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May 2022

The Twinsburg urban planning commission favors the layout of industrial buildings

By Site plan

TWINSBURG — Despite intense opposition from several Old Mill Road residents, the city’s planning commission favored a final site plan for two large industrial buildings on the north side of the road, just east of Darrow Road.

At its May 16 meeting, the committee sent a positive site plan recommendation to City Council for what is being called Project Gumbo, which involves erecting 299,000 and 156,000 square foot buildings on the north and the west of many houses.

Scannell Properties has proposed development of the 33.5 acres east of Siffron in the I-2 Limited Industrial Zoning District, and is working to finalize the purchase of an adjoining 1.5 acre residential property.

Emotions ran high at a handful of meetings because nearby residents said the project would negatively impact their lives and possibly reduce the value of their properties.

“These plans have been reviewed by a number of local, state and federal professionals and approvals have been given,” planning committee chairman Marc Cohen said.

“We have to rely on these professionals for information so that we can make decisions. Although I wish the development was smaller than what is offered, Scannell followed all procedures, codes and regulations.

The panel vote was 3 to 1 in favor of the sitemap, with Michael Walker voting “no” and Cohen, Steve Shebeck and David Kleinman voting “yes”. Kraig Shipley was absent.

Some revisions to the original plans were described by Matt Weber of Weber Engineering, including reducing the width of a building’s facade from 240 to 210 feet, eliminating an 18-foot-tall barrier wall, and relocation of a port lane for trucks.

“We worked within the guidelines presented to us,” Weber said. “We have completed studies, received approval from multiple regulatory agencies, and received or applied for wetland permits from the US Army Corps of Engineers.”

Some of the infrastructure improvements proposed by Scannell are the addition of an Old Mill turning lane at Darrow, changing the signage at the intersection, landscaping to conceal buildings from neighboring houses and sidewalks along of Old Mill.

City planner Lynn Muter said Summit County officials said they would support lowering the speed limit to 35 mph on the Old Mill Township side, and Twinsburg Township administrators said they would support that.

Neighboring residents have expressed concerns about truck and car traffic accessing the property from Old Mill Road, fumes from trucks, how the project will affect their water wells and nearby wetlands and streams, bright lighting and noise.

The main theme expressed by residents is that the industrial development “is not harmonious with the surrounding neighborhood”. They were particularly critical of Old Mill Road, rather than Darrow, being the access point to the property.

City officials explained that the reason access is not possible from Darrow is that no easements were obtained to extend East Summit Commerce Park Drive east from Darrow when the installation of Siffron was built.

Weber said Scannell tried to buy a small parcel from Siffron so that the two proposed buildings could be located farther west, but that attempt failed.

ADDING STORAGE

The panel approved a final site plan for a 2,000 square foot storage building behind Summit Sound & Security at 8027 Darrow Road, south of Old Mill Road and north of Darrow Road Plaza.

TLJ Cos. LLC wants to erect the addition on its 0.75 acre lot in the C-2 Community Commercial Zoning District. Summit Sound occupies 3,000 square feet of the existing building, with Subway occupying the remaining 1,788 square feet.

Thirty-two parking spaces are available for Summit Sound and Subway, including 13 on-site and 19 on the adjacent Havana’s Cigars property. There is a shared access drive off Darrow Road for both properties.

A side lot setback waiver was granted by the Zoning Appeal Board.

The planning committee changed its next meeting date from June 20 to June 27 because the city will observe the old date as the June 19 holiday.

Contact the newspaper at [email protected]

Preliminary site plan for Empire Parkway site approved in Macedonia

By Site plan

MACEDONIA – A preliminary site plan for the first of a handful building to be built on 125 acres on Empire Parkway, which includes land where Bedford Anodizing once stood, was approved by the city’s planning commission on 16 may.

ARKO National Construction representative Russell Clark said the company plans to build a 353,400 square foot (310 by 1,140 ft) warehouse/distribution center south of East Highland Road and east west of the Norfolk Southern Railroad tracks.

At its March 21 meeting, the planning committee approved the clearing of the site. Clark said the trees were felled but not removed. He noted that the specification building would house two as yet unknown tenants.

Empire Parkway would be extended and access to other future buildings would be via a driveway leading to Empire Parkway past the initial building.

When the building is complete, Clark explained that car parking will be provided on the north and south sides and truck parking on the west side, with 39 loading docks on the west side and 11 on the north side. A total of 104 parking spaces are planned.

City planner Brian Frantz said a waiver from the zoning appeals board would be required regarding the number of parking spaces, and the building’s proposed 40-foot height meets zoning code requirements.

Stormwater management ponds are planned on the west and northeast sides, and Clark said the developer will add landscaping. “We look forward to working with the city on a successful project that brings economic development,” he noted.

Frantz said photometry and detailed landscaping plans must be submitted prior to final site plan approval, and approvals from the Ohio EPA and/or the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are required for areas. wetlands and impacts on watercourses.

Last July, the city council approved a tax increment financing agreement with Macedonia Empire LLC to redevelop the site.

The city benefited from nearly $1.5 million through a cooperative effort between the city, the Summit County Land Bank, the county tax office, and state and federal regulatory agencies to redevelop the property.

The city acquired the property in October 2019. It was state-owned under forfeited land status and was included in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure process.

The plant carried out metal finishing work and ceased operations in June 2013.

OTHER BUSINESS

The panel approved a final site plan for a new Don Basch Jewelers store on Fairway Drive, construction of a pavilion and gazebo at Specialty Lubricants on Corporate Park Drive, and signage for IHOP at 613 E. Aurora Road.

The Basch building will be north of Route 82, west of Fairlane Drive and behind the First Watch/AT&T building. The company plans to move from its current location on the north side of Route 82, east of Fairlane Drive and next to the Winking Lizard.

The 6,500 square foot building will be erected on the west side of the lot, with the entrance and parking lot on the east side. It will include spaces for merchandise, repairs and offices, as well as a community hall and kitchen.

A flagpole is planned near the building entrance, with trees, evergreens and shrubs as landscaping around the property.

A mound on the north side of the parking lot was eliminated from the plans, the height of a tower at the entrance to the building was reduced to 32 feet, and Frantz said additional landscaping is recommended along Route 8 and north of the parking lot.

A usage gap and a handful of setback/forward width gaps were granted by the BZA.

The specialty lubricants pavilion will measure 30 feet by 26 feet and 10 feet in height and will be erected in front of the building adjacent to the parking lot.

A crosswalk will cross a paved driveway to the front lawn, and a sidewalk will be installed between the paved driveway and the pavilion/gazebo.

Signage for the IHOP restaurant, which sits on the site of the former Pizza Hut, includes three wall signs totaling 61 square feet and one floor monument sign totaling 40 square feet. Frantz said the signage meets zoning code standards.

Contact the newspaper at [email protected]

Vista revised to Uptown site plan in Brighton approved

By Site plan

May 20, 2022

by Tom Tolen / [email protected]

The footprint of the Vista at Uptown luxury housing project near Brighton city center has just become noticeably smaller, while at the same time the number of units has increased significantly. The development is to be located between N. Second St. and Mill Pond. The project developers are Lansing’s DTN Development Group

Last night Brighton City Council approved the amended site plan for the revamped development by a 5-1 vote, with council member Renee Pettengill the only one not voting.

Vista at Uptown is a development proposal that has been on the books since 2018 but was delayed for at least two years when the COVID pandemic hit. John Woods, representing Lansing’s DTN Brighton LLC, told the board that despite COVID the company remained committed to the project and believed in Brighton’s future. He said, in his words, “The economy has changed with COVID and costs have gone up, but we’re still committed to the project.”

Developers originally proposed 199 apartments over four floors with a 110,000 square foot footprint and a parking structure. This then grew to 205 apartments. The most recent revised plans call for 235 housing units, but on a smaller footprint of around 80,000 square feet. Woods says they will be able to accomplish this by placing the parking structure below ground level. This will make 190 underground parking spaces and 180 surface spaces. Two other changes will be to have two rooftop courtyards instead of one and to move the swimming pool.

After his presentation, Woods told WHMI that the project’s estimated costs had skyrocketed due to COVID and inflation, from the initial $40 million to around $60 million. The high-end development — with 1- to 3-bedroom apartments costing $1,300 and up — these numbers are preliminary, the developer says — will feature a patio, pool, outdoor kitchen and grill, fitness centers, conference rooms, foyers, club rooms and bocci ball fields. The luxury apartments will range from 500-foot studios to 1,300-square-foot 3-bedroom units. Woods says the company intends to begin work on the foundation this fall and hopes the project will be completed in the spring of 2024.

NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR FINAL APPROVAL OF THE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

By Site plan

NOTICE OF APPLICATION

NOTICE OF APPLICATION

For

FINAL APPROVAL OF THE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

A request has been filed by Danny Veri of Livonia Builders G2, LLC 18261
Shelley Pond Ct., Northville, MI 48168
for the approval of the final site plan at construction
twenty-five single-family residences
on a site of approximately 10.5 acres as
“cluster development” on the following described parcels of land:

TAX CODE: # 06-06-13-275-036, 06-06-13-275-044, 06-06-13-275-034
Machnik Drive, Chelsea, MI 48118

The final site plan application will be reviewed by the Chelsea Planning Commission on
Tuesday, June 21, 2022 to 7:00 p.m. at the Chelsea City Council Chambers at 311
S. Main St. The meeting will also be accessible to members of the public via Zoom.
The information will be posted on the City of Chelsea website (www.city-chelsea.org).

Signed and written comments regarding the application will be accepted before the
Planning Commission meeting, and will be read at the meeting upon request. comments
should be addressed to the Chelsea Planning Commission, 305 S. MAIN ST. ST. 100,
Chelsea, Michigan 48118.

A public hearing on the site plan will take place, if requested in writing by any property
owner or occupant within three hundred (300) feet of the property line being
considered.

Persons requiring reasonable accommodations for disabilities in order for the hearing to be
which are accessible to them, are asked to inform the chairman of the Chelsea Planning Commission
no later than five (5) working days before the date of the hearing of this disability.

CHELSEA PLANNING COMMISSION
Sarah Haselshwardt, Secretary

The Outer Banks Voice – KDH board approves Wawa site plan

By Site plan

KDH Board Approves Wawa Site Plan

By Michelle Wagner | Outer Banks Voice May 17, 2022

No timetable set for local construction

Kill Devil Hills will host the first Wawa convenience store in North Carolina after city commissioners approved a site plan May 16 for one of its stores at 1900 N. Croatan Highway, located on the west side of the city. highway just south of BB&T and across from the old Kmart.

The site, which was unanimously approved under certain conditions, will include a 6,000 square foot convenience store, eight gas pumps and 52 parking spaces. The plan was put together by Arista Development on behalf of Wawa, which also has its eye on several other sites in North Carolina, according to its external public relations supervisor, Jennifer Wolf. In an email to The Voice written after the board vote, Wolf said there was currently no timeline for the store to be built in Kill Devil Hills.

Wawa operates more than 850 convenience stores (600 of which offer gas) in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Florida and Washington, D.C. The chain is known for its made-to-order meals, its freshly brewed coffee, hot breakfast sandwiches and other Wawa brand items.

“Overall the package we got is extremely comprehensive, it’s well designed, it’s very detailed – how each post hole is going to be drilled and where each piece of wire goes,” the Kill Devil mayor said. Hills, Ben Sproul, before the vote. . “We want people here in the public and people in the neighborhood to know that we have your best interests at heart, we do our best for the community at all times. You certainly have a quality engineering team that put this package together.

Several residents who live on nearby streets spoke during the public comment portion of the meeting, expressing concerns, including Wawa’s plans to install a vinyl fence as a neighborhood buffer. “A vinyl fence won’t provide any barrier against noise, lights or anything else,” one resident claimed.

When presenting the site plan, however, Deputy Director of Planning Cameron Ray said the claimant had since revised the site plan to replace the vinyl fence with a shadowbox fence to take into account the load of the wind and other maintenance issues.

For his part, Kill Devil Hills commissioner Terry Gray said he would like to see the candidate go further.

“I urge the developer to look at the closing of Lowe’s and try to go further and help buffer residences,” Gray asserted. He said in the future he would like to see city ordinances strengthened to require buffering that provided more of a sound barrier in situations similar to the Wawa project, where commercial establishments adjoin residential properties.



NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING TO REVIEW PLANS FOR OUTSIDE BANKS EVENT CENTER
Dare County, North Carolina
Dare County Visitor Center

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Visitors Bureau will hold a public meeting to review plans for an Outer Banks Events Center. The meeting will be held on Monday, June 6, 2022 from 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. at the Keeper’s Galley building in Haven on the Banks, 115 Dove Street, Nags Head North Carolina 27959.

Still in the conceptual phase, the Events Center is intended to provide a suitable and flexible space for year-round events, concerts, sports, meetings, smaller trade shows, galas and many more. other uses. Learn more about visitor and resident benefits and how the event center is planned to complement the new Soundside Promenade being designed.

The staff will be at your disposal to answer all your questions. For more information, please see our Event Center FAQ Page.



Site plan committee reviews proposed office conversion and subdivision

By Site plan

By Lorilyn C. Lirio

Olympia’s site plan committee is considering two requests for development projects – one is to use the existing building and the other is a proposal to subdivide 1.4 acres into nine lots with eight single-family homes.

Office space

In a meeting on Wednesday May 11, LDC Principal Engineer Ross Jarvis provided a brief overview of the client’s proposal for a building at 720 Lilly Road, SE, Olympia.

The site includes two buildings with 36 parking spaces.

He said the Montessori school uses one of the buildings; the other is a bank.

As indicated in the narrative description submitted to the site committee, the Montessori building would remain on its land.

The developer plans to split the second building in two and use it as a dental clinic and office space.

The drive-thru that is on the east side of the building will be removed and a new exit door installed.

No additional buildings will be established, Jarvis added.

Olympia planner Casey Schaufler asked Jarvis to submit the binding site plan amendment, which outlines their drive-thru plan.

“Some of the parking requirements may depend on whether or not you meet a threshold of 50% of the package’s rateable value,” Schaufler said when explaining why he had to request their plan with drive-thru.

“If you have a project that meets this threshold, you will have additional requirements for parking islands that must be installed on site,” Schaufler added.

He also recommended referring to the building’s binding 1997 site plan. “It shows the proposed building for the school and the bank. We need to see an actual outline.

Housing estate

At the same meeting, the Site Plan Committee heard a proposal from JSA Civil on behalf of a client who seeks to subdivide 1.4 acres into nine lots and construct eight single-family home parcels at the south end of Decatur St. at about 18and Avenue SW, just northwest of the offices next to the Auto Mall west of Olympia.

The project also proposed a new connection between the sidewalk and the pedestrian path on Decatur Street to provide expanded pedestrian amenities for residents of the project and adjacent neighborhood.

BADA approves plan for two warehouses along Boulevard Enders | Winchester star

By Site plan

BERRYVILLE — Only two new warehouses will be built along Jack Enders Boulevard.

On Wednesday evening, the Berryville Area Development Authority (BADA) approved a site plan for LGV Group LLC to build the warehouses on 12½ acres adjacent to Clarke County Business Park.

The company initially proposed to develop three warehouses there.

Originally owned by Brent Mercke, the property was already zoned to accommodate types of businesses suitable for small industrial parks.

BADA advises the Clarke County Board of Supervisors and Berryville City Council on land use issues involving an area targeted for possible incorporation into the city.

Her unanimous vote, following a motion by Kathy Smart seconded by Diane Harrison, ends more than six months of indecision on the project.

Based in Loudoun County, LGV operates a business on Station Road in Berryville where metal windows and doors are manufactured.

Each of the three warehouses initially proposed was to comprise 60,000 square feet. LGV planned to occupy one and lease the other two.

The review of the site plan has been postponed several times. Officials asked for more information on how the warehouses would affect their environment. The Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) also reviewed the project.

To address the DEQ’s concerns about stormwater runoff, LGV decided not to build one of the warehouses. This will reduce the amount of impermeable surface on the site from 8.2 acres to around 6 acres, documents show.

One of the warehouses to be built will include 60,000 square feet. LGV plans to occupy this warehouse, which will be closest to the boulevard, according to Berryville Community Development Director Christy Dunkle.

The other warehouse will be 85,000 square feet and will be leased, Dunkle said in his understanding.

A stormwater management system will be installed on the property, she said.

The approved site plan will also establish a larger buffer zone between the property and the adjacent subdivision of Berryville Glen. Dunkle said landscaping pads will be installed.

The LGV “responded to the (local) requirements of the buffer zone”, she stressed.

The company did not say when construction would begin, it said.

Lucan Commercial Development Receives Conditional Site Plan Approval

By Site plan

Content of the article

Lucan-Biddulph City Council has conditionally approved the site plan for a planned large new shopping center at the north end of Lucan.

Content of the article

Conditional site plan approval was granted at the May 3 council meeting at the Glenns Shopping Center at 315 Main Street on a 3.73-hectare (9.24-acre) parcel of land at the far end north of Lucan (north of the community center). The land is now used for agriculture.

As Middlesex County planner Dan FitzGerald explained in his report to council, site plan approval allows “the construction of a large format commercial development primarily for retail, restaurants , professional offices and commercial services in the form of a gas station and an automatic car wash. ”

The project proposes a commercial development of 5,087.49 square meters consisting of five separate buildings.

According to the FitzGerald report, “Municipal services currently do not exist on the property and access is maintained via Main Street. As a condition of development, the developer would be required to extend municipal services to the property through Main Street.

Certain conditions and provincial approvals must still be met for the site plan agreement to be signed. Responding to the con. To Daniel Regan’s concerns about traffic on Highway 4, FitzGerald said there will be a requirement for two left turn lanes on Highway 4 in the development.

Com. Jaden Hodgins asked if the sidewalks off Highway 4 leading to the property are part of the project. Public Works Director Jeff Little said sidewalks are not part of the project and will need to be addressed in the future.

Torrington P&Z approves school construction project site plan, with conditions

By Site plan

TORRINGTON — Members of the Planning and Zoning Commission and city planner Jeremy Liefert have approved the city’s $180 million school construction project, although concerns remain about traffic and sustainable practices such as the solar panels.

The School Building Committee requested special exception permits and site plan approval for middle and high school buildings and new administrative offices for the school district, replacing the aging Torrington High School, which will be demolished once the new construction is completed.

Amy Samuelson, representing the SLAM Collaborative, the developer of the project, answered a number of questions regarding traffic issues raised by the police sergeant. Dustin Baldis.


“There are traffic issues that have yet to be resolved with the Winthrop Street intersection,” Liefert said, referring to reports and comments from Baldis.

“There still has to be traffic analysis, and there still has to be a solution. But I think we are in a good position at this point,” Liefert said.

Baldis requested that all bus traffic entering and exiting school property during construction enter the school campus using the back or “north route,” according to Liefert.

Commission member Starley Arias asked how these buses would affect nearby neighborhoods.

“I understand the buses will be coming from the back of the school; (this area has) been closed and not used,” he said. “There’s a little condo neighborhood there, plus the cul de sac neighborhood up the hill. They haven’t seen any bus traffic, but now we’re using it as a method to get students to high school during construction. … Trafficking could cause problems for these communities.

Building committee co-chairman Ed Arum said no other traffic would be allowed except for buses. “The buses come, the doors are closed, and when school is over, the buses come back to pick up the kids,” he said. “No one else is allowed to go there.”

Baldis’ biggest concern, according to Liefert, is traffic at the three-way intersection on Winthrop Street and Major Besse Drive. Even with the diverted buses, incoming and outgoing vehicles and pedestrians using crosswalks could cause traffic jams and other hazards, Baldis said.

“Sergeant. Baldis said there would be traffic jams at the three-way intersection and something should be done now rather than later,” Liefert said.

In his own memorandum of approval, the planner set out a condition that all traffic issues must be resolved before the certificate of occupancy is issued.

“We recommend that the claimant stay in contact with Officer Baldis and resolve these issues,” he said.

Arum said he and the committee would continue discussions with Baldis. “We have met the sergeant several times and we will continue to meet him,” he said. “We also meet the bus drivers.”

Arias also asked if solar panels and other “sustainable systems” for the new building were being considered.

“You said you designed the school to have solar panels, but they’re not in the design,” he said. “Or (are there) backup generators; a sustainable system for the school in case of bad weather.

Samuelson said the buildings had a generator that would provide power in an emergency. “That includes all lighting, security systems, alarm systems, access control and many other things,” she said. “As a measure of sustainability, we designed the building with the possibility of putting solar panels on the roof, and sized the roof to accommodate these (panels).”

Arias said, “Our state is evolving to be more sustainable, to be a green state,” he said. “I want to be sure that any future projects we approve are consistent with these goals.”

Arum said the building committee did not put solar panels in this design. “We don’t want to install the panels until the building is complete,” he said. “We want to make sure we have enough money to build a school for the children of Torrington.”

Glen Carbon holds hearing over gas station site plan

By Site plan

At one of two public hearings on Monday, the Glen Carbon Planning and Zoning Commission heard a preliminary plan and site plan for a proposed gas station and convenience store.

The commission struggled to assemble a quorum but eventually voted in favor of the site plan with four variants and a possible fifth variant for parking should the village staff deem it necessary.

The preliminary platform and site plan was for The Game Gas Station and Convenience Store. The new plans would completely redevelop the current gas station which sits just off Route 157 at Glen West Drive and south of Interstate 270. The preliminary flat proposes taking the current five lots on the site and redesigning them. -flat in all three lots, totaling 2.39 acres.


Dan Koziatek, a civil engineer with Civil and Environmental Consultants, and owner Bobby Patel represented the project. Koziatek also served as a spokesperson.

He said the project will be carried out in two phases. First, the existing 3,500 square foot convenience store and gas pumps will remain open while crews dig the ground for the new store and pumps behind or west of the current store. The new gas storage tanks will go to the southeast corner of the site while a new buried storm water retention pond will go to the southwest corner. If the village grants final approval, construction could begin as early as July.

When the new store is complete and the pumps are ready for use, a demolition crew will then level the old store and pumps and remove the old storage for remediation. The new convenience store and liquor store would be approximately 6,000 square feet and include a gas awning. Access to and from the site will only be from The Game Drive, not 157.

“The biggest challenge of this project has been access [to and from Route 157]”said Koziatek. He said they had met with the village’s building and development committee about adding an in/out fee on 157, but it was opposed.” Ultimately, what was clear from their perspective was that the sidewalk cuts must remain on The Game Drive.”

At one point, Scott Slemer, the village’s director of public works, stepped in with a future IDOT project that will affect the width of the road.

“The village advanced by making a [agreement] for this intersection, so we have this design,” Slemer said. “There will be another lane and a sidewalk that will be put in place further to the west.

He said the village applied for a Congestion and Air Quality Mitigation (CMAQ) grant, but failed to obtain it. They will resubmit, and Slemer said there’s a strong chance the village will get the funds next time around.

“More than likely this whole intersection will be under construction in 2026,” Slemer said.

The developer, Ma Tulja, Inc., submitted the following deviations:

• Not providing “street trees” along The Game Drive, which has approximately 226 linear feet of frontage requiring six street trees. The developer says that due to the large driveways and paved areas along The Game Drive, the waiver is requested to place these trees along 157 and the west side of the site instead.

• Request that said street trees be within 10 feet of the back of the sidewalk. Due to the creek that runs along the western boundary of the property and the wide driveways required for tanker trucks that haul fuel, “street trees” should be placed five feet from the back of the sidewalk along the 157

• No sidewalks along The Game Drive Due to a future Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) development plan to widen the road and change its overall elevation, it is impossible to design a site that will connect the proposed and existing roads while providing a sidewalk that meets the requirements of the village. The IDOT project is currently not funded

• Allow a 25 foot setback from the stream bank without disturbance. The existing creek along the western boundary would be rerouted to align with an existing culvert under The Game Drive and remove any invasive species along that segment of the creek. The west driveway of the site is located 15 feet into the buffer zone. Erosion control devices would be installed to protect the bank

This project will be presented to the full board in time for the May 24 meeting or at one of the meetings next month.

Tribal Council approves $75 million for ‘theme show’ and site development at exit 407

By Site development

One of the world’s largest amusement park companies, based in France, Puy du Fou, is teaming up with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians to create a “theme show” centered on Cherokee history on the property of 200 acres under development by Kituwah LLC, off Interstate 40 at Exit 407 in Sevier County.

The Cherokee Tribal Council voted May 11-1 to appropriate $75 million for the project, including $45 million budgeted for attraction construction and $30 million for site development costs on the entire 80-acre section of the property slated for Phase 1 development. The Puy du Fou project is expected to control 4-5 acres when it opens in 2024.

“This project in Tennessee developed with EBCI means a lot to us: it will initiate our presence on American soil, where there are so many great stories to tell”, Nicolas de Villiers, President & Artistic Director of Puy du Fou . “As lovers of history and cultural roots, we are proud and honored to partner with the EBCI Tribe to achieve this goal.”

Twice voted “Best Theme Park in the World”, Puy du Fou operates an original flagship park in France that attracts more than 2.3 million visitors each year and only follows Disneyland Paris for the most in the country. The park features multiple shows, vintage villages, and more than half a dozen on-site resorts custom designed and built with authenticity as the focal point. The company now has attractions in Spain, the Netherlands, the UK and China.

This would be its first foray into the US market, and under the agreement, Kituwah LLC would have first right of refusal on any future US projects.

“We are excited to take the first steps towards developing this world-class attraction that will help sustain our nation economically while creating a new platform to share dimensions of Cherokee history that many have never heard” , Tribal Council Chairman Richard French said in a statement.

The concept

The tribe’s relationship with Puy du Fou at exit 407 will be similar to its relationship with Caesar’s Entertainment at its casinos. The tribe will own the property, building and business through a newly formed company called Cherokee Rose, which in turn is owned by Kituwah LLC, but Puy du Fou will design and operate the attraction.

The attraction itself will consist of a 125,000 to 175,000 square foot “retail entertainment” dining and entertainment space, with an immersive show that will be the first of its kind in the United States, said Matthew Cross, CEO of OE Experiences, the Knoxville-based experience development company that represented Kituwah and The 407 in their global search for ideal partners.

“The closest example would be something like Titanic over there in Pigeon Forge where you walk around a themed space, but it’s much more about immersion and the authenticity of actually being there,” said said Cross. “And those sets are complemented by live actors, which is sort of Puy du Fou’s signature.”

“The vocation of Puy du Fou is to tell stories in an innovative, original and rooted way,” said Manon Rigaudeau, Puy du Fou’s international press officer. “This new immersive show is the embodiment of this vocation: it will plunge visitors into the heart of a moving epic, from the Appalachians to the plains of Champagne.

Puy du Fou is one of the only companies in the world to create its own creative design and operate the attraction, allowing it to “seamlessly integrate” guest experiences into the space.

The show itself will present the “authentic and heartbreaking” story of Cherokee heroism during World War I through a “fully immersive” show that will take guests on a “patriotic and moving journey for the whole family”, according to a news. Release.

“These were Cherokees who actually participated on behalf of the Allies, and this experience will put you in the thick of the action as someone who travels overseas with them and has that experience,” Cross said. “Our goal, as is the goal of any experience, is for it to be highly transformative. This is going to be a very emotional yet very positive story, and we hope everyone comes away with a sense of admiration for a story that many people don’t know and which, in my opinion, deserves to be told.

Council debate

During a May 5 Tribal Council discussion, Big Cove representative Teresa McCoy said the proposal met with a favorable reception from Big Cove residents when she discussed it with them at a meeting. She said she was also “comfortable” with the decision, despite the steep price tag.

“If we give the information to our people, they will read it and make their own decisions and take away the fear of us sitting here and handing out $75 million, because it’s scary,” she said. . “He is.”

Birdtown representative Albert Rose was the only one to vote against the project. He disputed that the tribe, not Puy du Fou, would pay to build the attraction and wondered what the return on investment would be. His instinct is that it’s not a good deal, he says.

“Commercial games, you’re going to get a pretty quick return,” he said. “This, I don’t know when I was going to get it back.”

Registered member Ernest Tiger also spoke out against the proposal.

“I just think the money could be better spent,” he said. “Why not spend $75 million and buy every member of the tribe a house?”

Progress on the 407

Buc-ee’s, the first company to announce its partnership with Kituwah, is currently working to vertically build what will be the world’s largest convenience store when it opens next summer. The entire 80 acres of Phase 1 is now the subject of letters of intent from restaurants, retail chains and concepts looking to build there. Although these letters are not binding, Cross expects the Puy du Fou announcement to prompt these companies to make their own public commitments. In December, the Tribal Council voted to allow another of its LLCs, EBCI Holdings, to proceed with construction of a sports betting bar on the property.

In addition to work at Buc-ee, fine grading has begun for the construction of a Marriott Courtyard owned by Kituwah LLC. The tribe hopes to see this facility open in 2023, but achieving that goal will be “challenging” given current supply chain issues, Cross said.

Cross said he doesn’t anticipate any zoning issues with the development, as the property was designated as a tourism improvement district before the tribe purchased it in 2019. However, he said the developers are discussing the how the current labor shortage might impact development plans and considered potential solutions, including labor housing, and also assessed infrastructure needs in the community.

“Many new timelines all start at the same time after a milestone like this, but we pay a lot of attention to the City of Sevierville, Sevier County, and the Tennessee Department of Transportation regarding area infrastructure and which is necessary to support not just our development, but the community itself.

Edinburgh International Book Festival unveils new sitemap for years to come

By Site plan

The Edinburgh International Book Festival has announced the locations of its upcoming events.

The festival will be held at the Edinburgh College of Art, before moving to a brand new city center and the University of Edinburgh site in 2024.

Building on the success of last year’s hybrid program, this year will see the current site expand, with increased capacity and number of sites. Last year was the first year the Book Festival has moved since its inception in 1983, beginning its long-term partnership with the University of Edinburgh.

As part of the partnership, the event will move to the Edinburgh Futures Institute in 2024, a landmark development based on the site of the former Royal Infirmary on Lauriston Place.

READ MORE: The centenary of the birth of Hugh MacDiarmid – and the Scottish renaissance

The University of Edinburgh said it was transforming the building into a space for multidisciplinary collaborations and partnerships.

Organizers say the institute will provide the Book Festival with a variety of accessible indoor and outdoor venues as well as the necessary facilities to host a hybrid program of live and in-person events. They say the venue provides ample space to create the atmospheric literary gathering place that audiences and authors have long enjoyed for socializing, connecting and sparking ideas.

Festival director Nick Barley said: “We are extremely excited to return to Edinburgh College of Art in August, where we can bring back the buzz of Edinburgh’s best festival years. We’ll build on what we offered last year and look forward to sharing how this charming and welcoming site can provide unforgettable experiences for audiences and authors alike.

“We have worked closely with the University of Edinburgh over the past two years and are delighted that our new permanent home will be the Edinburgh Futures Institute from 2024, a historic building with a ‘green village’ outdoor space. very important campaign which is developed for the enjoyment of all and of which our festival city can be proud.

He continued: “It creates extraordinary and game-changing opportunities for the book festival, but more importantly – for the first time in our festival’s history – it helps us plan a number of years in advance.

“The new site will allow us to continue to rebuild our world-renowned program, while placing accessibility, sustainability and innovation at the heart of what we do with a very important outdoor ‘green village’ space.”

READ MORE: The Catalan arts festival will take place across Scotland this spring

Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh, Professor Peter Mathieson, said: “I am delighted that the University of Edinburgh is deepening its partnership with the Edinburgh International Book Festival.

“We will provide world-class venues, and our students and staff will be an integral part of the festival programme, sharing and discussing ideas with audiences in Edinburgh and around the world. We look forward to welcoming book festival-goers to Edinburgh College of Art for the next two years.

“When the festival then moves to the Edinburgh Futures Institute from 2024, it will help realize the inscription engraved on its wall: ‘Patet Omnibus’, which stands for ‘Open to All’.”

This year’s hybrid festival will take place from August 13-29.

Approved Site Plan for Don Sol Restaurant

By Site plan

Posted May 10, 2022 7:55 PM

Last updated on May 11, 2022 09:08

Written by Greg Sapp

Premier Local News 2022

Members of the Effingham City Plan Commission on Tuesday approved a site plan for a Don Sol Mexican restaurant, which will be located at 1303 Avenue of Mid-America.

The restaurant will be located along the south side of the Avenue of Mid-America, north of TGI Friday’s and will relocate the fountain north of the Thelma Keller Convention Center. The 6,385-square-foot building will feature a pick-up window, but no walkway.

The Commission voted to recommend that City Council rezone the properties at 801,805, 807, and 809 North Keller Drive from the R-2 single-family residential zoning to the B-1 Ward shopping area. Some residents who live in the Hickory Hills Subdivision, west of these properties, have asked what could be developed on the lots if rezoning is granted. They also said that, if the properties are developed commercially, what arrangements could be made so as not to affect their standard of living. Buffers, berms, fences, plantings and other landscaping were all suggested. City council will likely consider the proposed rezoning at its May 17 meeting.

The Commission recommended that Council approve a subdivision of the Oak Pointe subdivision so that the land north of Kohl’s could be developed as a residence on Lake Pauline. A subdivision flat for the 4th addition to the HGI subdivision, essentially the Don Sol site, has also been recommended for approval.

Developer Scott Conant has asked the Commission to withdraw his application to rezone a property near Effingham Country Club and to delay his application for a flat of the property.

Brian Hayes and Dave Storm were re-elected Chair and Vice-Chair of the Planning Commission for another year, and Ken Wohltman was welcomed as a new member of the Commission.

05/10/2022 | Sitemap for Triple Crown Estates Development Advances

By Site plan
Phases one and two of the new Triple Crown Estates development are shown in a rendering above. Image courtesy of Vista Design Inc.

SNOW HILL – As construction on the first phase begins, plans for the second phase of a new development off Route 589 are also progressing.

Last week, the Worcester County Planning Commission reviewed the site plan for the second phase of Triple Crown Estates, the residential community built next to Ocean Pines.

“This project has been approved for a very long time,” attorney Mark Cropper said. “It’s just a continuation of what was originally approved with no major changes.”

Cropper presented the site plan for Phase Two of Triple Crown Estates to the commission last Thursday. The project, which received initial approval in 2015, at one time included duplexes but was adjusted in 2020 and is now made up of 60 single-family homes.

Phase one, which is currently under construction, consists of 30 units while phase two, which was under review last week, will also consist of 30 units.

ocean city live cams

The homes will be connected to Ocean Pines via an extension of King Richard Road and will not be accessible via Route 589 or Gum Point Road.

“The only access is from Ocean Pines,” Cropper said.

Planning commission member Ken Church said he had received calls from residents of Gum Point Road who said they had seen construction vehicles on their street.

Cropper said the vehicles were not associated with Triple Crown Estates, but were instead related to the county’s sewer installation along Gum Point Road.

“I have been told that any activity that has been observed has nothing to do with the construction of the subdivision,” Cropper said.

He added that, as proposed, the second phase of the planned residential community (PRC) was consistent with the county’s overall plan and plans for the project had not changed since the duplexes were converted to single-family homes in 2020.

“If the RPC did not comply with the compensation plan, zoning regulations and other guidelines, it would never have been approved to begin with,” he said.

The commission voted unanimously to forward the RPC to County Commissioners with a favorable recommendation.

The Urban Planning Commission approves the plan for the implementation of the project in the city

By Site plan

May 10 – A final site plan has been approved for the second phase of an age-limited development along US 15 in Frederick that is expected to have nearly 400 units.

The city’s Planning Commission voted unanimously on Monday to approve the combined preliminary plan and final site plan for Section 2 of the Bloomfields community, being developed by Natelli Communities.

The community – on the east and south sides of Willowbrook Road and west of US 15 – will add 207 detached single-family homes and 186 townhouses and villas.

The entire Bloomfields community is bordered by Sundays Lane to the north, Willow Road to the south, US 15 to the east and Willowbrook Road to the west, according to a Planning Commission report prepared by city staffers.

The first section of the community, with 229 single-family homes and 79 townhouses/villas, was approved in November 2020, according to the staff report.

The developer is trying to take much of the design from Section 1 and has tried to focus on how the units are oriented around small parks and other areas that can be destinations for residents, said Michael Natelli, of Natelli Communities, to the commission.

The commission granted an amendment to allow noise walls in a section of the neighborhood to be up to 12 feet high – above the 6 feet allowed by the city’s land management code – to help limit the noise from nearby freeway.

Natelli said the developer would try to keep the fences under 12 feet if possible, but asked for some flexibility in the requirements.

The wall in this area will need to be further away from the homes it would protect, requiring a higher height to be effective, he said.

The project will include five types of single-family homes and two models of villas, according to the staff report.

Bloomfields was annexed to the city in two parts, according to the staff report: 286 acres in September 2009, then 252 acres in September 2012.

A previous master plan called for up to 1,200 units, 1.3 million square feet of retail or office space, and a 15-acre school site.

A preliminary plan and a final site plan for the first residential phase were approved prior to the cessation of project activities.

A new annexation resolution was passed in 2017 after Natelli Communities announced plans to create an age-restricted community.

A master plan was approved in October 2018 for 1,500 non-residential units and amenities.

The project includes 45 acres of public park and open space, including 15 acres that the city will transfer to the county for a school site and 15 acres for public park that will include a portion of the Tuscarora Creek Trail and a shared-use trail. There is also land for a future water tower.

The final 15 acres will be a linear park along US 15 that will be part of the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Scenic Byway, according to the staff report.

Planning Commission approves the plan for the implementation of the project in the city | Real estate and development

By Site plan

A final site plan has been approved for the second phase of an age-limited development along US 15 in Frederick that is expected to total nearly 400 units.

The city’s Planning Commission voted unanimously on Monday to approve the combined preliminary plan and final site plan for Section 2 of the Bloomfields community, being developed by Natelli Communities.

The community – on the east and south sides of Willowbrook Road and west of US 15 – will add 207 detached single-family homes and 186 townhouses and villas.

The entire Bloomfields community is bordered by Sundays Lane to the north, Willow Road to the south, US 15 to the east and Willowbrook Road to the west, according to a Planning Commission report prepared by city staffers.

The first section of the community, with 229 single-family homes and 79 townhouses/villas, was approved in November 2020, according to the staff report.

The developer is trying to take much of the design from Section 1 and has tried to focus on how the units are oriented around small parks and other areas that can be destinations for residents, said Michael Natelli, of Natelli Communities, to the commission.

The commission granted an amendment to allow noise walls in a section of the neighborhood to be up to 12 feet high – above the 6 feet allowed by the city’s land management code – to help limit the noise from nearby freeway.

Natelli said the developer would try to keep the fences under 12 feet if possible, but asked for some flexibility in the requirements.

The wall in this area will need to be further away from the homes it would protect, requiring a higher height to be effective, he said.

The project will include five types of single-family homes and two models of villas, according to the staff report.

Bloomfields was annexed to the city in two parts, according to the staff report: 286 acres in September 2009, then 252 acres in September 2012.

A previous master plan called for up to 1,200 units, 1.3 million square feet of retail or office space, and a 15-acre school site.

A preliminary plan and a final site plan for the first residential phase were approved prior to the cessation of project activities.

A new annexation resolution was passed in 2017 after Natelli Communities announced plans to create an age-restricted community.

A master plan was approved in October 2018 for 1,500 non-residential units and amenities.

The project includes 45 acres of public park and open space, including 15 acres that the city will transfer to the county for a school site and 15 acres for public park that will include a portion of the Tuscarora Creek Trail and a shared-use trail. There is also land for a future water tower.

The last 15 acres will be a linear Park along US 15 which will be part of the Journey Through Hallowed Ground Scenic Byway, according to the staff report.

City Council approves site plan for 224-unit development

By Site plan

Posted on Monday, May 09, 2022

Owen Sound City Council has approved a site plan application to permit the construction of 6 purpose-built 4-storey multi-unit residential buildings totaling 224 units, as well as a common amenity building, a parking area, landscaping and a network of sidewalks at 1144 1st West Ave.

The development proposal comes from Hansa Financial & Property Management Inc.

The property is the location of the former BCK Foundry where propellers were cast for Canadian-built vessels until it closed in 1996. The factory buildings were removed in the early 2000s and ownership of 8 acres has since been vacant.

The site is a former brownfield site with fully serviced utilities, access to public transit, and walking distance to amenities in the city’s riverside district, making it ideal for developing strong, livable communities that promote the long-term prosperity and social well-being. -be.

More information on this and other projects is available on the City’s website at www.owensound.ca/development.

For more information, please contact Amy Cann, Planning and Heritage Manager at 519-376-4440 ext. 1232 or by email at [email protected]

Fast facts:

  • The Application for Site Plan Approval proposes the construction of six (6) purpose-built four-storey multi-unit residential rental buildings with a total of 224 units at 1144 1st Ave W.
  • A number of studies, including a site condition report and a traffic impact study, were submitted in support of the applications.
  • The proposal is consistent with the policies of the City’s 2021 Official Plan and meets the requirements of the City’s Zoning By-law

-30-

Site Development Manager – Data Center

By Site development
This opportunity is with a market leader in the critical data center developer / wholesaler / colo provider space. This company provides data center solutions tailored to the requirements of their customers’ critical operational facilities. They ensure the reliability of critical installations for most of the world’s largest organizations, including the Hyperscale market.

Data Center Strategy and Site Development Manager – Ashburn, VA
This position is also available in: Santa Clara CA, Portland OR, Denver CO, Chicago IL, Charlotte NC, Atlanta GA, Dallas TX and Toronto ON.

Our client is looking for a Site Development Manager. The ideal candidate will have extensive experience leading data center and infrastructure development efforts, including ownership due diligence and licensing, site and facility design, utility interconnection, finances and taxes. The candidate should also understand municipal issues as they relate to site strategy and land acquisition.

Responsibilities:

  • Lead infrastructure development activities, including negotiation of land deals and support agreements
  • Develop and manage project budgets
  • Assist in the development and management of project budgets and participate in data center site localization efforts
  • Managing due diligence and permitting efforts, optimizing utility and network interconnections, collaborating with design and construction teams
  • Negotiate data center development transactions, including supporting legal real estate procedures
  • Maintain strategic relationships with stakeholders in the region
  • Collaborate with the sales team to offer custom build opportunities and product development

Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree in business, finance, construction or engineering, master’s a huge plus
  • 3-6 years of experience developing data center sites and other mission critical facilities
  • Previous experience with acquisition of existing sites/assets
  • Involved in the placement of vertical telecom assets
  • In-depth understanding and experience in conducting complex transactions
  • Attention to detail and ability to manage multiple projects with internal staff, external consultants, vendors and other stakeholders
  • Ability to effectively communicate complex business and market information and analysis at all organizational levels to include senior management, utility partners, government officials and local stakeholders
  • Proficiency in MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint
  • Must pass a comprehensive background check
  • Travel required is 25-50%

Submission Instructions:

Qualified candidates can send their CV to [email protected] (CV on pkaza dot com) with 15306048 in the subject. After applying, if you have any further questions, you can call 973-895-5200 and ask for Iggy. You can also submit through our career portal and also see all of our critical plant openings at: https://jobs.pkaza.com

If this job isn’t for you – feel free to pass it on to someone who might be a good fit – WE PAY FOR RECOMMENDATIONS!!

EOE/AA Employer M/F/D/V

Pkaza, LLC is a third-party employment company. All fees assessed by Pkaza will be paid by the employer we represent and not by the candidate.

City gets site plan for new dispensary – Hasso Hering

By Site plan

Seen from across Ninth, this is the site of a proposed “Albany Dispensary”, between the street and the back of the white building in the background.

Albany’s planning division issued public notice of a proposed construction project, called “Cannabros Albany” on one plan sheet and “Albany Dispensary” on another, off the eastbound leg exiting the Pacific Boulevard overpass.

The vacant property sits on two adjoining tax lots at 739 and 815 Ninth Ave. SE Ninth Avenue, it is part of the couplet carrying two freeways, Oregon 99E and US 20.

The site is between the freeway and the back of a strip mall facing Pacific Boulevard. There is already a marijuana store in the mall and two more less than a block east.

The owner, Peter E. Brock of Sherwood, told me on the phone that the project was still in the planning stage and that he did not want to comment on it.

Plans submitted to the city for review call for a one-story 2,438 square foot retail building. Planning staff say it’s a marijuana store. There would be parking for 18 cars and 10 bicycles.

Planning staff said the application was for site plan approval as well as an adjustment to a property line.

Property owners within 300 feet were notified of the application and asked to comment on it against city development code standards. The standards cover things like off-street parking, landscaping and more. Comments are expected before the close of business on May 18.

The zoning designation for the property is “Commercial Community” and the proposed use is permitted.

Site plan approval is required before a building permit can be issued. But not all approved site plans result in something being built. (hh)

This bare parcel of land is approximately where the parking lot for the proposed building would be.

Site plan to be presented for new South Chatham Catholic School

By Site plan

Content of the article

A site plan for a new Catholic elementary school and day care center in south Chatham will be presented to city council on Monday.

Content of the article

The property is located on the south side of a recent extension of Tweedsmuir Avenue West, west of Keil Drive South. The targeted lands of 3.24 hectares are currently vacant.

St. Clair Catholic District School Board is proposing the construction of a 3,129 square meter facility while +VG The Ventin Group Architects Ltd. participate in the design of the project.

In the plan, the new two-story school would have an adjoining single-story daycare center.

The Ontario Ministry of Education approved $26.6 million in 2017 for the local Catholic school board to merge Chatham’s six elementary schools into two new schools to deal with declining enrollment.

The school board already owned land on McNaughton Avenue West where the $16 million St. Angela Merici Catholic Elementary School was built and is now open.

In December 2020, council approved the proposed Plan of Subdivision Application, Official Plan Amendment and Zoning By-law Amendment for future institutional uses.

‘The proposed primary school and day care center is within the urban limits of Chatham and is adjacent to the existing built-up residential areas, which it will serve,’ says a planning report.

“The development is an efficient use of vacant, appropriately designated land that has access to all municipal services and is in an area that includes existing and planned transit facilities and other public services.”

Halifax councilors call for revisions to site plan for homeless tents

By Site plan

Despite lingering questions over designated tent sites for the homeless, Halifax Regional Municipality councilors have agreed to move forward with a revised version of the proposal.

Read more:

Why having some parks for homeless people in Halifax ‘misses the point’, says expert

HRM staff initially recommended 16 possible outdoor sites on municipal land that they deemed suitable for accommodation – 11 of them for “overnight stays” and five for longer-term situations.

Halifax staff proposed 16 outdoor spaces across the municipality where people could shelter.

Halifax staff proposed 16 outdoor spaces across the municipality where people could shelter.


Halifax


The motion passed on Tuesday evening included asking staff to formalize the criteria and locations of designated accommodation sites, while removing one-night options. Most councilors objected to one-night options, which would only be open from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.

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“If someone doesn’t want to leave at 8 o’clock and has nowhere to go, where do they go? Will they turn around the corner waiting for the compliance officer to leave? It’s a tricky situation,” the adviser said. Iona Stoddard, who represents District 12 (Timberlea – Beechville – Clayton Park – Wedgewood).

An amendment was made, requesting a staff report on the negotiation of a memorandum of understanding with the province on support for unhoused residents. This report, the advisers said, should define the roles of each level of government.

“The least worst option”

Staff told councilors at Tuesday’s virtual council meeting that there have been people sleeping “roughly” in the municipality for decades now.

Com. Waye Mason, who represents District 7 (Halifax South Downtown), said designated spots will only work if they are properly stocked and safe.

“We need to make sure these camps are a place that maximizes safety for everyone,” he added.

Read more:

Nova Scotia Housing Crisis: How the Emergency Reached a Boiling Point

The report was prepared after a six-week reassessment of the city’s approach to homelessness and encampments. The city and province recently partnered to create modular units to provide housing on the Halifax and Dartmouth side. The Dartmouth units were operational by January. The Halifax versions have not yet been opened.

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In a statement to Global News, Halifax Mutual Aid said the group was disappointed with the report from HRM staff.

“Halifax Mutual Aid is disappointed that the council did not consult a single member of the homeless community when drafting a report which directly impacts their safety and self-reliance,” a spokesperson wrote.

“The absolute bare minimum they could have done was involve people in their planning. They should be a primary stakeholder in this conversation. This once again shows their lack of compassion for our homeless friends and neighbors.

Deputy Mayor Pam Lovelace, who represents District 13 (Hammonds Plains – St. Margarets), echoed that concern.

“Their voices are not in this report. Yes, we have voices of homeless people, but the most important people we’re trying to help – we haven’t heard from them,” she said at the council meeting.

She said the idea of ​​designated sites had “good intentions, but it’s not going to work.”

Modular units work, she said, because they’ve partnered with an organization that has on-site workers and community groups to work with clients.

“But if you start placing people only in these designated sites without any management, coordination or community connection, it will be chaos,” she said.

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‘I can’t support this until staff come up with a real detailed plan of how the rules and regulations will actually be enforced.’


Click to play video: “Report details hardship of homeless people in Halifax”







Report details plight of homeless people in Halifax


Report details plight of homeless people in Halifax – April 6, 2022

Vicky Levack, a housing and disability advocate with PADS Community Network, watched the debate and told Global News that law enforcement is still a top concern for many in the community.

“We are concerned about the powers of compliance officers and whether the police will be used,” she said. “They say they won’t unless there is actually violence perpetrated against someone.”

The issue of security was raised several times by councilors during the council meeting.

“I don’t want to see August 18 recreated in 16 different places,” the adviser said. Lisa Blackburn, who represents District 14 (Middle/Upper Sackville – Beaver Bank – Lucasville), in reference to evictions at downtown Halifax sites last year.

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She and others have also expressed frustration about the province’s lack of input. Housing, they pointed out, falls under provincial jurisdiction.

“We’re running out of millions of reserve dollars that we can get off the couch to spend on this problem,” Blackburn said.

She added that the municipality’s “level of expertise” was “reaching its limit.

The motion adopted by the board in its entirety:

THAT Halifax Regional Council:

1) Direct the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) to continue to support the province and other partners to ensure people have safe, supportive and affordable housing,

2) To request the CAO to continue its efforts to increase the availability of affordable housing, as described in the body of this report,

3) Direct the CAO to formalize the criteria and locations for the designation of overnight accommodation sites in the parks in accordance with the criteria and locations described in the body of the staff report dated April 28, 2022, with the deletion of the sites overnight camping, and adding these sites to the list of potential longer-term camping sites if necessary and possible to ensure sufficient supplies to meet requests to be brought back to Council for consideration,

4) Direct the CAO to continue to review options for adding off-park sites to the inventory of outdoor sites available for overnight accommodation,”

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5) Authorize the Executive Director to negotiate and enter into a contribution agreement with United Way to convene a lived experience committee to advise staff, and

6) Request the CAO to return to the Board with a subsequent report with additional analysis and recommendations for actions, including a timeline and plan to support people transition, education and implementation that is led and provided by civilian personnel.

7) Request the Executive Director to provide a staff report on the negotiation of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Province of Nova Scotia on support for non-housed HRM residents. The report should include defining the roles of each level of government and specific actions to support and prevent homelessness within HRM.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Site plan for three-house project approved | Beaches

By Site plan

INDIAN SHORES — A developer who had asked for the construction of three single-family residences on 2nd Street in the Town Square neighborhood has revised the construction plans for the condominium units, which appeased members of the planning and zoning board and of the city council.

Both councils unanimously approved the project on April 26, 3-0 by the planning board and 5-0 by the council.

A packed house attended a first planning council meeting on April 12 as well as its continuation on April 26. Residents had height issues and argued that the project would trigger flooding and disturb wildlife and vegetation. Opponents said the 3-sided garages would be a potential hurricane hazard, there would be parking issues due to construction trucks, and they were concerned about pile driving.

An issue with the middle building in the site plan being too small to meet the city’s criteria for a single-family dwelling led Hunter P. Brown, who was representing New Port Richey developer Coastal Design Consultants at the meeting, to agree to change the concept of three individual single-family dwellings to condominium status.

City Engineer Jerry Dabkowski and City Building Official Brian Rusu said the proposed site plan meets or exceeds all existing city code requirements. Both supported the plan once the lot size met condominium requirements versus single family residence requirements.

Dabkowski noted three conditions: the applicant had to be aware that the state Department of Environmental Protection permit expires on May 22, 2024; Applicant must demonstrate purchase of 0.07 Saltwater Forest (Mangrove) and Wetland Mitigation Credits from Little Pine Island Mitigation Bank; and an Army Corps of Engineers permit appeared to have expired, with the applicant required to prove that the permit is still valid in writing to the Corps.

Police Chief Rick Swann also required the development to submit a traffic control plan as part of the permit requirements.

Brown noted that a silt fence would surround the construction area to keep the construction contained.

In other business, council was told that the civic center has officially reopened for recreation classes, Library Read & Feed and other events from May 2.

Convalt Energy obtains site plan approval from Hounsfield planners

By Site plan

May 4 – HOUNSFIELD – Convalt Energy has received site plan approval from Hounsfield City Council to begin construction of a 330,000 square foot solar panel manufacturing facility near Watertown International Airport on Highway 12F.

The five-member board of directors unanimously approved the project on Tuesday evening.

“I think this is a big step forward,” said Convalt CEO Hari Achuthan. “We just have a lot of work ahead of us now to do that.”

Mr Achuthan said construction will likely start in July, although he hopes for June. Operations are expected to begin early next year.

“This is the most important step,” he said of the planning board’s approval.

The next step is for Convalt to gather financing documents and submit approvals to the US Department of Agriculture for a loan guarantee.

“And once that’s done, I think we’ll be revolutionary,” he said.

Convalt purchased two Watertown buildings that will be used for storage – the former New York Air Brake building at 100 Purdy Ave. and part of the Black Clawson complex at 511 Pearl St.

The company plans to invest $4 million to renovate the 52,000-square-foot Purdy Avenue structure into 100,000 square feet of space, Jefferson County Economic Development CEO David J. .Zembiec.

A section of the old air brake structure continues to house the Living Waters Fellowship Church. Mr Achuthan said last week that he planned to build a new church near the Purdy Avenue property to replace meeting space.

The Watertown Local Development Corp., also known as the Watertown Trust, approved a $300,000 bridging loan for Convalt on Thursday.

The loan will be combined with another $1.050 million loan from the Jefferson County Industrial Development Agency and the Sackets Harbor Local Development Corp. which will be used for working capital.

Funding from the bridge gap will go to trucking $8 million worth of solar power plant equipment the company purchased from SunPower, a former Oregon solar company. The first of more than 200 trucks carrying the equipment began arriving last week and will be stored at the Purdy Avenue and Pearl Street buildings.

The company plans to employ more than 380 workers in the first three years of the plant.

Times writer Craig Fox contributed to this story.

MPC Approves Checkers Site Plan and Old Jesup Road Development

By Site plan

May 4 – The Glynn County Continental Planning Commission voted on Tuesday to approve a site plan for a new Checkers drive-thru restaurant on Altama Avenue.

The land on which the developer, listed in county documents as Valerie Babb of Starrchex Georgia LLC, would like to build the 1,343-square-foot drive-thru restaurant is a wooded lot at 5599 Altama Ave. road intersection with the Scranton Connector near Golden Isles Laundry and Dollar General.

In October 2021, the MPC voted to rezone the property from medium residential to roadside commercial to allow for new development.

The planning commissioners voted 7-0 to approve the development.

Katarina Crumpler, with EMC Engineering, represented the developer on Tuesday. She said it was too early to tell when construction might begin or when the restaurant might open due to the lengthy development approval process that remained.

The MPC also voted to recommend approval of a rezoning on Old Jesup Road to allow up to 70 residential units on the west side of the road, just south of Walker Road.

County Community Development Department Director Pamela Thompson recommended that the MPC require the applicant to conduct a traffic survey prior to construction, which the commission did.

Jake Hightower of Roberts Civil Engineering gave the MPC and the public a first look at the proposed neighborhood. While the proposed rezoning would allow for 90 residential units, the development is expected to be closer to 60 units.

“What she (the owner, Mayte Cruz) envisioned was a new neighborhood similar to the other nearby development of Settler’s Cove,” Hightower said.

The intention is to create a peaceful neighborhood of clean, well-built homes with traditional off-street parking. All but a few units the developer intends to keep will be sold at a standard market rate to individual owners, he said, and will ideally benefit property values ​​in the area.

MPC member Richard Strickland asked if the main road through the neighborhood could connect to Boyd Road. Hightower said the owner had no ownership of the property that would allow this. It would also require a level crossing, he said.

Several residents expressed concerns about problems the development would cause for traffic and the sewage system on the busy thoroughfare.

Brenda Boyd Cross, who lives nearby, said her family had lived opposite the proposed development for over 100 years. More houses are planned on Walker Road around the corner, she said, and overall both will have a negative impact on traffic. She was also very concerned that the development would cater to low-income residents.

“We frown on having this here because we’re scared. If it’s high income, we’ll be fine, but if it’s low income, we’d be scared,” Cross said. “We love our house, but we don’t want someone moving in who destroys our house or kills us, you know what I mean?”

Timothy Johnson said his family have also lived on Old Jesup Road for over 100 years. He was mainly concerned about traffic. The Canal Crossing shopping center on Canal Road has seen a noticeable increase in traffic and Old Jesup Road needs more work to reduce traffic, not development. Emergency vehicles are already having trouble crossing the area.

Rather than improving property values, Johnson said the neighborhood would hurt him because of all the trees that would be cut down and overload the area’s sewer system.

Neighboring resident Mike Carter said he wanted a privacy fence around the neighborhood, which Hightower said would be part of the project.

Hightower responded to citizens’ concerns by assuring them that the developer would carry out a traffic study to ensure that the necessary road arrangements were taken into account.

In response to questions about sewer capacity, he said the Brunswick-Glynn County Joint Water and Sewer Commission had issued a letter confirming the system could accommodate the new development.

He reiterated that the intent is to create a clean, thoughtful, and orderly neighborhood by addressing Cross’s concerns about low-income residents.

MPC member Missy Neu suggested the developer agree to lower the residential unit cap from 90 to 60. Hightower said it was a reasonable request, but would significantly hurt the owner’s potential income.

Mike Boatright, another MPC member, said any traffic problems arising from the property would be temporary as Old Jesup Road will have to be widened to four lanes anyway.

In the end, the MPC voted to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning on the condition that townhouses be excluded from development and density be capped at seven residential units per acre for a maximum of 70 units. residential.

Planning Commissioners Strickland, Boatright, Neu, Darrel Dawson and Chair Sherrye Gibbs voted in favor of the motion with restrictions. MPC member Bo Clark was the only opposing vote.

The Glynn County Commission will decide on the rezoning at an upcoming meeting.

In other cases, the MPC has recommended approval for a rezoning at Heritage Christian Academy.

Thompson said the church to which the school is attached wants to remove the old mission house and replace it with new modular classrooms, but cannot due to the residential zoning of that part of the property. The church has requested that this portion of the property be rezoned to commercial zoning.

The commissioners voted unanimously to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning.

MPC members also voted for:

—Approve a site plan for a new medical practice at 140 Martin Palmer Drive.

—Approve a site plan for a new 50 foot by 20 foot storage building at Golden Isles Collision on Candler Road.

– Recommend that the County Commission approve a rezoning of a property at the corner of Ga. 99 and Chanslor Road to allow for more residential development in addition to residential and commercial uses already permitted.

MPC Approves Checkers Site Plan and Old Jesup Road Development | Local News

By Site plan

On Tuesday, the Glynn County Continental Planning Commission voted to approve a site plan for a new Checkers drive-thru restaurant on Altama Avenue.

The land on which the developer, listed in county documents as Valerie Babb of Starrchex Georgia LLC, would like to build the 1,343-square-foot drive-thru restaurant is a wooded lot at 5599 Altama Ave. Road intersection with the Scranton Connector near Golden Isles Laundry and Dollar General.

In October 2021, the MPC voted to rezone the property from medium residential to roadside commercial to allow for new development.

The planning commissioners voted 7-0 to approve the development.

Katarina Crumpler, with EMC Engineering, represented the developer on Tuesday. She said it was too early to say when construction might begin or when the restaurant might open due to the lengthy development approval process that remained.

The MPC also voted to recommend approval of a rezoning on Old Jesup Road to allow up to two 90 residential units on the west side of the road, just south of Walker Road.

County Community Development Department Director Pamela Thompson recommended that the MPC require the applicant to conduct a pre-construction traffic survey, which the commission did.

Jake Hightower of Roberts Civil Engineering gave the MPC and the public a first look at the proposed neighborhood. While the proposed rezoning would allow for 90 residential units, the development is expected to be closer to 60 units.

“What she (the owner, Mayte Cruz) envisioned was a new neighborhood similar to the other neighboring development of Settler’s Cove,” Hightower said.

The intention is to create a peaceful neighborhood of clean, well-built homes with traditional off-street parking. All but a few units the developer intends to keep will be sold at a standard market rate to individual owners, he said, and will ideally benefit property values ​​in the area.

MPC member Richard Strickland asked if the main road through the neighborhood could connect to Boyd Road. Hightower said the owner had no ownership of the property that would allow this. It would also require a level crossing, he said.

Several residents expressed concerns about problems the development would cause for traffic and the sewage system on the busy thoroughfare.

Brenda Boyd Cross, who lives nearby, said her family had lived opposite the proposed development for over 100 years. More homes are planned on Walker Road around the corner, she said, and overall both will have a negative impact on traffic. She was also very concerned that the development would cater to low-income residents.

“We disapprove of the idea of ​​having this here because we are afraid. If it’s high income, we’d be fine, but if it’s low income, we’d be scared,” Cross said. “We love our house, but we don’t want someone moving in who’s going to destroy our house, or who’s going to kill us, you know what I mean?”

Timothy Johnson said his family has also lived on Old Jesup Road for over 100 years. He was mainly concerned about traffic. The Canal Crossing shopping center on Canal Road has seen a noticeable increase in traffic and Old Jesup Road needs more work to reduce traffic, not development. Emergency vehicles are already having trouble crossing the area.

Rather than improving property values, Johnson said the neighborhood would hurt him because of all the trees that would be cut down and overload the area’s sewer system.

Neighboring resident Mike Carter said he wanted a privacy fence around the neighborhood, which Hightower said would be part of the project.

Hightower responded to citizens’ concerns by assuring them that the developer would carry out a traffic study to ensure that the necessary road arrangements were taken into account.

In response to questions about sewer capacity, he said the Brunswick-Glynn County Joint Water and Sewer Commission had issued a letter confirming the system could accommodate the new development.

He reiterated that the intent is to create a clean, thoughtful, and orderly neighborhood by addressing Cross’s concerns about low-income residents.

MPC member Missy Neu suggested the developer agree to lower the residential unit cap from 90 to 60. Hightower said it was a reasonable request, but would significantly hurt the landlord’s potential income.

Mike Boatright, another MPC member, said any traffic problems arising from the property would be temporary as Old Jesup Road will have to be widened to four lanes anyway.

In the end, the MPC voted to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning on the condition that townhouses be excluded from development and density be capped at seven residential units per acre for a maximum of 70 units. residential.

Planning Commissioners Strickland, Boatright, Neu, Darrel Dawson and Chair Sherrye Gibbs voted in favor of the motion with restrictions. MPC member Bo Clark was the only opposing vote.

The Glynn County Commission will decide on the rezoning at an upcoming meeting.

In other cases, the MPC has recommended approval for a rezoning at Heritage Christian Academy.

Thompson said the church to which the school is attached wants to remove the old mission house and replace it with new modular classrooms, but cannot due to the residential zoning of that part of the property. The church has requested that this portion of the property be rezoned to commercial zoning.

Commissioners voted unanimously to recommend that the county commission approve the rezoning.

MPC members also voted for:

• Approve a site plan for a new medical practice at 140 Martin Palmer Drive.

• Approve a site plan for a new 50 foot by 20 foot storage building at Golden Isles Collision on Candler Road.

• Recommend that the County Commission approve a rezoning of a property at the corner of Ga. 99 and Chanslor Road to allow for more residential development in addition to residential and commercial uses already permitted.

Convalt Energy Obtains Site Plan Approval from Hounsfield Planners | Business

By Site plan

HOUNSFIELD — Convalt Energy has received site plan approval from the Hounsfield Town Planning Board to begin construction of a 330,000 square foot solar panel manufacturing plant near Watertown International Airport on Highway 12F.

The five-member board of directors unanimously approved the project on Tuesday evening.

“I think this is a big step,” said Convalt CEO Hari Achuthan. “We just have a lot of work ahead of us now to do that.”

Mr Achuthan said construction will likely start in July, although he hopes for June. Operations are expected to begin early next year.

“This is the most important step,” he said of the planning board’s approval.

The next step is for Convalt to gather financing documents and submit approvals to the US Department of Agriculture for a loan guarantee.

“And once that’s done, I think we’ll be revolutionary,” he said.

Convalt purchased two Watertown buildings that will be used for storage – the former New York Air Brake building at 100 Purdy Ave. and part of the Black Clawson complex at 511 Pearl St.

The company plans to invest $4 million to renovate the 52,000 square foot Purdy Avenue structure into 100,000 square feet of space, Jefferson County Economic Development CEO David J. .Zembiec.

A section of the old air brake structure continues to house the Living Waters Fellowship Church. Mr Achuthan said last week that he planned to build a new church near the Purdy Avenue property to replace meeting space.

The Watertown Local Development Corp., also known as the Watertown Trust, approved a $300,000 bridging loan for Convalt on Thursday.

The loan will be combined with another $1.050 million loan from the Jefferson County Industrial Development Agency and the Sackets Harbor Local Development Corp. which will be used for working capital.

Funding from the bridge gap will go to trucking $8 million worth of solar power plant equipment the company purchased from SunPower, a former Oregon solar company. The first of more than 200 trucks carrying the equipment began arriving last week and will be stored at the Purdy Avenue and Pearl Street buildings.

The company plans to employ over 380 workers in the first three years of the plant.

Times writer Craig Fox contributed to this story.

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Letter to the Editor: Car Wash Site Analysis

By Site analysis

In the March issue of this publication, I wrote an article called “Site insights”. The article offered practical best practices for operators looking to build a new car wash. Among other site selection and design questions, I asked Henry Shine of WhiteWater Express Car Wash and Michael Murry of Champion Xpress Carwash, “What does a modern car wash look like in 2022?”

Click here to read more

However, as one of our readers recently reminded me, proper site selection and design is more than meets the eye. Robert Johnson, Principal Engineer of Civilogistix in Roswell, Georgia, was kind enough to take the time to share his thoughts in the following letter to the editor.

Rich: I just wanted to congratulate you on the editorial and article for the March issue of Professional Carwashing and Detailing magazine. I would just like to put more emphasis on property selection and site design.

I started designing fast food drive-throughs, convenience stores and gas stations nearly 40 years ago; Since that time, the company has evolved a lot. The automated car wash industry is no exception — in a very short time.

A big mistake I see small business owners make is to dive headlong into site selection – following all the basic car wash business advice – determined to acquire what they think is the perfect site…only for discovering this site, downtown, in the perfect location, reasonably priced, vacant for 20 years is for a reason. The reason may be imperceptible to the untrained eye.

As engineers who specialize in this type of development and have multiple car wash clients, we see the end result of what happens when investors choose the “wrong site” and have to spend many days and money trying to make it work.

Leading car wash investors have learned that they need experts at all levels to achieve the desired outcome. But, the smaller ones, some just trying to save money by “expanding”, often run up against development codes, utility restrictions and environmental regulations, and they tend to get discouraged very quickly when the site is not finished and to return them the money as soon as they expected.

As a service to prospective car wash owners/operators, someone should tell them that it’s money well spent to hire a professional engineer, who has experience in this particular type of fit-out to guide them through the procurement and entitlement phases, produce the latest effective innovations and aesthetically appealing site design, and guide the process to satisfactory completion. There is much more I could say, but time and space forbid it.

Back to my first thought, nice article, happy reading and keep providing this much needed information.

Sincerely, Robert Johnson.

Robert, thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts and for reading PC&D.