities and product development

Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree in business, finance, construction or engineering, master’s a huge plus
  • 3-6 years of experience developing data center sites and other mission critical facilities
  • Previous experience with acquisition of existing sites/assets
  • Involved in the placement of vertical telecom assets
  • In-depth understanding and experience in conducting complex transactions
  • Attention to detail and ability to manage multiple projects with internal staff, external consultants, vendors and other stakeholders
  • Ability to effectively communicate complex business and market information and analysis at all organizational levels to include senior management, utility partners, government officials and local stakeholders
  • Proficiency in MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint
  • Must pass a comprehensive background check
  • Travel required is 25-50%

Submission Instructions:

Qualified candidates can send their CV to [email protected] (CV on pkaza dot com) with 15306048 in the subject. After applying, if you have any further questions, you can call 973-895-5200 and ask for Iggy. You can also submit through our career portal and also see all of our critical plant openings at: https://jobs.pkaza.com

If this job isn’t for you – feel free to pass it on to someone who might be a good fit – WE PAY FOR RECOMMENDATIONS!!

EOE/AA Employer M/F/D/V

Pkaza, LLC is a third-party employment company. All fees assessed by Pkaza will be paid by the employer we represent and not by the candidate.

City gets site plan for new dispensary – Hasso Hering

By Site plan

Seen from across Ninth, this is the site of a proposed “Albany Dispensary”, between the street and the back of the white building in the background.

Albany’s planning division issued public notice of a proposed construction project, called “Cannabros Albany” on one plan sheet and “Albany Dispensary” on another, off the eastbound leg exiting the Pacific Boulevard overpass.

The vacant property sits on two adjoining tax lots at 739 and 815 Ninth Ave. SE Ninth Avenue, it is part of the couplet carrying two freeways, Oregon 99E and US 20.

The site is between the freeway and the back of a strip mall facing Pacific Boulevard. There is already a marijuana store in the mall and two more less than a block east.

The owner, Peter E. Brock of Sherwood, told me on the phone that the project was still in the planning stage and that he did not want to comment on it.

Plans submitted to the city for review call for a one-story 2,438 square foot retail building. Planning staff say it’s a marijuana store. There would be parking for 18 cars and 10 bicycles.

Planning staff said the application was for site plan approval as well as an adjustment to a property line.

Property owners within 300 feet were notified of the application and asked to comment on it against city development code standards. The standards cover things like off-street parking, landscaping and more. Comments are expected before the close of business on May 18.

The zoning designation for the property is “Commercial Community” and the proposed use is permitted.

Site plan approval is required before a building permit can be issued. But not all approved site plans result in something being built. (hh)

This bare parcel of land is approximately where the parking lot for the proposed building would be.

Site plan to be presented for new South Chatham Catholic School

By Site plan

Content of the article

A site plan for a new Catholic elementary school and day care center in south Chatham will be presented to city council on Monday.

Content of the article

The property is located on the south side of a recent extension of Tweedsmuir Avenue West, west of Keil Drive South. The targeted lands of 3.24 hectares are currently vacant.

St. Clair Catholic District School Board is proposing the construction of a 3,129 square meter facility while +VG The Ventin Group Architects Ltd. participate in the design of the project.

In the plan, the new two-story school would have an adjoining single-story daycare center.

The Ontario Ministry of Education approved $26.6 million in 2017 for the local Catholic school board to merge Chatham’s six elementary schools into two new schools to deal with declining enrollment.

The school board already owned land on McNaughton Avenue West where the $16 million St. Angela Merici Catholic Elementary School was built and is now open.

In December 2020, council approved the proposed Plan of Subdivision Application, Official Plan Amendment and Zoning By-law Amendment for future institutional uses.

‘The proposed primary school and day care center is within the urban limits of Chatham and is adjacent to the existing built-up residential areas, which it will serve,’ says a planning report.

“The development is an efficient use of vacant, appropriately designated land that has access to all municipal services and is in an area that includes existing and planned transit facilities and other public services.”

Halifax councilors call for revisions to site plan for homeless tents

By Site plan

Despite lingering questions over designated tent sites for the homeless, Halifax Regional Municipality councilors have agreed to move forward with a revised version of the proposal.

Read more:

Why having some parks for homeless people in Halifax ‘misses the point’, says expert

HRM staff initially recommended 16 possible outdoor sites on municipal land that they deemed suitable for accommodation – 11 of them for “overnight stays” and five for longer-term situations.

Halifax staff proposed 16 outdoor spaces across the municipality where people could shelter.

Halifax staff proposed 16 outdoor spaces across the municipality where people could shelter.


Halifax


The motion passed on Tuesday evening included asking staff to formalize the criteria and locations of designated accommodation sites, while removing one-night options. Most councilors objected to one-night options, which would only be open from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.

The story continues under the ad

“If someone doesn’t want to leave at 8 o’clock and has nowhere to go, where do they go? Will they turn around the corner waiting for the compliance officer to leave? It’s a tricky situation,” the adviser said. Iona Stoddard, who represents District 12 (Timberlea – Beechville – Clayton Park – Wedgewood).

An amendment was made, requesting a staff report on the negotiation of a memorandum of understanding with the province on support for unhoused residents. This report, the advisers said, should define the roles of each level of government.

“The least worst option”

Staff told councilors at Tuesday’s virtual council meeting that there have been people sleeping “roughly” in the municipality for decades now.

Com. Waye Mason, who represents District 7 (Halifax South Downtown), said designated spots will only work if they are properly stocked and safe.

“We need to make sure these camps are a place that maximizes safety for everyone,” he added.

Read more:

Nova Scotia Housing Crisis: How the Emergency Reached a Boiling Point

The report was prepared after a six-week reassessment of the city’s approach to homelessness and encampments. The city and province recently partnered to create modular units to provide housing on the Halifax and Dartmouth side. The Dartmouth units were operational by January. The Halifax versions have not yet been opened.

The story continues under the ad

In a statement to Global News, Halifax Mutual Aid said the group was disappointed with the report from HRM staff.

“Halifax Mutual Aid is disappointed that the council did not consult a single member of the homeless community when drafting a report which directly impacts their safety and self-reliance,” a spokesperson wrote.

“The absolute bare minimum they could have done was involve people in their planning. They should be a primary stakeholder in this conversation. This once again shows their lack of compassion for our homeless friends and neighbors.

Deputy Mayor Pam Lovelace, who represents District 13 (Hammonds Plains – St. Margarets), echoed that concern.

“Their voices are not in this report. Yes, we have voices of homeless people, but the most important people we’re trying to help – we haven’t heard from them,” she said at the council meeting.

She said the idea of ​​designated sites had “good intentions, but it’s not going to work.”

Modular units work, she said, because they’ve partnered with an organization that has on-site workers and community groups to work with clients.

“But if you start placing people only in these designated sites without any management, coordination or community connection, it will be chaos,” she said.

The story continues under the ad

‘I can’t support this until staff come up with a real detailed plan of how the rules and regulations will actually be enforced.’


Click to play video: “Report details hardship of homeless people in Halifax”







Report details plight of homeless people in Halifax


Report details plight of homeless people in Halifax – April 6, 2022

Vicky Levack, a housing and disability advocate with PADS Community Network, watched the debate and told Global News that law enforcement is still a top concern for many in the community.

“We are concerned about the powers of compliance officers and whether the police will be used,” she said. “They say they won’t unless there is actually violence perpetrated against someone.”

The issue of security was raised several times by councilors during the council meeting.

“I don’t want to see August 18 recreated in 16 different places,” the adviser said. Lisa Blackburn, who represents District 14 (Middle/Upper Sackville – Beaver Bank – Lucasville), in reference to evictions at downtown Halifax sites last year.

The story continues under the ad

She and others have also expressed frustration about the province’s lack of input. Housing, they pointed out, falls under provincial jurisdiction.

“We’re running out of millions of reserve dollars that we can get off the couch to spend on this problem,” Blackburn said.

She added that the municipality’s “level of expertise” was “reaching its limit.

The motion adopted by the board in its entirety:

THAT Halifax Regional Council:

1) Direct the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) to continue to support the province and other partners to ensure people have safe, supportive and affordable housing,

2) To request the CAO to continue its efforts to increase the availability of affordable housing, as described in the body of this report,

3) Direct the CAO to formalize the criteria and locations for the designation of overnight accommodation sites in the parks in accordance with the criteria and locations described in the body of the staff report dated April 28, 2022, with the deletion of the sites overnight camping, and adding these sites to the list of potential longer-term camping sites if necessary and possible to ensure sufficient supplies to meet requests to be brought back to Council for consideration,

4) Direct the CAO to continue to review options for adding off-park sites to the inventory of outdoor sites available for overnight accommodation,”

The story continues under the ad

5) Authorize the Executive Director to negotiate and enter into a contribution agreement with United Way to convene a lived experience committee to advise staff, and

6) Request the CAO to return to the Board with a subsequent report with additional analysis and recommendations for actions, including a timeline and plan to support people transition, education and implementation that is led and provided by civilian personnel.

7) Request the Executive Director to provide a staff report on the negotiation of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Province of Nova Scotia on support for non-housed HRM residents. The report should include defining the roles of each level of government and specific actions to support and prevent homelessness within HRM.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Site plan for three-house project approved | Beaches

By Site plan

INDIAN SHORES — A developer who had asked for the construction of three single-family residences on 2nd Street in the Town Square neighborhood has revised the construction plans for the condominium units, which appeased members of the planning and zoning board and of the city council.

Both councils unanimously approved the project on April 26, 3-0 by the planning board and 5-0 by the council.

A packed house attended a first planning council meeting on April 12 as well as its continuation on April 26. Residents had height issues and argued that the project would trigger flooding and disturb wildlife and vegetation. Opponents said the 3-sided garages would be a potential hurricane hazard, there would be parking issues due to construction trucks, and they were concerned about pile driving.

An issue with the middle building in the site plan being too small to meet the city’s criteria for a single-family dwelling led Hunter P. Brown, who was representing New Port Richey developer Coastal Design Consultants at the meeting, to agree to change the concept of three individual single-family dwellings to condominium status.

City Engineer Jerry Dabkowski and City Building Official Brian Rusu said the proposed site plan meets or exceeds all existing city code requirements. Both supported the plan once the lot size met condominium requirements versus single family residence requirements.

Dabkowski noted three conditions: the applicant had to be aware that the state Department of Environmental Protection permit expires on May 22, 2024; Applicant must demonstrate purchase of 0.07 Saltwater Forest (Mangrove) and Wetland Mitigation Credits from Little Pine Island Mitigation Bank; and an Army Corps of Engineers permit appeared to have expired, with the applicant required to prove that the permit is still valid in writing to the Corps.

Police Chief Rick Swann also required the development to submit a traffic control plan as part of the permit requirements.

Brown noted that a silt fence would surround the construction area to keep the construction contained.

In other business, council was told that the civic center has officially reopened for recreation classes, Library Read & Feed and other events from May 2.

Convalt Energy obtains site plan approval from Hounsfield planners

By Site plan

May 4 – HOUNSFIELD – Convalt Energy has received site plan approval from Hounsfield City Council to begin construction of a 330,000 square foot solar panel manufacturing facility near Watertown International Airport on Highway 12F.

The five-member board of directors unanimously approved the project on Tuesday evening.

“I think this is a big step forward,” said Convalt CEO Hari Achuthan. “We just have a lot of work ahead of us now to do that.”

Mr Achuthan said construction will likely start in July, although he hopes for June. Operations are expected to begin early next year.

“This is the most important step,” he said of the planning board’s approval.

The next step is for Convalt to gather financing documents and submit approvals to the US Department of Agriculture for a loan guarantee.

“And once that’s done, I think we’ll be revolutionary,” he said.

Convalt purchased two Watertown buildings that will be used for storage – the former New York Air Brake building at 100 Purdy Ave. and part of the Black Clawson complex at 511 Pearl St.

The company plans to invest $4 million to renovate the 52,000-square-foot Purdy Avenue structure into 100,000 square feet of space, Jefferson County Economic Development CEO David J. .Zembiec.

A section of the old air brake structure continues to house the Living Waters Fellowship Church. Mr Achuthan said last week that he planned to build a new church near the Purdy Avenue property to replace meeting space.

The Watertown Local Development Corp., also known as the Watertown Trust, approved a $300,000 bridging loan for Convalt on Thursday.

The loan will be combined with another $1.050 million loan from the Jefferson County Industrial Development Agency and the Sackets Harbor Local Development Corp. which will be used for working capital.

Funding from the bridge gap will go to trucking $8 million worth of solar power plant equipment the company purchased from SunPower, a former Oregon solar company. The first of more than 200 trucks carrying the equipment began arriving last week and will be stored at the Purdy Avenue and Pearl Street buildings.

The company plans to employ more than 380 workers in the first three years of the plant.

Times writer Craig Fox contributed to this story.

MPC Approves Checkers Site Plan and Old Jesup Road Development

By Site plan

May 4 – The Glynn County Continental Planning Commission voted on Tuesday to approve a site plan for a new Checkers drive-thru restaurant on Altama Avenue.

The land on which the developer, listed in county documents as Valerie Babb of Starrchex Georgia LLC, would like to build the 1,343-square-foot drive-thru restaurant is a wooded lot at 5599 Altama Ave. road intersection with the Scranton Connector near Golden Isles Laundry and Dollar General.

In October 2021, the MPC voted to rezone the property from medium residential to roadside commercial to allow for new development.

The planning commissioners voted 7-0 to approve the development.

Katarina Crumpler, with EMC Engineering, represented the developer on Tuesday. She said it was too early to tell when construction might begin or when the restaurant might open due to the lengthy development approval process that remained.

The MPC also voted to recommend approval of a rezoning on Old Jesup Road to allow up to 70 residential units on the west side of the road, just south of Walker Road.

County Community Development Department Director Pamela Thompson recommended that the MPC require the applicant to conduct a traffic survey prior to construction, which the commission did.

Jake Hightower of Roberts Civil Engineering gave the MPC and the public a first look at the proposed neighborhood. While the proposed rezoning would allow for 90 residential units, the development is expected to be closer to 60 units.

“What she (the owner, Mayte Cruz) envisioned was a new neighborhood similar to the other nearby development of Settler’s Cove,” Hightower said.

The intention is to create a peaceful neighborhood of clean, well-built homes with traditional off-street parking. All but a few units the developer intends to keep will be sold at a standard market rate to individual owners, he said, and will ideally benefit property values ​​in the area.

MPC member Richard Strickland asked if the main road through the neighborhood could connect to Boyd Road. Hightower said the owner had no ownership of the property that would allow this. It would also require a level crossing, he said.

Several residents expressed concerns about problems the development would cause for traffic and the sewage system on the busy thoroughfare.

Brenda Boyd Cross, who lives nearby, said her family had lived opposite the proposed development for over 100 years. More houses are planned on Walker Road around the corner, she said, and overall both will have a negative impact on traffic. She was also very concerned that the development would cater to low-income residents.

“We frown on having this here because we’re scared. If it’s high income, we’ll be fine, but if it’s low income, we’d be scared,” Cross said. “We love our house, but we don’t want someone moving in who destroys our house or kills us, you know what I mean?”

Timothy Johnson said his family have also lived on Old Jesup Road for over 100 years. He was mainly concerned about traffic. The Canal Crossing shopping center on Canal Road has seen a noticeable increase in traffic and Old Jesup Road needs more work to reduce traffic, not development. Emergency vehicles are already having trouble crossing the area.

Rather than improving property values, Johnson said the neighborhood would hurt him because of all the trees that would be cut down and overload the area’s sewer system.

Neighboring resident Mike Carter said he wanted a privacy fence around the neighborhood, which Hightower said would be part of the project.

Hightower responded to citizens’ concerns by assuring them that the developer would carry out a traffic study to ensure that the necessary road arrangements were taken into account.

In response to questions about sewer capacity, he said the Brunswick-Glynn County Joint Water and Sewer Commission had issued a letter confirming the system could accommodate the new development.

He reiterated that the intent is to create a clean, thoughtful, and orderly neighborhood by addressing Cross’s concerns about low-income residents.

MPC member Missy Neu suggested the developer agree to lower the residential unit cap from 90 to 60. Hightower said it was a reasonable request, but would significantly hurt the owner’s potential income.

Mike Boatright, another MPC member, said any traffic problems arising from the property would be temporary as Old Jesup Road will have to be widened to four lanes anyway.

In the end, the MPC voted to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning on the condition that townhouses be excluded from development and density be capped at seven residential units per acre for a maximum of 70 units. residential.

Planning Commissioners Strickland, Boatright, Neu, Darrel Dawson and Chair Sherrye Gibbs voted in favor of the motion with restrictions. MPC member Bo Clark was the only opposing vote.

The Glynn County Commission will decide on the rezoning at an upcoming meeting.

In other cases, the MPC has recommended approval for a rezoning at Heritage Christian Academy.

Thompson said the church to which the school is attached wants to remove the old mission house and replace it with new modular classrooms, but cannot due to the residential zoning of that part of the property. The church has requested that this portion of the property be rezoned to commercial zoning.

The commissioners voted unanimously to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning.

MPC members also voted for:

—Approve a site plan for a new medical practice at 140 Martin Palmer Drive.

—Approve a site plan for a new 50 foot by 20 foot storage building at Golden Isles Collision on Candler Road.

– Recommend that the County Commission approve a rezoning of a property at the corner of Ga. 99 and Chanslor Road to allow for more residential development in addition to residential and commercial uses already permitted.

MPC Approves Checkers Site Plan and Old Jesup Road Development | Local News

By Site plan

On Tuesday, the Glynn County Continental Planning Commission voted to approve a site plan for a new Checkers drive-thru restaurant on Altama Avenue.

The land on which the developer, listed in county documents as Valerie Babb of Starrchex Georgia LLC, would like to build the 1,343-square-foot drive-thru restaurant is a wooded lot at 5599 Altama Ave. Road intersection with the Scranton Connector near Golden Isles Laundry and Dollar General.

In October 2021, the MPC voted to rezone the property from medium residential to roadside commercial to allow for new development.

The planning commissioners voted 7-0 to approve the development.

Katarina Crumpler, with EMC Engineering, represented the developer on Tuesday. She said it was too early to say when construction might begin or when the restaurant might open due to the lengthy development approval process that remained.

The MPC also voted to recommend approval of a rezoning on Old Jesup Road to allow up to two 90 residential units on the west side of the road, just south of Walker Road.

County Community Development Department Director Pamela Thompson recommended that the MPC require the applicant to conduct a pre-construction traffic survey, which the commission did.

Jake Hightower of Roberts Civil Engineering gave the MPC and the public a first look at the proposed neighborhood. While the proposed rezoning would allow for 90 residential units, the development is expected to be closer to 60 units.

“What she (the owner, Mayte Cruz) envisioned was a new neighborhood similar to the other neighboring development of Settler’s Cove,” Hightower said.

The intention is to create a peaceful neighborhood of clean, well-built homes with traditional off-street parking. All but a few units the developer intends to keep will be sold at a standard market rate to individual owners, he said, and will ideally benefit property values ​​in the area.

MPC member Richard Strickland asked if the main road through the neighborhood could connect to Boyd Road. Hightower said the owner had no ownership of the property that would allow this. It would also require a level crossing, he said.

Several residents expressed concerns about problems the development would cause for traffic and the sewage system on the busy thoroughfare.

Brenda Boyd Cross, who lives nearby, said her family had lived opposite the proposed development for over 100 years. More homes are planned on Walker Road around the corner, she said, and overall both will have a negative impact on traffic. She was also very concerned that the development would cater to low-income residents.

“We disapprove of the idea of ​​having this here because we are afraid. If it’s high income, we’d be fine, but if it’s low income, we’d be scared,” Cross said. “We love our house, but we don’t want someone moving in who’s going to destroy our house, or who’s going to kill us, you know what I mean?”

Timothy Johnson said his family has also lived on Old Jesup Road for over 100 years. He was mainly concerned about traffic. The Canal Crossing shopping center on Canal Road has seen a noticeable increase in traffic and Old Jesup Road needs more work to reduce traffic, not development. Emergency vehicles are already having trouble crossing the area.

Rather than improving property values, Johnson said the neighborhood would hurt him because of all the trees that would be cut down and overload the area’s sewer system.

Neighboring resident Mike Carter said he wanted a privacy fence around the neighborhood, which Hightower said would be part of the project.

Hightower responded to citizens’ concerns by assuring them that the developer would carry out a traffic study to ensure that the necessary road arrangements were taken into account.

In response to questions about sewer capacity, he said the Brunswick-Glynn County Joint Water and Sewer Commission had issued a letter confirming the system could accommodate the new development.

He reiterated that the intent is to create a clean, thoughtful, and orderly neighborhood by addressing Cross’s concerns about low-income residents.

MPC member Missy Neu suggested the developer agree to lower the residential unit cap from 90 to 60. Hightower said it was a reasonable request, but would significantly hurt the landlord’s potential income.

Mike Boatright, another MPC member, said any traffic problems arising from the property would be temporary as Old Jesup Road will have to be widened to four lanes anyway.

In the end, the MPC voted to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning on the condition that townhouses be excluded from development and density be capped at seven residential units per acre for a maximum of 70 units. residential.

Planning Commissioners Strickland, Boatright, Neu, Darrel Dawson and Chair Sherrye Gibbs voted in favor of the motion with restrictions. MPC member Bo Clark was the only opposing vote.

The Glynn County Commission will decide on the rezoning at an upcoming meeting.

In other cases, the MPC has recommended approval for a rezoning at Heritage Christian Academy.

Thompson said the church to which the school is attached wants to remove the old mission house and replace it with new modular classrooms, but cannot due to the residential zoning of that part of the property. The church has requested that this portion of the property be rezoned to commercial zoning.

Commissioners voted unanimously to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning.

MPC members also voted for:

• Approve a site plan for a new medical practice at 140 Martin Palmer Drive.

• Approve a site plan for a new 50 foot by 20 foot storage building at Golden Isles Collision on Candler Road.

• Recommend that the County Commission approve a rezoning of a property at the corner of Ga. 99 and Chanslor Road to allow for more residential development in addition to residential and commercial uses already permitted.

Convalt Energy Obtains Site Plan Approval from Hounsfield Planners | Business

By Site plan

HOUNSFIELD — Convalt Energy has received site plan approval from the Hounsfield Town Planning Board to begin construction of a 330,000 square foot solar panel manufacturing plant near Watertown International Airport on Highway 12F.

The five-member board of directors unanimously approved the project on Tuesday evening.

“I think this is a big step,” said Convalt CEO Hari Achuthan. “We just have a lot of work ahead of us now to do that.”

Mr Achuthan said construction will likely start in July, although he hopes for June. Operations are expected to begin early next year.

“This is the most important step,” he said of the planning board’s approval.

The next step is for Convalt to gather financing documents and submit approvals to the US Department of Agriculture for a loan guarantee.

“And once that’s done, I think we’ll be revolutionary,” he said.

Convalt purchased two Watertown buildings that will be used for storage – the former New York Air Brake building at 100 Purdy Ave. and part of the Black Clawson complex at 511 Pearl St.

The company plans to invest $4 million to renovate the 52,000 square foot Purdy Avenue structure into 100,000 square feet of space, Jefferson County Economic Development CEO David J. .Zembiec.

A section of the old air brake structure continues to house the Living Waters Fellowship Church. Mr Achuthan said last week that he planned to build a new church near the Purdy Avenue property to replace meeting space.

The Watertown Local Development Corp., also known as the Watertown Trust, approved a $300,000 bridging loan for Convalt on Thursday.

The loan will be combined with another $1.050 million loan from the Jefferson County Industrial Development Agency and the Sackets Harbor Local Development Corp. which will be used for working capital.

Funding from the bridge gap will go to trucking $8 million worth of solar power plant equipment the company purchased from SunPower, a former Oregon solar company. The first of more than 200 trucks carrying the equipment began arriving last week and will be stored at the Purdy Avenue and Pearl Street buildings.

The company plans to employ over 380 workers in the first three years of the plant.

Times writer Craig Fox contributed to this story.

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Letter to the Editor: Car Wash Site Analysis

By Site analysis

In the March issue of this publication, I wrote an article called “Site insights”. The article offered practical best practices for operators looking to build a new car wash. Among other site selection and design questions, I asked Henry Shine of WhiteWater Express Car Wash and Michael Murry of Champion Xpress Carwash, “What does a modern car wash look like in 2022?”

Click here to read more

However, as one of our readers recently reminded me, proper site selection and design is more than meets the eye. Robert Johnson, Principal Engineer of Civilogistix in Roswell, Georgia, was kind enough to take the time to share his thoughts in the following letter to the editor.

Rich: I just wanted to congratulate you on the editorial and article for the March issue of Professional Carwashing and Detailing magazine. I would just like to put more emphasis on property selection and site design.

I started designing fast food drive-throughs, convenience stores and gas stations nearly 40 years ago; Since that time, the company has evolved a lot. The automated car wash industry is no exception — in a very short time.

A big mistake I see small business owners make is to dive headlong into site selection – following all the basic car wash business advice – determined to acquire what they think is the perfect site…only for discovering this site, downtown, in the perfect location, reasonably priced, vacant for 20 years is for a reason. The reason may be imperceptible to the untrained eye.

As engineers who specialize in this type of development and have multiple car wash clients, we see the end result of what happens when investors choose the “wrong site” and have to spend many days and money trying to make it work.

Leading car wash investors have learned that they need experts at all levels to achieve the desired outcome. But, the smaller ones, some just trying to save money by “expanding”, often run up against development codes, utility restrictions and environmental regulations, and they tend to get discouraged very quickly when the site is not finished and to return them the money as soon as they expected.

As a service to prospective car wash owners/operators, someone should tell them that it’s money well spent to hire a professional engineer, who has experience in this particular type of fit-out to guide them through the procurement and entitlement phases, produce the latest effective innovations and aesthetically appealing site design, and guide the process to satisfactory completion. There is much more I could say, but time and space forbid it.

Back to my first thought, nice article, happy reading and keep providing this much needed information.

Sincerely, Robert Johnson.

Robert, thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts and for reading PC&D.

BREAKING: City OKs sitemap for new car wash

By Site plan

Can’t say it’s a good idea — Randall Guarnieri

The Rio Rancho Board of Directors on Thursday night approved a site plan application to build a car wash at 507 NM Highway NE. (Matt Hollinshead Photo/Observer)

Rio Rancho’s board of directors approved a site plan late Thursday to build a second Champion XPress car wash in the city, but not before residents voted against the proposal.

The company opened a car wash at 1890 Abrazo Road NE in March. The proposed location would be by Northern Boulevard, Monterrey Road and New Mexico Highway 528.

“When seeking new locations for development, our primary considerations include sites that the city has zoned for commercial use and areas with existing high traffic,” said company spokeswoman Lindsey Joy. Observer in an email.

“I hate to see this turn into another Stripes situation”

The Board of Directors voted 5-1 in favor of the sitemap. Councilor Dan Stoddard was absent.

Councilman Bob Tyler voted against it, arguing that Champion XPress picked the wrong location to open.

Although the city does not have the right to tell a business what it can or cannot build on a property, the access location, off Monterrey Road, could be a barrier for residents. , did he declare.

Several residents agreed.

The car wash is said to be just a few feet from the home of Professor Randall Guarnieri of Cleveland High School.

There could be dozens of cars queuing on the street in the afternoon when school buses come down to drop off the kids. Traffic would turn the street into a one-lane road, he said.

“I can’t say it’s a good idea,” Guarnieri said.

Resident Darryl Gregerson said he was worried about traffic going in and out of the car wash.

“I would hate to see this turn into another Stripes (Burrito) situation,” he said.

The proposed car wash would have three lanes that can accommodate up to 34 vehicles as well as 16 drying stations, according to the company.

“These elements help us understand how quickly cars will be able to cross the queue and start moving on the roads, so that they don’t all go off the road at once,” Councilor Karissa said. Culbreath. .

The Board then approved an amendment directing Champion Xpress to come up with a design to create a right turn lane at the car wash. The plan would then be submitted to the city’s public works department.

Other Concerns

Resident Andrea Lerner said she fears the flooding on Monterrey Road will get worse as the car wash opens.

Hull then proposed an amendment – ​​which was approved – requiring the company to submit its grading and drainage permit for review by the city.

Some residents also felt that the car wash would interfere with their scenic views of the city.

Kevin Breen said he loved being able to watch the Sandia Mountains and the balloons at the annual party.

“Mass Ascension is going to be totally clogged with this car wash,” he said.

The car wash would only be about 36 feet tall and things could be worse. For example, the proposed company could have been larger, Hull later said.

“Unless you own the property between you and the mountain, there are no protected views in the town of Rio Rancho,” he said, adding that the town “cannot deprive someone of a property right which has been established”.

Laurel Park Phase One, 173 Units, Under Site Plan Review | Business

By Site plan

Phase one site plans are currently under review for the 306-unit Laurel Park housing development on 60 acres adjoining Highpoint, which will be located at the end of Laurel Street off Orange Road in the town of Culpeper .

The Culpeper Planning Commission provided an update on the project during a working session on March 29.

Once proposed to be built in three phases, Laurel Park is now expected to develop in two phases, starting with 84 single-family homes and 89 townhouses for a total of 173 new residences. The Culpeper City Council rezoned the property, bordered to the south by US Route 29, for the higher density earlier this year.

The Laurel Street extension will provide access to the neighborhood via a roundabout leading to Lily Lane and Laurel Park Drive on the north side, parallel to Apricot Drive on the south and seven cross streets, in accordance with planning and zoning . The development will have 19.2 acres of open space, a park on the west boundary, two pocket parks on the east side and a center green in the middle.

People also read…

Laurel Park will have two community basketball courts and a capacity of nearly 1,400 parking spaces – a mix of garages, driveways, on-street parking and off-street parking. The extended Laurel Street will be widened with sidewalks, curbs and gutters installed before the first certificate of occupancy is issued, city staff told the planning commission.

Improvements to the Orange Road intersection, including dedicated turning lanes, will be completed near the end of the first phase. A total of 746 parking spaces will be provided in the initial phase along with one of the basketball courts and pocket parks.

The city’s multi-agency technical review committee continues to review the phase one site plan also still under review by the Department of Environmental Quality.

Asked by the planning commission what the homes in Laurel Park would look like, city planner Ben Holt said the renderings are included in the project narrative, adding that the developer is not tied to them.

“I anticipate it would look like most new home construction we see right now,” Holt said.

Planning commissioner Jeffrey Mitchell championed pedestrian safety in the upcoming development. The posted speed limit will be 25 miles per hour, which means motorists will drive at 37 mph, he said. Mitchell suggested setting it to 20 mph.

Holt said the roads would be public streets with a standard 25 mph display.

Planning Commission Member, Councilor Meaghan Taylor had questions about the Orange Road deceleration lanes and whether they would be long enough to safely accommodate cars waiting to turn onto Laurel Street.

Roddy Reyes of Bowman Consulting, representing the plaintiff, said the turn lanes would meet the VDOT’s minimum standards of a 100ft right turn lane with a 100ft taper and a 100ft left turn lane with a 150 foot taper and a 200 foot transition from Elizabeth Street, across Orange Road.

Across the city, a separate site plan to launch the Greens on Lake Pelham housing development was resubmitted after the project went dormant after its initial submission in 2006 during the housing crisis.

The latest plans show 58 single-family housing lots on 23 acres, two open space lots totaling 0.654 acres, and three stormwater management areas. A 10-foot-wide golf cart path is proposed from the Culpeper Country Club property to Golf Drive, according to city staff.

The project is located at the north end of Sunset Lane, Country Club Estates to the northeast and bordered by the country club golf course. Access to the homes would be via Sunset Lane and Golf Drive.

Mitchell wondered how residents of the development would walk to businesses near Madison Road. He encouraged the addition of golf cart paths and other pedestrian features.

[email protected]

540/825-4315

Solar Company Withdraws Industriplex Sitemap Change Request | Woburn

By Site plan

WOBURN – As the city council prepares to declare a handful of site changes as major alterations, a Waltham-based solar energy company has recently abandoned plans to build a new access road through a North Woburn solar farm.

At their final rally at City Hall last week, the council voted unanimously to let ECA Solar withdraw without prejudice a request to change several fence lines and the site’s main access point to a new solar power facility by Commerce Way, Atlantic Avenue and New Boston. Street.

According to a memo submitted to the board earlier this month by ECA Solar representative Michael Redding, company officials intend to reconsider the proposal in light of recent comments from the Special Permits Committee. .

“[We] Respectfully withdraw our minor edit request. We plan to revise our plans based on feedback received from city council and will resubmit them in the future,” wrote Redding, who heads the company’s engineering division.

In June 2021, the city council granted the petitioner a special permit to build a solar farm on a 36-acre portion of the IndustriPlex site.

The solar panels will include a smaller 2.45 megawatt facility and a larger farm capable of generating up to 498 kilowatts of electricity. Both green power facilities will be located near a series of new residential developments off New Boston Street by Anderson Regional Transportation Center.

Since the original special permit was issued, ECA Solar officials have been asked by the Woburn Conservation Commission to move sections of the green power facility away from on-site wetlands. To reflect these changes, the petitioner earlier this spring requested permission to revise the special permit to reflect a change to the perimeter security fence and the relocation of a utility pole and streetlight.

The council generally doesn’t object to most changes, but was hesitant to call a “minor change” a proposal to add a new access road through the solar power fields from Atlantic Avenue to at a nearby Passport car park. Originally, access included a paved “apron” where maintenance workers could park while the panels were being serviced.

During a discussion at City Hall on the application earlier this month, members of the Special Permits Committee also concluded that the access road was a major alteration that would require an entirely new process for public audience.

In coming to this conclusion, council referred to a recent memo from Building Commissioner Thomas Quinn, who noted that he considered the requested changes to the site plan to be “substantial” in light of what was originally proposed.

Before voting to allow the petitioner to withdraw, Ward 5 Councilor Darlene Mercer-Bruen asked if council should instead reject the petition to clarify council’s position.

However, according to City Clerk Lindsay Higgins, council would not “turn down” the proposal, but rather declare the proposed changes to be “major amendments”.

In Higgins’ view, the end result of such a vote would amount to allowing the withdrawal, as the petitioner is forced to refile the application or redraw the access road in a manner more consistent with the plan of origin of the site.

“Technically, within the parameters of the order, you’re not refusing a minor modification. You consider this to be a major change and then [vote] triggers what looks like a special permit process,” Higgins explained.

Concern over waste site plan off A19 at Tollerton

By Site plan

VILLAGERS are calling on planning bosses to reject a proposal to create a waste transfer station in open countryside, fearing it could worsen an accident black spot on the A19.

Some 22 months after Riley Plant Hire Ltd applied to North Yorkshire County Council for permission to change the use of land and buildings near the A19 in Tollerton, North York, the company and residents are awaiting a recommendation from highways authority officials on whether the plan would increase the risk of accidents.

A decision on the project, which has so far been delegated to planning officials although it is controversial, is expected to follow shortly after the highways department delivers its conclusion.

Documents filed with the application by Riley Plant Hire, which specializes in demolition, excavation, plant and dumpster hire, indicate that the site would receive around 3,000 tonnes of waste per year, with 20 tonne heavy trucks making about five deliveries a day.

Read more: Darlington made list of top ten best places to live for home and office work

Company officials say the accident data “clearly demonstrates that access to the site can accommodate both the volume and capacity of traffic likely to be generated” and that the use of the A19 junction at Tollerton did not result in any accidents involving heavy goods vehicles between 2015 and 2019.

They added: ‘The application contemplates the development of a facility remote from any sensitive receptors and, although located in open countryside, the character of the site lends itself to the establishment of a facility such as this.’

The section of the trunk road between Shipton through Beninborough and North Tollerton has developed a notorious reputation for serious collisions with large vehicles over the past two decades.

Incidents on the A19 near Tollerton include a 27-year-old woman who died after a crash involving a bus and a black car last year, a York driver who was killed in a collision with a tanker in 2018 and in 2014 a 45-year-old Middlesbrough man died in a head-on collision between his car and a bus.

Since 2000 there have been several other fatal accidents on the A19 near Tollerton.

However, Hambleton District Council has raised concerns about increased use of the site, with a transport company, waste transfer site and agricultural use all operating from there.

Read more: Joyous display of iconic Bible stories told through wool – Here’s where to see it

In its objection to the scheme, Tollerton Parish Council said lorries heading to and from the remote countryside site via a narrow lane would see the flow of waste increase, causing more vehicle movement and “a nuisance additional for surrounding properties, on both sides of the A19”.

He said: “This junction is a high-risk area as traffic passes at high speed. Additional movements of heavy goods vehicles in this area will potentially increase the risk of accidents.”

Keep up to date with all the latest news on our website or follow us on Facebook, Twitter and instagram.

You can also follow our dedicated North Yorkshire Facebook page for all the latest news in the area by clicking here.

For all the top news from across the region straight to your inbox, sign up for our newsletter here.

Do you have a story for us? Contact our press office on [email protected] or contact 01325 505054

Site plan approved for a 15-unit waterfront building with underground parking

By Site plan

The Huntsville Planning Committee has approved a site plan for a three-storey building located at 32 Brunel Road and overlooking the Muskoka River.

The approval includes 15 condominium units: one one-bedroom unit, six one-bedroom units plus a den, four two-bedroom units and four three-bedroom units, according to Huntsville planning director Richard Clark.

The developer is offering about 23 parking spaces, about four above ground and 19 underground, according to Clark.

The property has an area of ​​1,849 m². It contained a dwelling and detached garage and has approximately 70 meters of river frontage and 72 meters of Brunel Road frontage.

Clark noted that in 2009, a zoning bylaw amendment was approved to allow development of 15 units with underground parking. “In addition, a minor variance was approved in 2011 to provide additional zoning relief to allow development within the 200 meter setback requirement between new housing units and water treatment facilities. worn. A site plan application proposing a similar development was also conditionally approved by the City in 2012.”

Various iterations of the plan have been proposed over the years, but on April 13, the committee agreed with the planning staff’s recommendation and approved an updated site plan for a total of 15 units. Approval is conditional on the landscaping being revised to remove landscaping along the shore, such as a retaining wall, and replace it with “appropriate native plantings to the extent possible to the satisfaction of the municipality”. And that all drawings and plans are to the satisfaction of the municipality and commenting agencies.

The owner’s planning consultant, Lanny Dennis, said he did not foresee any problems with meeting the conditions subject to site plan approval. “The owners will continue to work with the city and district to address their feedback and they are certainly looking forward to continuing the project and another infill project to help address the housing shortage in Muskoka,” Dennis said.

Owner Ed Wiebe also addressed the committee during their remote meeting. He said it was a long process. He started the project in 2009 with his partner Glen Smith, then the real estate market experienced a downturn in early 2012. But now, with the dismantling of the sewage plant and with the high demand for housing, it is the good time to move the project forward.

“I did preliminary work as you saw in the photos,” he told the committee. “There is an excavator on site. We are currently carrying out soil sampling to ensure that the site is suitable for housing. We are putting in chopper coils, it will just determine the size and quantity of chopper coils and once we are approved we will be ready to start.

An excavator sits on the site of a future 15-unit condominium.
Renderings of the proposed elevation of the building are included in the staff report. (See more at the link at the end of this post.)

Huntsville councilor Bob Stone called the building quite imposing on the river, “and from Brunel it’s right on Brunel Road, so imposing on both sides,” he added. “And yet it addresses serious housing issues and I guess we have to understand that housing is so important that we have to consider these things right on our river. I am delighted to hear that there is going to be some robust vegetation planted. I hope there are many things that protect the building from the river and from Brunel.

Stone also spoke to Wiebe and said, “I hope the facade of that – some effort can be made to make it look a lot like Muskoka and it’s hard to define what that means, but I think Mr. Wiebe knowledgeable about what we like to see in Huntsville.

Councilor Dan Armor asked if the additional cars associated with the development on Brunel Road would require a traffic study. Dennis said it would be a district requirement since Brunel is a district road, but he said a unit count below 50 does not generally require a traffic study.

Finally, the committee approved the site plan. For more information, you can find the staff report here.

Don’t miss the Doppler!

Register here to receive our email digest with links to our most recent stories.
Local news delivered to your inbox three times a week!

Click here to support local news

Silverlake Dorset luxury holiday sitemap to add huge spa, pools and restaurant

By Site plan

A master plan has been unveiled to add a spa, restaurant and sports areas to a luxury holiday village in Dorset. The Silverlake luxury holiday home site on the outskirts of Crossways near Dorchester, which was previously Warmwell Quarry, has been redeveloped into a luxury, eco-friendly site since its takeover by The Habitat First Group in 2011.

Habitat First group has submitted a reserved application to Dorset Council to create a spa with a restaurant, outdoor space, bin stores, factory and ancillary buildings, communal areas, landscaping, parking and the associated infrastructure. Known as Dorset Spa, it is proposed to be built around Lake 5, which is located at the center of the development, west of the five licensed villages and south of Knighton Heath Forest and the Biodiverse Heart.

The design and access statement outlines how the owners want to create an “open and welcoming” spa and restaurant and “provide a community center for the development as a whole”, as well as “provide economically sustainable development”. Sketches show that the restaurant will take advantage of a lake view with up to 90 seats inside and 80 seats outside, and further seating inside the bar.

Read More – Dorset family frustrated with Ukrainian visa system delays

The developers say the spa, which will contain two pools, a sauna and a steam room, is articulated to capture southern views and daylight and could accommodate 73 people in its indoor pool, 46 in its outdoor pool, 16 people in its hammam. Plans also show that its outdoor spa will contain a large thermal area with hot hubs, thermal cabins, relaxation decks and a floating fire pit, as well as a treatment area and event space.

A hydrotherapy activity hub, which offers water sports, has been offered, alongside lakeside treatments and cabins, a welcome hub and open-air spa cabins. Due to the expansion of the site, Habitat First Group believes the new site will create at least 66 new jobs with a mix of management, therapist, chef and staff roles available, and additional scope for more staff during high season.

Computer-generated sketches show that the proposed buildings will be ‘sustainable’ and ‘create a positive impact on the wider community and respect and harmonize with nature’. Natural materials, sourced locally, will be used to create buildings in line with the location, with a margin of greenery on the buildings.



Luxury holiday home site Silverlake has unveiled expansion plans to build a new restaurant, spa, cabins and more on the former Warmwell Quarry site

A number of pathways and access points for cyclists and shuttles will also be created to connect the new development to the wider site. A new car park aims to provide 180 parking spaces for guests and visitors.

The design and statement read: “Habitat First Group creates communities of private vacation homes that share a love for mother nature. By combining excellence in architecture, interior design, amenities, security and service, vacationers can escape the rigors of city life. Habitat First provides an oasis of space where families can comfortably and responsibly vacation, explore and recharge safely in acres and acres of natural habitat.

The existing site was previously a 227-hectare quarry, and before that a World War II air base. Prior to this planning application, the last phase to gain approval included a “flagship” four-bed house, numerous properties as well as outbuildings, a gym, a communal jetty on the lake and private jetties for several of the houses.

Comments are welcome on the application on Dorset Council’s planning section of its website until 21 May, with application reference number P/RES/2022/02437.

Do you have a story to share or an issue we need to investigate? Email us at [email protected] or tweet @DorsetLive_

You can stay updated on the best news near youu with FREE Dorset Live newsletters – enter your email address at the top of the page or sign up for our newsletters here.

More from Dorset Live:

New sitemap for Hospital Cross in Helston with The Range removed

By Site plan

New plans have been submitted for the proposed retail park in Helston, showing one less store.

A full planning application was submitted last September for development of land at the top of the town to include a McDonald’s, Aldi, The Range and Costa.

The pristine 2.7 hectare site is in Hospital Cross, between Sainsbury’s supermarket and Flambards theme park, and RNAS Culdrose.

However, a new sitemap has now been submitted by the Pegasus Group, on behalf of Parsonage Developments Ltd, which shows The Range removed from the plans.

This follows an objection from the Ministry of Defence, which led developers and planners to agree to an eight-week deadline to make room for further consultation, after it was found that current proposals should be modified or risk being rejected.

The objection stated that the development would fall within a safeguard zone of one of the MoD’s air navigation aids, a High Resolution Direction Finder (HRDF), which is located on a mast near the runway at RNAS Culdrose.

The safeguard zone that surrounds the HRDF is designed to maintain a protected grade line around the instrument, so that it is not obstructed or its performance degraded by nearby buildings or structures.

The sitemap now, with The Range removed Photo: The Pegasus Group/Cornwall Council

Along with breaching the Safeguard Area, the MoD also raised concerns about bird strikes that could result from the development, “providing additional attractants to dangerous birds, resulting in an increased risk of strike of birds for aircraft operating from RNAS Culdrose”.

The Ministry of Defense has also raised concerns that waste generated from the development could end up on the base’s runway, causing a risk of “foreign object debris”.

The new site plan shows that Aldi has been moved further to the Culdrose side of the site, into space that would previously have been occupied by The Range.

The remaining area is now designated as a service yard and parking lot, following a redesign of the parking spaces.

Details of the layout of McDonald’s and Costa appear to remain unchanged.

The previous sitemap with The Range alongside Aldi Picture: Pegasus.

The previous sitemap with The Range alongside Aldi Picture: Pegasus.

The app continues to divide opinion, with members of the public commenting as recently as February and March this year.

The most recent comment was supportive, with the writer saying, “I fully support this development in hopes it will improve my children’s quality of life, save me gas money to travel more away to use these businesses, and will bring jobs and business to Helston.

“I will also be returning to work very soon and as someone experienced in retail I can see the potential to get a job with one of these companies.”

Another wrote: “Interest in Helston is rapidly diminishing as it doesn’t have much to offer. I think these new ventures are a very good idea to bring more attention to the town and also more jobs for residents.

However, a third person wrote: ‘As a resident of the Lizard Peninsula, I strongly oppose this proposed development for several reasons.’

He then listed some of them, including traffic, describing the roundabouts which would be affected by the proposal as ‘already awful in the summer months’, adding: ‘There are many days where traffic is blocked for miles in all directions from these intersections. It’s the only way out of the Lizard and traffic is more than an inconvenience, it’s a significant health and safety concern. Imagine you’re rushing towards A&E or you are evacuating an area due to a fire that is spiraling out of control.

He also cited conservation as another reason, as well as concerns about noise and odor nuisance, particularly air pollution, concluding: “I believe this development project will be a social, fiscal and health burden. for our community.”

In total, Cornwall Council has received 282 comments from the public so far, with 190 objecting and 88 in favour.

The latest site plan and proposed designs can be found on the Cornwall Council website under Plans PA21/07481.

North Little Rock Unveils Entertainment Site Plan

By Site plan

North Little Rock developers and officials announced a new $28 million entertainment complex on Friday that will include a driving range, restaurants, shops, bars and bowling alley.

People filled the lobby of North Little Rock City Hall for the much-anticipated announcement that the city will land a new “family-friendly” entertainment complex that will become a major draw in central Arkansas during its opening in the last quarter of 2023.

The project will be built on the site of the now closed Wild River Country Water Park on Crystal Hill Road.

“This is something, as I said, not just for North Little Rock but for Maumelle, West Little Rock, all of central Arkansas,” North Little Rock Mayor Terry Hartwick said. “When we bring people here, now they will have something else [to do] and, yes, go spend their money.”

The new development will be dubbed Maly’s Entertainment Area, after the Conway-based developer – the Maly Group – leading the effort. Maly Group owner Dr James Thomas said he expects his project to become a new model of entertainment.

“As a child, you were probably hanging out in a mall,” said Thomas, who is also a cardiologist at Conway. “There are no more malls now, so kids and everyone else needs a place to be entertained.”

The anchor of the new entertainment complex will be a golf and dining complex called “T-Time”, similar to Top Golf, the driving range chain. The complex will also include a virtual arcade, restaurants, specialty shops and eventually a hotel and multi-family homes.

The project is estimated at $28 million, which includes plans for the driving range and bowling alley, Thomas said.

Thomas said he landed on a site in North Little Rock while researching places in the area, eyeing a spot west of Little Rock. But with Wild River Country shutting down during the pandemic, the land in North Little Rock became available.

“His [got] easy access to highways with very good visibility both from [Interstate] 40 and [Interstate] 430,” Thomas said.

After finding the location, the Maly Group approached the town of North Little Rock with their plan. Hartwick and North Little Rock development manager Robert Birch said he was happy with the plan, as it is expected to create around 200 jobs.

“One thing we miss is that we don’t have these part-time jobs that students can work,” Birch said.

Hartwick, who was carrying a golf club at Friday’s event at Town Hall, couldn’t hide his delight at the announcement, stepping in to hug Thomas, after Thomas said the project would pay off $10 million to the city per year, including tax revenue.

Announcing the project was made easier because the Maly Group did not ask the city for money or tax breaks, Hartwick and Birch said. However, at the press conference, Thomas said he wanted a four-lane road connecting his development to I-40.

When asked what made North Little Rock attractive for a developer as opposed to Little Rock, Hartwick replied “besides the mayor”, jokingly referring to Little Rock Mayor Frank Scott Jr.

For many, the news of an upcoming high-tech driving range and sports bar in central Arkansas was welcome news. In 2020, Little Rock officials attempted to get Top Golf to open a location in War Memorial Park, but ultimately no action was taken.

The North Little Rock site will be similar to Top Golf, but not affiliated with the chain and will be dubbed “T-Time”. Thomas said he considered trying to bring Top Golf to central Arkansas, but decided to back out of working with the chain.

“Oh my God, we never thought we would get such a response,” Thomas said. “We just wanted to showcase it, so Top Golf [doesn’t] announce in Little Rock.”

Thomas said he consulted Kansas City-based T-Shotz, a golf-focused entertainment and dining venue when considering his plans for North Little Rock. A previous report in the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette incorrectly reported that T-Shotz would anchor the new development at North Little Rock.

Concord approves site plan for former job security building

By Site plan

The next stage of the long-awaited redevelopment of the former Job Security Building quietly moved forward this week with a major milestone for the project just a month away.

Following widespread comment on the downtown building’s ugly appearance, the Concord Planning Board approved the John J. Flatley Company’s major site plan for demolition of the current structure and construction of 64 apartments on the 32-34 South Main Street plot.

Plans for the project include a six-story building with a fitness center, ground floor parking, a swimming pool and a pergola. Construction could be completed as early as spring or summer 2023.

The city first purchased the building from the state in 2014 for $1.575 million. Since then, the sales and development process has been bumpy. A previous deal with Dol-Soul Properties fell through and last fall the discovery of additional asbestos outside the building delayed the closing date with Flatley Company, which is now set for May 31.

In all, Concord paid $2.65 million into the property. After fees, subsidies and a final sale price of $350,000 from Flatley, the city’s net investment will be approximately $1.6 million.

Planning board chairman Richard Woodfin said that usually the board would expect more people to show up at a public hearing for a large multi-family development like this.

“This type of project would usually involve a few people, either neighbors or people with a heart to get rid of a beautiful historic building,” he said, prompting laughs.

The DES building is known for its dated facade with a grid of blue and yellow panels interspersed with windows of equal size.

By comparison, a heated aisle dispute between two East Concord neighbors took up a third of Wednesday’s board meeting, leaving a nearly empty room for the Flatley Company’s presentation.

Attorney Ray D’Amante told council he hated the current building on South Main, which has been an eyesore in downtown Concord for as long as he can remember.

“I’m very happy to be part of the team ahead of you tonight,” said D’Amante. “I’ll be even happier when that first bullet hits the side of that building.”

Council granted waivers for a traffic study requirement and a slightly steeper driveway grade.

Annual property taxes for the redeveloped site could yield between $200,000 and $257,000 per year, using the 2021 municipal tax rate. Concord estimated that the assessed value of the site would be between $8 million and $10.24 million. dollars.

These tax dollars will go to the Sears Block Tax Increment Finance District to pay off the debt before they go to the general fund. A tax increase district, or TIF district, is a tool that municipalities like Concord use to encourage economic development in a particular area by paying for infrastructure costs.

Planning Board Vice Chair Carol Foss asked the Flatley team about the lack of playgrounds in the complex’s outdoor spaces.

“I don’t see any accommodations for kids,” Foss said.

Doug Richardson, vice president of acquisitions and planning for the Flatley Company, said that at the other four Flatley properties in New Hampshire, children made up only 4 to 5 percent of occupants.

“The main residents who come to a place like this are usually young professionals and empty nests,” Richardson said.

Foss said even a few children could benefit from a swing.

On Wednesday, the council also approved a multi-colour light display on the roof of the Concord Hotel, where previously only one color could be lit at a time. Currently, the top of the building is lit with blue and yellow lights at night in support of Ukraine, which lead planner Sam Durfee said was a particular exception.

Capital Commons conducted a trial on Dec. 24 with green and red lights. Some of the light scheme ideas included red, white and blue lights for July 4 and rainbow colors for Pride month.

The East Market Street site plan is discussed –

By Site plan

Picture

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (CBS19 NEWS) — Construction of new downtown townhouses could begin in late fall this year.

Eric Woolley of Woolley Engineering and Eleventh Street Partners has submitted a preliminary site plan which includes ten townhouses along East Market Street and 11th Street NE.

Construction could take a year.

The project would also include streetscape improvements and new sidewalks.

The aim of the project is to bring a new high quality and environmentally friendly residential offer to the city centre.

“It’s extremely exciting for our team to be able to grow in Charlottesville, especially downtown in a great neighborhood,” said Keith Payne, one of the owners.

The preliminary site plan will be administratively approved by City staff as the proposed use is de jure with no rezoning or special use permits required.

However, city staff cannot approve the preliminary site plan until Charlottesville City Council acts on a related matter. The project involves the closure of a paper alley, which requires council action.

“City council does not approve closing the lane, it wouldn’t necessarily preclude approval of the current development, but we would need to make design changes in response to their action,” Woolley said.

The staff development review team is currently reviewing the preliminary site plan and subdivision applications.

Next Public Consultation for Truck and Freight Site Analysis PD&E Study

By Site analysis
FDOT logo color

PHOTO COURTESY OF FDOT

” title=”FDOTPHOTO COURTESY OF FDOT logo color”/>

IMAGE COURTESY OF FDOT

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will hold a public meeting regarding the Project Plans Development and Environmental Assessment (PD&E) of the Truck and Freight Alternate Site Analysis Project on Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 5:30 p.m. The purpose of this project is to evaluate and recommend potential alternatives for truck and freight parking sites along the I-4 corridor that are viable for use by private and public operators.

Additional public meetings for potential alternative truck parking sites along the I-4 corridor are scheduled for April 2022 for Orange and Osceola counties. A public meeting was held in Seminole County in March 2022. Each public meeting for this project will include the same information and presentations about potential sites in all counties.

The Department offers several ways for the community to participate in the meeting. All participants, regardless of the platform they choose, will participate in the same live meeting.

Virtual option: Interested parties can join the Virtual Public Meeting (VPM) from a computer, tablet or mobile device. A VPM is a free live presentation or webinar over the Internet. For this option, pre-registration is required by visiting attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2683019897236010765. Once registered, attendees will receive a confirmation email with information to join the online meeting. Please note that Internet Explorer cannot be used to register or attend this webinar. If registering online, please provide sufficient online time to view the presentation in its entirety.

Telephone option (listening only): Participants can join the meeting in listen-only mode by dialing 631-992-3221 and entering passcode 218-033-636 when prompted.

In-Person Open House Option: Attendees may attend in person by heading to Volusia County Fairgrounds, Talton Exhibit Hall, 3150 E New York Ave., DeLand, FL 32724 anytime between 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. to view a looping presentation and project exhibits , talk with project team members, and submit comments or questions.

If you are attending in person, please remember to follow all safety and hygiene guidelines as well as obey local ordinances. If you are unwell, please consider attending the meeting virtually or by phone.

All meeting materials, including the presentation, will be available on the project website at www.cflroads.com/project/447724-1 prior to the meeting.

Audience participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability, or marital status. Individuals wishing to raise concerns regarding FDOT Title VI compliance may do so by contacting Jennifer Smith, FDOT District Five Title VI Coordinator, at [email protected]

The environmental review, consultation, and other actions required by applicable federal environmental laws for this project are, or have been, conducted by FDOT pursuant to 23 USC §327 and a memorandum of understanding dated December 14, 2016, and performed by the Federal Highway Administration and FDOT.

Individuals requiring accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or individuals requiring (free) translation services should contact Mark Trebitz, PE at 386-943-5157 or [email protected] dot.state.fl.us at least seven (7) days prior to the meeting. If you have hearing or speech problems, please contact us using the Florida Relay Service, 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-8770 (Voice).

Montreal’s Loew’s Theater commemorated in the development of a new site

By Site development
From left to right: John Marcovecchio, CEO, Magil Construction; Marco Millin, Vice President, Real Estate Financing, Business Services, Laurentian Bank; Kate Low, Regional Vice President (Quebec), Real Estate Finance, BMO; Charles Li, Tianqing Group; Kheng Ly, President and CEO, Brivia Group; Chee Sing Yip, founder of Kim Phat Group; Fangfei Wang, Deputy Director, Montreal Branch, Bank of China; Michelle Vien, Senior Director, Real Estate Finance Division, Eastern Canada, CIBC and Olivier Legault, Senior Associate Architect, BLTA. Photo courtesy Brivia Group

A 19-story mixed-use development will soon be built on the former site of Montreal’s historic Loew’s Theatre, giving the city’s Mainsfield Street a new face.

A significant presence of asbestos and significant structural constraints made it impossible to preserve what remained of the dilapidated theatre, other than the walkway over the north aisle. Moreover, the subdivision of the interior over the years has damaged the characteristic spatial sequence, affecting the historical value of the building. However, in keeping with the promoter Groupe Brivia’s commitment to Montreal’s heritage, the company is building a project in its place that blends carefully into its immediate environment, consisting of several buildings of architectural interest.

The design will reconnect Cathcart and Metcalfe streets and recall the site’s cinematic past with a dome above the main entrance soffit that will mimic the original theater ceiling. Pedestrians will be immersed in an urban mural, bringing together elements inspired by the former Loew’s Theatre.

As site excavation begins, 226 downtown residential units take another step toward completion. Future residents of the project will have the opportunity to live next to Sainte-Catherine Street, starting in 2024.

Béïque Legault Thuot Architectes (BLTA), the architects of the project, reflected the different uses of the site in their vision. At the forefront of urban life, an outdoor swimming pool on a rooftop terrace overlooking Dorchester Square and the shops and boutiques of downtown Montreal will be one of the main features of the building.

“Redeveloping an iconic site like the former Loew’s Theater requires skill and sensitivity, and I am particularly sensitive to what this place represents,” said Kheng Ly, Founder, President and CEO of Brivia Group. “As a Montrealer, I understand the attachment of citizens and the community to traces of the past. Here in Mansfield, we will strive to remember the beautiful hours and moments experienced by Montrealers who, for decades, occupied the seats of Loew’s Theatre. I want this atmospheric walkway to be a time-tested reminder of the site’s cultural past.

Planning commission approves site plan for large housing estate | Local News

By Site plan

A preliminary site plan was approved by the Defiance planning commission on Monday to build dozens of homes in the southeastern outskirts of the town.

The subject property, located at the northwest corner of the T-intersection of Carter Road and Ohio 15 in Defiance Township Section 36, is being proposed for new single family homes by Duane and Jhonelle Kees of Zion Real Estate Development in Fort Wayne.

Some 82 homes are proposed for the first round of development with another phase planned for the future.

The site plan was approved Monday without opposition and details plans for the construction of 82 single-family homes with more possible in a future phase. A small pond is proposed in each phase with houses built around them.

“We are delighted,” Johnelle Kees told the commission on Monday. “We hope you are.”

Kees hopes the houses could be started in about a year.

Asked about home prices, Kees said between $250,000 and $350,000 at today’s prices.

The site has not yet been annexed to the city.

Defiance County Commissioners have approved a petition asking for the 52,371 acres to be incorporated into Defiance, but the annexation must still be submitted to the city council for approval after a required 60-day waiting period.

The council has already approved legislation indicating which municipal services the city government would extend to the property after annexation to Defiance.

Also on Monday, the commission approved a zoning exemption requested by Cheryl Rupple of The Purple Dog, 1506 Baltimore Road, for a new building measuring 40 feet by 60 feet.

The variance allows for an eight-foot fence on the property instead of the six-foot maximum allowed under city zoning requirements.

A neighbor at 1502 Cherry St. expressed concern about maintaining a fence between properties, but it should remain.

Rupple informed the commission that his company planned to set up parking behind the building for its employees. This will allow customers to park in front.

The company offers boarding services for dogs. Rupple said 1,800 dogs were in his database.

Carolina Panthers Rock Hill SC Headquarters Site Development Schedule

By Site development

READ MORE


Panthers-Rock Hill Saga

Go in depth with what happens behind David Tepper and the Panthers ending their deal to build their headquarters in Rock Hill.


The Carolina Panthers have announced the termination of their contract with the City of Rock Hill for the construction of a new team headquarters and practice site. The project had been seen as transformational for Rock Hill and York County.

So how did the team and the city get here?

Here’s a timeline of key developments spanning five years of planning for the Panthers’ move:

An August 2018 letter from Rock Hill Mayor John Gettys to Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper, later published online by Gettys, features Rock Hill as a sports destination and invites Tepper to visit the city and explore options for a new team headquarters and training facility.

In November 2018, broadcaster and then-voice of the Carolina Panthers, Mick Mixon, spoke at a meeting of the York County Regional Chamber of Commerce in Rock Hill, where Mixon released a list of hypotheses alluding to a headquarters project.

“What if I told you a few hundred acres somewhere near here is going to be bought up pretty soon,” Mixon said at that meeting, “and a state-of-the-art training facility with restaurants, stores, banks , condos, apartments are going to be built and the Carolina Panthers business center is going to move here?”

After the meeting, area business leaders said they viewed Mixon’s comments as hypothetical and not an announcement.

“As speaker of the chamber, I hope that’s true,” said Rob Youngblood, then speaker of the chamber. “It would be great even to be considered for something like that.”

In March 2019, U.S. Representative Ralph Norman and Rock Hill Mayor John Gettys confirmed that the city and the team had discussed a headquarters in Rock Hill. The two chosen ones met the team in February 2019 to pitch the Rock Hill project.

That same month, state lawmakers and Gov. Henry McMaster met to discuss legal changes — they would ultimately be approved in May 2019 — to allow tax incentives for the Panthers.

Later in March 2019, Gettys confirmed that the Hutchison Farm site off I-77 was under consideration for the team’s training facility. The property was in York County, but later annexed to the Rock Hill town limits.

In May 2019, a joint letter signed by the mayors of Rock Hill, Columbia, Charleston, Greenville, and Myrtle Beach expressed support for the Rock Hill site. The letter from the state’s major landmarks urged state lawmakers to enact economic incentives under discussion at the time, which those lawmakers would do.

“The impact on Rock Hill and York County in the specific case before us today will be felt for generations to come,” the mayors wrote.

In June 2019, Tepper and team officials joined city and state leaders for a cheer rally in downtown Rock Hill to announce a partnership. Tepper spoke of a world-class orthopedic and executive medicine facility in addition to the Panthers facility in Rock Hill, which would attract people from across the country.

“It’s going to be a showcase here,” Tepper said at the Fountain Park rally. “We are going to bring people to this area. We’ll just have a sense of excellence not only up there for the football team, but everything we do here at Rock Hill.

In September 2019, multiple sources reported that land was under contract to be sold to the Panthers. In October 2019, Team Vice President and COO Mark Hart presented plans for the training site to the Rock Hill business community during a downtown business retreat. Hart talked about a training facility and headquarters, but also venues for other events, and even a golf course purchase.

“We want our facility in this community to have an iconic presence,” Hart said.

In November 2019, the Rock Hill City Council began the team headquarters approval process, after months of discussions ranging from allowing what could have been South Carolina’s tallest building to playing , tattooing and other possible businesses on the site.

Gettys asked its business community in December 2019 to convey the need for a sense of urgency to York County officials to bring the $2 billion Panthers project to fruition. City officials requested changes to tax districts, which the county would have to approve, to allow Opportunity Zone funding for the Panthers and other development projects.

“The one thing we’re missing to make all of this happen is a sense of urgency,” Gettys said at the time.

In February 2020, the state Department of Transportation issued a public notice of an I-77 interchange planned to serve the Panthers project. The $90 million project would be part of a larger road improvement plan in the region, boosted by the new headquarters.

In March 2020, the hiring of contractors began for the construction of the new Panthers site. That same month, York County agreed to its share of the project and released details of the incentives involving the city, county and team.

The county’s final vote in April took place despite few people being able to attend, amid the early stages of social distancing due to COVID-19.

In March 2020 the team purchased Waterford Golf Club and its planned headquarters.

In June 2020, nearly $35 million in federal funds was announced for the new I-77 exit.

Foundation stone laid in July 2020 with the aim of opening the new head office in 2023.

Hart held a virtual presentation for around 1,000 people in October 2020 to update plans for the site, which the team called “The Rock”.

In February 2021, the team had a time lapse video to show the construction progress.

A May 2021 request from the team to York County requested assistance with infrastructure costs. A letter from Hart to the county that month indicated that Rock Hill’s expected money had not come. Bonds were to be issued by the city by October 2020, according to the letter, and an extension to February 2021 had already been missed. The city said it has met its financial obligations up to this point.

“Unfortunately, infrastructure funding remains at a crossroads,” Hart wrote to the county.

In June 2021, the team and the Tepper family announced a combined donation of $700,000 to Miracle Park, indicating plans for an ongoing partnership with the city where his team would operate.

A March announcement from the team said the headquarters project would be put on hold due to ongoing funding issues with the city. An announcement from Tepper Sports & Entertainment read:

“Given the economic realities, the difficult but prudent decision has been made to put the project on hold. Ongoing work will continue with our partners to find an economically acceptable solution for all parties to continue this project at Rock Hill.

Later in March, York County agreed to a newly proposed funding agreement with the team and the city. In it, four decades of incentives would pay for the $225 million in public infrastructure at the heart of the team’s funding with the city.

On Tuesday, the team announced that it would end its contract with Rock Hill for construction at the site off I-77.

This story was originally published April 19, 2022 1:26 p.m.

Related stories from the Rock Hill Herald

John Marks graduated from Furman University in 2004 and joined the Herald in 2005. He covers community growth, municipalities, transportation and education primarily in York and Lancaster counties. The Fort Mill native has won dozens of South Carolina Press Association awards and several President McClatchy Awards for news coverage in Fort Mill and Lake Wylie.
Support my work with a digital subscription

Valvoline Roswell-JF Site Plan Approved Archives

By Site plan

Cobb commissioners on Tuesday approved an amendment to the site plan and details of the development of an oil change business in a vacant quadrant of the Roswell-Johnson Ferry Road intersection.

Valvoline Instant Oil Change’s proposal to construct a 2,088-square-foot building on the site of a former Chevron station was put on the agenda with consent from commissioners at a rezoning hearing.

You can read the revised application by clicking here and an updated development plan by clicking here.

The new company will have three bays and will have access to them on a right-in, right-out basis. The plans call for a landscaping plan and 15 parking spaces. The Chevron station, which closed in 2020, was demolished last year and the nearly three-acre lot has stood vacant ever since.

The land is in front of the Merchants Festival shopping centre, but not part of it.

The East Cobb Civic Association also submitted comments ahead of the vote that were not immediately available online.

Related stories

Receive our free newsletter by e-mail!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the week ahead in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to register, and you’re good to go!

The planning commission approves the layout plan for a large housing estate | Local News

By Site plan

A preliminary site plan was approved by the Defiance planning commission on Monday to build dozens of homes in the town’s southeastern outskirts.

The subject property, located at the northwest corner of the T-intersection of Carter Road and Ohio 15 in Defiance Township Section 36, is being proposed for new single family homes by Duane and Jhonelle Kees of Zion Real Estate Development in Fort Wayne.

Some 82 homes are proposed for the first round of development with another phase planned for the future.

The site plan was approved Monday without opposition and details plans for the construction of 82 single-family homes with more possible in a future phase. A small pond is proposed in each phase with houses built around them.

“We are delighted,” Johnelle Kees told the commission on Monday. “We hope you are.”

Kees hopes the houses could be started in about a year.

Asked about home prices, Kees said between $250,000 and $350,000 at today’s prices.

The site has not yet been annexed to the city.

Defiance County Commissioners have approved a petition asking for the 52,371 acres to be incorporated into Defiance, but the annexation must still be submitted to the city council for approval after a required 60-day waiting period.

The council has already approved legislation indicating which municipal services the city government would extend to the property after annexation to Defiance.

Also on Monday, the commission approved a zoning exemption requested by Cheryl Rupple of The Purple Dog, 1506 Baltimore Road, for a new building measuring 40 feet by 60 feet.

The variance allows for an eight-foot fence on the property instead of the six-foot maximum allowed under city zoning requirements.

A neighbor at 1502 Cherry St. expressed concern about maintaining a fence between properties, but it should remain.

Rupple informed the commission that his company planned to set up parking behind the building for its employees. This will allow customers to park in front.

The company offers boarding services for dogs. Rupple said 1,800 dogs were in his database.

Corning Northside School Site Plan Involves Rental of Single-Family Homes

By Site plan

After years of delays, plans for Northside Place have changed and 24 single-family rental homes are now planned on the former Northside School site in Corning.

Riedman Companies, which purchased the site in early 2020, originally planned to build single-family homes, costing between $336,900 and $377,900, at Northside Place.

But the plan has been delayed by COVID-19, rising costs, delays in sourcing building materials and lack of interest, forcing the company to change its approach.

Jerry Watkins, senior real estate director at Riedman Companies, said construction of the first single-family rental home will begin in April, with work on a new home beginning every two weeks thereafter.

The first house is expected to be completed in January 2023, with the entire project expected to be completed in January 2024, Watkins said. Rental rates for 1,400-1,500 square foot homes are to be determined, but will be at or above market rate.

Related:Corning city leaders angered by lack of progress on planned Northside Place housing

Lodging in Corning:Plan to resurrect Corning church project fails in city council vote

Real estate:How hot is the real estate market near Corning? Home prices rise to $133,000

Chris Sharkey, president of Corning Enterprises, said she contacted Riedman Companies in February to ask if there was a different, accelerated plan that would address the Northside Place project.

Riedman Companies, a Rochester-based company, worked diligently to develop a new plan for the project on the city’s north side.

“In terms of making that decision, if you look at some of the news and some of the stuff that’s going on out there, single family home rentals are becoming a popular thing,” Watkins said. “So we think that will be an ideal thing to do.”

Councilman Mark ReSue, I-7, who represents the neighborhood where Northside Place is located, is hopeful but not convinced the work will actually take place.

“I’ll believe it when I see it,” ReSue said. “Riedman made multiple obligations that they failed to meet.”

The letter Riedman Companies wrote to the city and Corning Enterprises regarding its new plan is not legally binding.

“They have no obligation to follow up on this,” ReSue said. “They didn’t follow up on anything else that was presented to us. When they do, that’s when I’ll start to believe it.

To date, Riedman Companies has not violated any contractual or legal agreement with the city, or any law.

But ReSue’s comments are partly due to Riedman’s announcement in late August 2021 that construction of a second single-family home would begin on the site in September. This work never took place.

The number of single-family homes built for rental purposes is growing and currently accounts for about 6% of all new homes built in the United States, according to the US Census Bureau. This number is expected to double in the next 10 years.

“Corning Enterprises will work diligently with Riedman Associates to ensure the timeline and schedule are met,” Sharkey said.

Mayor Bill Boland called Riedman’s plan a wonderful change.

“It’s something we’ve been looking forward to for quite some time,” Boland said. “It sounds like an exciting concept.”

Boland said the project reflects an emerging concept in housing across the country.

“I think it’s just a whole new product that’s welcome and innovative,” Boland said.

Riedman Companies has a strong property management presence in Corning and will manage the development. The company operates Academy Place – the former building of the Corning Free Academy – as well as locations in Hornell and Elmira.

“It’s been very successful for us down there in the southern part,” Watkins said.

Solar farm site plan discussed in Tusculum | Local News

By Site plan

The Tusculum Planning Commission reviewed a preliminary site plan for an 80-acre solar farm off Ball Road on Tuesday evening and interviewed a representative of the Silicon Ranch project owner.

Commission members raised their concerns with Emma Tillitski, a senior project development associate with the Nashville-based company.

The Planning Commission must approve a site plan so that Silicon Ranch can begin work on the property. The company finalized the purchase of the land in March and expects the solar farm to be operational by December.

Tillitski said questions posed by members of the Planning Commission on Tuesday will be answered in time for the commission’s next meeting on May 10, when company officials seek formal approval of the site plan.

On February 28, the Tusculum Council of Mayor and Commissioners approved by a 2-to-1 vote a Silicon Ranch rezoning application to make the M-1 industrial property uniformly zoned.

Commissioner Mike Burns, who is also vice-chairman of the Planning Commission, voted against the rezoning application. Teresa McCrary, Secretary of the Planning Commission, is asking for more information about the project and also for assurances from Silicon Ranch that it will restore the land to its previous state after the solar farm ceases operations.

The Tusculum Solar Farm is one of four planned for Greene County by Silicon Ranch. In addition to the Tusculum property, the company has also completed the purchase of a 141-acre parcel on Liberty Hill South Road and a 55-acre property off Reed Road, both in unincorporated sections. of Greene County.

The Tusculum solar farm would operate on land bordered by Ball Road, Afton Road and US 11E. Company officials said the solar panels would be surrounded by fencing and the property would be lined with plant pads.

Electricity produced by the solar farm would be sold to Greeneville Light & Power System and fed into the utility’s electrical grid. The Tusculum location and other planned solar farm sites are all near utility substations, Brown said.

A total of 180 solar panels housing 14,350 solar panel modules will be arranged in four separate rows on the property, which will also include two electrical transformers, two chain-link perimeter access gates and two 20-inch driveway security gates. feet. A driveway intended for use by Greeneville Light & Power System will have an entrance on US 11E, while a service road will have an entrance on Ball Road.

The site would include 3,350 feet of gravel access road. Approximately 36 acres will be fenced, along with the surrounding vegetative buffer. The Project’s “disturbance area” is just under 50 acres.

A final site plan including the envisioned landscaping was not complete, Tillitski said.

“We are working on the project with Greeneville Light & Power,” she said.

Silicon Ranch’s purchase of the 80.25-acre property from Wayne Jeffers was officially finalized on March 8. The purchase price is $1.3 million, according to a warranty deed filed with the Greene County Deed Registry Office.

Preparatory work has begun. Some trees have been cleared from certain sections of the property, Tillitski said.

The company has been in contact with the owners of land adjacent to the planned solar farm.

“Some people have been active and interested in the project,” Tillitski said.

A petition signed by more than 50 property owners opposing the rezoning application was presented to the Mayor’s Council and Commissioners ahead of the February 28 vote approving the rezoning.

Developers are trying to “maintain the integrity” of the ridge line surrounding the property, Tillitski said.

“We have tried to prevent the clearing of trees as much as possible,” she said.

The solar panels are designed to present a low profile to surrounding neighbors, Tillitski said.

McCrary is concerned about the acceptability of land use for a solar farm project.

“We have to make sure it’s legal and make sure we’re not responsible,” she said.

McCrary asked about the noise level at the solar farm. She mentioned a controversial Bitcoin mine in Limestone in Washington County that led to numerous noise complaints and lawsuits against owners to cease operations, and a Silicon Ranch solar farm in Jonesborough that began operations in January. .

Tillitski replied that solar farm technology has nothing to do with a bitcoin mine. Tillitski said she would look into any issues related to what McCrary called the “energy conversion” process at the Jonesborough Solar Farm site.

Tillitski said that once the construction phase of the Tusculum solar farm is complete, noise from power generation is barely audible on site.

Rick Fancher, who lives next door to the solar farm, said he was concerned about the location of two transformers that will be on the Tusculum property, as shown in the proposed site plan, and “the glare” from solar panels as they move during the day to convert sunlight into electricity.

The modules will be arranged to minimize glare, Tillitski said. She will also consider a request to place additional hedges along the property line.

McCrary referenced a bill pending in the state General Assembly that would direct the Tennessee Advisory Committee on Intergovernmental Relations to conduct a study “of the overall effect of solar power development in large scale in this state”.

“There’s so much we don’t know and so many issues that haven’t been looked into,” McCrary said.

To ensure that Silicon Ranch returns the land to its undeveloped state after the solar farm’s operational life ends, McCrary asked about the possibility of issuing a “decommissioning bond” to ensure that the city ​​is not responsible for the works.

“We don’t make any income unless we generate electricity” so the property isn’t allowed to fall into disrepair, Tillitski said after the meeting.

“It’s a field that we consider an asset,” she says.

Tillitski earlier told the Planning Commission that Silicon Ranch hopes to follow its previously announced timeline for the project. She will seek answers to questions posed on Tuesday ahead of the Planning Commission’s consideration of site plan approval at its May 10 meeting.

“I should be frank. We had to delay construction if the site plan was not approved in May. It would affect our relationship with Greeneville Light & Power,” she said.

Washington City Council Approves Site Plan for EBD Project | Radio KCII

By Site plan



Washington City Council Approves Site Plan for EBD Project | KCII Radio – The one to rely on



































The Washington City Council accepted a major site plan for a local business at their recent meeting.

Council has approved a resolution for a construction plan for a wood storage building at Engineered Building Design located on Highways 1 and 92 north of West Main Street. Mayor Jaron Rosien shared that he and other city officials recently heard about the project during a tour for the director of the Iowa Economic Development Authority: “I will point out that we appreciated a tour of Engineered Building Design with Sally. [Hart] and Deanna [McCusker] when Debi Durham visited and David talked about this addition. It has also gone through P&Z, there is a site plan for drainage, which has been a high priority for P&Z and is recommended for approval.

A memo from the city’s construction and zoning official, Jeff Duwa, mentioned that the site plan had been reviewed by Garden and Associates for stormwater retention and flow before being submitted to the Planning Commission. and zoning. EBD is planning a 78 foot by 128 foot structure located near its truss fabrication facility in the southeast corner of its property. This will allow for easy access and dry storage of wood for their building projects that are currently outside in the elements.


1138764958

Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.3; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/100.0.4896.88 Safari/537.36

f3d8f82ee005967538a60f70f72e841d5957a59f

1

The auditor can determine if the conditions of the site plan are met

By Site plan

Engage in Arlington civic activism and you will almost invariably be embroiled in one or more sitemap battles between the developers on the one hand, the community on the other, and somewhere in between the government. County.

At the end of the day, a deal is usually negotiated. In exchange for increased density or other bonus features, the developer agrees to provide community-specific gear. Public art here, underground utilities there, affordable housing there. . . this kind of things.

But when the vote is taken and all parties move on, what then? That could be the goal of the Arlington government auditor over the next year.

Auditor Chris Horton has offered to spend about 300 of his 2,000 hours of work in fiscal year 2023 evaluating old site plans to determine whether the benefits promised to the public have actually materialized.

His work plan, which will have to be endorsed by the County Board, was welcomed at the April 7 meeting of the government’s audit committee.

“I really like this idea,” said John Vihstadt, a former county council member who currently serves as a citizens’ representative on the panel.

Vihstadt said ensuring the community benefits emanating from site plan covenants actually materialize will go a long way to “building community confidence in how the county is handling development and growth.”
“It will be reassuring for people,” he said.

County Executive Mark Schwartz agreed with the idea, saying it would be timely and help assess “how we are doing with the promises that have been made.”

But just wait a second, some of you long involved in county activism might say. Haven’t we been down this road before?
Indeed we have.

More than 15 years ago, the county government hired a consultant to determine if site plan conditions were being met.

“There was a lot of community involvement in 2005 and 2006,” said Schwartz, who was in county government but not county executive at the time.

The consultant delivered the report and while some recommendations to improve the monitoring process were adopted, a number were never addressed.
“Some [recommendations] have been implemented, but many have not,” acknowledged Schwartz.

The reason? It often boils down to staff availability and overall government priorities.

“I don’t want to pretend we have enough people” to complete every project, the county executive said.

Horton’s proposed audit is not likely to delve into the larger topic of whether the community was getting a fair deal in sitemap agreements with developers, as this is a matter of policy rather than an administrative task.

“I’m always thinking about ‘scope drift,'” Horton said of asking for a direct assessment of whether the site plan conditions are being met.

County Council will vote on Horton’s planned fiscal 2023 work plan in June. It is likely that the site plan audit will go through the approval process; two county council members (Takis Karantonis and Christian Dorsey) sit on the audit committee and have expressed support for the idea.

“Obviously we’re very interested in that,” Karantonis said.

The site plan audit will likely be the only major new initiative in Horton’s arsenal for the upcoming fiscal year, which begins July 1, as it has a number of projects from previous years that need to be completed.

“Deferral audits are going to make up the bulk of the time spent” over the coming year, he said.

Horton is one of the few county government employees who report directly to the county council, rather than to Schwartz. The Audit Committee is an advisory committee appointed by the County Council.

Planning Board Approves Site Plan Revisions for Kmart Plaza | News

By Site plan

HERKIMER, NY — The Herkimer Planning Board approved site plan revisions for the abandoned Kmart Plaza development in Herkimer on Monday evening.

The place has been vacant since the store closed in 2017.

In October, BME Associates of Fairport, which is located near Rochester, announced that it would purchase the site and redevelop the land into 4 separate building zones that will house a mix of commercial and retail users. Pristine Auto Wash, Wellnow Urgent Care and T-Mobile are 3 of the tenants known to move into the site.

The 4and is a yet-to-be-determined fast food restaurant with drive-thru.

As for the Kmart building itself, that remains to be seen, says planning board chairman Adam Hutchinson.

“At this point, they’re not doing anything with the old K-mart building. They’re splitting the lot. They’re subdividing it into different lots. Basically, they’re focusing on developing the front half which is the parking lot right now. This is where the buildings are going to be erected”.

Rebecca Spurr, project engineer at BME Associates, told the planning committee that work on the T-Mobile and Wellnow Urgent Care buildings would begin as soon as possible.

New Multi-Site Development to Bring More Affordable Housing to Louisville | Business

By Site development

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) – A local developer has big plans to bring thousands of apartments to Louisville and help low-income families in the process.

The new development was announced Monday morning. It’s called Lou 2.2 and there are 10 resorts in the plan.

One of the approved projects – The Prestonian – will be located at the corner of South Gray Street and East Clay Street, near the Phoenix Hill neighborhood of Louisville.

LDG Development plans to create 2,200 units within the 10 complexes, some of which will be scattered throughout downtown Louisville, including the Russell neighborhood near Lake McNeely and Cane Run Road.

Some of these housing units will be set aside in an effort to meet the need for affordable housing in Louisville. The city needs 30,000 affordable housing units, so 1,300 of Lou 2.2 units will be specifically for those earning only 30-80% of the city’s median income.

LDG says the resorts will have on-site health and education services to improve the lives of its residents, especially those with low incomes.

“We all know homelessness is an issue in this community,” said Chris Dischinger, co-founder and director of LDG Development. “You don’t have to go very far to see it, feel it and believe it. And there are no easy answers to homelessness. I know that. You all know that. But we We have to start with having enough housing.”

Some of the Lou 2.2 projects are ready to go, while others are still in the proposal phase, but if all goes well, LDG Development expects the project to be completed in about 5 years.

The company plans to innovate on The Prestonian and 4 other sites by the end of this year and complete some by 2024.

Copyright 2022 by WDRB Media. All rights reserved.

Dundas 71 Main Street builder prepares site plan and permit approvals

By Site plan

Legacy Constructors Inc. this week installed temporary fencing around 71 Main Street in preparation for site plan approval and building permits for a 64-unit, nine-storey residential development on the site.

City of Hamilton spokeswoman Michelle Shantz confirmed eight site plan conditions remain outstanding, along with the city’s approval of a construction management plan and construction agreement. shoring and encroachment, before building permits are issued.

Shantz said April 5 that conditions still pending approval include: grading and drainage control; servicing plan, site plan drawing, taxes, tariff of fees, security deposit, removal of a holdback clause and special servicing agreement.

In an April 6 email to neighbors, Legacy Constructors and Porte-cochere houses vice president of operations and construction manager James Cameron said the company had arrived at the site for “preparatory activities” including tree removal and fencing installation.

“We have conducted an initial hazard assessment, with the safety of the public (and all) being our primary concern,” Cameron said in the email. “Under no circumstances should anyone enter the construction area unless authorized construction personnel.

“We will do our best to be good neighbors while working on this site, and that sentiment is echoed by the owner. We can appreciate the inconvenience and disruption that our work can sometimes bring. Please also understand that we have a job to do and are working together. If you have any legitimate concerns, please bring them to my attention. We will do our best to provide periodic updates in the future.

In a previous notice, Cameron said inquiries can be directed to his attention at 905-637-8888, ext. 204 or [email protected]

If construction excavations reveal undocumented archaeological resources, the Ontario Heritage Act requires work to be stopped and a licensed archaeologist hired for assessment.

If human remains are discovered during the excavation, the police or the coroner and the provincial registrar of cemeteries must be notified.

Solar farm site plan to be discussed by Tusculum planners | Local News

By Site plan

The Tusculum Planning Commission will meet Tuesday at 6 p.m. at City Hall, 145 Alexander St.

Agenda items include a discussion of the site plan for a solar farm off Ball Road.

The purchase of the 80-acre property by Silicon Ranch Corp. from Nashville was finalized on March 8.

The Tusculum Council of Mayor and Commissioners on February 28 approved a resolution to rezone several parcels of land for the solar panel farm at all M-1s (Industrials).

The property had been divided into zones M-1, R-1 (low-density residential area), and B-1 (neighborhood business area).

The solar panel farm will be on property bordered by Ball Road, Afton Road and East Andrew Johnson Highway in Tusculum.

The solar panel area will be surrounded by fences and the property will be lined with plant pads, a Silicon Ranch spokeswoman told council members in February before voting 2-1 in favor of the rezoning request.

A more detailed site plan will be reviewed Tuesday evening by the Planning Commission.

A final site plan is subject to the approval of the Planning Commission. Silicon Ranch must also obtain regulatory approval from the state and other agencies for the project.

Electricity produced by the solar park will be sold to Greeneville Light & Power System and fed into the power grid for use by commercial and residential customers. The Tusculum location and three others slated for solar farm development in unincorporated sections of Greene County are near utility substations.

The current site plan locates the solar park entrance area off the East Andrew Johnson Highway.

Also on the planning commission’s agenda is a discussion regarding double-width homes in the city of Tusculum.

A discussion of “possible fence regulations” in the city is listed as another agenda item.

The next scheduled Planning Commission meeting after Tuesday evening is at 6 p.m. May 10 at Tusculum City Hall.

Fleming Residence could start next year pending site plan approval

By Site plan
An architectural rendering of the proposed student residence for Fleming College on the Haliburton campus in Glebe Park. Screenshot

Fleming Residence could start next year pending site plan approval

By Darren Lum
Construction of the first phase could begin in late spring and take up to 18 months
Fleming College’s student residence plan with 94-bed space takes a step forward in its process to add much-needed accommodation to the area, following a special council meeting on March 25 which took place held virtually.
Council for the Municipality of Dysart et al accepted the zoning by-law amendment to address setback provisions and deferred the site plan agreement to be discussed at a future meeting.
The plan, which is expected to be executed in three phases, includes a 1,790 square foot residence, with four three-story buildings, divided into two pavilions, which includes 54 suites.
The first phase includes the construction of the first two buildings, with one building for each of the following phases. Pending site plan approval, the first phase is expected to begin in late spring or early summer 2023 and construction will take up to 18 months, then the college will assess the success of phase 1 by terms of occupancy to determine the need for further development. A year or two would pass before starting phase two. This residence will be served by municipal sewage and a new private well.

Even before the start of the discussion, the mayor of Dysart, Andrea Roberts, who is convinced that the residence will be filled during the opening phase, has shown her enthusiasm for the development.
“It’s a very exciting day for Dysart and for the college. It’s been a long time coming and it’s a desire of the municipality and basically the county to see a student residence here which will only help the college grow and [I’m] look forward to today’s meeting,” she said.
Public consultation on plans for Fleming College’s new residence on the 3.7 acres in Haliburton continues. Part of this already included the “traffic requirements of all neighboring property owners within 120 meters of the lands in question and the appropriate agencies were circulated for comment on March 1, 2020. The required advertisement was also placed in the local newspaper , in accordance with the requirements of the Planning Act,” said Kris Oran, Senior Planner at Dysart.
While the mood in the township and college was positive, there are concerns among stakeholders. Some of these concerns include parking, for example whether there would be designated places for students, users, which include hikers, cyclists and Nordic skiers; lighting of parking lots and walking paths; the location of the wooden frame entrance barrier (closest to the college); accessibility; ensure that a trail width is consistent with the needs of the winter snowmobile trail under the Haliburton County Snowmobile Association and ensure that the access route for emergency vehicles is established in accordance according to the requirements.

The proposed plan for the Haliburton Residence at Fleming College includes four buildings completed in three phases. Screenshot

The college and its team were encouraged to address these concerns and consider the recommendations, as presented through this process, which included delegations made at the meeting. The team’s plan includes native landscaping, lights that meet the requirements of the night sky, and ensuring a landscaped buffer between the museum’s historic buildings and the residence. The latest concerns raised are expected to be addressed in the plan which has yet to be approved and will be part of a future meeting later this year.
Area resident Adam Brind, who lives a short walk from the college parking lot, asked about lighting and suggested planting mature evergreens to reduce the light directed at the back of his home.
A member of the consulting team, DM Wills Associates Limited lead designer Joe Fleming was open to the suggestion and said it was “an excellent suggestion for mitigating light intrusion”.
He added that the trees would also help provide shade for the parking lot.
Jim Blake of the Glebe Park and Museum Committee spoke on behalf of a few groups such as the museum, the HCSA and individuals. Blake pointed out that the path between the museum and the wood-framed entrance is frequently used as a passage and should be considered part of the plan that was not visually final with a path. The kiosk is valuable and should remain, as it functions as a gathering site and the space between the gate and the parking lot is used as a staging area for groups, he added.
Blake said Mike Darlington noted that the college parking lot lights went out at night.
“That’s right, Jim. The parking [lot] the lights go out when the college is closed. However, once we start having a residence there where students come and go all hours of the night, we will have to be mindful of their safety. That being said, I think we can have other conversations around the overflow parking lot [furthest away from the college]. I think we can do it for sure. But we can’t turn off all the lights. We just have to be very, very mindful of student safety,” said Sandra Dupret, Fleming College’s executive vice president, academic and student experience.

Blake also raised concerns with Darlington about “how the water management ditch silted up at the bottom of the hill near the leaf sculpture”. It has been suggested and it needs to be looked into, so that the water does not flow into the houses where his residence is instead of going east to Head Lake.
Another issue that came up at the meeting was the planned use of asphalt for the nearly 200-space parking lot, which was chosen in part for accessibility. The council was concerned about the environmental problems that asphalt could pose and that it was not complementary to the environment.
“Dealing with climate change and everything else in our world is always about trade-offs. And, you know, I guess I’m counting on the college team to kind of express a willingness or an unwillingness to go away, maybe, to reassess the need for all that asphalt,” Smith said.
Until council saw this recent plan, they were unaware of the choice to use asphalt for the parking lot. The Fleming team said stormwater management was being considered to mitigate flooding prior to the Darlington sighting.

Dupret said she recognizes the concern over the choice of surface.
She will consult with the team to deliberate on options related to the amount of asphalt used as requested by council.
Smith suggested the team look at the Minden Animal Hospital parking lot, with its permeable surface, as an example to consider.
Prism Partners Inc. co-chief executive Susan Conner, who is the project manager for the development, said the timeline for completion of the three phases is not known at this time.
“We heard a lot today. I think we need to digest that and think about what those solutions would look like, both in terms of implementation and cost of implementation. And I also think that working with Kris [Orsan, Dysart senior planner] and Jeff [Iles, Dysart director of planning]we need to do some housekeeping with the site plan agreement that you have in front of you… I think we need to do another draft, you know, and work with the staff to do a draft that addresses some of the things that I just spoke,” she said.

Auburn Planning Board reviews Popeyes site plan | Business

By Site plan

Traffic was the main topic of conversation when the Auburn Planning Board considered a proposed Grant Avenue development that includes a Popeyes restaurant.

Engineer Brett Steenburgh and Kevin Parisi of developer Liberty Restaurants presented the project site plan to the board on Tuesday. It would merge six parcels — 121, 135, 139, 143 and 145 Grant Ave., and 9-13 McGarr St. — into three. The first would be a Popeyes and the second another quick-service restaurant, and both would be connected to Grant Avenue by a new access road.

The third plot was originally intended to be a two-story apartment complex. However, Steenburgh told the board that the developer is now considering a temperature-controlled self-storage facility on the 3.1-acre parcel. In addition to attracting less traffic, such an installation would meet a need in the sector, according to market studies. It would still have two floors and contain a freight elevator.

People also read…

The three houses, two garages and the commercial warehouse currently on the lots would be demolished.

“We hope to redevelop this and make it better than it would have been or was when these houses were occupied,” Steenburgh said.

The site plan will continue to take shape as Liberty works with the State Department of Transportation on traffic issues. Stephen Selvek, the city’s deputy director of planning and development, said the department’s analysis will be “critical” to the city’s decision on whether the site can support the project. According to department Datathis segment of Grant Avenue is Auburn’s busiest neighborhood.

Steenburgh said he didn’t anticipate Popeyes and the other restaurant, to be determined, would attract much more traffic. Popeyes would have two drive-thru lanes that can accommodate 12 to 14 vehicles, as well as 17 parking spaces, so backups wouldn’t be an issue either. However, Steenburgh continued, traffic patterns and especially turning movements could be altered by the project.

One way Liberty could mitigate those changes is to only allow right turns onto Grant Avenue from the access road, he said. Another possibility is to connect the road to Standart Avenue, and the developer is contacting the neighboring property owner in the hope that this will happen. Liberty also hopes to reduce the number of sidewalk plots on Grant Avenue from the current four.

One of the nation’s most popular fast-food chains may be coming to Auburn as part of an effort to redevelop some of the real estate near the…

“We obviously want to make sure we have everyone’s support,” Parisi said. “We’re pretty confident that we’re going to work on something, but we just don’t know. A lot has to happen to get there.”

Council voted to table the site plan as the developer works to finalize it with the Department of Transportation.

Ahead of the vote, Selvek said council may consider approving the project in phases, beginning with Popeyes, after completing a state environmental quality review for the six plots.

The city wants to welcome new businesses, said board member Crystal Cosentino, but not at the expense of existing businesses.

“That’s what Grant Avenue is for,” she said. “If Popeyes is interested, it’s great that they want to invest in Auburn. But I think we have to make sure we hear people and make sure the city is comfortable with the design, and how the traffic can bypass Grant Avenue, so we don’t cause more headaches because it’s not good for business in general.

Lake Life editor David Wilcox can be reached at (315) 282-2245 or [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @drwilcox.

Washington City Council to Review Site Plan | Radio KCII

By Site plan



Washington City Council to Review Site Plan | KCII Radio – The one to rely on



































The Washington City Council will hold a public hearing on the status of funded activities for the city regarding the Community Development Block Grant housing rehabilitation program on Tuesday.

The board will also consider an amendment to a processing agreement with Iowa Renewable Energy, a major site plan for engineering building design, and a tractor bid for the sewage treatment plant. Finally, the council will consider at second reading an ordinance repealing an ordinance declaring certain assets surplus and providing for their disposal. The council meets at 6 p.m. in the council chamber of the town hall.


392798200

Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_14_6) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/83.0.4103.116 Safari/537.36

ba4bd567a116cff72c63404d4ddd8c471c29f7c9

1

Guelph/Eramosa Council Approves Site Plan for Eight-Unit Building in Rockwood

By Site plan

ROCKWOOD – Guelph/Eramosa Council has approved a site plan application for an eight-unit building in Rockwood.

At Monday’s meeting, council approved in principle the site plan application for an eight-unit apartment building at 150 Alma Street. Council has also delegated final approval of the plans, drawings and site plan agreement to Township General Manager Ian Roger.

The proposed site consists of an eight-unit apartment building with a height of 11 meters with 14 parking spaces, including two visitor parking spaces and two accessible parking spaces.

“The intent of the site plan application that has been submitted is to basically redevelop the site by removing the single family home and constructing an eight-unit apartment building that will be two and a half stories tall,” said Meagan Ferris, county director of planning and environment.

Ferris noted that the proposal complies with applicable zoning regulations and standards, including lot size, frontage, setbacks, landscaping and parking requirements.

“This application has been thoroughly reviewed with internal and external commenting agencies. The proposal, in terms of the use itself, is permitted in the county official plan and an apartment building is a permitted use on this property. It also complies with all required provisions of the bylaw,” Ferris explained.

“At this time all review agencies are generally supportive of this request and the overall site plan itself, there are only minor tweaks that are required before final approval.”

The application was reviewed by the Ministry of Transportation (MTO); Grand River Conservation Authority; Gas Union; emergency services and firefighters; the township’s consulting engineer, RJ Burnside; and the head of the building department.

Ferris further noted that there were no objections to the application and that all necessary MTO permits and building permits had been obtained.

The council was happy with the request, as the development is only two and a half stories high and would suit the aesthetics of the township.

“It ticks all the boxes in terms of immediate relief. The fact that they already have MTO approval is no small feat. It adds eight more units to Rockwood and I think that’s a good thing. Housing is a serious problem everywhere. This small path contributes to the lack of housing,” the councilor said. Marc Bouwmeester.

The rest of the council echoed Bouwmeester’s remarks about the housing crisis and thought the building would help fill the township’s housing shortage.

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Conversations are opinions of our readers and are subject to the Code of conduct. The Star does not share these opinions.

Council approves site plan for eight-unit building in Rockwood

By Site plan

GUELPH/ERAMOSA – City Council has approved a site plan application for an eight-unit building in Rockwood.

On April 4, council received a planning report regarding the application for 150 Alma Street.

The proposed site plan consists of an eight-unit building and would contain a total of 14 parking spaces, including two visitor parking spaces and two accessible parking spaces.

Wellington County Planner Meagan Ferris said the proposal complies with applicable zoning regulations and standards, including lot size, frontage, setbacks, landscaping and parking requirements.

“The proposal, in terms of the use itself, is permitted in the County Official Plan and an apartment building is a permitted use on this property,” Ferris explained.

“At this time all review agencies are generally supportive of this request and the overall site plan itself, there are only minor tweaks that are required before final approval.”

She noted that no objections had been received and Ministry of Transportation (MTO) permits had been issued.

“He ticks all the boxes,” councilor Mark Bouwmeester said. There isn’t much there and the fact that they already have MTO approval is no small feat.

“It adds eight more units to Rockwood and I think that’s a good thing.”

He added: “Housing is a serious problem everywhere, or the lack of housing, so that helps in a small way to add more houses.

“It will be a nice addition to Main Street Rockwood.”

Acknowledging the housing crisis, Mayor Chris White echoed Bouwmeester’s comments.

“I think you’re absolutely right in terms of housing, and rental homes are just as dire as housing, so getting smaller rents on the market is absolutely a positive thing for those who are downsizing or coming to enter the market,” White said. .

New councilor Steven Liebig said: “Even with the province looking at ways to increase residential development, housing etc. and the need for it is a great idea.

“Looks like it’s well built and well designed…will be a great addition to Rockwood.”

Ferris said the site plan agreement is being drafted and once finalized will be forwarded to the township attorney for review and then to the developer for signature.

She recommended Council approve the site plan.

Council has approved the proposed site plan and will delegate final approval of the plans, drawings and site plan agreement, once finalized, to the township chief executive, the report said.

Plans revealed for phase two development of key Crewkerne site

By Site development

Residents of Crewkerne got their first glimpse of how the rest of a major development in their town could take shape.

Taylor Wimpey Exeter has won planning permission to build 635 new homes on the key Crewkerne site, which lies between the A30 Yeovil Road and the A356 Station Road east of the city centre. South Somerset District Council approved detailed plans for the first 110 homes in March 2021, with construction officially starting later the same year.

The developer has now revealed its proposed designs for the remaining homes at the northern end of the site, which could be delivered within the next three to four years. The master plan for the key site includes the new homes being delivered in two phases – the first phase of 110 homes in the south (which will also provide employment land and a 60-bed care home) and phase two of 525 homes in the north ).

READ MORE: NHS list of official Covid symptoms expanded as free lateral flow tests scrapped

The new link road will connect the two phases, with the vacant space between becoming the “southern park”, with new woods and open green spaces in addition to the planned play areas. Once construction is complete, these green spaces will be transferred to either Crewkerne Borough Council or the new Somerset Unitary Council, which is due to formally take over in April 2023.

The first details of phase two were released as part of a consultation event hosted by Taylor Wimpey in late March before a formal planning application was submitted to the district council. Of the 525 homes offered in phase two, 33 will be affordable, bringing the total for the two phases to 50.

Plans include an area near the A30 which is for a new primary school – one of the conditions for granting preliminary permission. However, Somerset County Council advised in January 2021 that the site will no longer be needed in light of its reforms of existing schools in and around Crewkerne and Ilminster which will come into effect in September 2022.



Plans for 525 homes in phase two of key Crewkerne site

In light of this, the school site is likely to be given over to further accommodation – although this will require a separate planning application. Taylor Wimpey is still to provide more than £2.2million for new places in Crewkerne Schools as part of the outline permission – one of several financial contributions to the town that have been secured.

These include over £393,000 for open space and recreation outside the site (which could be used to improve other parks and play facilities), £277,000 to improve Crewkerne’s existing road network , £164,000 to secure local bus services and over £100,000 for improved cycling facilities in and around the city.

A spokesperson for Taylor Wimpey said: “At the heart of the development is the new Village Green and Local Center which provides informal and formal open space, including a playground. To the east of the Village Green, a new local center building is located which will provide opportunities for shops, cafes or other facilities for the community.

“The southern parks area will provide additional informal space for people and wildlife, with extensive timber plantations creating habitats here and informal mown paths providing walking routes.”



Plans for open green space and link road in phase two of key Crewkerne site
Plans for open green space and link road in phase two of key Crewkerne site

A formal planning application covering phase two is expected to be submitted to the district council in the coming months. Taylor Wimpey has indicated that the haul road linking the phase one and phase two sites could be delivered in full by summer 2023, with the last link road and access to the A30 completed when the first 200 houses are occupied. .

Construction of phase one is expected to be completed by the summer of 2024, with phase two commencing around that time, provided additional planning agreement can be secured.

Crescent City Harbor Officials Refuse Site Development’s Request to Present Their Vision for Redevelopment of Bayside RV Parks, Redwood Harbor Village | Wild Rivers Outpost

By Site development

Jessica Cejnar Andrews / Friday, April 1 at 12:19 p.m. / Local Government

Crescent City Harbor officials decline on-site development application to present vision for redevelopment of Bayside RV Parks, Redwood Harbor Village


Previously:

• Another firm moves to Port of Crescent City on its RV parks, says plan includes long-term residents

• “This is not my port, this is not my vision”; developer will meet with Crescent City Harbor Commissioners and RV Park residents

###

Crescent City Harbor Commissioners will not hear a presentation from On-Site Development, the area-linked construction company offering an alternative to Alex Lemus and Renewable Energy Capital to revitalize two RV parks at the harbor .

In an email to on-site development project manager Kay Fry on Thursday, Harbor Master Tim Petrick said the stewards chose to deny his request to be placed on Tuesday’s agenda on the advice from their lawyers.

“In this case, the Crescent City Harbor District Board issued a request for proposal in 2020 and then selected a developer,” Petrick told Fry. “We appreciate your interest in working with the Port District and encourage you to monitor and submit proposals to any future tenders.”

According to Petrick, since the Harbor District Board of Commissioners approved a project by Lemus, which was the sole respondent to a request for proposals in December 2020 to redevelop the harbour, they could not accept the on-site development proposal.

After lengthy negotiations, including holding a closed-door meeting on Thursday, the Harbor District Council is expected to consider a lease deal with Lemus on Tuesday, Petrick told the Outpost.

In August 2021, Lemus unveiled plans to upgrade Bayside RV Park’s landscaping and infrastructure, purchase Airstream trailers, and install cabins for short-term overnight stays. He also proposes placing electric vehicle charging stations at Spotty’s Car Wash, installing solar panels on the old car wash and building a cooperative for local fishermen to sell their catch.

In January, in response to concerns from residents who feared being evicted to make way for the project, Lemus said he and his company would create transition plans for each individual tenant.

Fry appeared before the Harbor Commission at its March 15 meeting, saying she and her father, On-Site Development founder Jim Fry, had developed a redevelopment plan for Bayside RV Park and Redwood Harbor Village that includes her long-term tenants.

In a later conversation with the Outpost, Fry said she and her father approached the RV park tenants before making their presentation to the Harbor District. While she wasn’t ready to say what On-Site Development’s vision for the parks is, she said one possibility would be to change the layout to accommodate both overnighters and long-term tenants.

However, when asked why she did not respond to a December 2020 request for proposals that the Harbor District had sent out to developers, Fry said her company had already accepted a project to build a park. $2.4 million motorhomes at Cave Junction and was unable to respond to the tender, although it piqued their interest.

On March 15, Fry, speaking in public comments, remarked to the Harbor Commissioners that they had not yet signed a lease with Lemus and that “negotiations cannot go on forever”. She received an invitation from Harbor Board Chairman Rick Shepherd to pitch her business to the Harbor District on Tuesday.

In an email to the Board of Commissioners earlier this week, Fry welcomed the invitation.

“President Shepherd’s invitation to learn more on April 5 demonstrated that you approach this in an unbiased and open manner,” she said.

The Crescent City Harbor District Board of Commissioners will meet at 2 p.m. Tuesday. Agendas are available here.


SHARE →


Approval of the final site plan for Millenium Place Condos

By Site plan

By Doug Marrin, STN Reporter

At its March 28, 2022 meeting, Dexter City Council approved a planned unit development and final site plan for Millenium Place condominiums for working adults and professionals who wish to live in Dexter.

The three-story, 23-unit condominium development will feature three two-story townhouses facing Grand St. The remaining 20 units will be a mix of one-, two-, and three-bedroom condos ranging from 774 to 1,405 square feet . Parking will be at the rear of the complex, hidden from passing traffic by architectural design. An open green space and patio are provided with picnic tables around the rain garden. Plans include protected bike racks to further address the growing desire for non-motorized modes of transportation.

Aerial view of the 0.71 acres at 7956 and 7960 Grand St. approved for Millenium Place Condominiums. Carlisle/Wortman Assoc. of the city council package

In its written description of the project, developer Marhofer/Campbell Development Co., LLC, said, “Living within the city limits provides convenient access to all of the amenities of the downtown community, including restaurants, theater, health services, retail, parks/trails B2B and mass transit, identified as attractive to many current markets, as analyzed in the City of Dexter’s Target Market Analysis (MSHDA/Land UseUSA, 2015).

The condos are designed with aesthetics in mind. Material variations aim to break up the facade of the building and blend into the surrounding neighborhood while maintaining an urban feel. The landscaped buffer zones and exterior design are intended to create a visually appealing landscape for passing pedestrians and motorists. Facade materials will be primarily environmentally friendly and durable.

Conceptual rendering looking west. Jeffrey A. Scott Architects PC of the City Council Package

The property has no historic or significant structures. A small house will be removed. Many trees on the lot are unhealthy or invasive. Ten maple trees will be removed and replaced, some with trees suitable for growing under the power lines that cross the plot.

Council asked Marhofer/Campbell partner Jack Campbell if he had received any feedback from neighbours. Besides working with a neighbor on some shared ownership issues, he replied that no one else had contacted them, which was unusual.

“We got none of that. I think that will really be a benefit to the neighborhood,” he told the Council.

Council approved the plans with some conditions regarding lighting and a low wall to prevent vehicle headlights from shining into first floor windows.

Conceptual view looking from the east. Jeffrey A. Scott Architects PC of the City Council Package

City Council will hold a special meeting regarding site plan updates HEB | Business

By Site plan

FORNEY, Texas— Forney City Council will hold a special meeting on Thursday evening to hear public input before going into executive session to discuss the proposed HEB store which was announced late last year and recently approved.

Scheduled for Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at Forney Town Hall, the council will take up to 30 minutes for public comment before reconvening in executive session.

The majority of comments and discussion will focus on a current proposal put forward by Union Pacific Railroad that would close three crossings – two in downtown Forney and a third on County Road (CR) 212 – and create a new crossing on the HEB property website. .

“At a special meeting on March 22, the council discussed a new level crossing for the HEB site plan. In order to open a new level crossing, Union Pacific requires that three existing level crossings be closed At this meeting Forney City Council authorized the City Manager to write a letter in support of the closure of the Elm St. and Center St. crossings These crossings were proposed as they are the least frequented crossings with only an average of 1,000 vehicles per day. . on average about 10,000 vehicle crossings per day,” the town of Forney posted on its Facebook page on March 24, 2022.

The proposed site plan is available here on the city website.

“The purpose of the meeting was to speak with representatives from HEB and also consult with our city’s legal counsel regarding this important decision. The meeting was not ‘last minute’, ‘under the radar’ or in no ‘secret’ way,” said, in part, Forney Councilman Sarah Salgado of the March 22 meeting. “The City issued the agenda and public notice last Friday, March 18, and everyone was welcome to attend the open session portion of the meeting.”

“While there are of course always different opinions, the overwhelming majority of residents I have spoken with are thrilled with HEB coming to town. That is how I feel too. This development will be a huge benefit to economic growth, the tax base, and HEB is known to be an amazing community partner, which includes working with nonprofits, school districts, and many other community partners. high quality online with the kind of community we want Forney to be,” Salgado said.

As HEB’s first store east of the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex – a market they’ve largely avoided before – HEB is a huge win for any city in Texas. According to a local chamber of commerce official, towns in Texas are “aiming” for an HEB.

Forney’s expansive growth and traffic is what attracted HEB to Forney and the surrounding area. However, this growth has not been met by my infrastructure improvements from the federal level for years.

Congressman Lance Gooden of Terrell said he was working with Union Pacific officials in Washington, confirming to inForney.com that he met with them on Wednesday about how they can help ease traffic jams.

Gooden tells inForney.com that working with Forney Mayor Amanda Lewis, he feels positive about conversations with Union Pacific to find something acceptable and they are actively working to minimize closures.

“This is my main local priority and Mayor Lewis and I are acutely aware of the seriousness of the already difficult traffic situations. We will work to remedy this and Mayor Lewis and I will not agree to anything that our constituents find unacceptable or unreasonable. “, says Gooden inForney.com

“The closure of the three crossings is only proposed and has not been approved by Union Pacific. If approved, it will not be closed until after the completion of HEB, which is more than 18 months away. “Salgado said.

“Closing Elm and the Center will not hinder or help our response times for police or firefighters,” Salgado’s comments continued. “If there is a train on the tracks in Bois D’Arc, that means there is also a train in Elm, Center and Chestnut. The problem of getting our police and fire department across the tracks to respond appeals is being resolved by council – such as with our recent vote to approve a temporary fire station on the south side.”

“This is not a permanent or permanent solution, but it is a step in the process of building a permanent station. Other measures to alleviate the traffic build-up at the Bois D’Arc intersection have discussed on Tuesday night,” she said. “We are aware that more needs to be done, and plans and ideas are being discussed.”

Amazon sitemap for Cleckheaton could face union boycott

By Site plan

A union has said it will call for a boycott of plans for a massive Amazon facility at Scholes near Cleckheaton if the company makes it difficult for workers to organise.

This follows concerns about the number of jobs advertised on Amazon’s site and doubts about whether they materialized. Opponents of the program have expressed concern that the majority of jobs created will be low-skilled or unskilled.

Now the GMB union, which campaigns for better working conditions for Amazon workers, says its “main objective” will be to secure recognition and settlement agreements with Amazon and ensure that the company adheres to the new West Yorkshire Fair Work Charter. GMB’s lead organizer for Amazon in Yorkshire, Pete Davies, said the union will ask Kirklees Council to put as much pressure as possible on Amazon to ensure GMB has access to recruitment for all workers it company employs “if this planned new investment materializes”.

Read more:Exact time it will snow in Huddersfield, York, Bradford, Sheffield and Leeds today

Last year Kirklees Council planning officers said it was ‘acceptable in principle’ because of the 1,500 jobs it would create. That number has since risen to 2,400.

The plans are expected to come back to the committee over the summer. Mr Davies said: “If Amazon just remains silent on these issues, we will view this as another attempt to circumvent GMB.

“In this case, we will discourage the board from granting permission and support accordingly.” The huge base, recently revealed to be a distribution centre, is set to occupy 59 acres of farmland between Whitehall Road, Whitechapel Road and Junction 26 of the M62.

It has been described by critics as “absolutely monstrous” and equivalent in height to an eight-story tower and the length of three full-size football pitches side by side. Since coming to the planning committee last May, the proposal has been compared to other Amazon sites where green fields have been bulldozed, but final drafts have failed to come up with numbers. employment.

Among those who spoke was Batley and Spen MP Kim Leadbeater. Ahead of her election last year, she called Amazon’s plan “totally inappropriate” and said much-valued green spaces should not be “traded off” for jobs.

That sentiment was partly echoed by Mr Davies, who commented: “We understand and sympathize with those who don’t want to see these huge warehouses popping up in their areas. We agree that we should not encourage multinationals to simply invest in West Yorkshire. for the unemployment figures and at all costs.

“But we are a union and our first priority must be to campaign for better opportunities for workers and better employment rights.” Action group Save Our Spen said a new report to the council setting out socio-economic benefits ‘paints a totally different picture of reality’ by outlining projections of up to 2,400 jobs.

A spokesperson said the group was “not against job creation”, but added: “There is already a surplus of low-skilled distribution vacancies in the region. All that development Amazon warehouses will make the situation worse.”

Milton Board Confirms Preliminary Approval of Verizon Sitemap

By Site plan

Milton City Council has unanimously upheld the planning and zoning commission’s decision to grant preliminary site plan approval to Verizon to erect a 140-foot cell tower on land owned by the town on Front Street.

At its March 23 meeting, the board agreed that the planners conducted a thorough, orderly, and logical review of Verizon’s application and made their decision based on the evidence presented. Councilwoman Lee Revis-Plank said the commission attached 17 conditions to their approval that must be met before Verizon can begin moving toward final review of the site plan.

“It’s not something where one or two of them can be checked off. I think the planning and zoning commission took the time to review all the evidence and document for the written record anything that was of concern to them and needed to be addressed. This indicates that the process itself was quite comprehensive,” she said.

Councilman Larry Savage said when Verizon sought a special use permit — required because the tower is in a residential zoning district — the commission imposed nine conditions on approval. During the preliminary sitemap process, the commission added eight more, Savage said, indicating a thorough process.

Council had met on March 23 to decide on an appeal of preliminary site plan approval filed by Milton resident Allen Benson.

In a public hearing on March 9, Benson presented two arguments in favor of overturning the commission’s decision. First, the planning and zoning did not take into account the negative impacts on neighboring properties when granting approval. Second, the city code states that no new utilities can be built in a flood zone, which is this part of Front Street.

The Verizon Tower has been a source of controversy from the start, primarily due to its location, which is believed to be in the city’s current public works yard at 210 Front St. The location backs onto residential homes on Walnut Streets and Collins.

Verizon said the tower’s location and height will provide the best cellphone coverage for Verizon customers in Milton. Opponents, however, say the tower would be an eyesore in a part of town that is frequently flooded and is being proposed as a potential gateway to the town in Milton’s overall development plan, particularly after demolition and construction. removal of the current sewage treatment plant when the new Artesian plant on Route 30 is operational.

At the March 9 hearing, city attorney Seth Thompson, representing planning and zoning, said the commission considered the health, safety and welfare of the community in making its decision. decision. He said the series of conditions placed on the approval were intended to address the flooding issue and that Verizon indicated that the platform where the tower would be placed is above the floodplain. Thompson said the commission questioned Verizon representative John Tracey at length about the flooding issue around Front Street, demonstrating that those concerns were addressed before the commission granted preliminary site plan approval. Finally, he said Verizon still needs approval from state agencies before final approval of the site plan.

Benson’s appeal was only heard by four of the seven council members. Councilor Randi Merdith and Councilors John Collier and Sam Garde have opted out of the proceedings. Supporters of Benson’s appeal also wanted Mayor Ted Kanakos to recuse himself due to a land lease he signed with Verizon in 2019. Kanakos chose not to recuse himself, leaving Kanakos, Savage, Revis- Plank and Councilman Rich Baty as judges on the appeal.

Revis-Plank addressed the audience: “The process this board follows to deal with the appeal is narrowly focused on whether the decision is based on the evidence. It is very difficult and difficult to make this decision. We heard your concerns – I see nods – but, honestly, we heard you. We are your neighbors and we are trying to do our best to make this decision.

After the vote, Benson said: ‘It was apparent to me that, contrary to the comments of two of the board members, they did not listen to my appeal statement or my closing statement at the appeal hearing. The point that seems to have been overlooked is that I never denied that Planning and Zoning discussed flood risk at the site plan hearing, but the point of the appeal was that, contrary to city code, they never discussed the impact a possible increase in flooding on Front Street would have on the adjacent neighborhood.

He said that while he doesn’t have the resources to appeal the council’s decision to the Delaware Superior Court, supporters have been discussing possible funding because the issue is of such concern to the community, which unfolded in large numbers at the March 9 and March 23 meetings on Benson’s Call.

Snoqualmie Valley Community Invited to Public Hearing for Proposed Plant Site Plan Application

By Site plan

The community of Snoqualmie Valley is invited to a public hearing on the proposed Business/Industrial Plan (BIP) Application for the Snoqualmie Mill Site on Wednesday, March 30, 2022 at 4:00 p.m. via Zoom.

The public hearing will be held before a Hearing Examiner, who will allow participants a maximum of 5 minutes for oral testimony.

At the discretion of the Hearing Reviewer, the public comment time may be reduced to less than 5 minutes per participant.

Those wishing to provide written public comments may email Gwyn Berry ([email protected]) for transmission to the Hearing Reviewer.

Written comments must be received no later than March 30, 2022 at 4:00 p.m. Please note the subject line of the email: “Planned commercial/industrial plan (PCI) for the Snoqualmie plant site. »

Details of the Zoom Meeting of the Public Hearing on the Plant Site Plan Application:

ON

Plaintiff (Snoqualmie Mill Ventures, LLC [SMV]) asks the City to approve a Planned Commercial/Industrial Plan (PCI), which proposes the development of the 261-acre Snoqualmie Mill site in three main planning phases/areas over a period of approximately 10-15 years .

Construction would include a total of approximately 1.83 million gross square feet of light industrial/manufacturing, warehouse, office, retail/restaurant and residential uses.

The proposed PCI plan includes requests for several deviations from zoning code development standards.

The Applicant will enter into a Development Agreement with the City for the Project to guide further planning and development of the entire site in accordance with the Snoqualmie Mill PCI Plan.

[Information provided by the City of Snoqualmie]

Snoqualmie will hold a public hearing on the development of the plant site

By Site development

Snoqualmie will hold a public hearing on the development of the plant site

The Town of Snoqualmie will hold a public hearing into the Commercial/Industrial Plan of the Snoqualmie Plant Site before a Hearing Examiner at 4:00 p.m. on March 30.

The meeting will take place via Zoom. Residents interested in participating may submit oral or written testimony to the Hearing Examiner, who, along with a report and recommendation, will be submitted to City Council for consideration.

Using this report, the city council will then make a final decision on whether to approve or reject the PCI plan at a later date. If the PCI plan is approved, it would give the green light for construction on the property, assuming no additional building permits are required.

The PCI plan was submitted to the city in 2017 by Snoqualmie Mill Ventures LLC. The plan proposes to develop the 261-acre Mill Site property north of downtown in three phases over a 10 to 15-year period. This development would include 1.83 gross square feet of commercial, office, light industrial and residential space.

Several areas of the proposed development are heavily polluted due to its more than 100 year history as a sawmill. However, there is no known pollution in the first phase of the proposed development.

This first phase would include 604,000 square feet of development, as well as 160 residential units in mixed-use buildings.

A draft environmental impact statement for the project completed by the city in April 2020 received over 900 pages of public comment. A final impact statement was released last December.

A link to the hearing and more information can be found here: bit.ly/3wuJbnJ.

Trustees greenlight final site plan for Brown Mortgage Group

By Site plan


A rendering of the proposed office building to be built next to Edley’s Bar-B-Que on Route 157 this year.

Town of Glen Carbon

Chris Brown, owner of Brown Mortgage Group, received unanimous approval from village administrators on Tuesday for the final site plan for his company’s new building, which will be built in the Sunset Park Plaza development in Glen Carbon, next to ‘Edley’s Bar-B-Que.

The plan calls for a 9,670 sq. of Public Works, Scott Slemer. It also complies with the village code.

Plocher Construction is the general contractor for the project. Thouvenot, Wade and Moerchen, Inc. is the engineering company for the project.


RELATED: Brown Mortgage Group Could Build Next to Edley’s BBQ

The business will employ approximately 10 people on a shift with approximate hours of operation from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. The site will have 51 regular parking spaces with two bicycle parking spaces and two that meet Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. The parking lot will have two entrances, one shared with Edley’s and the other in a cul-de-sac.

The former site of the Clark gas station could accommodate food trucks | Ozaukee County Business News

By Site plan

GRAFTON – The village of Grafton is set to repurpose the former Clark Station site, clearing it so it can be made available as a food truck site.

The finance committee on Monday discussed a plan to convert the 1020 Washington Street site to Grafton Station, a village-run property that could accommodate food trucks. According to information from village staff, they were contacted by a food truck salesman to use the site for his business.

The site has been vacant for several years since the closure of Clark Station and had to undergo the removal of underground gas tanks left after the property was abandoned.

“Unfortunately the site is in poor condition since the removal of the underground storage tanks also removed some of the concrete,” Grafton village administrator Jesse Thyes wrote in a briefing to the committee of councils. finance.


Stay up to date on all the latest Washington County news with a print subscription to the Daily News: https://bit.ly/dailynews_sub


“Staff worked with Ozaukee County on a preliminary cost estimate of $8,840 for the paving,” he added.

The site, once redeveloped, could accommodate one or two food trucks at a time.

The Finance Committee sent the item to the Village Council with a positive recommendation that the Village use up to $10,000 from the Village Revolving Credit Fund to cover site improvements.

There is currently up to $35,000 available in the revolving loan fund for economic development projects, beyond the $450,000 the village is holding back for future loans, according to village information. The village council will need to approve the use of the funds at its next meeting before the funding is finalized.

“The village will prepare the site and work with Ozaukee County on paving,” Thyes said. “There are several other steps to realizing the vision of a food truck site, including but not limited to establishing a ‘rental’ permit for use of the site, as well as other logistical details.”

A layout plan for Grafton station was also approved by the Planning Commission this week at its meeting on Tuesday.

“The original plan for the Clark site at 1020 Washington Street was to work with the owner to the north – the Patel family – to combine the two properties for a mixed-use redevelopment project. Unfortunately the Patels have indicated to the staff that they are unable to move forward in the near future, (so) the staff are developing the food truck idea to create a managed food truck site by the village”, Jessica, director of community development for the village. Wolff said in a memo to the commission.

Wolff said the Grafton Station site would be an interim use. Once the owners to the north are ready to plan a redevelopment of the two properties together, the village is still planning that.

In the meantime, the creation of the temporary location for the food trucks will give the property a potential function and allow it to be finished and maintained.

Right now the use is really just to clear the site,” said village chairman and planning commissioner Jim Brunnquell. “It’s a potential use. We had some interest.

Site plan for a new craft beverage plant approved in Berryville | Winchester Star

By Site plan

BERRYVILLE — A businessman’s project to make hard cider on a former industrial site is moving forward.

The Berryville Planning Commission on Monday approved a site plan for the former Smalley Packaging Co. property at 324 First St., where Jim Madaj aims to establish a craft beverage manufacturing plant.

Madaj owns Wild Hare Cidery, which already has operations elsewhere in Northern Virginia. He intends to manufacture the company’s alcoholic beverage products at the Berryville location, as well as have retail sales and a tasting room for customers there.

At a public hearing, Christina Kraybill, who lives nearby, expressed concern that the installation could increase traffic along First Street. She said she had visited other tasting rooms where full portions were served rather than samples.

Today, a tasting room is “more like a pub,” Kraybill said.

“I don’t think it will be another Bear Chase situation,” said fellow neighbor Katie Rosenbrook. She was referring to a brewery in Bluemont that Clarke County officials say is largely responsible for the traffic problems at the Va intersection. 7 (Harry Byrd Highway) and Route 601 (Blue Ridge Mountain Road).

Yet another neighbor, Natalie Fiorica, said “young people in Berryville need to have a safe place to go” to grab a drink without traveling far.

The site plan was approved with three conditions:

All building code requirements must be met and Clarke County must issue a certificate of occupancy prior to plant opening.

Planned changes to parking areas and site exit must be completed prior to opening, and

An amendment to the plan must be approved by the commission before operations can be extended in the future. A special use permit may be required for certain types of expanded operations, said Berryville Community Development Manager Christy Dunkle.

The First Street building has approximately 14,000 square feet of floor space. About 1,600 square feet are to be used for tasting and sales, documents show.

Madaj recently told the commission that he plans to use only about 20% of the space initially, and eventually hopes to do bottling and canning for other craft beverage makers. on the spot.

He estimates that three or four employees will work there immediately, and more will be added to the payroll as activity increases.

Scheduled opening hours for tasting and retail will be 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, noon to 8 p.m. Saturday, and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday, depending on plans.

No outside storage will be permitted on the property, which according to county tax records is owned by Valley Venture Fund I, LLC. The appraised value of the property is listed at $660,000.

The community must be included in the development of the Northern Metal site

By Site development



For generations, the Mississippi River in north Minneapolis has been treated like a brownfield, home to some of the dirtiest businesses that have harmed families living nearby. An example is Northern Metal Recycling’s shredding plant.

The metal shredder started in 2009, and residents of north and northeast Minneapolis paid the price. For 12 years, people close to Northern Metal have breathed in pollution, including lead dust in the air, which has poisoned people and our children. This, in addition to other sources of pollution, has resulted in some of the largest health disparities in the state for this region.

When Northern Metal refused to shut down their grinder in 2019 as they had promised, it took organizing, taking legal action and a whistleblower presented evidence that the operation was providing false readings on their monitoring equipment. pollution to end this nightmare.

The decade-long struggle against Northern Metal ended with the victory of community members, mothers and youth in North Minneapolis and Northern Metal finally moved on.

The pollution is gone, but the work is not done

With news that the Minneapolis Park Board is considering a proposal to acquire and redevelop the Northern Metal site, it’s time to think about the decades ahead. We need to celebrate this win, learn from what happened, and make sure the community gets a leading voice in determining the future of this site.

I’ve been involved in this fight with many others since the beginning, and it’s part of the reason why I helped found Community Members for Environmental Justice (CMEJ). The CMEJ is a vehicle for our community to stand up against pollution on the Northside and in solidarity with other neighborhoods, raise awareness in our community, advocate with our elected officials and, if necessary, intervene in court.

Community members demonstrate outside the Northern Metal Recycling facility in May 2021. Credit: Jaida Gray Eagle | Sahan Diary

Since 2013, community members have been coming forward and asking our elected officials to do something about Northern Metal’s fires, lies and pollution. In 2016, we learned that airborne lead and other toxic compounds released from their facility along the Mississippi River were being inhaled by our children.

We know from a whistleblower in 2019 that Northern Metal tried to hide its wrongdoings by manipulating pollution data. We know we cannot trust Northern Metal to operate safely when fires broke out at their facilities in Minneapolis and Becker, Minnesota. Throughout this period, and since the mill ceased operations, community members feared further fires. It is a huge relief to me and my neighbors that we can soon be rid of this environmental hazard to our neighborhood.

Holding Northern Metal accountable has been hard and exhausting work. It shouldn’t have been so painful. It should not have been left to an already overburdened community to do this work. We have been fighting for almost a decade for Northern Metal and members of government to protect people and ensure our children can breathe.

Seeking to end this corporate polluter is a relief, but that doesn’t mean the job is done. What replaces Northern Metal matters a lot. Now is the time to engage people, not push ahead with developer-focused proposals that put profits first.

The point is, if and when Northern Metal leaves, the public will foot the cleanup bill after we’ve already paid the cost with our health.

So if Northern Metal is out, what will happen next? The site has functioned as an industrial site for generations. The point is, if and when Northern Metal leaves, the public will foot the cleanup bill after we’ve already paid the cost with our health. With all this burden we have carried comes the responsibility of our public servants to engage and be accountable to the community.

Obviously, the Northsiders are not starting from a place of trust in our government and in the for-profit developers, all the more reason for it to be done right. And this site has the potential to become a space that reclaims natural abundance and the community’s connection to the river, guided by the vision of those who live here.

We must take this moment to reflect on how we got here, or we risk repeating the same historical mistakes and processes that reflect colonialism and perpetuate environmental racism. It is not enough to simply eliminate the evil, the community deserves reconciliation and reparation.

The creative energy and commitment to our community is what makes this next phase in the story of this patch of land along the river exciting and so important. We celebrate the idea of ​​a future free of Northern Metal and many other polluters, and once again demand that our voices be valued and our bodies respected wherever we go from here.

The Villages files site plan for Spanish Springs Town Square apartments

By Site plan

The Villages has officially filed a site plan with the Town of Lady Lake for apartments at Spanish Springs Town Square.

The Villages’ desire to put age-restricted apartments in empty second-floor commercial space in Spanish Springs has been a contentious issue for more than a year. The Villages sued to bend the Lady Lake Commission to their will, ultimately forcing the commissioners to drop their 33 years Regional Impact Development Contract with the Developer.

The site plan, filed with the city on Tuesday, calls for seven apartments in the Van Patten House, the former home of Katie Belle. Three of the apartments will be one bedroom units and four of the apartments will be two bedroom units. There will be 16 dedicated parking spaces for apartment dwellers and their guests.

Many residents, including Mayor Jim Rietz, who has a large “Save Spanish Springs” sticker on the rear window of his vehicle, remain suspicious of the Villages’ potential long-term program for the original town square. The elimination of Katie Belle, cutting off the extended happy hour previously enjoyed exclusively in Spanish Springs, and the eerie silence over the future of the shuttered Rialto Theater are feared to be part of a secret plan to suck life space. Some have expressed concern that The Villages will end nighttime entertainment in the square.

York County vote on Carolina Panthers site plan at Rock Hill SC

By Site plan

A surprise vote Monday night could get the Carolina Panthers headquarters project in Rock Hill back under construction.

York County Council voted 4-3 for a resolution that would commit the county to take “all necessary steps to execute and deliver” a fee agreement with the team, according to the motion brought forward by Councilman Joel Hamilton. The motion would authorize fees rather than taxes “as we discussed in depth during the executive session,” Hamilton said.

There weren’t many details on the plan since it wasn’t on the county’s agenda Monday. More details on the restructured financial package will come later.

Council members who backed the decision Monday night said it signaled to the Panthers that the county was serious about the project and put people back to work at the site.

Hamilton said he thought the incentive deal discussed during Monday night’s executive session was better than the one previously negotiated. It’s growth that pays for growth, he said, and puts the site’s tax revenue back into it.

“We’re not talking about giving money away,” Hamilton said. “We are talking about an investment in public goods.”

According to the county, this does not involve any government entity borrowing funds. These are special source income credits. With the deal, the county wouldn’t see tax revenue from the site — it would go to public infrastructure there — for 30 years.

“I think it’s very important that we continue to fight on behalf of the Carolina Panthers and one of the biggest booms in economic development, whether it’s five, 10, 15, 20 or 30 years from now,” Councilor Allison Love said.

Council held its typical business meeting and then spent almost three hours in closed executive session. The Board returned and suspended its rules of procedure for voting on the Panthers’ deal.

President Christi Cox, who voted against the resolution with members Tom Audette and Robert Winkler, said the vote was out of order.

“I don’t believe that’s the way the county should do business,” Cox said.

Cox did not vote in favor of the original incentive agreement reached between the county, the team, the town of Rock Hill and the school district that committed future tax revenues to public infrastructure – roads, utilities – related to the project off I-77. Cox said she wanted the project, but feared the new resolution would commit an additional $57 million in incentives to get it. His biggest concern is public transparency.

“I decline to do so when I believe our process has not been followed and it results in additional expense that taxpayers have not had a chance to speak out against,” Cox said.

Winkler, who spearheads many economic development projects in his role on the council, said he owes it to his constituents not to back a plan that has come forward so quickly.

“That resolution was not on the agenda tonight,” Winkler said. “It wasn’t in an email to us. I didn’t see it until the executive session tonight.

Hamilton said he shared his concern and discomfort with how the vote went. Yet he also spoke of a generational project that is likely the biggest any council member will ever see in the area. A project the county stands to lose, he said, without quick action.

“I also have great concern for the hundreds of men and women who have worked tirelessly day in and day out on this site to get this project off the ground and whose jobs are currently under threat and may not return,” Hamilton said.

Earlier this month, Tepper Sports & Entertainment, representing the Charlotte-based NFL team, announced it would put the Rock Hill headquarters site project on hold due to missed payment deadlines. The City of Rock Hill says it did not miss deadlines from a previous incentive agreement. The construction of the first phase was due to be completed next year.

“Given the economic realities, the difficult but prudent decision has been made to put the project on hold,” Tepper Sports said in a statement in early March. “Ongoing work will continue with our partners to find an economically acceptable solution for all parties to continue this project at Rock Hill.”

In early March, Rock Hill officials said in a statement that the city was unaware of a planned pause in construction and intended to continue to honor its agreement with the Panthers.

Early Tuesday, Rock Hill officials said the city had no further comment on the matter.

A spokesperson for Tepper Sports & Entertainment declined to comment.

Councilman William “Bump” Roddey has been asking Rock Hill officials for the past two weeks to contact the county for help. He agrees that the timing of the resolution was not ideal.

“It happened to us very quickly,” Roddey said. “It probably put the staff in one of the most difficult positions.”

Still, he said, the project is too big for the county to miss.

“It’s not the normal course of action,” Roddey said. “But I think the time we find ourselves in, the situation we face, requires us to suspend the rules and do what we must do to assure the taxpayers of York County that we still have their interests at heart. best interests.

“It’s better. It brings us back to a point where we’re going to see revenue on the bottom line much faster.”

This is a developing story. Check back later for more details.

This story was originally published March 22, 2022 10:55 a.m.

Hilton Head Island Packet Related Stories

John Marks graduated from Furman University in 2004 and joined the Herald in 2005. He covers community growth, municipalities, transportation and education primarily in York and Lancaster counties. The Fort Mill native has won dozens of South Carolina Press Association awards and several President McClatchy Awards for news coverage in Fort Mill and Lake Wylie.
Support my work with a digital subscription

New requirements affect the use of Fill in Site Development

By Site development

In an October 2021 guidance document, which included LSRPA participation in the stakeholder process, the NJDEP provided LSRPs and their clients with more options for the sustainable reuse of “alternative backfill” in redevelopment. and the cleanup of brownfields and other remediation sites.

However, there is a significant catch. Current NJDEP policy requires NJDEP’s prior approval for the use of alternate fill above existing site grade. This has the potential to require large amounts of “clean fill” to raise site levels to climate-resilient elevations where alternative fill could otherwise be safely used.

The growing need for backfill has prompted some companies to supply fill that is falsely identified as clean fill. IIn response, the New Jersey Legislature changed the A-901 license requirements for companies providing filler to require more stringent background checks.

The 2019 amendment, called the Dirty Dirt Act, places companies that engage in soil and fill recycling services (including brokerage, transportation and processing) under a similar regulatory regime and expands the definition of a broker.

Implementing regulations have not yet been promulgated. However, some key deadlines have already passed. Companies engaged in soil and fill recycling services were required to file a notice by October 14, 2021 or cease engaging in newly regulated activities by January 13, 2022. Companies that filed a timely notice must submit a complete A-901 application by April 15, 2022. .

With key deadlines already past, all fill producers and users need to pay attention to the source of the fill material and the sometimes competing regulatory initiatives controlling the fill world.

For more business news, visit NYC News Now.

Planning Board Discusses Economic Development Officer, OK Marathon School Major Site Plan for Addition

By Site plan

A proposal to hire an economic development officer, raised by Hopkinton’s 2020 growth review committee, is moving slowly, with planning council chairman Gary Trendel calling for a meeting between some city officials city ​​and the chamber of commerce.

Hiring a director of development would be above the Planning Board level, but Trendel said he wanted to “put him on the radar” and get the conversation going again.

“I want to make it clear that the Economic Development Officer does not report to the Planning Council, but that is something we could potentially support,” Trendel said at the council meeting on Monday evening.

At least two board members expressed some reservations, while member Fran DeYoung, who served on the growth review committee, said the group’s recommendation was born out of an analysis and review of other regional cities employing an economic development officer or group.

“We identified positive non-residential activity — let’s call it commercial — as a result of this,” DeYoung said. “We were in favor of making a recommendation to the Planning Board [of hiring an economic development officer]. It was also examined by the select committee.

DeYoung said one aspect the committee looked at was how to increase revenue from the nonresidential sector in the city. He mentioned the towns of Ashland and Hudson as examples.

“We thought the economic development officer over time was able to increase the non-residential business base in towns that had an individual or a group that was responsible for…trying to develop that business aspect and who managed to do it. ”

Responding to a question from fellow Planning Council member Ron Priefer, DeYoung said the position could be full-time or contract, with obvious differences on funding for each position.

Member Rob Benson called for more comments from people on “all sides” of the issue.

“I know it came out of the growth study committee, but I thought at the time that the select committee hadn’t moved forward because they couldn’t justify the cost of it compared to, say, a new teacher,” Benson said. “We can say we support him, but I don’t see how we can really go beyond saying we support him. Second, as much as anyone in town wants to minimize their own taxes, there are probably plenty of people out there who want Hopkinton to be a dormitory community.

“Having an economic development officer will obviously stimulate businesses that some people don’t want. I feel like it’s a one-sided conversation right now. I wish we had more input from all sides.

Member David Paul counts himself among those who want to maintain Hopkinton as a “quiet, dormitory community”.

“When the [Town Meeting] article came as far as building a car wash or a storage facility, I voted against that,” he noted. “I like the idea of ​​a quiet town.”

Trendel acknowledged that the board would not vote or make a decision on the matter.

“It’s up to the selection committee. It’s also probably a Town Meeting article,” he said. “There are a lot more discussions to be had here. Our goal is not to solve everything here. … The Growth Study Committee was a sub-committee of this council. … There is no perfect solution. But generally the talking side is to start talking about how we’re going to get things done.

“We don’t make decisions,” Trendel added. “We’re just taking the next step to explore that.”

Approval of the major implementation plan for the Marathon school

Continuing a public hearing since its last meeting, the Planning Board unanimously approved a major site plan for a $3.6 million project that will add four classrooms and 6,400 square feet to the school Elementary of Marathon.

There was no in-depth discussion of the project itself, with BETA Group’s Phil Paradis, the city’s consultant, noting that most of his agency’s issues had been resolved. There must be an updated operation and maintenance plan for the school with the addition. Paradis also mentioned the need to ensure the prevention of runoff leaving the stone dust surfacing area.

Finding that the site plans met site plan standards and were sufficient to properly review the proposed project, council voted 9-0 in favour.

“I can not wait to see it [project] progress over the next year and beyond,” Trendel said.

April 25 meeting added

While the council is meeting again on April 4, its next meeting would have conflicted with the annual municipal meeting on May 2. This has been fixed with the addition of a meeting on April 25. After that, other scheduled meetings are May 16 and June 6.

An agenda item for April 4 will be the discussion of increasing the maximum gross floor area of ​​buildings in Industrial District A from 50% to 80%. Council continued a public hearing Monday evening into the matter, which will appear in the town hall.

Final approval of site plan next to M65 making visitors cringe

By Site plan

The approval of the latest piece in a multi-million pound flagship development of an awful site was greeted as a moment of ‘joy’.

And a Tory senior adviser has said fans outside coming to watch Blackburn Rovers at Ewood Park will no longer “squeal” as they pass the abandoned Lower Darwen paper mill site.

The comments came as the Blackburn with Darwen Council planning committee approved the fourth employment unit on Millbank Business Park. This is the final part of the mixed-use regeneration of land between Greenbank Terrace and Milking Lane, formerly occupied by the Lower Darwen Paper Mill, to come before councillors.

More: Poor quality work carried out on Blackburn road leads to rethinking of repairs

Work has already started on the commercial part of the scheme with Cheshire-based Elan Homes securing full planning permission to build 76 properties on the residential element. The Lancashire Enterprise Partnership has awarded a £1.4million grant for the new link road between Milking Lane and Greenbank Terrace, crucial to the project,

The permitted planning application came from Barnfield Blackburn Ltd, the joint venture between Barnfield Developments and Blackburn with Darwen Council set up to develop the site just off Junction 4 of the M65 which had been vacant and an eyesore for several years.



The abandoned site of the Lower Darwen Paper Mill

Blackburn with Darwen Council regeneration boss Cllr Phil Riley said: “It was put together happily. It was a horror for a very, very long time. We have Rossendale and Darwen MP Jake Berry to thank for getting the money for the link road. This good project will transform the neighborhood.

Blackburn South and Lower Darwen Curator Cllr Jacquie Slater said: ‘I used to cringe every time I walked past the site on a key gateway to Blackburn.

“Away fans going to Rovers must also have backed off. It was horrible. Now we and they won’t have to back down.

Committee chairman Cllr Dave Smith said: “This is a good project on a key gateway to the city. This is the final piece of the site’s puzzle.

The business unit unanimously approved at Thursday night’s meeting will be the largest of four on the site, comprising 35,000 square feet of internal floor space.

Sun Property Group secures Chatswood apartment development site, plans two towers

By Site plan

Sun Property Group, the prominent developer on Sydney’s Lower North Shore, is set to undertake one of its densest projects to date.

They have secured a large development site in Chatswood, which will be their first in the suburbs, and are embarking on the creation of two towers, with around 180 apartments, across the block at 1-17 Bowen Street.

Sun Property Group managing director Cameron Johnson says there is a lot of growth potential in the Chatswood area.

“Understandably, as we anticipate a substantial increase in net migration and workers continue to seek nearby employment, we believe the Chatswood market has strong growth potential,” Johnson told Urban.

While moving away from their more traditional boutique developments, some of which only offer a handful of apartments, Johnson believes they will still be able to attract a similar clientele to which they are accustomed.

“While we don’t produce the size of boutique residential apartments we typically offer, we will always look to include oversized products,” Johnson said.

“We will do two-bedroom apartments of around 85m² to 90m², rather than the more traditional 70m² size of a regular two-bed apartment.”

Johnson says there will naturally be more investors given Chatswood’s strong transport infrastructure and job opportunities, but there will be inventory to suit every buyer.

Where the Bowen Street site is near Chatswood. Image credit: CoreLogic

“The three beds will be designed for those with children or looking to start a young family, and the two beds will suit young shoppers looking to work from home and entertain on location.”

Construction at the site is expected to begin in early 2024, with development to be released in stages. There are expected to be around 70 apartments developed in the first stage, at the start of the Bowen Street site.

A+ Design Group’s Tony Leung is currently working on the plans, with the development application due later this year.

The site has been secured alongside SPG’s funding and equity partner, Qualitas, and will add $250 million in revenue to SPG’s pipeline.

SPG recently burst into the Melbourne market, where they launched Euroka, a boutique collection of apartments in the heart of Toorak, one of Melbourne’s premier suburbs.

Euroka is inspired by Melbourne’s iconic Roy Grounds House, once home to one of Victoria’s most influential modern architects.

Renowned architect and design firm Carr Design created the 10 luxury apartments, including two ultra-luxury penthouses.

Mt. Bethel Christian Academy Sports Field Site Plan Approval

By Site plan

After several months of delays, the Cobb Board of Commissioners this week approved a site plan change on the North Campus of Mt. Bethel Christian Academy for the construction of an athletic field.

Since 2014, Mt. Bethel has operated a secondary school on Post Oak Tritt Road near Holly Springs Road.

The school obtained a special land use plan the previous year, stipulating that changes must come back to the commissioners. The SLUP included the future construction of a sports field and related facilities.

In 2019, Mt. Bethel Christian proposed a sports stadium, but later withdrew the request after community opposition surfaced.

The new site plan (above) was passed on the commission’s consent schedule after the private school worked out a new list of stipulations with nearby residents of the Holly Springs subdivision and the East Cobb Civic Association.

Mt. Bethel Christian attorney Kevin Moore filed the new site plan and letter of stipulation on Tuesday on March 9 (you can read here; you can read the zoning staff analysis by clicking here).

This includes moving the parking lot, removing an athletics track, creating an 85-foot undisturbed buffer between the lot and neighboring homes, and requiring the District Commissioner ( JoAnn Birrell) to approve the maximum land elevations.

Other provisions limit the range of lighting and the hours of operation of a public address system and public address system. The District Commissioner would also approve a final landscaping plan with community and ECCA reviews.

Approval comes after a few the neighbors objected to the proximity of the land in their backyards.

Commissioners voted in December delay the requestand Mt. Bethel requested another extension in February.

But at a zoning hearing on Tuesday, Birrell told affected parties “I appreciate you working with me in the background.”

The site plan changes also provide for the addition of 39 parking spaces for a total of 121 on campus.

Related Items:

Receive our free newsletter by e-mail!

Every Sunday we round up the week’s top headlines and preview the week ahead in the East Cobb News Digest. Click here to register, and you’re good to go!

Wawarsing OKs Sitemap for Marijuana Grower and Distributor – Daily Freeman

By Site plan

WAWARSING, NY — A whole new type of grass and up to 400 new jobs will soon be springing up in Ellenville, officials said this week.

On Tuesday, March 15, the Wawarsing Planning Board approved a site plan proposed by Cresco Labs, a Chicago-based national cannabis producer and marketer. Cresco will soon build a marijuana growing, processing, packaging and distribution facility in the former Kora Components building at 11 Aluminum Drive, city supervisor Terry Houck said Friday.

Ellenville Mayor Jeff Kaplan said Cresco still plans to purchase and renovate the former vacant Channel Master and Schrade knife company site on U.S. Route 209 adjacent to Aluminum Drive. Cresco has expanded its original proposal by purchasing the 10-acre Kora property and existing building, Kaplan said. He said negotiations were still ongoing regarding the Channel Master and Schrade sites.

The Kora purchase will allow Cresco to start its cannabis growing business sooner than it had anticipated, Kaplan said. He didn’t know the company’s schedule.

A spokesperson for the company could not be immediately reached on Friday.

Kora is transferring its operations to Liberty, Houck said.

In an emailed statement on Friday, Ulster County Executive Pat Ryan said: “Cresco Labs has taken a critical step in creating what will be one of the greatest economic opportunities we have had. in Ellenville for decades.” The executive said Project Cresco “will transform a site that was once the beating heart of this economy into the economic engine it can and should be – providing well-paying jobs for local residents and placing the county Ulster at the forefront of the rapidly growing cannabis industry.

In an emailed statement, County Economic Development Director Tim Weidermann called the planning board’s approval “a major milestone for an incredibly transformative project that is rapidly moving to shovels into the ground.”

When final approvals, state licenses and funding are secured, Wiedemann said Cresco promised to deliver “400 well-paying jobs (with benefits), over $200 million in investment, and the birth of a major new industry for the Rondout Valley, County of Ulster., and region.

Houck said he hadn’t seen a list of jobs the company expected to create, but he believed they would offer competitive benefits and salaries. He said Cresco employees are “well-treated and well-paid” and this will be the company’s 19th plant and 10th state in which they are setting up shop.

In an August email, a representative from Cresco Labs said the company is “excited about adult use and expanding our footprint in New York State – we know the economic impact that a large-scale cannabis facility can have on a community, and we look forward to continuing to work through the process with Ulster County at the Wawarsing site.

According to the company’s website, Cresco is “on a mission to standardize, professionalize and revolutionize cannabis.” The company, which operates 18 facilities in other states, including a medical cannabis dispensary on Long Island, describes itself as “the most trusted and fastest growing cannabis company in the world.”

At a press conference in August, Ryan said the company should employ local builders and “building partners” to develop the property. He said Cresco used to employ local workers.

Ulster County Executive Pat Ryan leads a press conference outside the George and John R. Hunt Memorial Building at 2 Liberty St. in Ellenville, NY on Wednesday afternoon, August 4, 2021, to announce a company of distribution of marijuana at the former Schrade knife-making plant in the town of Wawarsing, which sat vacant for about 17 years. (Tania Barricklo/Daily Freeman, File)

New York State legalized recreational marijuana in March 2021, and Ulster County is poised to become “one of the first communities in the state to house a major marijuana distribution facility,” it said. Ryan.

Reached by phone on Friday, Kaplan welcomed the new venture and said he was not concerned about the introduction of a marijuana facility in Wawarsing. “I’ve only heard positive things and we’re very excited about that,” the mayor said.

Kaplan said he’s also not worried about the arrival of a marijuana business in Ellenville or the possible development of cannabis dispensaries and cafes in the village. “No. It’s going to be controlled. I’m more concerned about people drinking than me. [them] consume cannabis. He said the Woodridge Village Police Chief told officials that “people who use cannabis are much less likely to be aggressive and fight than people who drink. He said they had a lot more trouble with bars than with people getting high.

In December, the Ellenville Village Board voted to allow dispensaries and recreational marijuana parlors in the village, and Kaplan said he believed they would encourage growth. “I think this will be a major asset in eliminating the neighborhood dealer and that people who want to use cannabis do not have to go to a dealer who sells heroin, cocaine and cannabis at the same time. ‘ecstasy….Once you start having to go to the illegal drug dealer to begin with, it’s much easier to take the next step.

He said having a few cannabis cafes in Ellenville “will just add to the whole experience that we’re trying to create there of a theater, a row of restaurants, which we’ve already created, and I think it will be a good add-on. And the fact that we have a local village with a local village police department to make sure things are done safely… is going to be a big help.

Wawarsing Town Council has chosen not to allow cafes or cannabis dispensaries outside the village boundaries.

Milton council hears appeal over cell tower site plan

By Site plan

Milton City Council is weighing whether to rescind preliminary site plan approval for Verizon’s proposed 140-foot cell phone tower on Front Street.

A decision on the appeal of Allen Benson, resident of Milton, will be made at the council meeting at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 23, at the Milton Library.

At a March 9 appeal hearing, Benson made two arguments as to why he believes the planning and zoning commission erred in granting preliminary site plan approval.

First, he said, the planning and zoning did not take into account the negative impacts on neighboring properties when granting approval. Second, the city code states that no new utilities can be built in a flood zone, which is this part of Front Street.

“The issue that has been raised repeatedly is about increased flooding on Front Street by building this cell tower on a 50ft by 50ft platform in a designated flood zone. The basis for this appeal is that planning and zoning, contrary to city code requirements, never really considered the impact on the adjacent neighborhood,” Benson said.

The proposed Verizon Tower has been controversial from the start, primarily due to its location, which would be in the city’s current public works yard at 210 Front St. Verizon said the tower’s location and height will give the Better Cell Phone Coverage for Verizon Customers in Milton. Opponents, however, say the tower would be an eyesore in a part of town that is frequently flooded and is being proposed as a potential gateway to the town in Milton’s overall development plan, particularly after demolition and construction. removal of the current sewage treatment plant once Artesian’s new plant is on the road. 30 is operational.

Because the land is zoned residential R-1, Verizon had to obtain a special use permit from planning and zoning. This permit was granted and the decision was appealed to the city council in August.

In its decision, the council said the overall plan imagines what could be on this site, but also calls for the improvement of infrastructure services, which the tower would provide, and which planners have put in a state stipulating that Tower plans must comply with all state and federal rules and regulations. Council members said at the time that floodplain issues would be addressed through the site plan review process.

Planners approved preliminary site plans in November but attached several conditions that must be met before final approval, including geotechnical analysis of the site in wet and dry conditions, permits from the US Army Corps of Engineers , a construction sequence, no pile-driving allowed, runoff and flood analysis, vibration monitoring, and a promise that Verizon will maintain plantings around the site.

Benson said planners had not considered the effect on streets surrounding the tower, such as Collins and Walnut streets, and whether they would be able to handle the increased traffic the tower would bring. He said planners and city officials had not given due consideration to an alternative to building a tower, such as installing an antenna on an existing water tower.

“This project cannot move forward,” Benson said.

Presenting on behalf of planning and zoning, city attorney Seth Thompson said the commission considered the health, safety and welfare of the community in making its decision. He said the series of conditions placed on the approval were intended to address the flooding issue and that Verizon indicated that the platform where the tower would be placed is above the floodplain. Thompson said the commission questioned Verizon representative John Tracey at length about the flooding issue around Front Street, demonstrating that those concerns were addressed before the commission granted preliminary site plan approval. Finally, he said Verizon still needs approval from state agencies before final approval of the site plan.

Tracey presented on behalf of Verizon and reiterated that the commission addressed concerns about flooding in its Preliminary Site Plan Approval Terms. He said the commission, by a vote of 6 to 1, found the layout of the site acceptable and asked council to uphold the commission’s approval of the preliminary site plan.

“The planning commission carefully weighed the testimony of those before it,” Tracey said. “The planning commission acted in accordance with the law in an orderly and logical manner.”

Recusals and public comments

For this appeal hearing, the council had just four members, after three – councilor Randi Meredith and councilors John Collier and Sam Garde – recused themselves. Prior to the hearing, Collier announced that he was recusing himself due to prior statements about the case made on a public record. Meredith and Garde recused themselves before the meeting. Although council members did not have to publicly state the reason for their recusal, Meredith said after the meeting that she was unable to attend due to a death in the family.

Benson and Barry Goodinson of 313 Mill St., asked Mayor Ted Kanakos to recuse himself due to a ground lease he signed with Verizon in 2019. Kanakos refused to do so; attorney Glenn Mandalas, representing the city council because Thompson, the city attorney, represented the planning and zoning commission, told Goodinson he could take his complaint to the City’s Public Integrity Commission. Delaware for consideration. Goodinson previously appealed the planning and zoning decision to grant Verizon a special permitted use for the tower.

Public comments were exclusively against the tower.

Agnes Steele, 209 Collins St., requested that the matter be referred to the planning commission for reconsideration.

Ginny Weeks, 119 Clifton St., said nowhere in city code is a 140-foot cell tower permitted.

The comment period became tense after Goodinson asked Kanakos to recuse himself; Goodinson said Kanakos misled people as to why the tower was placed on Front Street. Steele then returned to the microphone and said Kanakos was sarcastic and seemingly frustrated with people voicing their concerns. Kanakos said it was the first time in six years as mayor that he was personally attacked in a meeting.

Public comments were then closed and Benson, Thompson and Tracey were allowed to make closing statements, reiterating their points. The city council chose to postpone the vote on the case so that it could consider all the evidence. The Board has several options it can pursue toward its expected March 23 decision: It can reject Benson’s appeal and uphold the panel’s decision; he can overrule the commission’s decision or send the matter back to planning and zoning for further review. The Board has 60 days to issue a written decision on the appeal.

Council rejects Neighbors sitemap – Times News Online

By Site plan

Published on March 17, 2022 at 2:07 p.m.

A power outage caused by high winds dampened but would not have extinguished the February 22 meeting of the Hellertown Borough Council, as its chairman Thomas Rieger, council members and attendees improvised – with Rieger broadcasting the session on Zoom with his laptop and a mobile wireless “hotspot” until the electricity was restored.

The most widespread topic of discussion was the resounding rejection of a revised proposal by Gabriel Solms of Lou Pektor’s Ashley Development Corporation in Bethlehem to transform the former Neighbors Home and Garden Center site at 42 Main St. between Walnut Street and Polk Valley Road into three -building apartment complex.

Since the plot is currently in a shopping center zoning district, the council would have to allow a waiver. When representatives for Ashley first presented their plans to council in November 2021, the site plan called for 142 apartments, which raised several concerns.

Despite changes to the plan that Solms and Associates presented to the board, members expressed many of the same reservations. Between “setting a precedent” for so-called “spot zoning,” as planning commissioner Liz Thompson said, and traffic and maintenance issues, most of the reception of the proposal was cold at best.

Some council members have expressed apprehension over what has been called an “explosion” of multi-family, mixed-use developments across the borough. Only Mayor David Heintzelman shared a positive view of the idea, saying there was worse than the 112-unit structure that could be built.

In the end, council decided to place the item on the agenda for the next meeting for the formal rejection of the zoning variance. Due to recent changes to Pennsylvania’s Sunshine Act, any such proposed motion must be made public before any action can be taken.

In addition, Borough Director Cathy Hartranft announced an electronics recycling and document shredding event scheduled for April 30 at Dimmick Park. The two-hour event is free for residents of the Borough of Hellertown only.

A discussion also took place on the Borough’s difficulty in obtaining bids for a renovation project for the Community Pool concession kiosk. Borough engineer Bryan Smith recommended reposting it and said contractors had been “extremely hesitant” due to supply chain and personnel issues. The board voted unanimously in favor of Smith’s suggestion.

Along the same lines, Hartranft and Rieger reiterated the need for candidates for various seasonal positions at the pool: a water sports manager, a ticket/concessions manager and lifeguards. “If we don’t get any of those, the pool can’t open,” Rieger said.

Hartranft noted that the borough has increased its salaries for the upcoming season and is offering a 50% reimbursement for the cost of lifeguard certification training.

press photo by Chris Haring Hellertown Planning Commission member Liz Thompson raises concerns about the proposed development of the Neighbors Home and Garden site.

The Neighbors Home and Garden site on Main Street in the borough has been vacant since its closure in 2020.

The Neighbors Home and Garden site on Main Street in the borough has been vacant since its closure in 2020.

PRESS PHOTOS BY CHRIS HARING The Neighbors Home and Garden site on Main Street in the borough has been vacant since closing in 2020.

Owen Sound approves site plan for former gas station

By Site plan

Content of the article

The site plan for the construction of a new shopping center on long-vacant land at Owen Sound’s “southern gateway” has been approved by council.

Advertisement 2

Content of the article

On Monday, council voted 7 to 2 in favor of the site plan for the property at the southwest corner of 10and East Street and 9and Avenue East, which once housed a gas station, but has been vacant since 2005. The plans for the property at 889 10and St. E. includes an approximately 4,300 square foot mall containing three retail units, including a drive-thru restaurant.

Sarj Mehat, part of the owners’ team, 1948654 Ontario Inc., said Tuesday he doesn’t yet know when construction will begin, but hopes it will be this year.

“I am happy that it has been approved and I hope we can move on to the next stage of its construction now,” Mehat said.

He said he will have to consult with tenants and contractors before finalizing a timetable on when work will start.

“With COVID in the air, the world has changed and it’s not as easy as it used to be,” Mehat said. “The intentions are good, the property will be developed and it’s only a matter of time.”

Mehat said he could not yet disclose who the tenants of the property will be.

With the approval of the site plan, council directed staff to introduce a by-law to authorize the mayor and clerk to sign a site plan agreement, service agreement and any other items required to implement site plan approval.

The property has the Travelodge to the north on 10and Street East while Tim Hortons is east across 9and East Ave. The property adjoins residential homes to the west and south.

Advertisement 3

Content of the article

In addition to the building, the property’s proposed site plan also includes 13 drive-thru waiting spaces, a 26-space parking lot, and two new right-hand and right-hand-only entrances from 10and East Street and 9and East Ave. The median out of 10and East Street must be extended to prevent illegal left turns into the property. There are plans for site maintenance, retaining walls and landscaping, according to a report in junior planner Jacklyn Iezzi’s Monday diary.

Because the property is in the area designated in the city’s official plan as the southern gateway to Owen Sound, the development requires “a high standard of urban design,” Iezzi’s report explains. The property is zoned Commercial Artery (C4).

Among the features incorporated into the site plan and landscape plan in support of this designation are the orientation of the building to the intersection “to create an attractive street edge”, with parking at the rear and to the side, wrought iron and masonry fencing consistent with the harbor and downtown areas and outdoor lighting along building facades, the report details.

A drawing of a proposed development for a vacant property at 889 10th St. E. On Monday, March 14, 2022, the Owen Sound City Council approved a site plan for the property which includes three commercial units, including a restaurant with drive-thru.
A drawing of a proposed development for a vacant property at 889 10th St. E. On Monday, March 14, 2022, the Owen Sound City Council approved a site plan for the property which includes three commercial units, including a restaurant with drive-thru. Photo provided

Landscaping is proposed and includes a mix of deciduous trees, coniferous and deciduous shrubs and perennials. It is also proposed to retain three existing trees along the west lot line.

Due to adjacent residential properties, an acoustic fence must be constructed along the west lot line, while the drive-thru is to be closed between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. Retaining walls should be constructed along the south and west rear area of ​​the property.

Advertisement 4

Content of the article

On Thursday, some councilors raised concerns about the proposed development, including the high-traffic location, the frequency of collisions at the intersection and vehicle idling in the drive-thru.

Com. Scott Greig said he had significant concerns about the type of development.

“I thought it would be a great place for something like four or five story multi-residential housing, as we all know, which this community desperately needs,” said Greig, who also raised concerns about shortages. of labor and “another drive-thru only reduces the viability of existing alternative businesses.

Com. Carol Merton raised concerns about ‘information gaps’ regarding collisions at the intersection and an emissions assessment ‘particularly with a drive-thru’.

Community Services Director Pam Coulter said at Monday’s council meeting that a transportation impact study had been submitted, reviewed by city technical staff, and the findings were deemed acceptable. A noise study was also carried out. In 2010, the city’s comprehensive zoning ordinance was updated to prohibit new drive-thrus in the then downtown area, but drive-thru is permitted in other commercial areas both in the city’s official plan and zoning regulations, Coulter explained.

Many other councilors have spoken out in favor of the development, including Coun. Richard Thomas, who said it’s good to see a development coming up for a brownfield property in a high visibility location.

“Lately around this table, the idea has crept more and more into discussions that we should be telling developers what to develop in Owen Sound,” Thomas said. “I don’t see that as the board’s role.”

Deputy Mayor Brian O’Leary expressed support for the proposal, which meets all development standards and is consistent with the official plan and zoning by-law.

O’Leary said that in the past developers had been unwilling to work in the city because of the “board getting in the way”.

Advertisement 1

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively yet civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to be moderated before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread you follow, or if a user follows you comments. Visit our Community Rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.

Maryland Introduces Washington Commanders to Sprawling FedEx Field Development

By Site development

Newly obtained documents show that Prince George’s and the state have developed an expanded vision for a five-mile economic development corridor to surround a new stadium, similar to Virginia’s “mini-city” approach. state and county told the team in confidential documents that Prince George’s would help further team president Jason Wright’s goals for a stadium project that is also progressing social justice initiatives.

Maryland is clearly willing to spend big on stadiums. Lawmakers are proposing a plan to invest $1.2 billion to upgrade the state’s other two major professional sports stadiums in Baltimore. But, so far, heads of state have not introduced legislation to implement the commanders’ speech.

And if Prince George’s loses the commanders and the multi-billion dollar project to build a new team stadium, the county would face an economic crater.

“I ask you to remember Prince George’s County,” Alsobrooks said in his first public appeal for money for the stadium proposal. “Residents of Prince George’s County deserve the same commitment and resources.

A spokesperson for the commanders said Wednesday that the FedEx Field site, where team owner Daniel Snyder already owns more than 200 acres, is the only site the team is considering in Maryland.

The 89-page pitch, delivered to the team in May and obtained by The Washington Post this week, offers the most detailed look yet at how a government vying for the team offered much more than incentives. economic or state-funded stadium.

He describes a “stadium district” that would not only anchor acres of sports-related development – ​​including a hotel, convention center, shops, homes and an on-site sports betting site – but also funnel billions into a predominantly black jurisdiction that local leaders say have been repeatedly left behind.

“We believe the prospect of a new stadium represents an opportunity for even greater long-term impacts, serving as a driver for equitable and inclusive economic development and social justice,” the pitch reads.

Yet in the months that followed, Maryland leaders failed to submit a financial proposal for public debate, even as Virginia lawmakers advanced a lucrative bid for a stadium in northern Virginia. The team searched for a new stadium site for years, pitting the two states and the district against each other. Commanders are contractually obligated to play in Landover, Maryland until 2027.

Maryland’s proposal included a 65,000-seat indoor stadium as the development’s crown jewel, built just east of FedEx Field and atop the current parking lots, placing the stadium a 15-20 minute walk from a station. metro. The stadium-district concept is similar to those implemented with Truist Park outside of Atlanta, SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, California outside of Los Angeles, and Nationals Park in southeast Los Angeles. Washington, which ushered in acres of redevelopment near the DC waterfront.

In Landover, the redevelopment vision would use the stadium to anchor the five-mile investment corridor. It would run along Central Avenue and four Blue Line stops from the DC boundary at Capitol Heights to downtown Largo, east of FedEx Field. The county has already begun investing resources in the “Blue Line Corridor”, with the goal of turning it into an urban extension of DC

Over 10 years, according to the pitch, the FedEx Field site would house nearly 4 million square feet of development, with rooms set aside to ensure minority-owned businesses benefit from the windfall. There would be four training grounds alongside the team headquarters, as well as public parks and 2,100 homes – many of which are designated as affordable housing, to help black families build “generational wealth”, says the ground.

The campus would be integrated into the community, hosting a K-8 charter school, a field for 16 basketball and volleyball courts, and a “team culture and history museum.”

Parts of the campus would be connected by a pedestrian and bicycle path, part of which would be an elevated bridge. He would be nicknamed the “Bobby Mitchell Greenway”, in honor of the team’s first black player.

“It can demonstrate how corporate partnerships can innovate equity, education, recreation and social justice initiatives,” the proposal states.

Money for Baltimore stadiums, but not for commanders

Although the proposal bore the signatures of Alsobrooks and Gov. Larry Hogan (R), Alsobrooks’ call to Annapolis on Tuesday signaled that the plan has yet to gain widespread local approval like Virginia’s. Hogan publicly rejected on Tuesday the idea that the state would build a stadium for a team, even though he supports investing in those of the Orioles and Ravens.

In May’s proposal to commanders, Maryland highlighted the Maryland Stadium Authority’s decades of experience with professional sports venues, likely to contrast with Virginia, which is expected to create a football stadium authority in the next special session. of the Commonwealth.

Hogan’s spokesman, Michael Ricci, downplayed the governor’s May field signing, calling it a “marketing piece” that “consists largely of pro forma information and boilerplate language regarding the capabilities of state agencies to help the team develop facilities.”

Ricci added, however, that Maryland “will continue to provide support and expertise to the county in its discussions with the team.”

A bill being considered Tuesday in Annapolis would allow the Maryland Stadium Authority to inject $600 million into upgrading the Orioles’ Camden Yards and an additional $600 million into the Ravens’ M&T Bank stadium. But efforts to amend the bill to include commanders have not moved forward, prompting public advocacy from Alsobrooks.

Prince George’s proposal suggests the team could, as in the Virginia plan, get a reduction in taxes generated by the new development – a feature that has not been publicly discussed. The county also had no plans to eventually expand tax incentives to reduce costs and attract further development around the stadium, including the team’s headquarters and practice facilities.

In an analysis, the proposal touted the viability of the FedEx Field site while pointing out the flaws of alternative sites the team had once considered, such as Landover Mall (“relatively small site with high acquisition costs”), Oxon Cove (“large site, but not near Metrorail” and “environmental constraints limit development potential”) and Greenbelt (“limited space on site” and “would compete with proposed FBI headquarters”).

The Commanders spokesperson said that after working with the county executive’s office, the team decided to focus on the FedEx location in Maryland.

Regional competition heats up

DC Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) outlined plans on Wednesday to build a $60 million indoor athletics stadium on the RFK Stadium campus as part of an effort to demonstrate his commitment to building a sports entertainment district and attracting the team. the. “I think world-class cities have their football team within their city limits,” Bowser told reporters.

In Virginia, Wright, the team’s president, met with Loudoun County officials on Tuesday to discuss the team’s concept for a new stadium and retail complex, likely near a quarry northeast of Virginia. Dulles International Airport, Loudoun officials said.

County Board Chairwoman Phyllis J. Randall (D-At Large) called the introductory meeting saying, “They went through a very high-level idea of ​​what they want to come up with, if they were going to come up with Something.”

If commanders were to relocate to Loudoun at two other possible sites in neighboring Prince William County, Randall said, she would like the team to be more transparent about its issues of sexual assault allegations, which make the under investigation by Congress.

“I don’t particularly care who you are, what entity or individual you are – I will always stand on the side of listening and supporting women,” she said.

Prince William’s officials said they have yet to meet with commanders.

As jurisdictions seek the financial windfall a project would bring, Maryland leaders are also seeking to avoid the economic devastation that would be left behind if FedEx Field were abandoned.

“I have thousands of voters who live within a mile whose property values ​​will drop if they have an empty stadium in their backyard,” Del said. Jazz Lewis (D-Prince George’s), chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, whose district includes FedEx Field.

“We’re just looking for parity,” Lewis said, referring to the state’s willingness to invest $1.2 billion to retain Baltimore’s stadiums.

Whether or not the county keeps the team, Alsobrooks said getting resources to the Blue Line Corridor is a primary goal of his administration.

“This is our next opportunity,” she said. It is also, she said, the “best opportunity for commanders to achieve their vision of long-term economic sustainability.”

Antonio Olivo and Julie Zauzmer Weil contributed to this report.

The Outer Banks Voice – Wawa submits site plan to City of KDH

By Site plan

Wawa Submits Site Plan to KDH City

By Michelle Wagner | Outer Banks Voice on March 14, 2022

Wawa, Inc. has submitted a commercial site plan to the City of Kill Devil Hills requesting permission to build one of its popular gas stations and convenience stores at 1900 N. Croatan Highway, located on the west side of the highway just south of BB&T and across from the old Kmart.

Kill Devil Hills Deputy Director of Planning Cameron Ray told The Voice in an email that the application was submitted by Arista Development on Wawa’s behalf and included a 6,000 square foot Wawa convenience store, awning with gas pumps and 53 parking spaces. Wawa is popular for its made-to-order meals, freshly brewed coffee, hot breakfast sandwiches, and other Wawa-branded items.

Wawa, Inc.’s external public relations supervisor, Jennifer Wolf, confirmed that the company has its eye on Kill Devil Hills as well as other locations in North Carolina, with the opening of the first stores of by the end of 2024. Wawa has more than 850 convenience stores, 600 of them offering gasoline, in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Florida and Washington, D.C., but n currently has no location in North Carolina.

“We are thrilled to confirm that we are expanding in North Carolina,” Wolf said in an email to The Voice. “While we cannot confirm specific locations or construction timelines at this stage in the process, we can say that we are actively seeking potential sites for new Wawa stores in North Carolina, including Kill Devil Hills,” said she declared.

In January, Wawa came to Kill Devil Hills to request a waiver for primary access to US 158 at the same site. This request was denied by the Kill Devil Hills Board of Adjustment because city code requires that corner lots along US 158 have driveway access on the side street rather than on the freeway with the aim of minimizing driveways along the freeway.

Wawa’s current site plan was submitted on February 28 and is currently being reviewed by staff. Deputy Director of Planning Ray said he will likely go to the Kill Devil Hills Planning Board in April for review and then to the Board of Commissioners in May.

Wawa, the website says, is a Native American word for the Canada goose that was found in the Delaware Valley over 100 years ago. The original Wawa Dairy Farm was also built in 1902 on land located in the rural area of ​​Pennsylvania called Wawa.

For his part, Wolf concluded, “We look forward to serving the community with our fresh, quality food and beverages and, as always, our deep commitment to the communities in which we operate.



PUBLIC NOTICE

STATE OF WISCONSIN – CIRCUIT COURT – ADAMS COUNTY
CREATIVE FUNDING, INC.
815 Commercial Park Road
Box 454
Wisconsin Dells, WI 53965,
Case No. 21CV148
Applicant,
v.
RANDALL SCOTT SCOTT
106 Charlotte Street
Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina 27948
Respondent.

ASSIGNMENT

THE STATE OF WISCONSIN
To each person named above as a defendant:
You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above Creative Finance, Inc., by its attorney, Christopher M. Kern, has commenced a lawsuit or other legal action against you.
Within forty (40) days of February 21, 2022, you must respond with a written request for a copy of the Complaint. The request should be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is: Clerk of Circuit Court, Adams County Courthouse, 402 Main Street, PO Box 220, Friendship, Wisconsin 53934, and to the plaintiff’s attorney, Christopher M. Kern , 815 Business Park Road, PO Box 454, Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin, 53965. An attorney can help or represent you.
If you do not provide an appropriate response within forty (40) days, the Court may enter judgment against you for an award of money or other legal action sought in the Complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judgment may be executed under the conditions provided by law. A judgment awarding a sum of money can become a lien on any real estate you currently own or in the future, and can also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property.
As of February 21, 2022.
Plaintiff’s General Counsel
Signed by: Christopher M. Kern
Christopher M. Kern
Status bar number: 1093883
CreativeFinance, Inc.
815 Commercial Park Road
Box 454
Wisconsin Dells, WI 53965
Phone: (608) 254-6855
Fax: (608) 253-5005
[email protected]



PUBLIC NOTICE

NC- INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY – ALBAMARLE
SOUND TO NEUSE RIVER ALLIGATOR RIVERSECOND CREEK-ALLIGATOR RIVER

All interested parties are advised that the Coast Guard Fifth District Commander has received a proposal from the North Carolina Department of Transportation, with plans for modifying a
existing drawbridge over a United States waterway.

WATERWAY AND LOCATION: Alligator River, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Mile 84.2, in Columbia, North Carolina.

CHARACTER OF WORK: The proposed project is to replace the 2.83 mile long 2-lane swing-span drawbridge with a two-lane high-rise fixed bridge on a new alignment of approximately
2,000 feet north of the existing bridge. The objective of the project is to replace a bridge that is structurally deficient and undergoing significant deterioration, due to its age, and to avoid having to carry out
thorough maintenance of obsolete mining machinery.

The existing drawbridge has a horizontal clearance of 100 feet on each side of the swing span and a vertical clearance of 14 feet above mean high water in the closed position and unlimited vertical clearance in the open position. The replacement bridge will be a fixed bridge with a horizontal clearance of 140 feet and a vertical clearance of 65 feet above mean high water.

A copy of Preliminary Public Notice D05PPN-02-2022, which describes the proposal in detail, can be obtained by calling (757) 398-6222 or by visiting https://www.navcen.uscg.gov/ ?pageName=pnBridges . Comments on this proposal should be sent to the address indicated in the notice no later than April 01, 2022.

Those who do not speak English or who have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English can receive interpretation services upon request by calling 1-800-481-6494.
Aquellas personas no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o intender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan llamando al 1-800-481-6494.


Chronicle: Meeting on the development of the site of the former prison well attended | News, Sports, Jobs

By Site development

ESCANABA – On March 8, the Escanaba City Council hosted a special meeting for the public to get a first-hand look at proposals from four development teams seeking to use the former Delta County Jail and the former chamber commerce property as a blank canvas to paint their vision of Escanaba’s latest lakeside addition. In my humble opinion, all the proposals have very positive economic impacts on the future of the region. Everyone will have a favorite proposal that they would like to see move forward and become a reality. Delta County and the City of Escanaba could benefit from any of these projects and I would love to see more than one come to fruition. Who wouldn’t love more commercial expansion, more hospitality venues to support tourism and luxury living spaces. They are all in high demand. As impressed as I was with the developer presentations, I was very excited to see the great audience participation to better understand the projects. The live audience was so large that a satellite section had to be set up in the lobby for people to sit and watch the meeting on television. There was also a large audience of viewers online. Whatever proposal our elected municipal officials choose, I hope we all understand that it may not be perfect, but it will be very good. This could be a starting point for further development in housing, tourism, small business expansion and job creation that our citizens outlined in the 2016 Escanaba City Master Plan. We may have different opinions on how to start this journey, but I think we all know we have to move on. Our mayor made an important announcement at the meeting that many of us might have overlooked towards the end of the session. Mr. Ammel reviewed the many openings on the Escanaba Town Board at this time. Many of our municipalities and service groups need energetic new people to join their group. Adding new people will bring new ideas and perspectives that will help all of our teams be more successful.

The past two years have been very difficult to get involved with new groups as we have been asked to socially distance and attend meetings remotely. We see life returning to a kind of new normal as we started 2022. It’s time to get involved and make a difference, even if it’s very small, it will benefit the larger group.

There are many opportunities to help, if not now, when? Everyone is busy, but make your involvement this year a priority for you. We will all be better thanks to your involvement!

I had the opportunity to participate in a meeting with a service club last week as they recruit new members and highlight all they can do to make a positive difference in our community. I have known the organization for a long time, having played in Little League and Babe Ruth League Baseball for the Kiwanis club. I always appreciated their sponsorship as a young man and grew to appreciate all the efforts that organizations like Kiwanis made to make a difference. The Kiwanis Club will celebrate its 100th anniversary at Hereford & Hops on March 16 from 5-7 p.m. Come tell them how much you appreciate what the organization has done over the years.

— — —

Ed Legault is Executive Director of the Delta County Economic Development Alliance.



Today’s breaking news and more to your inbox






03/11/2022 | Site Plan Approved for Berlin Activity Depot Expansion

By Site plan

Site Plan Approved for Berlin Activity Depot Expansion

BERLIN — The Berlin Planning Commission has approved a site plan for an extension and addition to the Berlin Activity Repository. On Wednesday, the commission approved plans to upgrade Berlin’s business depot on Old Ocean City Boulevard. The project, which will be done in phases, will begin with an addition to the side of the building…

Learn more »

Work on the Highway 50 bridge will include lane closures

Work on the Highway 50 bridge will include lane closures

OCEAN CITY — The State Highway Administration of the Maryland Department of Transportation will perform routine inspections of the Route 50 bridge next week. Officials say inspections will begin Monday, March 14, weather permitting, with crews working from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily on the bridge. The work should be completed by 5:00 p.m. on Friday…

Learn more »

OAR to headline new beach festival

OAR to headline new beach festival

OCEAN CITY — After months of speculation and anticipation, more details have emerged about the proposed major three-day music festival in Inlet in September, which includes Maryland-based OAR as a lead player. Last August, Director of Tourism and Business Development, Tom Perlozzo, and C3 Presents Founder and Promoter, Tim Sweetwood, pitched the idea of ​​a…

Learn more »

Townhouse project moves forward in Berlin

Townhouse project moves forward in Berlin

BERLIN — Plans for a new townhouse development on Old Ocean City Boulevard are moving forward after discussions with the city’s planning commission. The Berlin Planning Commission voted 6-0 on Wednesday to provide a favorable recommendation for a text amendment that would allow fee simple townhouse developments in Berlin. “It’s just another way to grow…

Learn more »

Glamping site plan for farmland in Aldham rejected

By Site plan

PLANS to set up a glamping site on farmland in Aldham have been rejected after a council decided there would be no ‘overriding public benefits’.

A change of use application to place four wooden glamping pods on the Tey Road plot in Aldham was submitted in January.

The land is used for raising sheep, alpacas and rare breed poultry.

The plans have been proposed due to “challenges in the agricultural sector” which have resulted in a “significantly reduced” scale of operations.

The planning statement read: “The proposed development site is a serene countryside enclave located in the rural heart of the borough of Colchester.

“The proposed concept is to offer visitors a quaint luxury retreat away from the buzz of the urban environment, surrounded by farm animals and patchwork landscapes.

“With the low density of this proposal of just four small holiday units, the site will provide a private sanctuary for overnight stays in the neighborhood, with the benefits of central Aldham just a 10 minute walk away.

“The proposed development will provide luxury accommodation for people who enjoy outdoor recreation and the serenity of a countryside getaway with magnificent views.”

Read more:

But Colchester Council has now rejected the plans.

The denial notice said the plans “would not result in any overriding public benefit”.

He said the proposed land use change “would fail to retain the rural character of the area due to the loss of part of the characteristic agricultural estate”.

He also said there were also potential negative effects on tranquility due to increased activity due to increased traffic movement on and off the motorway and the introduction of a access road and a hard surfaced parking area and an inability to respond to the historic settlement pattern.

He added: ‘As far as can be judged from the plans submitted, the proposal does not provide a reasonable degree of intervisibility between access users and those already on the motorway, which which will constitute a danger for pedestrians and motorists contrary to road safety. ”

The final reason for refusal was for a tree on the site, as the plans were not supported by a tree constraint plan or tree impact assessment.

Magistrate approves site plan for large apartment development near Millennium Park

By Site plan

A site plan for a large apartment development next to Wildwood’s Millennium Park was approved by Special Magistrate Lindsay CT Holt with conditions at a Tuesday meeting of the Wildwood Planning and Zoning Board.

The site plan for the initial phase of the project calls for 278 apartments, 10 carriage houses and 42 townhouses on approximately 22 acres.

The plan is part of a $110 million mixed-use development proposed a year ago by Blount Development Group of Wildwood and Chance Wildwood, a Delaware company. The entire development comprises 320 one- to three-bedroom apartments with no age limit, 150 self-catering senior apartments and 100,000 square feet of medical and office space.

Holt said the issues need to be resolved before the site plan is approved by the city commission. They include easements for connections to access roads and easements for the construction of retention basins.

Apartments should include a mix of townhouses, duplexes, carriage houses and garden-style units. A resort-style pool, fitness center, clubhouse, outdoor barbecue grills, and walking paths are among the planned amenities.

The site plan shows apartment buildings arranged in a square around a central area with parking and landscaping. A dog park and dog wash can be found at the northwest corner of the site and several bike racks are marked.

The project’s location near the center of Wildwood means that tenants will have easy access to the Wildwood Community Center, Millennium Park and Brownwood’s shops and restaurants. Children can cycle or walk to school or walk to school.

Application, site plan submitted for solar project

By Site plan

A photo simulation provided by Orion Renewables illustrates what the solar farm project could look like to passers-by on the north side of Bowers Road in Goodland Township.

GODLAND TWP. – A California-based renewable energy company that plans to build a $100 million solar farm in Goodland Township has submitted a special application for a land use permit, along with a site plan to officials of the township for the proposed development.

Goodland Township Supervisor Ron Cischke said a representative from Orion Renewable Energy Group delivered the documents to City Hall on Feb. 18. “There are no public hearings scheduled on their application and site plan yet. There’s a lot to do before we get to that,” Cischke said.

Copies of Orion Renewables’ application and site plan, Cischke said, will be forwarded to the Goodland Township Planning Commission, the township’s legal counsel and the Building Code Authority and to other related agencies for review and comment prior to scheduling public hearings.

“We have talked about it, and it is possible that there will be two public hearings. One for the special land use permit application and one for the site plan, but that will be up to the Planning Commission to determine,” Cischke said. “That probably won’t happen until their April meeting at the earliest.”

The proposed site plan illustrates in blue where solar panels would be installed on 13 parcels in southeastern Goodland Township.

The proposed site plan illustrates in blue where solar panels would be installed on 13 parcels in southeastern Goodland Township.

Amanda Hoffman, project development manager for Orion Renewables, was not told of any scheduled meetings regarding the company’s filings with Goodland Township.

Orion Renewables plans to build a 100 megawatt solar farm which will be bounded by Bowers Road to the south, Shaw Road to the north, and Cade and Sisson roads to the east and west in the southeast corner of the township. Hoffman said Orion’s proposed project will be located on property owned by 13 local landowners that covers 1,713 acres – although only 689 acres are expected to have solar installations.

The proposed project has been pitted neighbor against neighbor by opponents and individuals who would have signed leases with Orion Renewables to use their land for up to 25 years, in return for payments from the company.

A photo simulation of what the solar farm project on Shaw Road might look like.

A photo simulation of what the solar farm project on Shaw Road might look like.

Orion Renewables said that in the first year of operation, if Goodland Township officials allow it, the township could realize more than $750,000 in property taxes from the development.

In a recent statement to the Departmental press, Hoffman said property owners who sign with the company will receive millions of dollars in lease payments and more than $8 million in property taxes for Goodland Township over a 25-year period.

Goodland Township’s zoning ordinance permits solar energy projects in the community, provided the applicant company receives a special land use permit to build the project on land currently used for residential and agricultural purposes .

Site plan review process by the Planning Commission, subject to public review and comment, details of where the proposed development would be built, including the location of inverters and substations on the leased plots.

The site plan, including photo simulations of what the proposed development might look like for passers-by on local roads, can be found at www.goodlandsolarproject.com.

City Council meets the second Tuesday of the month at 7:00 p.m. The next meeting will be March 8 at City Hall, 2374 N. Van Dyke Rd.

The Goodland Township Planning Commission will meet March 17 at 7 p.m.

Donut Development LLC receives approval for rezoning and site plan

By Site plan

RINCON — Rejoice, pumpkin spice lovers!

During Monday’s regular Rincon City Council meeting, Donut Development LLC owner Jay Andrews said a Dunkin’ store is set to open on 12th Street this fall.

Andrews appeared before council to seek approval of a site plan for commercial space with three units, including Dunkin’. Jersey Mike’s Subs and T-Mobile are ready for others.

The inclusion of T-Mobile necessitated a rezoning (office commercial to general commercial). After agreeing to a rezoning, which came before the site plan was given the go-ahead, council peppered Andrews with a few questions.

Councilor Reese Browher asked, “Mr. Andrews, what is the timeline for this project? »

Browher, joking lightly, said he gets more questions about Dunkin’ and Jersey Mike’s Subs than about any other topic.

“There’s a lot of anticipation for it to be open,” he said.

Andrews responded confidently.

“We’re looking at around seven months,” he said.

Councilman Patrick Kirkland asked Andrews about the traffic of customers who use Dunkin’s drive-thru.

“They’ll come into 12th Street, then they’ll turn left from 12th Street at the back of the development, and they’ll come into the drive-thru – what we call stacking – and people will come into line . . said Andrews.

Kirkland expressed additional concern after Andrews’ response.

“…there is an average stacking required and this site actually has (space for) two more cars than the average for Dunkin’ in terms of stacking,” Andrews continued. “We feel like we’ve accommodated that too much.”

Andrews added an interesting tidbit.

“Seventy-three percent of Dunkin’s patronage is done before 10:30 a.m.,” he said.

After council approved the site plan, Mayor Ken Lee joked with Andrews.

“It’s a great tactic to be called Donut Development,” he said. “We cannot refuse a donut development. I don’t know how that would work.

Earlier in the meeting, the board approved a site plan for a 5,098 square foot extension to Wal-Mart for online pickup.

Planning committee approves site plan for three-storey, 26-unit building on Manominee Street

By Site plan

At its February 16 meeting, the Huntsville Planning Committee approved the site plan for a proposed three-story apartment building, which would contain 26 apartments.

The building would be located on a 4,583.6 m² plot at 50 Manominee Street. The parcel of land has 64m of frontage on an unopened right-of-way and future collector road (Cliff Avenue) and 66m on Manominee Street, planner Kelsea Shadlock told the committee.

“The property rises from Manominee Street and is currently vacant and forested. The surrounding land uses are: commercial uses to the east and south, low density residential to the north, and high density residential on the adjoining property to west,” she added.

Planning staff recommended that the site plan be approved, pending conditions such as a D4 landfill assessment and any recommended mitigation measures implemented.

A traffic impact summary was provided to assess road capacity following the proposed development and concluded that the existing road infrastructure is able to accommodate the development.

According to the Shadlock staff report, “the report author explained that it was possible to provide a pedestrian connection from Manominee Street to Cliff Avenue (and to formalize what appears to be an informal pedestrian connection via the swale In their review, they determined that further assessment would be required to formalize this connection given the elevation differential between Manominee Street and Cliff Avenue and to ensure that a connection would meet the requirements of She added that “the investigation of this connection should be further investigated by the requester in consultation with city operations and protective services personnel.”

Councilor Jonathan Wiebe asked who would be responsible for paying for the connection.

Matthew May, who was before the committee representing the application, said he thought it would be the municipality’s obligation rather than the developer’s.

“Often when we have developments, requests that come to us, we actually ask the requestor to provide, where they can, links – whether it’s trails, stairs or whatever, sidewalks or whatever, to make it part of the development. And that’s something we traditionally do,” said committee chair Councilor Nancy Alcock.

May replied that the matter could be discussed, “but I guess for me it’s not on private property. You know, it’s not on our property…”

Wiebe and Alcock continued discussions regarding the addition of a pedestrian link and liability or partial liability of the developer.

Huntsville Mayor Karin Terzino told the committee that while pedestrian connectivity is important, she reminded the committee that the area being discussed was not identified in the city’s sidewalk master plan. “To impose liability on a claimant who wants to build there, as a condition of the construction, I think is a bit unfair,” she said.

Following a question from Councilor Dan Armour, May indicated that the apartments would be rented at market price. He said it would be mostly one-bedroom units, with around four two-bedroom apartments.

You can find the staff report here.

Don’t miss the Doppler!

Register here to receive our digest by email with links to our most recent stories.
Local news delivered to your inbox three times a week!

Click here to support local news

South Haven housing estate stalls with tied vote on site plan | Local News

By Site plan

For the second time in two weeks, a proposal to allow an affordable housing development in South Haven ended in a tie vote, jeopardizing the project’s ability to move past the drawing board stage.

Chicago-based Habitat Co. has spent the past year finalizing plans to build a 144-unit apartment and townhouse development on 5.74 acres of property once occupied by the former factory. ‘Overton.

The South Haven Planning Commission blocked a 4-4 vote on February 16 to recommend Planned Unit Development (PUD) approval for the project. The tie vote put the matter before the city council to decide.

However, last Monday city council members were split 3-3 (with one member absent) on setting up a public hearing on March 7 for the project, meaning the proposal will not go ahead at this stage.

Council members who voted against the proposal expressed concern about the number of proposed housing units, the proximity of the proposed buildings to sidewalks and the company’s request to forego paying for an impact study environment for the site.






The rendering shows what the first phase of the SoHAVEN apartment complex could look like. Phase one apartments would face Elkenburg Street and Indiana Avenue in South Haven.



“We have planners split on approving this, City Council split, it’s too important for us to come to a conclusion at this point,” Mayor Scott Smith said.

Smith, however, said the city isn’t ready to drop Habitat’s proposal.

“The staff will come back to them and let them know of our concerns,” he said. “We still have some concerns, but not enough information. We hope this will be done at a later date. »

Several other board members have also expressed interest in continuing to work with Habitat Co.

“I hope we can find a way to move forward with Overton’s development,” said Board Member Wendi Onuki. “The community needs affordable housing. I look forward to finding solutions.

Council member George Sleeper expressed similar thoughts.

“Hopefully we can get through this,” he said. “There are a lot of good things with this development.”

A study and a waiver

Sleeper, who voted against the proposal, said his biggest concern was the developer’s waiver request for performing an EIS.

Environmental Impact Studies analyze the impact a proposed development would have on a municipality’s utility systems, fire, police, school services, solid waste disposal, soil, air , groundwater, floodplains, wetlands, noise levels and additional traffic.

Habitat officials said the city, which owns the Overton property, already has much of this information, and conducting a study on its own would cost up to $20,000 and take about two months.

They had hoped city council approval of the project would allow them to apply for tax credits from the Michigan Housing Development Authority by April 1 to help fund the first phase of the project.

In reviewing Habitat’s request for the EIA exemption, city staff agreed that the information was already available.

“The city council acquired this property through a tax foreclosure in 2015, obtained environmental due diligence reports, prepared and implemented an environmental protection plan, demolished an abandoned factory on the site and examined the impacts of a large development on the site. since the 2018 master planning process and developer’s RFP,” Deputy City Manager Griffin Graham wrote in a memo to the planning commission earlier this month.

However, Sleeper and several other dissenting board members believe Habitat should still undertake the study itself since the company is offering to develop the site.

“I don’t see any benefit to forgoing EIS,” Sleeper said. “It’s important to make sure the proposal fits in (for the surrounding neighborhood).”

South Haven subdivision stalled with tie vote on site plan | Southern Haven

By Site plan

SOUTH HAVEN — For the second time in two weeks, a proposal to allow an affordable housing development in South Haven ended in a tie vote, jeopardizing the project’s ability to move past the drawing board stage.

Chicago-based Habitat Co. has spent the past year finalizing plans to build a 144-unit apartment and townhouse development on 5.74 acres of property once occupied by the former factory. ‘Overton.

This page requires JavaScript.

Javascript is required for you to play premium content. Please enable it in your browser settings.

[email protected] w2G6? !=2??:?8 [email protected]>>:DD:@? DE2==65:? 2 cc [email protected] @ ? u63]`e [email protected] [email protected]>>6?5 [email protected]= @7 E96 !=2??65 &?:E [email protected]>6?EW!&sX [email protected] E96 [email protected];64E]% 96 E:6 [email protected] AFE E96 >2EE6C 😕 [email protected]?E @7 E96 4:EJ [email protected]?4:= [email protected] 564:56]k^Am

[email protected][ @? |@?52J[ 4:EJ [email protected]?4:= >6>36CD DA=:E bb WH:E9 @?6 >6>36C 23D6?EX @? [email protected]:?8 E96 [email protected];64E[ H9:49 >62?D E96 [email protected]@D2= H:== [email protected] [email protected] 2E E9:D [email protected]:?E]k^am

[email protected]?4:= >6>36CD [email protected] [email protected] 282:?DE E96 [email protected]@D2= 6IAC6DD65 [email protected]?46C? @G6C E96 ?F>36C @7 [email protected]:?8 F?:ED 36:?8 [email protected]@D65[ E96 [email protected]?6DD @7 E96 [email protected]@D65 3F:=5:?8D [email protected] D:56H2=A2?J’D C6BF6DE [email protected] H2:G6 A2J:?8 [email protected] 2? 6?G:[email protected]?>6?E2= :>A24E DEF5J [email protected] E96 D:E6]k^am

kAm“(6 92G6 E96 A=2??6CD DA=:E @? [email protected]:?8 E9:D[ E96 4:EJ [email protected]?4:= DA=:E[ :E’D [email protected]@ :>[email protected]?E [email protected] FD [email protected] [email protected]>6 [email protected] 2 [email protected]?4=FD:@? 2E E9:D [email protected]:?E[” |[email protected] [email protected] $>:E9 D2:5]k^am

kAm$>:E9[ [email protected][ D2:5 E96 4:EJ 😀 [email protected] C625J [email protected] D4C2A w23:E2E’D [email protected]@D2=]k^am

kAm“$E277 H:== [email protected] 324 2?5 6IAC6DD @FC [email protected]?46C?D[” 96 D2:5] “(6 DE :== 92G6 [email protected]>6 [email protected]?46C?D[ 3FE [email protected] [email protected] :[email protected]>2E:@?] (6 [email protected] [email protected] 86E E9:D [email protected]?6 2E 2 =2E6C 52E6]”k^Am

kAm$6G6C2= @E96C [email protected]?4:= >6>36CD [email protected] 6IAC6DD65:?E6C6DE:? [email protected]?E:?F:?8 [email protected] [email protected]

kAm“x [email protected] H6 42? 7:8FC6 @FE 2 H2J [email protected] >@G6 [email protected] H:E9 E96 [email protected] ? [email protected]>6?E[” [email protected]?4:= >6>36C (6?5: ~?F<: D2:5] “%96 [email protected]>>F?:EJ ?665D [email protected]=6 [email protected]:?8]x [email protected]@

[email protected]?4 := >6>36C [email protected] $=66A6C 6IAC6DD65 D :> :=2C [email protected]]k^Am

kAm“x [email protected] [email protected] H6 42? 86E [email protected] E9:D[” 96 D2:5] “%96C6’D 2 [email protected] @7 [email protected]@5 E9:?8D H:E9 E9:D [email protected]>6?E]”k^Am

k9cmp DEF5J 2?5 2 H2:G6Ck^9cm

kAm$=66A6C[ [email protected] [email protected] 282:?DE E96 [email protected]@D2=[ D2:5 9:D 3:886DE [email protected]?46C? H2D E96 [email protected]’D C6BF6DE [email protected] 2 H2:G6C 😕 [email protected]?5F4E:?8 2? tx$]k^am

kAmt?G:[email protected]?>6?E2= :>A24E DEF5:6D 2?2=JK6 E96 :>A24E 2 [email protected]@D65 [email protected]>[email protected]=5 92G6 @? 2 >F?:4:A2=:EJ’D FE:=:EJ DJDE6>D[ 7:C6[ [email protected]=:46[ [email protected]@= D6CG:46D[ [email protected]=:5 H2DE6 5:[email protected]=[ [email protected]:=[ 2:C[ [email protected]?5H2E6C[ [email protected]@5A=2:?D[ H6E=2?5[ [email protected]:D6 =6G6=D 2?5 255:E:@?2= EC277:4]k^am

kAmw23:E2E @77:4:2=D 92G6 D2:5 E96 4:EJ[ H9:49 @H?D E96 [email protected]? [email protected][ 2=C625J 92D >F49 @7 E92E :[email protected]>2E:@?[ 2?5 E92E [email protected]?5F4E:?8 2 DEF5J @? E96:C @H? [email protected]=5 [email protected] FA [email protected] Sa_[___ [email protected] [email protected]>A=6E6 2?5 E2<6 [email protected] [email protected] >@?E9D]k^am

kAm%96J 925 [email protected] [email protected]= @7 E96 [email protected];64E 3J E96 4:EJ [email protected]?4:= [email protected]=5 [email protected] E96> [email protected] 2AA=J [email protected] E2I 4C65:ED [email protected]> E96 |:49:82? [email protected]:?8 [email protected]>6?E [email protected]:EJ 3J pAC:= ` [email protected] 96=A 7:?2?46 E96 7:CDE A92D6 @7 E96 [email protected];64E]k^ A m

kAmx? 2?2=JK:?8 w23:E2E’D C6BF6DE [email protected] E96 tx$ H2:G6C[ 4:EJ DE277 28C665 E96 :[email protected]>2E:@? 😀 2=C625J 2G2:=23=6]k^am

kAm“%96 4:EJ [email protected]?4:= 24BF:C65 E9:D [email protected] [email protected] E2I [email protected][email protected]:? a_`d[ @3E2:?65 6?G:[email protected]?>6?E2= 5F6 5:=:86?46 [email protected][ AC6A2C65 2?5 :>A=6>6?E65 2? 6?G:[email protected]?>6?E2= 5F6 42C6 A=2?[ 56>@=:D965 2? [email protected]?65 [email protected] @? E96 D:E6[ 2?5 92D 366? G6EE:?8 E96 :>A24ED @7 2 =2C86 [email protected]:?8 [email protected]>6?E @? E96 D:E6 D:?46 E96 a_`g >2DE6C A=2??:?8 [email protected] 2?5 E96 [email protected] #6BF6DE [email protected] “F2=:7:42E:@?D[” pDD:DE2?E r:EJ |2?286C vC:77:? vC292> [email protected] 😕 2 >6>@ [email protected] E96 A=2??:?8 [email protected]>>:DD:@? 62C=:6C E9:D >@?E9]k^am

[email protected][ $=66A6C 2?5 D6G6C2= @E96C [email protected]?4:= >6>36CD [email protected] 5:DD6?E65[ E9:?< w23:E2E [email protected]=5 DE:== F?56CE2<6 E96 DEF5J E96>D6=G6D D:?46 E96 [email protected]>A2?J 😀 [email protected]@D:?8 [email protected] [email protected] E96 D:E6]k^am

kAm“x [email protected]?’E D66 2?J 36?67:E 😕 H2:G:?8 E96 tx$[” $=66A6C D2:5] “%9:D:DD:8?:7:42?E:? 6?DFC:?8 E96 [email protected]@D2= 7:ED:? [email protected] E96 [email protected]?5:?8 ?6:[email protected]@@5X]”k^Am