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June 2022

Developer of pizza slice sitemap has new hurdles in Matthews | Mmhweekly

By Site plan

MATTHEWS — A homebuilder whose townhouse proposal was chosen by Matthews commissioners last month has come back with revisions that boost its chances of approval.

But the commissioners still challenged the project on safety and price.

Tri Pointe Homes hopes to rezone 13.8 acres at 1748 Marglyn Drive to develop 73 townhouses on the pizza slice-shaped lot.

The homebuilder not only removed six units from the site plan, but also added a central park as a focal point of the community as well as a larger buffer zone between the community and a church.

Tri Pointe Homes also showed elevations with tall farmhouse-style buildings and eight-foot-deep porches, which Commissioner John Urban says matches the character of the town.

“I want to commend Tri Pointe Homes for making an incredible improvement on what was originally proposed,” said Mayor John Higdon. “It’s 1,000 times better than what was originally proposed.”

Mayor Pro Tem Ken McCool asked if the developer could remove three more units from a corner of the site near the road. He was concerned about sightlines for drivers.

A representative from Tri Pointe Homes said she wasn’t sure it was financially viable for the project. McCool countered that this was a serious concern for an already dangerous road.

Commissioner Renee Garner reminded her colleagues that they had 2,000 units, including 457 townhouses, in the rezoning queue. Garner added that only the projects they discussed on June 13 could add up to 70 students to Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools.

“We can complain about the school board and how dysfunctional it is, but our role as commissioners is to keep in mind the balance between growth and the pressure we put on our schools,” Garner said.

Ganer also worried about townhome prices in the $400,000 range.

“It hurts me every time I hear a developer say they keep their projects affordable at $400,000,” she said. “I say it over and over and over again. If we lost our home, our family could no longer afford to live in Matthews. As we approve of these projects, there is something in my heart that truly aches that what we approve of could rob my third-generation family of the city we call home.

The planning board will consider the project on June 28. Commissioners could vote as early as July 11.

Planning Commission Approves TKI Plant Site Plan | Local News

By Site plan

The development of the Neuweiler site in Allentown should respect the history and architecture of the brewery, according to planners at LV | Lehigh Valley Regional News

By Site development

ALLENTOWN, Pennsylvania — The plan to demolish much of the Neuweiler Brewery site in Allentown in favor of retail and apartment space should balance development with respect for the North Front Street landmark’s history , according to the Lehigh Valley Planning Commission.

“The structures to be demolished have considerable local cultural and historical value,” according to a study by Steve Neratko, the LVPC’s chief community and regional planner.

The commission will review Neratko’s recommendations in meetings at noon Tuesday and 7 p.m. Thursday.

The brewery on the west bank of the Lehigh River was completed in 1913 and closed in 1968. The site was used for other purposes in the 1990s but has been vacant since 1998, according to the LVPC. Row houses cover the land to the north and west of the old brewery, and there is a small park to the south.

“While redevelopment of the area is important, attempts should be made to protect those elements of the site that can be preserved and extract any salvageable architectural resources as assets for potential reuse for this project or others” , according to Neratko’s letter, which is a draft until it is approved by the full committee. “Specifically, the copper cupola of the brewery building could be retained and used as an artistic element of the future site.”

The planning commission is reviewing proposed major developments for Lehigh and Northampton counties, but the City of Allentown will make the final decision on whether Manhattan Building Co.’s plan can proceed.

The developer proposes to construct a seven-story building with 37,967 square feet of retail space, 306 apartments and 358 parking spaces. Neuweiler Tower will remain, John Palumbo of the Manhattan Building said at an Allentown Planning Commission meeting in May. The commission requested additional details on the architecture and design of the development, and did not vote on the project at this meeting.

The brewery is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, but it is not a registered National Historic Landmark.

Neuweiler’s range included light lager, ale, premium beer, seasonal Bock beer, porter and other beers. It was a large employer in Allentown, but competition from national breweries led to closure in 1968. Some Neuweiler recipes were brewed by other beer brands after the closure.

LVPC’s professional staff reviews development proposals and makes recommendations which are discussed and voted on by appointed commissioners. The commissioner votes on the recommendations, not on the projects themselves. Once approved, the recommendations are sent to local governments for consideration.

The development of Neuweiler will be discussed by the LVPC’s overall planning committee at noon Tuesday and by the full committee at 7 p.m. Thursday. Both meetings are virtual. Links to the meetings are available on the LVPC website.

Germantown commission backs site plan to allow for building additions

By Site plan

The Germantown Plan Commission backed plans at its June 13 meeting for the expansion of a business along Division Road in the northern part of the village.
Criterion Barrels, Inc., located at W172 N13052 Division Road, has requested a 12,108 square foot addition to its existing building. The item was on the committee’s agenda for a review of the site’s development plan.
According to village staff information, Criterion Barrels is an original equipment manufacturer of gun barrels. The staff report indicates that there has been increased demand over the past two years for the company’s product. As a result, the number of employees increased from 31 to 44 employees while production doubled.
The staff report states: “The addition will optimize product flow throughout manufacturing, allow for future growth in the workshop and create additional space for equipment such as additional bathrooms, a kitchen / break room, additional office space, conference and meeting rooms, changing rooms and an inspection area.
The addition would be added to an existing building on the southwest side of the property and would increase the total size of the building to 35,515 square feet. Associate Village Planner Emily Zandt said the addition will not be visible from Division Road as there are mature trees on the southern boundary of the property while existing storage buildings block the view from the south .

Approval of the layout plan for the Rooms To Go hypermarket in Mt. Juliet

By Site plan
  • Superstore Rooms To Go offered at Mt. Julietsupt

A site plan for the construction of a new 45,800 square foot Rooms To Go “superstore” on Adams Lane in Mt. Juliet was approved by the city’s planning commission on Thursday.

The store would be built on 3.85 acres on land adjacent to the recently approved BJ’s Wholesale.

The property is within the current planned unit development of Providence Central.

Hopes are to begin construction in the first quarter of 2023 and to open the store in the first or second quarter of 2024 “if all goes according to plan,” said Peter Weitzner, vice president of Rooms To Go.

The Mt. Juliet location will include a Rooms To Go, Rooms To Go Kids and a newer concept, the Rooms To Go Patio, Weitzner said.

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About 30 employees are expected with the store, Weitzner said.

183 parking spaces are available.

Construction plane at a major intersection

A construction plan for a 9,300 square foot commercial building on just over 1.4 acres at the corner of North Mt. Juliet Road and East Division in Mt. Juliet has been submitted.

The project, submitted as “Citi Station,” would be for a bank, retail and restaurant with separate spaces for each, city officials said. The plan was carried over from the planning commission’s agenda on Thursday, but is expected to return.

Mt. Juliet Station is on the other side of the Eastern Division.

Previous interest in the vacant property included a gas station, which City Commissioner Scott Hefner said he would not support.

Contact Andy Humbles at [email protected] or 615-726-5939 and on Twitter @AndyHumbles.

Former $250m development at Le Cornu site revealed

By Site development

More than 300 apartments and townhouses as well as a rooftop “urban farm” will be built as part of a $250 million market square development planned for the former Le Cornu site in Forestville.

The state government today unveiled its long-awaited master plan for the sprawling 3.6-hectare plot on the corner of Anzac Highway and Leader Street in Adelaide’s inner south, which has been vacant since October 2016, when furniture store Le Cornu ended its operations in South Australia. .

The new $250 million plan for the site, located 3.5 km southwest of the CBD, includes 199 apartments, 106 townhouses as well as short-term tourism apartments, with the development built around a marketplace with a supermarket, outdoor cafes and specialist retailers.

Appointed Venuethe development will comprise 30% green and open space, of which just under half will be accessible to the public 24/7, while the other half will come from “rooftop activations”, including a rooftop urban farm.

A model of the open green space that will be available in the new Forestville development. Image: SA Renewal

Plans have also been drawn up for a “green urban school” to be set up on site, accommodating around 250 disadvantaged students in grades 11 and 12.

The proposal was developed by a development consortium including local developer Buildtec, residential developer WA Peet and the Chapley Family’s commercial retail group – operators of Pasadena and Frewville Foodland stores.

The development will include over 300 apartments and townhouses. Image: SA Renewal

Construction in Forestville, initially scheduled for “end of 2022/beginning of 2023”, has now been postponed to 2024.

The project is not expected to be completed before 2029.

Commercial Retail Group director Spero Chapley did not give details on the expected starting price for Venue apartments, but said the development would offer a range of starting prices.

“At this stage we are not ready to talk about pricing, but what we can say is that through the design and master plan there is an array of residential pricing and options,” said he told reporters.

“We want to talk to first-time buyers to those retiring. We really want to create options for the community.

Renewal SA’s selection criteria included a minimum requirement that 15% of apartments built on site be classified as affordable.

Four five-storey apartment buildings, subject to approval, are planned to occupy the center of the development, while a number of two- and three-storey townhouses will occupy the east end of the development.

An eight-storey “gateway” building will be located on the west corner of the site, along with two other apartment buildings.

Spero Chapley with Planning Minister Nick Champion outside the vacant Forestville site. Photo: Tony Lewis/InDaily

But Chapley said the piazza-style market square was “at the heart” of the development.

“We seek to create a real [orientated] and residential development here, promoting and talking about local products, growers and makers,” he said.

“It’s a showcase site.

Chapley is the president of the educational organization YouthInc which will operate the “Green Urban School” slated for construction in the development district.

The school will offer “the equivalent of a Grade 11 and 12 VET and SACE curriculum” to students aged 17 to 24, Chapley said.

The students will also operate a rooftop urban farm which forms part of the green space planned for the site.

Image: SA Renewal

“The green school will be all about learning and discussing sustainability, climate justice, agriculture and so on,” he said.

“We are really excited, it will be a first for Australia.

“It’s really about getting disengaged South Australians aged 17 to 24… an understanding of themselves, an understanding of jobs and an awareness of their future.”

Planning Minister Nick Champion said the overall project would create 900 jobs during construction and 500 permanent jobs when completed.

The market place will be “at the heart” of Forestville’s development. Image: SA Renewal

Renewal SA bought the vacant 3.6 hectare land in Forestville for $38.2 million in September 2020 after German retailer Kaufland scrapped plans for a supermarket in the area.

Renewal SA under the former Marshall government chose the Chapley Consortium as its preferred developer and was expected to announce the master plan in the second half of 2021. Negotiations have taken “longer than expected”, the agency said, talks are ending. extending beyond the March state elections. .

But Champion dismissed suggestions that Renewal SA’s Forestville decision should be reviewed in the same way as the government’s current inquiry into the Brompton gasworks development plan.

“I think you can’t really compare sites because you can see there’s a high degree of consensus here,” Champion said.

“I think it’s a compelling offer and it’s a non-controversial issue.

Planning Minister Nick Champion and Badcoe MP Jayne Stinson speak to the media. Photo: Tony Lewis/InDaily

“Bowden is somewhat different, Bowden is a former gas works, it has a higher degree of contamination…and obviously there was an issue of public consternation given that the Bowden site was announced very shortly before the beginning of the interim arrangements for the state election.”

Tony Cole, managing director of Renewal SA, major projects and pipeline, declined to reveal how many developers the agency had shortlisted for the Forestville site.

“There were a number of developers interested in the site, we shortlisted and chose based on our vision,” he said.

“We are very passionate about having selected the right team to deliver to this incredible site.”

“It’s a site that will connect the existing community to a new community, it’s retail, it’s jobs, it’s education, it’s residential – it offers everything for the community. “

The Forestville Le Cornu site on March 14, 2022. Photo: Thomas Kelsall/InDaily

A community consultation undertaken by local Labor MP Jayne Stinson last year found that 43% of residents wanted a new school to be built on the Forestville site, followed closely by open green space.

Stinson said a government campaign pledge to ensure his constituents could send their children to Adelaide High or Adelaide Botanic High had “addressed many community concerns about schooling”.

“As for green space…this project has about 15% ground level green space and about 15% elevated green space that needs to be secured after hours,” she said.

“I’m really interested to see what my community thinks about it. A lot of people in my community would like to see all the green space on the site, but I don’t think that’s very realistic.

Formal consultation on the plans will open in October.

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Commission approves site plan for major downtown complex | City News

By Site plan

The Scottsdale Development Review Board has approved the site plan for a mixed-use development that contains a 70-foot-tall building, 7,000 square feet of retail space and 40 condominiums near the intersection of N. 70th Street and N Goldwater Boulevard Thursday.

Council voted 6-1 to approve the site plan for the project known as Goldwater despite concerns raised by Mayor David Ortega about it.

Ortega does not sit on the board but attended part of the meeting to voice his concerns. In particular, he disliked that the facility lacked overhangs to provide shade for sidewalks.

“I say covered walkways are just the way we do it… It’s one of the fundamental things we’ve been working on for 40 years,” Ortega said.

Ortega also didn’t like the fact that the top floor of the building wasn’t set back, calling the project “top heavy”.

Karin Santiago, architect for the developer, said the shape and landscaping of the building will provide enough shade for the sidewalk.

“We will work very hard to find more shade,” Santiago said after the June 7 meeting. “We want it to become a real asset and something that’s an enjoyable thing for people who are going to use it every day. That’s the most important thing that it’s an asset.

She also addressed the concern over the top floor setback stating that the project was one floor less than originally planned.

“The first thing we did to try and mitigate the scale was rather than just looking at the limited range of the recoil, let’s go a step further and reduce the scale of the building overall, so rather than six stories we have five floors,” Santiago said.

Commissioner Michal Ann Joyner praised Santiago for removing a story, saying, “I love it and I’m sure the homeowners around there will love it too.”

Commissioner Jeff Brand called the project “a significant benefit to downtown.”

He applauded the way the building is designed to create shade on the sidewalk.

“I think this building does a great job just the way it’s put together,” Brand said.

When Brand asked her what she envisioned in the commercial space, Santiago said she would like to see a restaurant in part of the space. “The patio and grand suite scream brunch to me,” Santiago said. “I hope one day I can have brunch here with my kids.”

Commissioner Barney Gonzales voted alone against the project.

He said he disliked that the building had no overhangs for sidewalks and felt that some of the renderings of the proposed building were inadequate. He didn’t particularly like the fact that the renders didn’t show a required stairwell.

“I have trouble passing stipulations without them being presented in a rendering,” he said, also asking if the building would allow short-term condo rentals. He dropped that line of questioning when a representative from the city attorney’s office said state law does not allow the city to approve the project based on whether or not short-term rentals are allowed.

Santiago said on Tuesday that it does not anticipate any short-term rentals in the space.

The facility will feature a High Intensity Activated (HAWK) crosswalk on N. Goldwater Boulevard.

The 1.2-acre site was rezoned by council to host the project in 2019, so Thursday’s vote was the final step in the development process.

The developer hopes to start construction in the fall, but doesn’t have a specific date for that, Santiago said.

Commission approves site plan for major downtown complex |

By Site plan

The Scottsdale Development Review Board has approved the site plan for a mixed-use development that contains a 70-foot-tall building, 7,000 square feet of retail space and 40 condominiums near the intersection of N. 70th Street and N Goldwater Boulevard Thursday.

Council voted 6-1 to approve the site plan for the project known as Goldwater despite concerns raised by Mayor David Ortega about it.

Ortega does not sit on the board but attended part of the meeting to voice his concerns. In particular, he disliked that the facility did not have overhangs to provide shade for sidewalks.

“I say covered walkways are just the way we do it… It’s one of the fundamental things we’ve been working on for 40 years,” Ortega said.

Ortega also didn’t like the fact that the top floor of the building wasn’t set back, calling the project “top heavy”.

Karin Santiago, architect for the developer, said the shape and landscaping of the building will provide enough shade for the sidewalk.

“We will work very hard to find more shade,” Santiago said after the June 7 meeting. “We want it to become a real asset and something that’s an enjoyable thing for people who are going to use it every day. That’s the most important thing that it’s an asset.

She also addressed the concern over the top floor setback stating that the project was one floor less than originally planned.

“The first thing we did to try and mitigate the scale was rather than just looking at the limited range of the recoil, let’s go a step further and reduce the scale of the building overall, so rather than six stories we have five floors,” Santiago said.

Commissioner Michal Ann Joyner praised Santiago for removing a story, saying, “I love it and I’m sure the homeowners around there will love it too.”

Commissioner Jeff Brand called the project “a significant benefit to downtown.”

He applauded the way the building is designed to create shade on the sidewalk.

“I think this building does a great job just the way it’s put together,” Brand said.

When Brand asked her what she envisioned in the commercial space, Santiago said she would like to see a restaurant in part of the space. “The patio and grand suite scream brunch to me,” Santiago said. “I hope one day I can have brunch here with my kids.”

Commissioner Barney Gonzales voted alone against the project.

He said he disliked that the building had no overhangs for sidewalks and felt that some of the renderings of the proposed building were inadequate. He especially didn’t like the fact that the renders didn’t show a required stairwell.

“I’m having a hard time passing stipulations on without them being presented in a rendering,” he said, also asking if the building would allow short-term rentals in condominiums. He dropped that line of questioning when a representative from the city attorney’s office said state law does not allow the city to approve the project based on whether or not short-term rentals are allowed.

Santiago said on Tuesday that it does not anticipate any short-term rentals in the space.

The facility will feature a High Intensity Activated (HAWK) crosswalk on N. Goldwater Boulevard.

The 1.2-acre site was rezoned by council to host the project in 2019, so Thursday’s vote was the final step in the development process.

The developer hopes to start construction in the fall, but doesn’t have a specific date for that, Santiago said.

Public Meeting for Osceola I-4 Trucking and Freight Site Analysis PD&E Study – June 23

By Site analysis

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will hold a public meeting to evaluate and recommend project plans for potential alternative truck and freight parking sites along the I-4 corridor that are viable for use by private and public operators.

The meeting place for Truck and Freight Alternative Site Analysis The Project Development and Environmental (PD&E) study will be held Thursday, June 23 at 5:30 p.m. at the Osceola Visitor Center and History Museum – Buster Kenton Room, 4155 W. Vine St. in Kissimmee. Attend between 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. to see a looping presentation and project presentations, speak with project team members, and submit comments or questions. If attending in person, please follow all safety and hygiene guidelines. If you are unwell, please consider attending the meeting virtually or by phone.

Speaking of which, residents can join the Virtual Public Meeting (VPH) from a computer, tablet or mobile device. For this option, prior registration is required by visiting attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1863957404204274701. Once registered, attendees will receive a confirmation email with information to join the online meeting. Participants can join the meeting in audio mode by dialing 631-992-3221 and entering passcode 257-996-889 when prompted. All meeting documents including the presentation will be available on the project website at www.cflroads.com/project/447724-1 before the meeting.

Site plan for 80-acre Lone Tree Regional Park passes first vote, city council passes next

By Site plan

The final site plan for Lone Tree Regional Park, an 80-acre park near I-25 and RidgeGate Parkway, passed its first approval vote June 8 at the parks board meeting and recreation in the southern suburbs.

The next step for the proposal is the Lone Tree Town Council. The board will vote on the measure at the June 20 regular meeting.

The regional park is a collaborative effort between Lone Tree City Council and South Suburban Parks and Recreation. If it goes ahead, it will be Lone Tree’s first regional park, according to the city’s website.

The park is part of the RidgeGate East development, a sprawling development on the east side of I-25 and RidgeGate Parkway that involves construction of three residential villages, a 400-acre Lone Tree City Center, retail districts, schools and more.

The preliminary plan for the park includes a variety of amenities, including a dog park, a festival terrace, a multi-level playground and several sports fields, according to the park’s webpage. It will also feature a 5,000-person amphitheater, Deputy City Manager Austin Good said during a June 7 study session.

The concept for the park’s final site plan, created by landscape architect The Architerra Group, is called “The Braid”, Good said.

“Bringing the two halves of the park together is what the plan is known for, which is called the braid. And it’s this intertwining network of trails that creates the backbone and connects the north end of the park to the south end of the park,” Good said.

Where the paths intersect, there will be different sections, also called “rooms,” spread throughout the park, Good said. These rooms can accommodate different uses, depending on the wishes of the community.

“We’re really, really excited about the opportunities that will open up here in the next stage of design when we start talking – ‘Well, what exactly is going on in these rooms? ‘” Good said, adding that some ideas for rooms include a community garden space and community art walks.

Building the park will take time and cost millions, Good explained. He said South Suburban Parks and Recreation has budgeted $300,000 this calendar year to advance the design of the park from its current preliminary plan to further develop a phased plan for the project.

“Right now, we’re estimating about $25 million for a phase one,” Good said, pointing out that it will take more than the city and South Suburban Parks and Recreation to build the project.

On June 8, the South Suburb Parks and Recreation Board voted 4-0 in favor of the plan, excluding board member Jim Taylor who was not present at the meeting, Jennifer said. King, head of district administrative services.

If city council votes to approve the plan on June 20, one of the project’s next steps will be to find additional partners to fund the project, according to a staff report.

“As we seek out potential partners, I am hopeful that Douglas County will recognize this as a real opportunity to provide additional amenities to their Lone Tree residents, but [also] to the community far beyond,” Mayor Jackie Millet said during the study session. “This park, we hope, is also a regional facility.”

Millet said the city has found that many Douglas County residents come to Lone Tree for recreation, and this park is likely to attract people outside of Lone Tree.

“We want to make sure that Douglas County also has a voice at this table as we move forward, to encourage them to invest,” Millet said, adding that she would like the city to engage Douglas County residents during the community feedback process.

Good also stressed the importance of getting community feedback on the park’s current plan and next steps in the process, saying the city will continue to develop the park’s webpage, cityoflonetree.com/regionalpark/, where members from the community can submit questions and comments about the project.

“It’s a big, multi-year effort just to put a shovel in the ground,” Good said. “It’s going to be a really, really important piece, continuing to engage with [the] community throughout the process.

Chappaqua Crossing owner seeks relief from sitemap conditions

By Site plan
Summit Development founder Felix Charney spoke to the New Castle Town board last week, saying the new owners of Chappaqua Crossing want several conditions lifted to help fill store vacancies and save money on restoring the property’s 1850s guesthouse.

The new owner of Chappaqua Crossing is seeking relief from several site plan approval conditions to help him lease the complex’s vacant commercial space and build a clubhouse rather than preserve an 1850s farmhouse .

Representatives of an entity called HPV IV Chappaqua LLC, which includes Heitman, a property management company that now owns the center’s 120,000 square foot retail business, and Toll Brothers, which is building the 91 townhouses on the property , appealed to the New Castle Town Council to relax a handful of the project’s 157 conditions. The demands were first made in an April 21 letter to city council.

Heitman asks the city to eliminate the 7,500 square foot cap for take-out dining establishments at the center to help fill some of the vacancies, to waive the 25% limit on a business’ floor space for the sale of liquor so that he could rent space from a liquor store and allow dumpsters to be stored outdoors rather than indoors.

Meanwhile, Toll Brothers hopes to convince city officials that building a new clubhouse for future owners of 91 units, but using the existing facade of the more than 167-year-old Thomas V. Wright House, near the entrance to Route 117, would be beneficial because Toll could use the money he saved to renovate the Chappaqua Performing Arts Center.

Felix Charney, founder of Summit Development, which built the commercial component and adapted the cupola into more than 60 apartments, said pandemic-related market conditions are at the heart of demands for vacant commercial space. The plan was to lease three spaces to restaurants, but only one is occupied — Sweetgreen, a fast-casual eatery specializing in salads and bowls that opened earlier this spring.

Traditional sit-down restaurants were originally planned for Chappaqua Crossing, said Charney, who Heitman asked to speak on his behalf, although once Summit Development sells its offices at the center, he will no longer be in the game.

“Ultimately, the conditions that are being imposed on us now, we will have to live with, but I think there is now an opportunity based on a bit of hindsight, based on a bit of logic and more specifically when we enter into retail, based on some of the changes the world has seen through COVID, that are worth revisiting,” Charney said.

Since the start of the pandemic, it has been difficult to rent spaces in part due to retail and restaurant uncertainties, but restrictions have also helped, he said. Heitman is asking the owner of a liquor store if he can get the zoning code changed to remove the 25% floor area limit, Charney added.

Allowing take-out restaurants would help rent the spaces. However, under current regulations, Chappaqua Crossing would not be able to accommodate two other businesses like Sweetgreen, which is approximately 3,000 square feet, due to the restriction.

“The mall is running out of energy and some of that energy was driven by food service and we failed to do that,” he said.

Supervisor Lisa Katz said she fears that if the 7,500 square foot cap is removed, there could be an unlimited number of takeout establishments. She and councilor Victoria Tipp wondered if it would be premature to make this change before the townhouses were occupied.

“So, I think, that would really change the dynamic of renting,” Katz said. “Now you’ll have a built-in audience of people who live here but also go to the performing arts center and want to eat afterwards.”

Charney said it could be another three years before the residences are filled. All establishments would have seating but could be closer to Chopt or Chipotle than a white-tablecloth restaurant, he said.

Councilman Christian Hildenbrand mentioned that the city has recently seen two sit-down restaurants open in recent weeks, a Mediterranean steakhouse near Walgreen’s and Italian restaurant Basso 56 on lower King Street.

Summit development project manager David Walsh said the requirement for an indoor dumpster is also proving to be a barrier to attracting restaurants. He said it was also wrong that the city could leave its dumpster outside while forcing businesses to find a place for it inside.

“So it’s hypocrisy to be able to put a dumpster 50 feet from a house, when we want to put a dumpster hundreds of feet from any residence,” Walsh said.

Meanwhile, Toll Brothers wants relief from having to adapt the lower level of the Wright house into a clubhouse. Charney, who said he supports and appreciates historic preservation, mentioned that Toll Brothers rejects any notion that the building is historic.

The building is not in good condition and its interior should be rebuilt from the inside, he said. Charney told The Examiner it was estimated that $850,000 could be saved and redeployed to improve the Chappaqua Performing Arts Center, which would benefit the entire community while residents would get a clubhouse.

The plan would be to put the facade on a new pavilion.

“If we build it new and build it right, make it look like this, it will survive for a long time to everyone’s benefit and the dollars that would otherwise have been used, then we can use it to fix the auditorium,” said Charney.

Town historian Gray Williams countered that the developer had retained one of the area’s most respected architects linked to the preservation of ancient structures, Stephen Tilly, who concluded that it would not be as expensive to save and adapt the first floor for a clubhouse.

In 2019, the city and Toll Brothers reached an agreement that it would preserve as much of the house as possible, but it appears the developer is looking to back down. Williams called it “a unique building” that has changed little since it was built.

“They never wanted it,” Williams said. “They prefer to say it would be expensive. I saw the plans. I don’t think that’s really entirely true. I think they should submit a budget to prove it and measure it against the cost of building something else. »

Katz said the council would refer retail-related items to the planning council and tentatively scheduled a tour of the Wright home for next week.

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Germantown Plan Commission Expected to Vote Monday on Two Site Development Plans | Washington Co. Business News

By Site development

GERMANTOWN — The Germantown Plan Commission will meet to review and vote on two site plans during its meeting at 6:30 p.m. Monday in the council chambers of Germantown Village Hall.

The first site plan the board will vote on is for Capstone Quadrangle Development Company/Capstone 41. According to the summary, Capstone 41 is seeking approval of a revised site development plan for the 203,580 square foot industrial building located in the Capstone 41. Business Park and Holy Hill Road Gateway District.

Site development and construction plans were approved by Council in August 2021 for Phase 1 of Capstone 41 Business Park under conditions.


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Plan Commission condition number 10 states that “the amount of landscaping and the height and design of berms for the area along the north elevation of the building adjoining Holy Hill Road shall be supplemented by berms and additional landscaping Additional landscaping including a mix of evergreen and deciduous trees should be installed along the west side of the truck parking/staging area to the west of the building to provide a better (future) visual display of truck activity.

Condition number 10 required a revised landscape and berm plan to be submitted for approval. before the approval of a first occupancy permit for the industrial building.

Capstone 41 prepared the revised landscaping and grading plans and submitted them to the commission for approval, according to the summary.

The second site plan the plan committee will vote on is for JSD Professional Services, according to the agenda.

Site plan review submitted by JSD Professional Services, on behalf of Criterion Barrels, seeks approval of site development and construction plans for a 12,108 square foot addition to the Criterion Barrels facility located at W172N13052 Division Road to Germantown. According to the summary, Criterion Barrels, an original equipment manufacturer of rifle barrels, has seen an increase in demand for its product over the past two years. This led to an increase in staff, from 31 to 44 employees, but left them running out of space.

To mitigate this, Criterion Barrels would like to add an additional 12,108 square feet to its manufacturing building to optimize flow and allow for future growth, according to the summary.

The Germantown Plan Commission will meet at 6:30 p.m. Monday in the council chambers of Germantown Town Hall, N122-W17001 Mequon Road in Germantown.

Final Approved Site Plan for Silverthorne Daycare

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Final plans for the Silverthorne Daycare site have been approved. include six child care centers The plans include six classrooms, a small administrative area, a kitchen and a multipurpose room. There are also three separate play areas for the three supervised age groups in the building.
Town of Silverthorne/Courtesy Image

Silverthorne City Council has approved the final site plan for the facility of the Silverthorne Early Years Center which will add 65 to 70 child care spaces for county children.

Land for the facility was purchased in October 2020, along with space for a potential grocery store, and it sits on the corner of Adams Avenue and Ruby Ranch Road. Since then, the city has partnered with the Summit County government to move the project forward, including sharing the cost of building the facility. The site is 1.72 acres and will have a single storey building it’s about 8,800 square feet. Current plans include six day care rooms, a small administrative area, a kitchen and a multipurpose room. There are also three separate play areas for the three supervised age groups in the building. The facility will have approximately 20 employees in the building for a maximum shift.

The building will have 23 parking spaces, approximately half of which will be reserved for staff. Council member Tim Applegate said he was worried there would be enough space for the drop off because a long line of cars could back down the freeway, but architect Matt Rodgers said it’s because it is a daycare where some parents should enter the school. with a baby or toddler, backing up traffic probably wouldn’t happen.



“It’s not really like what you might see college kids drop off where the kid goes out,” Rodgers said. “(Parents of daycare students) park there for three to five minutes while they check in on that student, and then they drive off. Throughout the design, we worked closely with other forward-thinking facilities in areas such as Timberline (Learning Center), and they have very similar traffic flow for drop-off situations. .

City Manager Ryan Hyland added that city staff can encourage the facility operator to consider a staggered drop-off approach so that not all children are dropped off at the same time. The building is owned by the Silverthorne Childcare Authority, and town leaders have already begun the process of finding an operator to run the daycare.



There is open space for two more classrooms to the west of the building, should the city and county choose to expand. Council Member Mike Spry said including these two classrooms in the build could allow for more children to be added, as child care is a county-wide issue, but Summit County Manager Scott Vargo said they would save that space for a later addition due to construction costs.

“We’ve had conversations about possibly doing an expansion,” Vargo said. “It’s really a question of timing, first and foremost, and certainly also a question of cost. Secondly, the cost of this facility is more than double what we originally planned. But we tried to create at least the opportunity for these classrooms later.

Along with rising construction and supply costs plaguing projects across the country, the estimated cost of building Smith Ranch Daycare in Silverthorne has also increased. Initial estimates from July 2021 had the total cost of the facility at $4 million. At the time, Summit County and the Town of Silverthorne would split the costs, contributing $3 million and $1 million, respectively. In January, that estimate edged closer to about $8.5 million. Now, the current price for the Smith Ranch facility is $9.7 million.

The updated contribution to Silverthorne Daycare would be $2.35 million. Of this amount, $1.2 million would be the value of the land (which is already provided), $150,000 for site development (which has been completed) and an additional $1 million which would be divided equally between the development fund. capital improvement and nicotine sales or 5A housing funds. . The remaining money to build the facility will be a combination of $3 million from the Strong Futures Fund, $3.41 million from Summit County, and $1 million in grants from the Town of Silverthorne and the county.

The municipal council adopted the final site plan unanimously. A ribbon-cutting ceremony is scheduled for the site at 4 p.m. on June 21.

“It’s been a long-standing desire for this area of ​​the county,” Council Member Kelly Owens said. “It’s really nice to see this happening, and happening soon. It’s very necessary.

Council approves site plan for church annexation – Yuma Pioneer

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A comprehensive site plan for the church annex at the northeast end of Yuma was approved by the Yuma City Council last week at its regular meeting.

The subject property is the parcel between N. Detroit Ave. and Indian Hills Golf Club. The city bought the property a few years ago, then sold it last year to Yuma Development, LLC, a limited liability company formed by Carlson and Associates.
The site plan, showing the potential for 241 residential lots of various sizes, as well as an industrial area at the south end by the railway tracks, was presented to council by Kent Carlson and Scott Carlson of Carlson and Associates.
They gave information about themselves, saying the family had operated a dairy farm a long time ago and had been involved in real estate development in the Denver metro area since 1964. They said they appreciated the opportunity to work with the Yuma community.
They explained that there had been a delay in submitting the site plan because they were focusing on the industrial part near the railway, but are now moving forward with the residential development. The housing development would be a mix of housing types and sizes. They said they would also seek to sell land to individuals to build their own homes.
The plan includes 20 lots of 200 by 100 that would run along the golf course. There are 38 lots 75 by 110 at the north end, the middle has 85 lots 65 by 100 and 98 lots towards the west side measuring 45 by 100. The plan includes a park in the middle of the development.
The Carlsons told the council that they plan to start with the smaller lots for modules and tiny houses in a bid to help people buy a first home.
The timeline is still up in the air. The Carlsons said they were working on signage and developing a website to kick off the marketing effort. They said they needed to see the scale of the need through marketing, then they would reduce prices and come back to the board with the first phase.
They emphasized that they wanted the development to be a community project.
The board approved the site plan on a 6-0 vote. Mayor Ron Swehla, pro-tem mayor Marc Shay and council members Tim McClung, Terri Frame, Jerome Benish and Marylu Smith-Dischner were in attendance. Councilman Dan Baucke was absent.

Middleburg Heights Reapproves Tru by Hilton Site Plan

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MIDDLEBURG HEIGHTS, Ohio — The city initially approved site plans for a Tru by Hilton hotel in 2018, with an expected opening in 2019. Then, as planning for the project progressed, the COVID-19 pandemic hit , causing nationwide work and travel stoppages and disrupting supply chains.

The Middleburg Heights Planning Commission recently extended its approval of the hotel’s final site plan for 17500 Rosbough Drive. No hotel representative was present at the May 25 meeting.

After breaking the ground, architect Dan Barney of Arcinetics said in 2018 that it would take 10 months to construct the building. The Tru hotel concept offers a lower than average rate and smaller rooms.

“This is one of those cases of form versus substance,” Myra Staresina Severyn, deputy legal director for Middleburg Heights, told the commission May 25. “We usually want and require a candidate to explain a project. (In this case) there is nothing (new) to explain, per se.

City Engineer Michael Mackay of Mackay Engineering noted some minor stormwater design issues four years ago, so commission member Eric Smearman asked if Mackay was happy with the final plan.

“There are a few outstanding comments in my 2018 memo, but they’re not major items,” Mackay replied. “They’ve complied with almost everything, and there are a few final details they need to iron out.

“From a technical standpoint, they are largely in pretty good shape with their plan.”

Economic development Director Charles Bichara said company representatives have been “very responsive” in working out variances and miscellaneous items with Building Commissioner Norm Herwerden and other city officials.

Approval from the May 25 panel was granted on the condition that Mackay’s previous stormwater design recommendations be considered.

Read more stories from the Sun News.

Yorkshire villagers celebrate ‘memorable victory’ as government rejects fracking site plan

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The government has rejected an appeal by Ineos to get the green light for a shale gas exploration site off Dinnington Road in Woodsetts, near Rotherham.

After planning permission for the site was refused by Rotherham Council, a public inquiry was held in June 2019, which resulted in a planning inspector recommending that the appeal be upheld and planning permission be granted.

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But in a recently published government decision, the program has now been blocked.

Members of the campaign group pictured in 2018

A decision by Housing Minister and MP for Yorkshire Stuart Andrew on behalf of Mr Gove read: ‘The Secretary of State disagrees with the Inspector’s recommendation.

“He decided to reject the appeal and refuse the building permit.”

He said the decision was made based on factors including damage to the green belt, negative visual impacts of the project and damage to nearby properties from a 3m high acoustic barrier that was to be constructed. around the site.

The report states: “Overall, he considers that the material considerations in this case indicate a decision consistent with the development plan – that is, a denial of permission. The Secretary of State therefore concludes that the appeal should be dismissed and that the planning permit should be refused.

There has been a long campaign against fracking plans for Woodsetts

Ineos has six weeks to decide whether or not to challenge the decision in the High Court.

Rother Valley MP Alexander Stafford, who campaigned against the fracking site to get the green light in his constituency, welcomed the result.

“I am delighted that the government has stood up for the people of Rother Valley on another crucial issue for our region,” said the Tory MP.

“I lobbied tirelessly from behind the scenes for the Secretary of State to intervene, and I am pleased that my calls have been answered with decisive and positive action.

“No one is a bigger advocate for cleaner energy than I am, but fracking is not and never has been the answer.

“It is not wanted here in Rother Valley, and this Conservative government has once again listened to us and represented us vigorously. I hope the residents of Woodsetts rejoice in this momentous victory we have achieved together.

Rotherham Council leader Chris Read said the Labour-led local authority’s decision to reject the proposal had now been justified.

“Communities in the south of our borough have been living with the threat of fracking hanging over them for far too long, so I’m really excited to finally see the direction coming from the government. Throughout the process, we felt that fracking would be bad news for our communities, for the local environment and an unsustainable way of meeting our energy needs.

“It seemed particularly in jeopardy recently when parts of the Conservative Party began to press publicly to end the moratorium. Our planning committee was one of the first in the country to reject a request for fracking and it is ultimately the government validation of this appeal, and our local planning policy.We all look forward to seeing this threat of fracking gone for good now.

There is currently a moratorium on fracking in the UK which was introduced by Boris Johnson after shale gas exploration was previously backed by Theresa May as a way to improve UK energy security.

More than a decade of efforts to develop hydraulic fracturing for shale gas appeared to be over, with authorities ordering the sealing of the only two horizontal drilled wells in Lancashire. But the order to permanently seal the wells was suspended earlier this year and the government has commissioned a review of the science around the process.

Ineos founder and chairman Sir Jim Ratcliffe said earlier this year it was “ridiculous” that the UK was not taking advantage of its shale gas reserves.

Speaking in April, he said: ‘The UK is in the midst of an energy crisis with ever-rising prices pushing people into energy poverty while giving huge sums of money to schemes oppressive.

“It’s a ridiculous situation with so much gas under our feet. As the United States has shown, homegrown shale gas could make us self-sufficient in 10 years.

But Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng warned fracking would take years to produce commercial levels of gas.

At the Yorkshire Post, we are committed to speaking truth to power on behalf of the people who call County God’s Own home. Our Politics Team and Westminster Correspondent are the eyes and ears of Yorkshire in the halls of power.

Olympia Site Plan hears 60 townhouse project proposal

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By Lorilyn C. Lirio

Olympia’s site plan committee yesterday heard Olympic Capital Growth’s proposal to build 60 townhouses on a five-acre plot near North Thurston High School, just west of Sleater-Kinney Road NOT.

According to architect Josh Gobel, of Studio 360 Architects, Olympic Capital also owns the Bayan Trails project, a retirement and townhouse project adjacent to the proposed development.

Gobel said the developer had acquired the land to the north, where he planned to build a row of townhouses and apartments.

“The goal is to tie the northern part of the lot to the Bayans Trail development. The idea is to put a series of homes in the northern part similar to what we are doing on the southern end,” Gobel said.

However, Gobel said the property is not yet zoned for development.

Tim Smith, assistant director of community planning and development, recommended going to the hearing examiner. “And because there’s kind of a 200-foot blurry boundary between land use designations, that could be considered site-specific.”

Smith said there was no need to go through a full plan modification process.

Gobel raised concerns about stormwater on the property. He said there is development in the neighborhood and storm water is draining onto the north property.

Olympia’s lead planner, Nicole Floyd, recommended updating the wetlands report.

Floyd said the last report was over five years old and did not address the current site.

“[Update] a part of a wetland or stream within 300 feet of your site could help define what that area is – is it a stream or a wetland? It might solve the storm water problem you have,” Floyd said.

Technical evaluation

Olympia’s engineering reviewer Zulaika Kim said the development site had water along Sleater Kinney Road. The town would require an extension and backflow devices for the multi-family development project.

As for the sewer, Kim said the closest is about 200 feet north of the site at the intersection of Sleater Kinney and Balsam Avenue. She said an extension of the building was needed.

Kim noted that the development site does not have a continuous passage for the solid waste truck. “You should look for an approved turnaround time for the continued passage of solid waste trucks or emergency services.”

Kim asked the developer to provide an analysis of how the wetland would allow 6th Avenue to connect with Coulter Street and Chehalis Trail.

“If the study or analysis has demonstrated that the wetlands do not connect the streets, then the city would need a neighborhood link or a shared-use path to Coulter Street and the West Trail of Chehalis,” Kim told promoters.

Yorkshire villagers celebrate ‘memorable victory’ as Michael Gove rejects fracking site plan

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The upgrade secretary has rejected an appeal by Ineos to get the green light for a shale gas exploration site off Dinnington Road in Woodsetts, near Rotherham.

After planning permission for the site was refused by Rotherham Council, a public inquiry was held in June 2019, which resulted in a planning inspector recommending that the appeal be upheld and planning permission be granted.

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But in a recently published government decision, the program has now been blocked.

Members of the campaign group pictured in 2018

A decision by Housing Minister and MP for Yorkshire Stuart Andrew on behalf of Mr Gove read: ‘The Secretary of State disagrees with the Inspector’s recommendation.

“He decided to reject the appeal and refuse the building permit.”

He said Mr Gove made his decision based on factors including damage to green belt, negative visual impacts from the project and damage to neighboring properties from a 3m high sound barrier which was to be built around the site.

The report states: “Overall, he considers that the material considerations in this case indicate a decision consistent with the development plan – that is, a denial of permission. The Secretary of State therefore concludes that the appeal should be dismissed and that the planning permit should be refused.

There has been a long campaign against fracking plans for Woodsetts

Ineos has six weeks to decide whether or not to challenge the decision in the High Court.

Rother Valley MP Alexander Stafford, who campaigned against the fracking site to get the green light in his constituency, welcomed the result.

“I am delighted that the government has stood up for the people of Rother Valley on another crucial issue for our region,” said the Tory MP.

“I lobbied tirelessly from behind the scenes for the Secretary of State to intervene, and I am pleased that my calls have been answered with decisive and positive action.

“No one is a bigger advocate for cleaner energy than I am, but fracking is not and never has been the answer.

“It is not wanted here in Rother Valley, and this Conservative government has once again listened to us and represented us vigorously. I hope the residents of Woodsetts rejoice in this momentous victory we have achieved together.

Rotherham Council leader Chris Read said the Labour-led local authority’s decision to reject the proposal had now been justified.

“Communities in the south of our borough have been living with the threat of fracking hanging over them for far too long, so I’m really excited to finally see the direction coming from the government. Throughout the process, we felt that fracking would be bad news for our communities, for the local environment and an unsustainable way of meeting our energy needs.

“It seemed particularly in jeopardy recently when parts of the Conservative Party began to press publicly to end the moratorium. Our planning committee was one of the first in the country to reject a request for fracking and it is ultimately the government validation of this appeal, and our local planning policy.We all look forward to seeing this threat of fracking gone for good now.

There is currently a moratorium on fracking in the UK which was introduced by Boris Johnson after shale gas exploration was previously backed by Theresa May as a way to improve UK energy security.

More than a decade of efforts to develop hydraulic fracturing for shale gas appeared to be over, with authorities ordering the sealing of the only two horizontal drilled wells in Lancashire. But the order to permanently seal the wells was suspended earlier this year and the government has commissioned a review of the science around the process.

Ineos founder and chairman Sir Jim Ratcliffe said earlier this year it was “ridiculous” that the UK was not taking advantage of its shale gas reserves.

Speaking in April, he said: ‘The UK is in the midst of an energy crisis with ever-rising prices pushing people into energy poverty while giving huge sums of money to schemes oppressive.

“It’s a ridiculous situation with so much gas under our feet. As the United States has shown, homegrown shale gas could make us self-sufficient in 10 years.

But Business Secretary Kwasi Kwarteng warned fracking would take years to produce commercial levels of gas.

At the Yorkshire Post, we are committed to speaking truth to power on behalf of the people who call County God’s Own home. Our Politics Team and Westminster Correspondent are the eyes and ears of Yorkshire in the halls of power.

Site plan approved for new Premier Tech Prairie facility in Urbandale

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City receives Costco site plan submission

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The City of Brantford said Tuesday it had received the complete third site plan submission for the development of a Costco retail warehouse on the Lynden Park Mall property at 84 Lynden Rd.

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The city said the bid proposes a Costco with a maximum floor area of ​​15,105 square meters and an associated gas station.

The proposal also includes the creation of access to Costco from Wayne Gretzky Drive, improvements to the mall’s main intersection at Edmondson Street, the construction of stormwater management facilities, on and offsite , and the enclosure of part of the drainage system adjacent to Gretzky Drive. and Highway 403.

The city submission includes architectural, civil, electrical, landscape and survey plans, as well as reports and transportation plans.

The idea of ​​building a big box store in the north has been a hot topic of discussion for years.

In 2014, Costco was tied to a 6.7-hectare property at Morton Avenue and Wayne Gretzky Parkway purchased by a real estate developer.

Despite a site plan and lengthy negotiations, the plans were scuttled when the Department of Transportation raised concerns about increased Costco traffic slowing traffic on the nearby Highway 403 interchange. . The property was eventually put back on the market.

In 2018, Lynden Park Mall presented plans to the city for a large expansion including a hotel, an 85-unit residential building, and a large retail building.

In May 2020, the Department of Transportation said it was in discussions with the city and mall owners about how the development of a Costco store on mall property would affect traffic at the interchange. Highway 403 to Wayne Gretzky Parkway. Then, in September 2020, it was learned that the ministry had completed a study, giving the green light to the mall’s redevelopment plan.

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Last month, a department said plans to improve interchanges at Highway 403 and the Wayne Gretzky Parkway are moving forward and construction could begin as early as 2023.

“Improvements to the Highway 403 and Wayne Gretzky Parkway interchange are currently in the detailed design stage,” said Simi Ikotun, Issues Management Coordinator for the ministry.

Ikotun said the ministry is reviewing necessary improvements to the interchange, including entry and exit ramps and ramp terminal intersections.

“The ministry is working with the City of Brantford to support future developments in the area and move this project forward,” Ikotun said.

He said the ministry expects construction to start as early as next year and be completed in a single construction season.

City planning staff received a second site plan submission in February 2021 for the Costco development.

Planning Commission discusses proposed plan for marijuana site

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IRONWOOD — Ankur Rungta, a business owner who hopes to open a marijuana retail facility called QPS Holdings at 100 W. Cloverland Drive in Ironwood, recently submitted an amended site plan for his facility to the Planning Commission. of Ironwood, which was discussed at a public hearing. Thursday.

Community Development Director Tom Bergman clarified to the commission that QBS Holdings does not have a marijuana retail establishment license and is not pre-approved for one. However, they wanted to modify their already proposed site plan in hopes that the city would change their ordinance to allow for additional establishments.

The city commission is currently considering an amendment that will permit two additional marijuana retail locations and will hold a public hearing on those changes in the auditorium of the Ironwood Memorial Building at 5:20 p.m. Monday.

Rungta wants to modify the QBS Holdings site plan so that customers can enter the building for curbside service – similar to Rize UP, another marijuana retail establishment that plans to open the doors of its outlet at 411 E. Cloverland Drive this summer. Rungta said this would allow QBS Holdings to take full advantage of its ownership while retaining the full interior layout as originally planned.

The new sitemap with a drive-thru has eight fewer parking spaces than the original sitemap, but Rungta said this amendment will improve traffic flow due to the number of customers who will be using the new feature.

Bergman said there was a lane between the parking spaces and the facility in the site plan and the owners would need some sort of traffic mechanism to prevent the lane from being blocked. Rungta said they plan to have signage and a road block to restrict traffic when entering the store, which will be staffed by an employee.

The planning commission has expressed concern that the venture is attracting more cars than parking spaces and that traffic is spilling onto surrounding roads, particularly Lowell Street. Rungta proposed closing the east entrance with traffic cones during their peak hours and redirecting traffic to the north entrance on Southland Avenue.

The planning commission decided to table this item on Bergman’s recommendation because he wanted to discuss the pros and cons of closing the Lowell Street entrance with City Manager Scott Erickson and building inspector Dennis Hewitt.

The planning commission also approved a conditional use permit for a dog grooming house at 210 E. Harding Avenue.

Site plan supported for development of former Sunset School site

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A site plan to develop the former Sunset School property into a 26-unit multi-family development received support last week from Sturgeon Bay’s Aesthetic Design and Site Plan Review Board.

Sturgeon Bay Common Council had previously approved a planned unit development for the site so that SC Swiderski could develop two eight-unit, two-storey buildings with attached garages between Erie Street and Delaware Street, as well as four and six-unit attached buildings one-story along 8th Avenue North.

Kortni Wolf, Business Development Manager for SC Swiderski, said the development, which will be known as SCS Sunset Estates, will feature two different building types, as well as community space; and have two entrances: one on Delaware Street and the other on Erie Street.

Wolf said the 26 units will include two and three bedrooms with six different floor plans.

“We have private entrances and our rental rates are very inclusive,” she said. “We also have ample parking on site.”

Jacqui McElroy, the company’s director of business development, said rent will be based on market rates, with specific prices to be released 90 days before the apartments open.

Tenants will pay for electricity, but McElroy said the monthly rent will include heating.

Kortni Wolf, Business Development Manager for SC Swiderski, appears May 23 before the Sturgeon Bay Aesthetic Design and Site Plan Review Board to discuss the company’s plans to build 26 apartments on the site of the Old School Sunset. Photo by Kevin Boneske.

“Our hydronic heating system is very efficient, so that’s one of the reasons we use it,” she said. “We pay for heating because we want to use this system instead of forced air. It’s more efficient. »

McElroy said the wall units will be used for air conditioning.

Project timeline

Instead of remodeling the existing school building into an apartment, as is currently the case at the old West Side School, the plans for the project call for the demolition of the old Sunset School and the construction of four new buildings.

McElroy said demolition work is expected to begin in about a month, with the company now working with the city on how best to handle the asbestos removal from the existing building.

She said groundbreaking is scheduled for late summer, after the existing building is demolished, with plans for the project to be completed next April.

Site plan committee hears plans for new fast food restaurant

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By Lorilyn C. Lirio

The Olympia Site Plan Committee heard a proposal to build a one-story, 4,987 square foot Chick-fil-A restaurant at 2930 Capital Mall Drive Southwest, Olympia on Wednesday, June 1.

The location was the site of the Fujiyama Japanese Steakhouse for many years.

Project engineer Estefania Escamilla, of Barghausen Consulting Engineers, said she proposed the demolition of the existing structure and the new construction of the fast food restaurant with concrete drive-thrus, order canopies, parking in asphalt, a garbage enclosure and associated utilities. .

According to the project document submitted to the committee, there will be two vehicle access points, both located along Mall Loop Drive Southwest. The first is located to the northeast near the waste enclosure and the second to the southwest, closer to the middle of the site.

Olympia’s associate planner Paula Smith said the property was in the design review district. The project is subject to review based on basic commercial and high-density design criteria. “It has a lot to do with the facades that face the high-density corridor street, which is Cooper Point Road.”

Smith also pointed to the sewer line that runs on the property along Cooper Point. “In this case, you would want to build up to the easement lines.”

If there are no easements, Smith said the city would require the developer to provide a 10-foot easement area. “We would seek to have your building placed right at this line. We would consider bringing it up to the street frontage.

Parking requirements

Smith said the city requires 10 parking spaces per 1,000 square feet at a drive-thru or restaurant.

The project proposed 80 parking spaces.

Smith said the developer was allowed 50 parking spaces depending on the size of the building. “An increase in parking beyond this amount would require a change in parking.”

She explained that changing parking between 10% and 40% is subject to administrative review, while more than 40% requires a decision from the Hearing Examiner. “I encourage you to review the criteria to be able to provide you with a waiver or amendment for increased parking.”

Smith also touched on perimeter landscaping. It asks the promoter to develop the facades on the street and the parking spaces.

According to Smith, the developer’s plan did not meet city code on parking lot walkways, which are at least 12 feet wide to accommodate a tree.

She added that parking rows should accommodate landscaped islands of at least 114 square feet.

Smith also asked the developer to provide them with a pedestrian access map showing where people are walking to and passing through the development.

The plan should also include bicycle parking – short-term outdoor and long-term parking for employees, Smith told the developer.

Land Use Review

The project triggers a land use review, Smith commented.

“The city usually organizes a neighborhood meeting. The meeting would be sent to landowners and business owners within 300 feet of the project site,” Smith said.

“Neighborhood meetings help provide information to the public about the plan and give them the opportunity to ask questions and raise concerns,” she added.

Planning committee approves site plan for shelter project

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“It’s a facility our city needs. I think we all wish it wasn’t. Maybe one day it won’t be. But it is now.”

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A five-year struggle over the Salvation Army’s plan to build a large shelter on Montreal Road continued Friday at a special planning committee meeting.

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Most of the committee voted to approve the site plan for the 211-bed facility, giving the last political approval the Salvation Army needed before it could put shovels in the ground.

They were under considerable pressure not to do so. Community leaders in Vanier on Friday reiterated their objections to the development itself and its potential impacts on the area and described recent consultation efforts as dishonest and unproductive.

“I can assure you at this time that Vanier and its community do not need a shelter,” said Michel Gervais, outgoing executive director of the Vanier Community Service Center. “(It is) healthy, clean, permanent affordable housing that is urgently needed for this community and across Ottawa.

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However, what was up for debate on Friday was not whether shelter should be allowed at the site. This battle has already been decided, and the site plan control process, planning committee staff and management pointed out, is supposed to address development elements such as landscaping, building location and parking lot layout.

“We’re not dealing with zoning today, we’re not dealing with programming today, and we’re also focusing on the exterior of the building rather than the interior of the building,” Co-Chair Glen Gower reminded his colleagues. colleagues.

Council granted the Salvation Army the zoning and official plan amendments it needed for its vision for 333 Montreal Road. more than four years ago, and these were upheld in 2020 by the provincial court that hears land use planning appeals.

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Staff recommended approval of the site plan and described the proposal in a report to the committee as “well designed in consultation with staff” and with “safety and security in mind”.

A presentation from the Salvation Army project team outlined how its plan for the low-rise H-shaped complex evolved, including replacing an addictions program with housing with support services and reduction of building height and footprint. The design principles shaping the development learned from the “obvious flaws” of the existing Salvation Army George Street Shelter, they noted.

According to Ottawa Inner City Health Executive Director Wendy Muckle, the only public delegate to approve the site plan, customers and staff at local shelters have consistently responded very positively to the design plans. A regular observation, she said, was that it didn’t look like an institution and looked more like a fancy apartment building or a college campus.

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“Of all the voices you’re going to listen to today…the voices of the people who actually need to access and use the facility should perhaps be the most important,” Muckle said.

She noted that her organization intended to provide services in a “special care unit” planned for the site and had a say in its design, as did the homeless clients they served.

This is an exception to the disregard that a number of community organizations and service providers the committee speaks to said they encountered when attempting to participate in the project. They shared particular frustration about their experience with a council-created advisory committee on the site plan and future programming, which involved Salvation Army staff and team.

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Marc Maracle, CEO of the Gignul Non-Profit Housing Corporation and representative of the Ottawa Native Coalition, described the committee process as “deeply disillusioning” and said it was “tactically and strategically focused on examining of the sitemap, and any conversation about programming was wrongly avoided.

Maracle predicted that the project would have a disproportionate impact on the large indigenous population in the area and said the Salvation Army had yet to provide an adequate response to this impact, particularly with regard to the safety of the workers. Indigenous women, girls, seniors and children.

Future clients using drugs and alcohol in the surrounding community, in the absence of a space to do so locally, was a concern for Lauren Touchant of the Vanier Community Association. Council Housing and Homelessness Liaison Officer, Coun. Catherine McKenney, opposed the exchange of on-site supportive housing units. “No one should live in a shelter or be attached to a shelter,” McKenney said.

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Gervais spoke about concerns about the duplication of services already available locally and the potential for this to impact government funding for existing community service providers.

They want to work with the Salvation Army, said Quartier Vanier Business Improvement Area general manager Nathalie Carrier, and their community needs services.

“But the services they offer and what is actually needed are different, and they refuse to hear that; so that’s where the animosity comes from.

Marco Manconi of ND Management told the committee that The Salvation Army is “100% absolutely committed to detailed engagement with all of the stakeholders you’ve heard from today, and others,” and said acknowledged that “we have absolutely not been perfect, by no means stretched, but we have made attempts based on getting this sitemap approval process.”

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There is a desire to eventually move all beds in the complex to supportive housing, The Salvation Army’s Glenn van Gulik told the committee. Other residential uses currently planned for the facility – 99 emergency accommodation beds, plus a self-contained transitional residence and a special care medical unit – make up the bulk of its bed count.

“It’s a facility that our city needs. I think we all wish that wasn’t the case. Maybe one day it won’t. But this is now,” Gower said in his closing remarks to committee colleagues.

Nine of the 11 planning committee members voted in favor of site plan approval. Com. Shawn Menard voted against and advised. Tim Tierney was absent.

Regional Councilor Mathieu Fleury, a longtime opponent of the Salvation Army proposal, won the support of the planning committee and staff for a number of additional site plan conditions, such as a separate sidewalk at the front of the property, securing several access points to the site and directions on the use of security cameras.

At the end of the meeting, Fleury vowed to continue fighting the project. He pointed out that Ottawa-Vanier MP and Cabinet Minister Mona Fortier and newly re-elected MLA Lucille Collard opposed it and that provincial and federal funding should be sought for the project.

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The Recorder – Greenfield ZBA approves fire station site plan and special permit

By Site plan

GREENFIELD — The Zoning Appeal Board has approved the site plan and special permit with conditions for the new fire hall, to be built on Main Street near Coombs Avenue.

These conditions include the planting of low-growing green shrubs along the parking area on the Coombs Avenue side of the development; adding a barrier around the concrete transformer pad (or a transformer that provides significant sound reduction); and that the project meets all city and state building requirements. Council members also approved sewer connection plans, while acknowledging receipt of a memo submitted by Technical Superintendent Alan Twarog.

The special permit, which allows for a waiver that would reduce the 8-foot buffer requirement along Coombs Avenue and the 15% open space requirement for new developments, was unanimously approved by the ZBA Wednesday night. With members of the fire station construction committee, David Singer and Jim Winn, recusing themselves due to conflicts of interest, the permit required the support of the remaining four board members.

The overall budget of $17 million for the fire station includes $2 million for the construction of the temporary station on Hope Street, in addition to the construction of the new station, professional fees and provident funds. The temporary fire station, which the service moved into in September, is expected to be used for two years.

Members of the fire station construction committee said the aim was to have the bid package sent out by July 1, hoping to meet the contract award date of August 15 and the start of construction in September.

Speaking on behalf of the city, Katrina Pacheco of Pacheco Ross Architects and Jon Allard of Fuss & O’Neill presented plans for the new fire station, noting their request for a waiver.

“Most of the landscape, you’ll see, is at the north end of the building, where we separate the facade with some planting, and along the side of the visitor parking lot as well,” Allard said, pointing to the 15 spaces. parking for visitors. /employees on the east side of the building, accessible from Main Street.

Allard explained that while there is a landscaped buffer between the employee parking lot and Coombs Avenue, it is currently less than a foot. In this parking lot, there are seven spaces reserved for employees.

“It’s, without a doubt, kind of a narrow site,” commented ZBA President Mark Maloney.

At one point, Maloney suggested the possibility of increasing the open space by decreasing the number of parking spaces. Fire Chief Robert Strahan, however, said the department “cannot afford” to lose designated spaces for both employees and visitors, given that heavy staffing days would require them.

ZBA member Peter Wozniak pointed out that if the extent of parking is necessary, there should be signs to ensure that anyone who parks in those spaces is there on department business.

He also expressed concern about hum, or potential noise, that could come from the proposed transformer block on the Coombs Avenue side of the building, near residences.

“Something should be done to mitigate the noise coming from this transformer because it doesn’t appear that far from the residence,” he said.

Other discussions focused on navigating motors and other service vehicles to and from the building, stormwater drainage plans, and the two proposed sewer lines. In his correspondence, Twarog noted that one sewer line per building is typical and would be recommended unless absolutely necessary.

“They are mostly arranged that way because of the berries,” Pacheco replied.

One of the lines, she explained, includes an oil and water separator, capturing any oil and other contamination on site, while the other is primarily for sanitary waste. office areas and dormitory areas. Maloney asked if there was a way to accommodate the Department of Public Works’ note that a sewer line is the norm.

“I think it wouldn’t be cost effective to combine them,” Pacheco said, adding that it would involve a “complex feat” to do so.

Maloney stressed the importance of the board granting a waiver, noting that during his tenure at the ZBA, only one was granted.

“Gaps in Massachusetts are hard to find,” he said. “I think we’re going to be pretty flexible, because I think we know we have to have a real fire station and have our fire department in a real building and get them out of the tents. I think whatever conditions the board is inclined to impose…I’m sure you’ll all smile with joy and comply.

No member of the public commented during the public hearing portion of the meeting.

“I know it’s been a long session, but it’s important for the project,” Pacheco told members before beginning their deliberations after nearly two hours of discussion. “I appreciate offers to help us mitigate what we are asking for.”

In the end, all four members voted in favor of the waiver with conditions.

Reporter Mary Byrne can be reached at [email protected] or 413-930-4429. Twitter: @MaryEByrne