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January 2022

Casey Site Development to Add Six Rental Units to Oak Bay Market – Saanich News

By Site development
A new three-story mixed-use multi-family commercial and residential building is set to rise at 713 St. Patrick St. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
A new three-story mixed-use multi-family commercial and residential building is set to rise at 713 St. Patrick St. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)A new three-story mixed-use multi-family commercial and residential building is set to rise at 713 St. Patrick St. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)

Parking remains a small secondary concern, as Oak Bay approved a development application for the planned new three-story mixed-use commercial and multi-family residential building at 713 St. Patrick Street.

Four parking spaces and a handful of e-bikes will have to suffice as the council has approved gaps for development on the former Casey’s Market site. These include the maximum permitted building height (11 feet taller), occupancy height (10 feet taller), and number of stories and minimum number of on-site vehicle parking spaces.

A parking study shows that the maximum parking demand for the proposed development would be 10 parking spaces. Adjustments to transportation demand measures for the proposal reduced that number to six, with all four proposed supported by city staff.

The proposal already included a bus pass for each of the six units and six strata e-bikes with proper parking and storage with charging capabilities as well as six bicycle parking spaces for visitors. Changes include the addition of two bicycle parking spaces for employees and an electric bicycle for use by commercial tenants.

The four on-site vehicle parking spaces will be allocated to residential units.

Com. Hazel Braithwaite was the only dissenter. She noted that Oak Bay’s dated parking regulations would see 21 parking spaces overabundant, but against six would have been a good number.

“I can’t understand he’s only got four,” she said, adding that she was happy to see him move forward, but had to vote against it due to concerns about parking in the region.

The balance of the council concluded that the compromise had value.

Com. Andrew Appleton noted that this is a potential shortage of two parking spaces, which contrasts with six new rental units that the community badly needs.

“This will add much-needed rental stock,” the adviser agreed. Cairine Green.

The building that will replace the one-story structure includes approximately 1,270 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor and six rental spaces on the second and third floors. Living areas would include four one-bedroom units measuring 600 square feet and two two-bedroom units measuring approximately 958 square feet. A clause guarantees that the suites must be rental units with no age restrictions and no short-term rentals.

The project also includes 24-hour restrooms for BC Transit bus operators.

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Development of Casey site to add six rental units to Oak Bay market – Victoria News

By Site development
A new three-story mixed-use multi-family commercial and residential building is set to rise at 713 St. Patrick St. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)
A new three-story mixed-use multi-family commercial and residential building is set to rise at 713 St. Patrick St. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)A new three-story mixed-use multi-family commercial and residential building is set to rise at 713 St. Patrick St. (Christine van Reeuwyk/News Staff)

Parking remains a small secondary concern, as Oak Bay has approved a development application for the planned new three-story commercial and multi-family residential building at 713 St. Patrick Street.

Four parking spaces and a handful of e-bikes will have to suffice as the council has approved gaps for development on the former Casey’s Market site. These include the maximum permitted building height (11 feet taller), occupancy height (10 feet taller), and number of stories and minimum number of on-site vehicle parking spaces.

A parking study shows that the maximum parking demand for the proposed development would be 10 parking spaces. Adjustments to the transportation demand measures for the proposal reduced that number to six, with all four proposed being supported by city staff.

The proposal already included a bus pass for each of the six units and six strata e-bikes with proper parking and storage with charging capabilities as well as six bicycle parking spaces for visitors. Changes include the addition of two bicycle parking spaces for employees and an electric bicycle for use by commercial tenants.

The four on-site vehicle parking spaces will be allocated to residential units.

Com. Hazel Braithwaite was the only dissenter. She noted that Oak Bay’s dated parking regulations would see 21 parking spaces overabundant, but against six would have been a good number.

“I can’t understand he’s only got four,” she said, adding that she was happy to see him move forward, but had to vote against it due to concerns about parking in the region.

The balance of the council concluded that the compromise had value.

Com. Andrew Appleton noted that this is a potential shortage of two parking spaces, which contrasts with six new rental units that the community badly needs.

“This will add much-needed rental stock,” the adviser agreed. Cairine Green.

The building that will replace the one-story structure includes approximately 1,270 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor and six rental spaces on the second and third floors. Living areas would include four one-bedroom units measuring 600 square feet and two two-bedroom units measuring approximately 958 square feet. A clause guarantees that the suites must be rental units with no age restrictions and no short-term rentals.

The project also includes 24-hour restrooms for BC Transit bus operators.

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Developer seeks to modify site plan of former Alvord Elementary | Local News

By Site plan

Developers of the dormant Alvord Primary School site have increased their plans to build accommodation there, much to the dismay of some members of the neighborhood.

The developers are requesting changes to the site’s master plan which, if approved by the city’s Planning Commission, will divide the two lots bordering Paseo de Peralta and Alarid Street into a 10-lot subdivision. The developers are also looking to raise building height limits up to four stories on part of the site.






Some neighborhood residents have raised concerns about the project, arguing that the new plans don’t fit the long-standing neighborhood.

“It doesn’t actually make sense,” longtime neighborhood resident Rey Montez said Tuesday. “I’m just disappointed that David [Barker] took this approach.

But Barker, of Barker Realty, the property’s owner, said the project is still ongoing and is keeping lines of communication open with affected residents to make the proposal work.

He noted that concerns about building heights, traffic and parking raised at an initial ward notification meeting last week are being considered.

“Our conversation and discussions are ongoing,” he said. “We went back to the drawing board and tried to come up with different ideas in response to concerns and issues that we heard.

“I have nothing to hide,” he added. “I want to work with the neighborhood. I hope to come up with a plan that better addresses their concerns, but I can’t do everything.

Barker purchased the 2.85-acre property in 2017 from Santa Fe Public Schools for $2.55 million after Alvord Elementary School closed in 2010 due to low enrollment.

Barker said he never had a specific proposal for the site, but had previously expressed interest in converting the campus into a live workspace for artists with a commercial component.

However, in April 2021, Barker said the team was going back to the drawing board to work on new designs.

“I started to lose faith in the project,” he said. “It wasn’t comfortable and I didn’t feel like it was the right thing to do.”

Now developers are evaluating a plan to sell the homes built on the 10 lots. The subdivision would be on the western portion of the property and the homes would be a mix of one- and two-story homes, according to plans in the First Neighborhood Notification Application.

Depending on demand, the project will be less dense than what could have been developed on site, which will hopefully alleviate any traffic or congestion issues.

Barker said that to make up for lost density in the new proposal, he is asking for a height limit change to allow buildings up to 48 feet tall on the site’s play area. The site is currently zoned for buildings up to 36 feet, with the majority being zoned at 28 feet.

The playing field is on the east side of the site, adjoining the rail yard buildings, and is zoned for buildings up to three stories, or 36 feet. Railyard Flats, adjacent to the Alvord Elementary site, has three floors.

Still, Montez said he thinks the proposal “goes beyond what’s reasonable.”

Barker said based on the concerns expressed at the notification meeting, he is also evaluating the height limit request.

“I have to rethink that,” he said. “I rethink that.”

The city’s planning commission is expected to hear the point in April before it goes to city council.

Paul Reed, who lives in a unit directly opposite Alvord, said while he hasn’t been following the development very closely, anything that adds extra car traffic to the street is a concern.

“I’m not sure this street can handle that,” he said.

In their first neighborhood notification questionnaire, the developers noted that the site addresses the lack of new residential construction in the city center.

The development will also help “stem the tide of negative impact from homeless people and vagrants that has weighed on the Railyard” and surrounding neighborhoods, according to the app.

Victor R. Hernandez, also a nearby resident, said he was in favor of the development or anything that would provide the town with additional housing.

“My daughter was looking for a place, and it was difficult,” he said. “So if it helps, yes, I’m for it.”

Neighborhood resident Ann Allen was strolling near the school on Tuesday and said any momentum is better than none for the inactive site.

“I’m glad to know that they will do something with the property rather than leaving it empty,” she said.

Layout plan for proposed warehouses in Berryville pending | Winchester star

By Site plan

BERRYVILLE — A developer’s project to build three 60,000 square foot commercial warehouses along Jack Enders Boulevard is on hold.

On Wednesday evening, the Berryville Area Development Authority (BADA) postponed review of a site plan for the second time. LGV Group LLC requested the deferral as it strives to meet Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) expectations.

As specified by an agreement between the localities, BADA advises the Clarke County Board of Supervisors and the Berryville City Council on land use issues involving an area targeted for possible annexation to the city.

The warehouses would be built on 12½ acres adjacent to Clarke County Business Park. The property is already zoned for business park uses.

Following a public hearing in early December, the authority initially postponed consideration of the site plan application because full details of how the warehouses would affect their surroundings were not yet available.

During the hearing, some residents of the nearby Berryville Glen subdivision expressed concerns that large trucks serving the warehouses could cause traffic and safety issues.

BADA continued the hearing until February 23, when it now aims to review the site plan.

“Hopefully everything will be ready by then,” said Berryville Community Development Manager Christy Dunkle, a BADA staff member.

Sterling-based LGV operates a business on nearby Station Road where metal windows and doors are made. The company aims to use one of the warehouses for assembly and storage and rent the other two.

LGV received initial feedback from DEQ on the warehouse layout earlier this month. The department requested more geotechnical testing, and it was done, property manager Lara Dunlap said in a recent letter to the authority.

Geotechnics refers to a component of civil engineering concerned with the materials of the earth, such as rocks and soil.

A DEQ representative “assured that they would have a formal review of the revised site plan (incorporating all geotechnical recommendations) completed by early February,” Dunlap wrote.

LGV is looking for tenants for the two warehouses it will not be using. Dunkle said she doesn’t know the status of that effort.

Next steps for the development of the Crewkerne key site

By Site development

A MAJOR housing project in Somerset can go ahead after the developer has received permission to move soil across the site.

Taylor Wimpey Exeter will spend the coming years delivering a total of 635 homes at the key Crewkerne site, which sits between the A30 Yeovil Road and the A356 Station Road.

The developer has obtained detailed permission to deliver the first 110 homes at the south end of the site in January 2021, with construction officially starting around Christmas.

South Somerset District Council must now agree to amend the original plans, allowing Taylor Wimpey to move material from the north end of the site to the south end so that the new access road can be delivered.

To allow the movement of materials through the site, a new haul road will be created between the A30 and the A356.

This will follow the route of the dorsal route crossing the site, the route of which was decided in May 2020.

Planning officer John Hammond told a virtual meeting of the council’s regulatory committee on Tuesday morning (January 18) that the changes would help ensure the new road was delivered in full within the next 18 months.

Chard & Ilminster News: The northern end of the key Crewkerne site, near the A30 Yeovil road.  CREDIT: Daniel Mumby.  Free to use for all BBC partners.

He stated in his written report: “There is merit in seeking to reuse materials from the same global site, given that the first access on Station Road will require backfilling of the ground given the difference in levels between the terrain and the road itself.

“Conversely, in relation to the access which will be taken on the A30, the ground is considerably higher than the road at the approved junction, which means that there will be a significant need for excavation of materials to create this junction and the internal routes. ”

Crewkerne resident Julie Chant worried whether the new haul road would harm the ecology of the site, asking for clarification on how badgers, dormice and otters would be protected.

She said: “This route will cut through the badger sets. I don’t think there’s enough clarity on how they’re going to protect all of these species.

“I understand that Taylor Wimpey has licenses from Natural England for the south site – but they are working on the whole site.

“Are all licenses in place for protected species and hedge removal? Everyone knew that ecology was the big thing on this site.

Colin Danks of Peter Brett Associates (representing the developer) assured Ms Chant that the impact of the road would be properly mitigated – and the construction would ultimately prevent further pollution in the town centre.

He said: “Ecology is an essential part of our process. There is a clear safety net with Natural England that would prevent any harm to badgers, otters or dormice.

“The aim of this app is to do just one thing: avoid having to drive heavy traffic through Crewkerne town centre. We need to move material, and doing it on site just makes sense. »

After approximately 45 minutes of debate, the committee voted to approve the plans by a margin of six to zero, with two abstentions (Councillor Adam Dance, due to technical difficulties, and Councilor Peter Gubbins, who elected not to not vote).

Taylor Wimpey said in December that he expects the first phase of homes on the site to be available for purchase by the fall.

Chard & Ilminster News: Crewkerne's key site in the context of the city.  CREDIT: LHC Group.  Free to use for all BBC partners.

Mr Hammond added that Somerset County Council was currently renegotiating its own legal agreement with Taylor Wimpey over funding for a new primary school.

He said in his report: “There is a separate agreement with the county council as the local education authority to provide a site for a first school, as well as capital to secure new buildings.

“Following its resolution to move to a two-tier education service for the area, the county council is separately seeking to revise this requirement to reflect the need for off-site education work funding and to remove the requirement for a school site.”

The county council’s controversial school reforms – which have successfully withstood judicial scrutiny by local parents – will be implemented in time for the new school year in September.

Gahanna-Jefferson Public Schools student high school, stadium site plan options

By Site plan

Three site plan options are being considered for the new $158 million Gahanna Lincoln High School, with a decision expected in February.

District officials, DLR Group and Construction Ruscilli met with neighbors near the high school, with the final meeting and options presented Jan. 12.

After further deliberations with the community at large and the senior facilities planning committee, Judy Hengstebeck, district communications coordinator, said Superintendent Steve Barrett plans to recommend a site plan to the school board in February.

Following:Gahanna-Jefferson will focus on building additions, relationships and staffing in 2022

She said Option 1, also called Option A, was an original design shown to the community.

She said Option 2 (B) is similar to a plan presented earlier, but in this design the building has been reversed so that the entrance faces the neighborhood rather than the rear of the building. Option 3 (C) is a new design.

The priorities the neighbors wanted in the design options included keeping the current stadium, keeping the school one room, maximizing sound/noise buffer, 3 story building, maximizing green space, retaining the veterans memorial, retaining the current auditorium, a buffer natural landscape, a traffic light, and moving the stadium to another location.

>> See the three options

Paul Lawton, architect of the DLR Group, said an effort had been made to come up with designs taking into account the neighbours’ objectives.

“A traffic light is beyond our design power,” he said. “I think moving the stadium totally offsite, at the time I think the context was sort of in the Blacklick area. It’s going to be pretty tough, but we made it in option C. A third one that was a bit out of our hands right now was guarding the auditorium. The other seven, however, we did our best to accommodate.

Keeping the stadium in its current location is option B(2), Lawton said.

“We kept the position of the current stadium,” he said. “What we did was we took the floor plan of the building and mirrored it from east to west and then moved it to the east side of this stadium so that the relationship between the stadium and the building remains the same. There are synergies there that we have tried to keep, and we think it works from that point of view. The one-class school, we have approached it. In this one, we moved it to the west of the stadium. Coming down Hamilton, you would see it at the back of those bleachers.

Lawton said the building would help act as a buffer against sound and noise in this plan.

As designers, he said, they try to minimize the footprint of the entire high school, so the building is 3 stories tall.

“The southern and northern parts are the gymnasiums and auditoriums, so these will naturally be 2 stories, but the main core of the building where the academic wings are – it’s a 3 story space,” Lawton said. “No. 5 (priority) is to maximize green space. As you know from the metrics we’ve shared, we have parking counts that we need to meet, based on code occupancy/gathering rates from the city to the auditorium/gym etc. We tried, of course, that’s our intention, we love greenery as much as you do, so we’ve done our best to maximize that.

He said all three options retain the veterans’ memorial.

This natural landscape area is increased along this eastern border in Option B.

“We think we did our best with the square footage of the building, the number of parking spaces we had to keep the stadium where they are,” he said. “The bus traffic is similar to the first diagram. We have tried to divide this traffic so that the buses come from the south, your student parking comes from west to north, and you have your staff parking and the deposit of relatives in the east.

The new option, Option C, is an attempt to move the stadium to another site.

“It was our attempt to get the best of both worlds,” Lawton said. “If we had a blank page, it might be close to what we would have found. We really did our best to achieve as many of these goals as possible: increase your border, separate parking and car traffic. This relocates the stadium to the southwest. All three have advantages and disadvantages. We intend to provide options and consider the district to present in the future. »

Frank Pinciotti, Ruscilli Construction project manager, said Option A would be to build the new stadium first.

“In this way, the current use of the stadium would only be affected by one year,” he said. “So the teams would find other places to play. We have to build the new building at the same time as we build the new stadium. »

He said options A and B would affect the use of the stadium for about a year, while the high school would be without a stadium for more than four years under option C, and it would cost about 3.5 million. dollars more.

Terry Rippl, a 44-year-old resident, said he thought the district answered questions well with the information available. He said he knew a school was near his home when he moved to the neighborhood.

“When there’s a football game and there’s a touchdown, we hear a roar,” Rippl said. “It’s not a big deal.”

He said he was satisfied with the maximization of green spaces.

Southwind Drive resident Judy Brown said she was surprised the district offered two other options.

“My preference is the one that doesn’t move the stadium, B. It looks like they’ve considered the requests,” she said.

The day after the meeting, resident Ginny Evans said she spent quite a bit of time thinking about the three proposals.

“I was pleased to see that the district listened to neighbors’ concerns and presented two additional options for the footprint design,” she said. “Personally, with the information I currently have, I would rule out Option A because no one should be as directly negatively impacted by having a stadium so close to their property as the neighbors of Saverne Place would be.”

At first, Evans said, she thought Option B sounded good.

“But upon further inspection and discussion, I realized that separating the student parking lot from the school building was not a good option,” she said. “Students would need to walk around the stadium to enter the school building, and the student parking lot is not visible from the building. I don’t think that’s a good thing as far as overall school security and logistics are concerned.

Evans said Option C appears to be the best long-term option.

“It’s a shame there won’t be a football stadium for four years, but when I focus on the overall lifespan of the new building/campus and general academic and safety issues, I think “they take precedence over short term athletics. program interruptions. Option C is also more expensive due to the time it takes to complete the whole project. However, although I don’t want to see the district spending money on unnecessary things (like moving the one room schoolhouse to High Street) I think it would be wise to spend the extra money doing what will give us the most benefit per relation to the life of the new building.

Pinciotti said there weren’t a lot of details in the schematic design phase.

“The next phase is called design development, when they get into the details – the walls, the partitions, the finishes – and get more detailed, but not to the extent that we could actually put it on the street and bid,” Pinciotti said. “We do another check of the cost of the development drawings of the design. This is evaluated. When this is approved, there may be a cost reduction exercise to remove certain things or specify certain things that are less dear.

Pinciotti said the next step would be construction documents.

“These, when they’re done, we can go out on the street and bid on them with some contractors and work out the actual costs,” he said. “There are these checks and balances along the way to make sure we don’t design the Taj Mahal when we can’t afford it.

Deputy Superintendent Jill Elliott said Gahanna Lincoln High School has about 2,400 students and a replacement Lincoln High School at the current site could accommodate 2,800 students.

Elliott said high school staff provided input in a variety of ways throughout the design process and will be more engaged in the coming months as the floor plan is finalized and the discussion moves to the spaces. interiors.

She said the goal is to open the new high school for the 2024-25 school year.

[email protected]

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Staffordshire Gypsy caravan site plan sparks 248 objections

By Site plan

Hundreds of people oppose plans for a gypsy caravan site on the edge of a rural village.

The proposed land at Radmore Lane, Gnosall, near Stafford, came nearly a decade after a previous application was turned down by Stafford Borough Council.

More than 260 people opposed the 2011 application, which was rejected because it had not been shown that there was a compelling need to develop the site in the middle of the countryside. It was also feared that the plans would lead to the loss of virgin land and detract from the appearance of the rural area.

More Stoke-on-Trent and Staffordshire headlines

Today, 248 people opposed the latest proposals for a private gypsy site for one family, with a day room and no more than two mobile homes and four traveling caravans.

Stone MP Sir Bill Cash, Gnosall Parish Council and campaign group Grid (Gnosall Resists Indiscriminate Development) are among the opponents.

Sir Bill said: ‘The proposed development is unsuitable and does not match the nearby homes and rural character of the area and would result in a loss of green land. This type of open country development would be visually detrimental to the surrounding area and would be highly visible in the local landscape.

“The proposed development would aggravate existing traffic problems on the A518 and the site would be accessed via an unlit junction on a section of the road which has a 60mph speed limit. The entrance to the site is around a sharp bend in Radmore Lane, which is a single lane country lane. It is unsuitable for heavy goods vehicles towing mobile homes and caravans.

The parish council said: ‘The claimant is already housed in Donnington so there are no welfare cases to consider. Even if such an argument were made, there are at least 36-39 Stafford Borough Council sites available.

“There is no compelling need demonstrated at this location. A pristine site in a rural area should not be used for a gypsy residential site. There are most likely suitable sites on brownfield sites or previously used land closer of urban areas (of) the borough of Stafford.

A resident of Glendower Close said: ‘It is a completely misguided proposition to try and enforce an award-winning scenic village. The proposed site is clearly visible from the A518 and will have a visual impact on anyone approaching the village of Gnosall.

“This is a development that will cause an intrusion into the green fields and countryside that separate Gnosall from Newport. There is no precedent for this utterly useless application and development and it will certainly be a permanent stain on the landscape for generations of the local community and anyone who drives in rural Staffordshire.

“We are traveling on the A518, passing the development project and we have observed a significant increase in traffic on this section of the A518. This is no doubt partly due to the increase in our local population using their vehicles.

“The site is rural farmland where sheep can safely graze without electricity, running water or human effluent disposal facilities. Installation of a septic tank would require drainage extending into adjoining farmland Additionally, there will be a significant increase in recycling waste collection from residents and visitors.

A Radmore Lane resident said: ‘Safety would be compromised on the adjacent road network due to the nature of the traffic the site would generate, inadequate turning arrangements at Radmore Lane and off the A518.

“Since 2011 there has been even more traffic on the A518 due to the Gnosall housing estates and there have been many more serious accidents which means there are even more reasons this time to refuse the application than in 2011. The increase in traffic makes this application dangerous for the community as well as the applicants and their families.

But seven letters of support were also sent to the council.

A resident of Coton said: “There is no difference between a few public transport vans towing a caravan and the dozens of big tractors towing huge trailers and various agricultural machinery that travels this road all the time. And caravans do not spread mud all over the road unlike tractors.

“If approval of this application means that their other fields in the center of the village on Station Road are left unoccupied, then I am in favor. If, however, their plan is to occupy both Radmore Lane and their fields on Station Road, then I oppose it.

And one Station Road resident said: ‘It should be allowed because it’s better to have this caravan site in a field outside the village than to have it in the fields which belong to travelers right in the middle of the village by Co-op.

“And the worries around trailers turning into Radmore lane causing danger on 518 – it’s no different than all the massive tractors with their huge trailers going up and down the lane all day and keeping traffic going, a transit with a trailer is no different.”

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Consolidated Restaurant and Nursing Facility Receive Site Plan Approval in the Netherlands

By Site plan

HOLLAND – Two new developments are progressing in South Holland.

The first, a mixed-use development that will serve as the new home of the Grand King Buffet and the Shanghai Grill and Bar, received its third site plan approval from the Holland Planning Commission on Tuesday, January 11.

Following:Shanghai Grill moves across the street to a mixed-use development

Following:Goog’s Pub announces it will return to Holland in a mixed-use development

The mixed-use development on 32nd Street will include a restaurant and banquet space, as well as residential apartments.

The 421 E 32nd St. site plan had previously been approved in 2019 and then again in 2020 after developers reduced the number of residential units. The latest iteration of the plan outlines a step-by-step process, with one building constructed in 2022 and another if finances permit.

The building planned for this year includes a 13,500 square foot restaurant and banquet center, as well as four apartments totaling approximately 5,500 square feet. In 2019, developers told the planning commission that the restaurant would consolidate the Grand King Buffet and Shanghai Grill and Bar, replacing existing locations at 661 E 24th St. and 442 E 32nd St.

The project applicant owns the two restaurants. Shanghai Grill and Bar opened in 2015, offering take-out and lunch and dinner options, including sushi.

The approximately 3-acre lot sits at the corner of 32nd Street and Hastings Avenue, a few lots from a similar mixed-use development at the old Goog’s Pub.

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The second phase will feature a mix of retail and apartment space in a 15,000 square foot addition. The plan is significantly larger than the 14,000 square foot total at 667 Hastings Ave. – where Goog’s Pub will reopen in a downsized space. This building will include nine residential apartments and a grocery and beverage market, in addition to the restaurant.

The Avenue at Holland, a planned retirement home for 16th Street, received unanimous site plan approval on Tuesday, January 11 from the Holland Planning Commission.

Commissioners also approved a site plan for a nursing home at 897 E. 16th St. The one-story facility, titled The Avenue at Holland, will have 100 patient rooms, two courtyards and a daycare on site for employees.

Construction on the 84,725 square foot facility is expected to begin in 2022, and the developers hope to open in late summer 2023.

— Contact journalist Cassandra Lybrink at [email protected]. Follow her on Instagram @BizHolland.

Botetourt County Receives State Grant for Greenfield Industrial Site Development | Local News

By Site development

Roanoke time

Botetourt County economic development officials welcomed the public funding announced Thursday to improve industrial site development in Greenfield.

Outgoing Governor Ralph Northam announced the grant as part of a $7 million expenditure to support industrial sites in Virginia. Other regional program grants included funding for Franklin and Pulaski counties and the city of Roanoke.

The $362,700 from the Virginia Economic Development Partnership’s Business Ready Sites program will be used to prepare 121 acres of land for occupancy in the county’s Industrial Center Park off US 220 near Daleville.

“Having industrial sites primed and ready is key to Botetourt County’s work to recruit future manufacturing employers to the community,” a county news release said.

“Speed ​​of access to business is one of the first things potential businesses turn to when looking to grow,” said Franklin County Economic Development Director Beth Simms.

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The Botetourt County Department of Economic Development has offered to use the state grant to update Greenfield’s environmental site assessment, survey and related engineering studies, the news release said.

In addition, the grant will support the construction of a sewer line, access road and grading involving the vacant site, located among the sprawling facilities officially known as Center Botetourt in Greenfield.

The gradually suburban, but mostly rural, county north of Roanoke sees Greenfield as the keystone to its business and economic future.

“Since 2016, nine manufacturers have announced plans to locate or expand in Botetourt County, involving over 1,000 new jobs and over $200 million in taxable investments. These manufacturers include: Munters, Maag Gala, Metalsa, Pratt Industries, Altec Industries, Canatal Steel USA, Constellation Brands, Eldor Corporation, and Arkay,” the county press release reads.

Botetourt County competed with 25 localities to receive a grant from the Business Ready Sites program, the county said.

“The purpose of doing this work now is that it is essential to prepare industrial sites for companies looking for locations for expansion projects before these companies call us to discuss our available sites,” said Botetourt County Director of Economic Development Ken McFadyen.

“The bigger the site, the better prepared we need to be when companies contact us,” he added,

“Communities whose sites are ready with all utilities in place and with at least grading plans are the ones that receive favorable attention from companies looking for locations for their expansion projects,” said said Botetourt County Administrator Gary Larrowe.

Other grants announced Thursday by the state’s Business Ready Sites program:

Franklin County, Summit View Business Park, $1,017,870

Pulaski County, New River Valley Business Park, $300,000

Roanoke County, Wood Haven Technology Park, $75,000

Consolidated Restaurant and Nursing Facility Receives Holland Site Plan Approval

By Site plan

The owner of the Grand King Buffet and Shanghai Bar and Grill plans to consolidate the restaurants into a new mixed-use development on 32nd Street.

HOLLAND – Two new developments are progressing in South Holland.

The first, a mixed-use development that will serve as the new home of the Grand King Buffet and the Shanghai Grill and Bar, received its third site plan approval from the Holland Planning Commission on Tuesday, January 11.

Following: Shanghai Grill moves across the street to a mixed-use development

Following: Goog’s Pub announces it will return to Holland in a mixed-use development

The mixed-use development on 32nd Street will include a restaurant and banquet space, as well as residential apartments.

The mixed-use development on 32nd Street will include a restaurant and banquet space, as well as residential apartments.

The 421 E 32nd St. site plan had previously been approved in 2019 and then again in 2020 after developers reduced the number of residential units. The latest iteration of the plan outlines a step-by-step process, with one building constructed in 2022 and another if finances permit.

The building planned for this year includes a 13,500 square foot restaurant and banquet center, as well as four apartments totaling approximately 5,500 square feet. In 2019, developers told the planning commission that the restaurant would consolidate the Grand King Buffet and Shanghai Grill and Bar, replacing existing locations at 661 E 24th St. and 442 E 32nd St.

The project applicant owns the two restaurants. Shanghai Grill and Bar opened in 2015, offering take-out and lunch and dinner options, including sushi.

The approximately 3-acre lot sits at the corner of 32nd Street and Hastings Avenue, a few lots from a similar mixed-use development at the old Goog’s Pub.

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The second phase will feature a mix of retail and apartment space in a 15,000 square foot addition. The plan is significantly larger than the 14,000 square foot total at 667 Hastings Ave. – where Goog’s Pub will reopen in a downsized space. This building will include nine residential apartments and a grocery and beverage market, in addition to the restaurant.

The Avenue at Holland, a planned retirement home for 16th Street, received unanimous site plan approval on Tuesday, January 11 from the Holland Planning Commission.

The Avenue at Holland, a planned retirement home for 16th Street, received unanimous site plan approval on Tuesday, January 11 from the Holland Planning Commission.

Commissioners also approved a site plan for a nursing home at 897 E. 16th St. The one-story facility, titled The Avenue at Holland, will have 100 patient rooms, two courtyards and a daycare on site for employees.

Construction on the 84,725 square foot facility is expected to begin in 2022, and the developers hope to open in late summer 2023.

— Contact journalist Cassandra Lybrink at [email protected] Follow her on Instagram @BizHolland.

This article originally appeared on The Holland Sentinel: Consolidated Restaurant and Nursing Facility Receive Site Plan Approval in the Netherlands

Rivian sitemap revealed | News

By Site plan

The long-awaited site plan for Rivian Automotive’s new multi-billion dollar electric car manufacturing plant in Stanton Springs North was released this week.

Rivian’s new site plan paints a stark picture of how unprecedented the massive plant will be when fully built, spanning 2,000 acres in Morgan and Walton counties.

“We’ve never seen anything like it here,” said Walton County Economic Development Manager Shane Short.

The vast green pastures of the former Verner and Bowden family farmlands in Rutledge will soon be covered in concrete, becoming the hub of industrial development heading into Rutledge town centre.

“Many of Rivian’s buildings will be built on former Verner family farmland and Bowden family farmland,” Short said. “This will help preserve some of the green spaces and wetlands closer to I-20 and US Highway 278. The plant will be approximately three miles from the town of Rutledge.”

According to the recently released site plan, approximately 13 million square feet of the Rivian plant will be built in Morgan County. The total project requires up to 20 million square feet of construction space.

Rivian’s new plant could be up to 20 times larger than Takeda Pharmaceutical’s Stanton Springs plant, which is 1 million square feet. Even Kia’s West Point, Georgia plant is just 2.2 million square feet.

For a visual comparison, 20 million square feet of building space equals 347 football fields. It would be three times bigger than Disneyland and four times bigger than Vatican City.

In addition to manufacturing warehouses and office buildings, roads, parking lots, access points and stormwater management areas will also be constructed in Morgan County for the project.

Rivian will invest up to $5 billion in the new plant, generate 7,500 jobs and produce 400,000 electric vehicles per year when fully operational. Details of the site plan were revealed after Morgan County Planning Director Chuck Jarrell filed two Developmental Regional Impact (DRI) statements with the Georgia Department of Community Affairs, as the requires the law for the project to go ahead.

Jarrell said the Joint Development Authority (JDA) expects to earn $100 million in local tax revenue each year from Rivian’s development, which will be split among Morgan, Walton, Newton and Jasper counties, as well as the City of Social Circle.

Jarrell also noted that Rivian’s development will affect 26 landowners who control 43 parcels of land in Morgan and Walton counties. Short said all owners involved voluntarily sold their land to the JDA, and no eminent domain was used to acquire land for the Rivian development.

The site plan also calls for major roadworks in and around the Rivian Automotive plant. Jarrell said a traffic study will be conducted in the near future to determine all the details.

Going forward, the site plan calls for the construction of a new exit off I-20 to Old Mill Road in Rutledge. Other improvements include widening US Highway 278 and connecting Old Mill Road to Highway 278.

Short believes the Rivian plant will bring significant benefits to the people of Morgan County and beyond, while becoming a force for environmental protection and stewardship.

“In all my years of economic development, this is the greenest company I have ever encountered. Their mission is to reduce the carbon footprint of our world,” Short said. “But we’re very excited about the jobs it will bring to the region…Rivian will provide generational career opportunities and benefits for thousands of families.”

Short and JDA members held a community meeting at Social Circle Middle School on Tuesday, January 11 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss the new site plan and other details of Rivian Automotive’s development. At press time, details of the reunion were not yet available.

Leaked site plan shows how Rivian could build up to 20 million square feet in Georgia

By Site plan

Rivian’s RS1 SUV model, which debuted at the 2018 Los Angeles Auto Show.

Electric car maker Rivian’s plans for a $5 billion assembly plant include nearly 20 million square feet of development in Stanton Springs, a 2,000-acre economic development megasite about 50 miles east from Atlanta.

As part of the landmark investment, the electric vehicle company could build a test track for its vehicles, wooded “adventure trails” and space for research and development, according to a leaked site plan. published on the Rivian Forum website. News of the sitemap was first reported by the Electrek green energy information site.

The logo of Savannah-based engineering firm Thomas & Hutton appears on the aerial render. Calls to the company have not been returned at press time.

The rumored sitemap closely matches what the company previously revealed about its assembly plant in a recent filing with the Georgian Ministry of Community Affairs, which requested a total of 20 million square feet of assembly and auxiliary buildings. But the documents offered more specific details about the campus, including 13 buildings, the adventure course and a test track.

Rivian wouldn’t be Georgia’s first car test track. The Porsche Cars North America headquarters next to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport includes a customer experience center with a test track. There are no details on what the adventure trail entails, such as whether it would be accessible to the public or only to Rivian workers or whether it would be pedestrian or a path to test the models of SUVs that Rivian plans to produce at the plant.

Other details on the site plan include 144 charging stations, a 100K SF event facility, outdoor amenity spaces and a 2.5M SF research and development facility. In one current filing with the state, Rivian also outlined road improvements for his project, including a new interchange at Old Mill Road and Interstate 20, as well as improvements and widening of the Interstate 278 interchange. The state previously announced plans to build a technical school on campus to train future workers.

California-based Rivian, founded in 2009, went public in November and has a market cap of more than $85 billion, but has yet to make a profit. Prior to its IPO, Rivian was a darling of the electric vehicle industry, attracting investment from Amazon, Ford and Cox Automotive. Experts say Rivian is part of a new generation of automakers aimed at an industry that is set to see tremendous growth over the next few years.

Rivian plans to hire 7,500 people. Once fully operational, state officials said Rivian would be able to produce up to 400,000 vehicles per year. Construction of the facility is expected to begin this summer with production expected to begin in 2024.

Site plan approved for housing development, seniors’ residence in Macomb Township

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A site plan was approved last month for Hampton Manor in Macomb. The area is on the north side of 24 Mile Road, west of Romeo Plank Road. The senior residence development would include an assisted living building and a memory care wing.

File photo by Patricia O’Blenes

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MACOMB TOWNSHIP – At its final meeting of 2021, the Macomb Township Planning Commission gave approval for a subdivision, seniors’ residence and more.

At the December 20 meeting, a revised final plan was recommended for approval for Wellington Estates. Planning director Josh Bocks said the plan was approved several months ago.

“Wellington West is the neighboring development that has also been approved,” he said. “From the time it was approved, Wellington Estates has acquired the property which is just south of this area.”

It is on the south side of 24 Mile Road, a quarter mile east of Romeo Plank Road. It is zoned urban single-family residential and has 146 lots. The applicant proposed to add three lots on the south side, bringing the total to 149 lots.

The commission also approved a planned unit development/general design for Freemont. It would be at the southeast corner of 21 Mile and Card roads.

Mario Izzi of MJC Companies said a purchase agreement had been reached with a gas station and a car wash. He is in the final stages of entering into a long-term lease agreement with Valvoline. It is possible that a daycare will be part of the development.

In other planning news, a site plan has been approved for Macomb’s Hampton Manor. The area is on the northwest corner of 24 Mile and Garfield Roads, just west of Macomb Lutheran North. The senior residence development would include an assisted living building and a memory care wing.

Regarding residents’ concerns about drainage and the Howard Drain, Engineer Jim Van Tiflin said the Macomb County Office of Public Works has strict building standards that must be adhered to.

“The township usually follows their standard because they are the ones dictating how much water they will accept down that drain,” he said.

The drain travels from approximately 24 Mile and Romeo Plank roads to 25 Mile and Hayes roads.

Resident Matt Dery said he was completely against the development.

“It’s a mess,” he said. “There are still additional changes to the proposed site plan, including the escape route, which is just across the fence from our homes in the supposed green space.”

After stating that there is a Hampton mansion in Shelby Township about five miles from the Macomb Township site, Dery asked the commission why there was a need for an additional similar property.

Also at the meeting, Supervisor Frank Viviano made a presentation, thanking members Nunzio Provenzano and Jasper Sciuto for their service to the township. It was their last meeting and they received an award from Macomb Township for their service. Provenzano served 15 years on the commission and Sciuto served for 14 years.

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Site map approved for Hy-Vee grocery store

By Site plan

By Kevin Boneske
Editor-in-chief


ASHWAUBENON – A site map for an Iowa-based supermarket chain having a retail grocery store inside the old Shopko in Bay Park Square was approved on Tuesday, Jan. 4 by the village sitemap review committee.

Community Development Director Aaron Schuette said Hy-Vee will maintain the existing 125,000 square foot building footprint with some facade upgrades.

He said there would be two drive-thru points on the north side of the buildings, one for a “click and choose” location, where groceries ordered online can be picked up, and the other for the pharmacy.

Schuette said the west side of the building facing Oneida Street will have a patio at the south end for a bar and food court.

He said an additional condition of approval requires Hy-Vee and Simon Property Group, which operates the mall, to continue working on the details of the parking lot.

Schuette said Hy-Vee will need to submit a separate sign permit application for review and modification of the unit’s planned development, if necessary.

“The revision of the site plan does not take into account the signage,” he said. “Signage will be authorized separately and all approvals beyond, if necessary. “

John Brehm, director of site planning at Hy-Vee, said in December that the company plans to open the grocery store this fall.

“Typical opening hours are 6 am to midnight,” Brehm said. “We anticipate that the store will employ 100 full-time and 300 part-time employees. “

The village council previously approved a Class B beer / Class B alcohol permit for a bar / dining room / patio at this location.

The company also applied for a Class A beer / Class A alcohol license to allow the sale of wine and spirits in the grocery store for off-premises alcohol consumption.

Conceptual Plan for Site South of Naval Base Recommended for Approval | Local news

By Site plan

The development of the Gordon House site in the face of opposition

By Site development

A city committee voted against a rezoning request to allow the construction of a condominium on the former site of a historic house.

The plan called for the construction of a four-storey condo at 514 Wellington Crescent, on the site of the former Gordon House.

This structure was built in 1909 and demolished in November 2020. At the time, neighborhood residents and heritage groups opposed the demolition.

The new 24,000-square-foot structure that the developers plan to replace it with would include eight units and underground parking.

Planning, real estate and development staff have recommended approval of the zoning change, but the proposal faces opposition due to building height, tree removal and related issues. to parking and access to the driveway.

A Heritage Conservation District (HCD) application for the neighborhood is also pending. If approved, new requirements could be placed on the development to ensure that the character and appearance of the neighborhood is maintained.

A public hearing on the development before the downtown community committee brought together the property owner, area residents and heritage advocates.

The committee rejected the zoning change request as it stands. The motion will now be considered by council.

Bruce County EMS Headquarters Plan in Port Elgin Gets Site Plan Approval

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Bruce County has approved a site plan for a new nine-bay Emergency Medical Services (EMS) headquarters to be constructed adjacent to the Bruce County Public Library building at the corner of Concession 10 and from MacKenzie Road. in Port Elgin.

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Saugeen Shores Town Planning Supervisor Jay Pausner told councilor meeting via Zoom on January 10 that approval of the site plan is contingent on a minor exemption request from Bruce County which will be heard on January 17. the Zoning By-law of the Town of Saugeen Shores. The county wants to increase the width of the lane from 10 meters to 18.5 meters and build three lanes that would not be permitted without a minor exemption.

Com. Dave Myette said the proposed EMS building is a “beautiful looking” development that will add to the first responder center in the area and possibly foster relationships with the nearby Saugeen Shores Police Department.

Mayor Luke Charbonneau said that not only will the new facility be located in Saugeen Shores, but it will also become the headquarters of Bruce County EMS.

“It is a really positive development for the Town of Saugeen Shores to have our Bruce County EMS senior management now located in Saugeen Shores…” said Charbonneau, adding that in addition to the employment benefits, this also makes Saugeen Shores “a bit of a hub” for EMS services in the region.

Last year, as plans for the new EMS HQ were underway, Bruce County Council accepted a recommendation from its Paramedic Services Committee to extend the two-year lease for its current building in the Green Street in Port Elgin. According to EMS staff, the 33-year-old rodent-infected building is overcrowded and unable to handle the length of the new ambulances.

The Bruce County website states that the Bruce County Paramedic Service employs approximately 100 full-time and part-time paramedics and operates a fleet of 15 vehicles – 12 ambulances and three supervision units stationed in six communities in County of Bruce – Walkerton, Chesley, Kincardine, Port Elgin, Wiarton and Tobermory – who are deployed when and where needed.

This vacant site, owned by Bruce County, at the southwest corner of Concession 10 and MacKenzie Road. in Port Elgin, will house the proposed Bruce County EMS headquarters, valued at $ 4 million. [Town of Saugeen Shores]

Sitemap and Service Agreement for Cedar Crescent Village

By Site plan

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Within three months, developers of the Village of Cedar Crescent development must apply for planning permission for phase one of its multi-million dollar project on land in the waterfront town of Port Elgin, otherwise the city ​​could terminate or suspend an agreement that has just been approved by the councilors and force the developer to resubmit the plans and drawings for approval.

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Councilors for the town of Saugeen Shores approved site works, servicing agreements and lease amendments, and viewed new renderings – the third iteration – of Cedar Crescent Village (CCV) during a virtual committee of the entire meeting on January 10.

The CCV plan is very different from what council approved in principle two years ago – it’s smaller, moved farther from the beach and doesn’t include a banquet hall, volleyball courts or staffed tourist office.

The phased development on the former mini-golf, train station and flea market grounds includes the Whitefish Grille with a rooftop terrace, pavilion, two-story market, restrooms and commercial tenants, including an ice cream shop.

Planning supervisor Jay Pausner noted that the developers had not yet approved the terms of the report which were presented to councilors as staff recommendations. He said CCV’s target opening is August 2023.

Architect Grant Diemert’s latest renderings – which aimed for “coastal architecture” – show buildings in sandy white with pre-finished panels and slatted wood siding and metal siding and roofs.

The design misses the mark for Coun. Cheryl who said the City needs to ensure the project supports the overall character of the design.

“This is a legacy project and I think we need to get this design right…” Grace said, explaining her opposition to site works and the maintenance agreement.

Grace said the proposed design is not in keeping with the coastal character and vision she believes most residents of Saugeen Shores want.

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“I believe we can have growth and development without sacrificing what makes Saugeen Shores a special and beloved destination, whether for tourists or for those who want to make our town their forever home,” said Grace.

Grace also expressed concern over references to “Carney Lane retail outlets” and a reference to the carnival atmosphere in an architectural brief submitted by the developer.

She said the brief indicates that the vision presented by the group of community representatives should ideally “express the freedom and hedonistic temptations of carnival, as well as the stability and organizational structure of seaside Georgian Revival architecture.”

“I believe the majority of residents don’t want a carnival beach-side atmosphere like the references in the report to the Santa Monica Pier and locations in Florida, Grand Bend or Sauble Beach,” said Grace, adding that she hoped the developers would “submit a different design that reflects what citizens have been asking for from the start.

Grace said her vision resembled the Cobble Beach Golf development north of Owen Sound with its features of cedar shingles, gabled windows and soft colors reminiscent of Nantucket.

Deputy Mayor Don Matheson called it a ‘great’ design that has been scaled down and will modernize Port Elgin’s main beach

Deputy Vice Mayor Mike Myatt said he lost sleep over the development and he urges homeowners who will lose their view of the lake. He added that it would take a long time to mend a divided community, but the development would clean up the “eye sore” of Port Elgin’s waterfront.

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“It was a heartbreaking decision…I think once this is built we will have quite a successful development on our beachfront…” Myatt said.

Mayor Luke Charbonneau recognized the difficulty of defining the aesthetics of a private project on the public domain, because to some extent it is a matter of taste and public consultation.

Charbonneau noted the evolution of the design since it was first presented in 2019, calling it “radically” different from the bricks of the first design to an intermediate design and now the third major iteration to try to integrate the vision.

“I’m happy with the design. I know this will satisfy some and not satisfy others, but I’m confident it’s being done for good reason and solid justification and I’m absolutely confident it will be a nice set up on the main beach that will provide in the end the amenities that I’ve been hearing for so long that people want to see at the main beach…” said Charbonneau.

Staff said the City is responsible for providing parking outside areas leased to CCV, work that will be done in 2022-23. As the site will be a destination of choice, the City wants quality landscaping.

Pausner said CCV will pay a $150,000 “taxation” or contribution to the city to help pay for some of the future landscaping, pedestrian connectivity and active transportation on adjacent city lands.

The councilors voted 6 to 2 in favor of the works and site servicing agreement.
With advice. Grace, counselor. Matt Carr voted against approval. He had not responded to a request for comment within the time limits.

Architects renderings show the latest conceptual design for the village of Cedar Crescent on the Port Elgin waterfront.  City councilors approved site works and the servicing plan on January 10 for private development on City-owned land. [Diermert Architect Inc.]
Architects renderings show the latest conceptual design for the village of Cedar Crescent on the Port Elgin waterfront. City councilors approved site works and the servicing plan on January 10 for private development on City-owned land. [Diermert Architect Inc.]

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Rivian site plan unveiled reveals unprecedented size for historic development near Rutledge | News

By Site plan

The long-awaited site plan for Rivian Automotive’s new multibillion-dollar electric car manufacturing plant in Stanton Springs North was released this week.

Rivian’s new site plan paints a startling picture of the unprecedented scale of the massive factory when fully constructed, spanning 2,000 acres in Morgan and Walton counties.

“We’ve never seen anything like it here,” said Shane Short, Walton County economic development director.

The expansive green pastures of former Verner family and Bowden family farmland in Rutledge will soon be covered with concrete, becoming the hub of industrial development heading into downtown Rutledge.

“A lot of Rivian’s buildings will be built on former Verner family farmland and Bowden family farmland,” Short said. “This will help preserve some of the green space and wetlands closer to I-20 and US Highway 278. The plant will be approximately three miles from the town of Rutledge.”

According to the recently released sitemap, approximately 13 million square feet of the Rivian plant will be built in Morgan County. The total project requires up to 20 million square feet of construction space.

Rivian’s new plant could be up to 20 times the size of Takeda’s pharmaceutical plant in Stanton Springs, which spans 1 million square feet. Even the Kia plant in West Point, Georgia is just 2.2 million square feet.

For a visual comparison, 20 million square feet of construction space represents 347 football fields. It would be three times the size of Disneyland and four times the size of Vatican City.

In addition to manufacturing warehouses and office buildings, roads, parking lots, access points and stormwater management areas will also be built in Morgan County for the project.

Rivian will invest up to $ 5 billion in the new plant, generate 7,500 jobs and produce 400,000 electric vehicles per year when fully operational. Site plan details were revealed after Morgan County Planning Director Chuck Jarrell filed two Regional Impact Development (DRI) statements with the Georgia Department of Community Affairs, as the demands the law to move the project forward.

Jarrell said the Joint Development Authority (JDA) expects to earn $ 100 million in local tax revenue each year through the development of Rivian, which will be split among Morgan, Walton, Newton and Jasper counties, as well as the town of Social Circle.

Jarrell also noted that the development of Rivian will affect 26 landowners who control 43 plots of land in Morgan and Walton counties. Short said each landowner involved voluntarily sold their land to the JDA and no prominent estates were used to acquire land for Rivian development.

The site plan also provides for major road works in and around the Rivian Automotive plant. Jarrell has indicated that a traffic survey will be conducted in the near future to determine all the details.

As of now, the site plan calls for the construction of a new exit off I-20 to Old Mill Road in Rutledge. Other improvements include widening US Highway 278 and connecting Old Mill Road to Highway 278.

Short believes the Rivian plant will provide significant benefits to residents of Morgan County and beyond, and become a force for environmental protection and stewardship.

“In all my years of economic development, this is the greenest company I have ever come across. Their mission is to reduce the carbon footprint of our world, ”said Short. “But we are very excited about the jobs this will bring to the region… Rivian will provide career opportunities and generational benefits to thousands of families.”

Short and members of the JDA held a community meeting at Social Circle Middle School on Tuesday, January 11 at 6:30 p.m. to discuss the new site map and other details of Rivian Automotive’s development. At the time of going to press, details of the meeting were not yet available.

Kitty Hawk Planning Board Reviews Setbacks, Lot Coverage, and Retail Sitemap – The Coastland Times

By Site plan

At its last meeting in 2021 on December 16, the Kitty Hawk Planning Council reconsidered a proposed zoning change, reduced the setback distance for some commercial lots, changed the definition of lot coverage, and considered a retail business development site map.

Due to the absence of members, an earlier recommendation vote on a proposal to allow multi-family dwellings with a maximum density of 14 housing units per acre as a special use in planned commercial developments (PCD) s ‘is a tie at 2-2. City council sent him back for another review and recommendation ahead of a public hearing scheduled for January 10.

According to Planning and Inspections Director Rob Testerman, PCDs are intended to provide developers with design flexibility and greater land use efficiency. Currently, multi-family dwellings are permitted with a maximum density of 10 dwellings per acre in Districts BC-1 and BC-2.

The requirement with the current demand for at least five contiguous acres with no less than 500 feet of total road frontage on US Highway 158 or NC Highway 12 limits the demand to three areas: Home Depot and part of the Beachwoods Resort development. , the new 7 -11 and Promenade Sports Nautiques.

Commenting in favor of the change, real estate agent Eddie Goodrich explained that there would be no changes to the lot coverage, height requirements or decrease in parking and that the overall intention is to achieve a similar development goal in a different way.

“It’s more like two times 15 is 30 versus three times 10 is 30,” Goodrich suggested. “Same number of people, just a different way of doing it,” adding that units per acre really doesn’t mean much, it just allows smaller units to be allowed in the same box.

During discussion of the request, Testerman stressed that the number of rooms and permitted occupants would be governed by the Department of Health.

At the end of the discussion, the vote of approval failed with only two for and three against.

The next item on the agenda was a request to reduce the setback for commercial lots adjacent to any dedicated open space or recreational area of ​​an adjacent residential development.

Testerman explained that examples of where the change would apply include the commercial lands up to the Sea Scape Golf Course and, since it is a recreation area, the Harbor Bay Playground.

In support of the request, Ralph D. Calfee stated that the number of eligible sites is rather limited and that in these areas the buffer zone of adjacent residential uses is actually larger than expected, creating an unnecessary restriction for these. development of commercial sites.

The motion to approve this request was carried with a 5-0 approval vote.

A change to the definition of land cover was also passed with unanimous support, which will exempt 500 square feet of pool area from land cover calculations.

Currently, lot coverage – a measure of developed land use – includes areas covered by buildings, parking lots, driveways, roads, sidewalks, decks, and any concrete areas. or asphalt.

Testerman explained that in most cases there is a gap of a few inches between the top of the pool water and the adjacent level of the pool deck, allowing the pools to serve as a catch basin for some of the rainwater. And, while the current code could be interpreted to allow it to decree that swimming pools are exempt, incorporating the wording into the city code removes any subjectivity and will ensure consistency going forward.

Testerman also said that for stormwater clearance purposes, the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality did not count pool areas in the lot coverage.

Returning to the last item on the night’s agenda, a review of the sitemap of a retail business development drew concerning comments from a few neighboring residents.

The proposed plans provide for the improvement of a vacant lot at 5201 North Croatan Highway between Ambrose Furniture and Outer Banks Furniture. A 7,500 square foot two-story commercial building with a maximum height of 28 feet, both within the permitted height and land coverage requirements, will have access to Byrd Street. There is currently no plan to connect Byrd Street to US 158 and terminals are available to prevent through traffic.

While there have been comments from local residents that the development will cause flooding to their properties, during discussions it was pointed out that the property to be developed does not flood them and in fact collects some of the land. excess water from higher up the street which flows into this property.

Michael W. Strader Jr., director of engineering at Quible and Associates at Kitty Hawk, said he was aware of the flooding issues associated with the development of the property. He went on to say that the property is a bowl, but that there would be no runoff to other properties and some of the landscaping and engineering on the property would actually exceed the standards. state stormwater retention requirements.

At the end of the discussion, it was highlighted that the proposed development plans meet all applicable guidelines and a motion to approve the site plan received a 5-0 vote.

Each of the items on the evening’s agenda will be considered by the municipal council, which is not bound by the votes of the town planning council.

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Site plan of a caravan for the popular seaside resort of Anglesey should be refused

By Site plan

Plans to set up a caravan site on a working farm near a popular Anglesey seaside resort could be rejected by planners.

A request for a change in agricultural land use to accommodate 10 touring caravans in Bunwerth, Trearddur Bay near Holyhead is to be discussed by the Anglesey Council planning committee next week.

Officers recommend that the proposal be denied.

READ MORE: First images of holiday lodge complex under development next to Conwy pub

In a report to committee members, the proposal was presented by two local councilors for consideration.

Planning Officer Gwen Jones, in her report, states that the application site includes agricultural land within an Area of ​​Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).

She adds, “As the existing screens on the site are empty or low in height, the northeast of the site would be most visible in views of a short stretch of the highway.

As the proposal is for white tourists, the local planning authority’s assessment is that the views of the site tend to be intrusive, although not all tourists would be fully visible. It is possible that part of everyone be visible indicating the extent of the proposed development.



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“A landscaping plan was provided with the planning request. The landscaping plan would reinforce the existing screening and it is anticipated in the assessment that it will take 5-10 years to become significantly effective.

She concludes her report by stating: “The proposal is not considered to include high quality development and that it would also be detrimental to the character and appearance of the area which is part of the AONB”.

The Rome subdivision is OK for the sitemap

By Site plan

A site plan review of a 50-lot first phase of a large residential subdivision of approximately 69 lots off Merrick Road, via Charles Anken Boulevard, known as Delta Luxury Townhomes, LLC, was approved by the Rome Planning Council at its monthly meeting on Tuesday, on condition that the developer agrees to install street lighting in the development in the future.

Steven Buck, owner of Buck Construction of Whitesboro, appeared before the board after members said at the December meeting that the project engineer had not provided evidence, since the November discussions, plans to install sufficient street lighting in the proposed residential subdivision for public safety. .

“Unfortunately, it is not in our budget to install the lighting, but we are committed to putting arrangements in place to facilitate the addition of a lighting district and fixtures to the project,” said Buck.

Last month, the project engineer explained how the site plan now included driving lights on each lot and that it would be “built into” the deed and rental agreements that residents would be required to light. these fires “during the hours of darkness”.

Buck mentioned Tuesday how the costs of building materials continue to rise, making the installation of lighting out of his budget for the project. He said his engineer altered the site drawings to indicate the installation of the lighting district conduit. Buck said he plans to work with National Grid to see if the gas and electric company would allow development to join the company’s “trench” as they dig trenches, but if they don’t. not, “we will provide a trench in the right-of-way of a solid conduit.

Buck and National Grid “are coordinating an effort to have a complete pipeline system where electricity can be supplied at any time in the future,” he said.

The plans continue to include outdoor lighting for installation in the home’s garages, Buck added. He also said the conduit could be tied to his next project to be submitted to town planning council and included on the February agenda, for the addition of 44 single-family lots.

City planner Garret Wyckoff said it was on the recommendation of the city’s Department of Community and Economic Development that the planning council approves the site plan for Delta luxury townhouses given the current escalation. material prices and that city codes do not require street lighting. Wyckoff said it was in the city’s best interest for the project to go ahead as it provides additional housing as the city grapples with a “lack of housing supply.”

Planning council vice-chairman Joseph Calandra said he would like to see the project “go ahead”, but recommended that a motion be made to approve the site plan, provided Buck adds street lighting once it is able to sell the units and make a profit. Then he could use the profits to reinvest in development, including adding lighting, Calandra added.

“Right now he (Buck) has a cash flow problem, but once he’s up and running we can recommend that he install street light – it’s a financial burden for him right now,” said Calandra.

Installing street lighting in the development would cost an additional $ 195,000, city officials said.

President Mark Esposito then asked how the city planning council or city might make the recommendation enforceable in the future.

City Assistant Corporation attorney James S. Rizzo said it would “not be a legal problem” to recommend that lighting be added in the future, because “there is nothing wrong with what the developer comes back for a status report “.

It was later indicated that Buck could give a status update during the licensing process in conjunction with the Planning Council, the Department of Public Works and the city codes office.

A motion to approve the site plan on the condition that Buck add street lighting to the development in the future was passed unanimously.

Also on the program:

• The review of the environmental quality of the site and the review of the site plan for a WellNow 4,375 square foot emergency care facility to be located at 1790, boul. Black River. have been deposited.

Project engineer Kevin Bamann explained that emergency care would be located next to the mall’s new Starbucks cafe. He explained that Caliber Commercial Brokerage, LLC of Rochester is developing the facility, along with Starbucks. The cafe’s sitemap was approved by the board in September for Randy Soggs, owner of Mohawk Acres Plaza.

Bamann said he, on behalf of Caliber Brokerage, was due to appear before the city’s Zoning Appeal Board next month to ask him to “line up” the reverse side of the emergency care building with Starbucks due to the existing water pipe.

As for Caliber taking over the development of WellNow and Starbucks, Bamann said Soggs sold the property to Caliber because the trading firm “made a lot of it (Starbucks) to other cities” and had to experience working with the company.

“From what I understand, WellNow is very responsive and Starbucks not so much,” Bamann said of explaining the sale.

As the board was still awaiting the SEQR review, Esposito proposed that the SEQR and sitemap be tabled, which were approved unanimously.

• A negative statement on a SEQR examination and preliminary plaque examination, requested by Pat Busyczak for a minor subdivision of two lots across from 6327 Lamphear Road, was unanimously approved. It is planned that the owner Busyczak will build a house on the second lot and sell it.

Easdales faces decision delay on £100m ex-IBM Greenock site development

By Site development

A PLANNING decision on a proposed £100million transformation of the former IBM site in Greenock has been postponed after the procedures followed by council officials were branded ‘incompetent’.

Inverclyde Planning Council yesterday voted 5-4 to carry out a visit to the Spango Valley site and demand a further briefing from council building officials about the candidacy of bus magnate businessmen Sandy and James Easdale , as reported by the Greenock Telegraph.

The decision came after a proposal by Councilman Councilor Jim McEleny to lift a council officer’s cap on new homes on the 270 to 420 site was rejected by Chief Legal Officer Jim Kerr.

A bid by developers for permission in principle for 450 homes has been deemed excessive by planning bosses because it exceeds the current limit for the entire Spango Valley site by 30 – only part of which is owned by the Easdale brothers.

FORMER IBM SPANGO VALLEY SITE

Cllr McEleny was told his motion was ‘incompetent’ with the Local Development Plan (LDP) and would render the other part of the site unviable for development by its owners, who opposed the Easdales’ request.

Mr McEleny argued that capping the app at 270 homes would ‘kill it like a stone’, as Sandy Easdale has publicly said in the Telegraph last month that the site would remain “derelict” with such a reduction in the number of properties.

Councilor McEleny – who described the development proposal as ‘exciting’ – said: ‘The fact is that the process followed by council officers has been incompetent.

“They should have reviewed the application for 450 homes outside the LDP and recommended denial and proceeded to a public hearing.

“It should have been both options.”

Chief legal officer Mr Kerr said changing a planning condition from 270 to 420 homes would be a ‘significant departure’ from the LDP, adding: ‘I don’t think we can go back.

HeraldScotland: Councilor Jim McElenyCouncilor Jim McEleny

Councilor McEleny retorted: “‘I don’t think’ is not a sufficient legal ground.

“We should give this candidacy every chance of succeeding and not put an end to it.”

Mr Jamieson replied: ‘The economic viability of the site is not a material planning consideration.’

The Easdales – who worked with delivery partner Advance Construction – have filed masterplans for a major development of 450 new homes, business space, a pub/restaurant and a ‘park and ride’ facility in the former IBM Halt station.

In a statement released last month, the Easdales said: “We have worked positively with council officials since the bid was submitted and understood that the officials were supportive of our bid.

“Therefore, it was surprising to read in the local media that council officials were now recommending that there be a 40 per cent reduction in the number of houses – as that was something they had specifically told us not to wouldn’t happen.”

Councilor Innes Nelson offered a site visit and another briefing of the elected members by council officers.

HeraldScotland: Spango Valley and former IBM site, Greenock.Spango Valley and former IBM site, Greenock.

Cllr Jim Clocherty proposed approval of the application as recommended by officials for 270 homes.

He said: “The frustration for me is that there is no master plan for the whole site.

“I know it’s not the applicant’s fault, but if we go for all the houses on offer, the other part of the site wouldn’t be viable, and that’s not LDP compliant.”

Organizer David Wilson asked if members approved the proposal with the recommendation of 270 homes, if the developers could appeal.

Mr Jamieson said: ‘It is within the gift of every applicant to appeal any decision of the planning council and it would be the Scottish Ministers who would consider the application.’

Councilors David Wilson, John Crowther, Jim McEleny, Robert Moran and Innes Nelson voted for a site visit and additional briefing before deciding on the application.

Councilors Jim Clocherty, Gerry Dorrian, Drew McKenzie and Ciano Rebecchi voted to approve the application with the recommendation of 270 new homes.

Sterling acquires Petillo, a leading specialist site development company

By Site development

THE WOODS, Texas – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Sterling Construction Company, Inc. (NasdaqGS: STRL) (“Sterling” or “the Company”) entered into a share purchase agreement and completed the acquisition of Petillo Incorporated and its related operating entities ( collectively “Petillo”) on December 30, 2021. Petillo is a leading provider of specialty site development solutions in the Northeast and Central Atlantic. Founded in 1994 by owner and CEO Michael Petillo, Petillo has experienced 29% compound revenue growth from 2017 to 2021 through continued expansion of its geographic footprint, customer base and service offerings. Petillo’s revenue and operating income in 2021 is expected to be approximately $ 212 million and $ 29 million, respectively.

“We are delighted to welcome the Petillo team, their culture and their capabilities to our electronics infrastructure solutions industry,” said Joe Cutillo, CEO of Sterling. “Their entrepreneurial spirit of delivering customer-centric solutions, coupled with their geographic footprint, will allow us to serve our major leading e-commerce customers across the East Coast with even more offerings than ever before. . Petillo’s capabilities along with our current Plateau capabilities will not only create one of the largest specialty site development companies in the United States, but will also add broader capabilities and service offerings to both end markets.

The aggregate consideration of $ 195 million paid on the Closing Date (the “Base Purchase Price”) consisted of $ 175 million in cash and 759,447 common shares of Sterling valued at $ 20 million. In addition, under the purchase agreement, if they have met the specified annual operating income growth thresholds and certain other conditions, the sellers are entitled to top-up payments not to exceed $ 20 million over the course of the years. next five years. The Company also entered into a five-year employment contract with Michael Petillo, which provides for five equal annual retention payments totaling $ 15 million.

Effective December 29, 2021, Sterling entered into a third amendment to its credit agreement (the “Amendment”) which, among other provisions, increased the Company’s existing term loans through a new additional term loan of $ 140 million with the same maturity as the existing term. Loans to finance part of the acquisition of Petillo. The amendment was led by BMO Capital Markets Corp, as principal arranger and joint bookrunner, and by BMO Harris Bank NA, as administrative agent. The balance of the base purchase price, as well as the costs associated with the acquisition, were funded from Sterling’s cash balance.

Stifel served as exclusive financial advisor and Jones Walker LLP served as legal counsel to Sterling on this transaction.

Conference call

Sterling management will hold a conference call to discuss this transaction on Thursday, January 6e at 9:00 a.m. ET / 8:00 a.m. CT. Interested parties can participate in the call by dialing (201) 493-6744 or (877) 445-9755. Please call ten minutes before the start of the conference call and request the Sterling call. Following the opening remarks from management, there will be a question and answer session. In addition, a slide presentation that will accompany management’s comments will be posted in the Investor Relations section of the Company’s website, available at www.strlco.com, where a simultaneous webcast of the Company is available. The call will also be available. If you are unable to listen live, the webcast of the conference call will be archived on the Company’s website for thirty days.

About Sterling

Sterling Construction Company, Inc. operates through a variety of subsidiaries in three segments specializing in heavy civil engineering, specialty services and residential projects in the United States (the “United States”), primarily in the southern United States. United States, Rocky Mountain States, California and Hawaii. , as well as other areas with strategic construction opportunities. Heavy Civil includes infrastructure and rehabilitation projects for highways, roads, bridges, airports, ports, streetcars, water supply systems, sewage and stormwater drainage. Specialty service projects include site development activities, multi-family home foundations, parking structures and other commercial concrete projects. Residential projects include concrete foundations for single family homes. From strategy to operations, we are committed to sustainable development by acting responsibly to protect and improve the quality of life of society. Caring for our employees and communities, customers and investors is The Sterling Way.

Joe Cutillo, CEO, “We build and maintain the infrastructure that allows our economy to run, our people to move, and our country to grow. “

Important information for investors and shareholders

Caution regarding forward-looking statements

This press release contains statements that are considered to be forward-looking statements within the meaning of federal securities laws. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control, which may include statements regarding: our projections or expectations regarding synergies and other benefits of the transaction; our business strategy; our financial strategy; our industry outlook; and our plans, goals, expectations, forecasts, outlook and intentions. All of these types of statements, other than the statements of historical fact included in this press release, are forward-looking statements. In some cases, forward-looking statements may be identified by words such as “may”, “will”, “could”, “should”, “expect”, “plan”, “plan”, “have the intention “,” “believe”, “estimate”, “predict”, “potential”, “pursue”, “target”, “continue”, the negative of these or other comparable terms. press release are largely based on our expectations, which reflect estimates and assumptions made by our management. These estimates and assumptions reflect our best judgment based on currently known market conditions and other factors. In addition, the assumptions management regarding future events may prove to be inaccurate. Management cautions all readers that the forward-looking statements contained in this press release are not guarantees of future performance, and we cannot assure any reader that such statements will materialize or forward-looking events and circumstances will occur. Although we believe these estimates and assumptions are reasonable, they are inherently uncertain and involve a number of risks and uncertainties that are beyond our control, including the possibility that the expected benefits of the transaction may not be fully realized. or may take longer to materialize than expected, the possibility that the costs or difficulties of integrating the Petillo business are greater than expected and our ability to hire and retain Petillo employees. Actual results may differ materially from those anticipated or implied in forward-looking statements because of these factors as well as other factors included in the “Risk Factors” section in our documents filed with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission and elsewhere in these documents. Other factors or risks that we currently believe are immaterial, that are not currently known to us, or that arise in the future could also cause our actual results to differ materially from our expected results. In light of these uncertainties, investors are cautioned that many of the assumptions on which our forward-looking statements are based are subject to change after the date on which the forward-looking statements are made. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are posted, and we assume no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements for any reason, whether as a result of new information, future events or developments, changed circumstances or otherwise, notwithstanding any change in our assumptions, changes in business plans, actual experience or other changes. These cautionary statements qualify all forward-looking statements attributable to us or to persons acting on our behalf.

Sterling Construction Acquires Petillo, a Leading Specialty Site Development Company – Form 8-K

By Site development

Sterling acquires Petillo, an industry-leading specialty site development company

• One of the largest specialist site development companies in the North East

• Expansion of geographic footprint to cover blue chip e-commerce customers in all major East Coast markets

•Positions Sterling to be an industry leader in the development of specialized electronic infrastructure sites

• Strong cultural alignment

• The pro forma total leverage ratio increases slightly from 2.14 to 2.35 times, remaining comfortably within our target range and providing ample liquidity

• First day accretive

Conference call with accompanying slideshow, Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 9:00 a.m. ET

THE WOODLANDS, TX – January 5, 2022 – Sterling Construction Company, Inc. (NasdaqGS: STRL) (“Sterling” or “the Company”) has entered into a stock purchase agreement and completed the acquisition of Petillo Incorporated and its related operating entities (collectively “Petillo”), on December 30, 2021. Petillo is a leading provider of specialty site development solutions in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. Founded in 1994 by owner and CEO Michael Petillo, Petillo has experienced compound revenue growth of 29% from 2017 to 2021 through the continued expansion of its geographic footprint, customer base and service offerings. Petillo’s 2021 revenue and operating profit are expected to be approximately $212 million and $29 million, respectively.

“We are thrilled to welcome the Petillo team, culture and capabilities to our Electronic Infrastructure Solutions business,” said Joe Cutillo, Sterling’s President and CEO. “Their entrepreneurial spirit focused on delivering customer-centric solutions, coupled with their geographic footprint, will allow us to serve our key, blue-chip e-commerce customers across the East Coast with even more offerings than before. Petillo’s capabilities along with our current Plateau capabilities will not only create one of the largest specialty site development companies in the United States, but will also add broader capabilities and service offerings to both end markets.”

The aggregate consideration of $195 million paid on the closing date (the “Base Purchase Price”) consisted of $175 million in cash and 759,447 common shares of Sterling valued at $20 million. In addition, under the purchase agreement, upon satisfaction of meeting specified annual operating profit growth thresholds and certain other conditions, the sellers are entitled to additional payments not to exceed $20 million. over the next five years. The Company also entered into a five-year employment contract with Michael Petillo, which provides for five equal annual retention payments totaling $15 million.

Effective December 29, 2021, Sterling entered into a Third Amendment to the Credit Agreement (the “Amendment”) which, among other provisions, increased the Company’s existing term loans with a new loan $140 million in additional term loans with the same maturity as the existing term loans. to finance part of the acquisition of Petillo. The amendment was led by BMO Capital Markets Corp, as joint lead arranger and joint bookrunner, and BMO Harris Bank NA, as administrative agent. The balance of the base purchase price, as well as acquisition-related costs, was funded from Sterling’s cash balance.

Stifel acted as exclusive financial advisor and Jones Walker LLP acted as legal advisor to Sterling on this transaction.

Conference call

Sterling management will hold a conference call to discuss this transaction on Thursday, January 6 at 9:00 a.m. ET/8:00 a.m. CT. Interested parties can participate in the call by dialing (201) 493-6744 or (877) 445-9755. Please call ten minutes before the start of the conference call and request the Sterling call. Following the opening remarks from management, there will be a question and answer session. Additionally, a slide presentation that will accompany management’s comments has been posted to the Investor Relations section of the Company’s website, which can be viewed at www.strlco.com, where a simultaneous webcast of the call will also be available. If you are unable to listen live, the webcast of the conference call will be archived on the Company’s website for thirty days.

About Sterling

Sterling Construction Company, Inc. operates through a variety of subsidiaries in three segments specializing in heavy civil, specialty service and residential projects in the United States (the “United States”), primarily in the southern United States, the Rocky Mountain States, California and Hawaii. , as well as other areas with strategic construction opportunities. Heavy civil engineering includes infrastructure and rehabilitation projects for highways, roads, bridges, airports, ports, light rail, water, wastewater and storm drainage systems. Specialized service projects include electronic infrastructure site development activities, foundations for multi-family homes, parking structures and other commercial concrete projects. Residential projects include concrete foundations for single family homes. From strategy to operations, we are committed to sustainability by operating responsibly to preserve and improve society’s quality of life. Caring for our people and our communities, our customers and our investors – that’s The Sterling Way.

Joe Cutillo, CEO, “We build and maintain the infrastructure that allows our economy to function, our people to move, and our country to grow.”

Important information for investors and shareholders

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains statements that qualify as forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control, which may include statements regarding: our projections or expectations regarding the synergies and other benefits of the transaction; our business strategy; our financial strategy; our industry outlook; and our plans, objectives, expectations, forecasts, outlook and intentions. All of these types of statements, other than statements of historical facts included in this press release, are forward-looking statements. In some instances, forward-looking statements may be identified by words such as “may”, “will”, “could”, “should”, “expect”, “plan”, “project”, “has intention to”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “estimate”, “predict”, “potential”, “pursue”, “target”, “continue”, the negative of such

terms or other comparable terms. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are based largely on our expectations, which reflect estimates and assumptions made by our management. These estimates and assumptions reflect our best judgment based on currently known market conditions and other factors. In addition, management’s assumptions regarding future events may prove to be inaccurate. Management cautions all readers that the forward-looking statements contained in this press release are not guarantees of future performance, and we cannot assure any reader that such statements will materialize or that forward-looking events and circumstances will occur. Although we believe these estimates and assumptions to be reasonable, they are inherently uncertain and involve a number of risks and uncertainties beyond our control, including the possibility that the expected benefits of the transaction may not be fully realized. or may take longer to materialize than expected, the possibility that the costs or difficulties of integrating Petillo’s business may be greater than anticipated, and our ability to hire and retain Petillo’s employees. Actual results may differ materially from those anticipated or implied by the forward-looking statements due to these and other factors included in the “Risk Factors” section of our filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. States and elsewhere in these documents. Other factors or risks that we currently believe are not material, that are not presently known to us, or that occur in the future could also cause our actual results to differ materially from our expected results. Given these uncertainties, investors are cautioned that many of the assumptions on which our forward-looking statements are based are subject to change after the date on which the forward-looking statements are made. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements for any reason, whether as a result of new information, future events or developments, change in circumstances or otherwise, notwithstanding any change in our assumptions, changes in business plans, actual experience or other changes. These cautionary statements qualify all forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf.

Company Contact:

Sterling Construction Company, Inc.

Ron Ballschmiede, Chief Financial Officer

(281) 214-0777

Contact with Investor Relations:

Equity Group Inc.

Jeremy Hellman, CFA

(212) 836-9626

Sterling acquires Petillo, an industry-leading specialty site development company

By Site development

Conference call with accompanying slide presentation, Thursday, January 6, 2022 at 9:00 a.m. ET

THE WOODLANDS, Texas, January 05, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sterling Construction Company, Inc. (NasdaqGS:STRL) (“Sterling” or “the Company”) has entered into a stock purchase agreement and completed the acquisition of Petillo Incorporated and its related operating entities (collectively “Petillo”), on December 30, 2021. Petillo is a leading provider of specialty site development solutions in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic. Founded in 1994 by owner and CEO Michael Petillo, Petillo has experienced compound revenue growth of 29% from 2017 to 2021 through the continued expansion of its geographic footprint, customer base and service offerings. Petillo’s 2021 revenue and operating profit are expected to be approximately $212 million and $29 million, respectively.

“We are thrilled to welcome the Petillo team, their culture and their capabilities to our Electronic Infrastructure Solutions business,” said Joe Cutillo, CEO of Sterling. “Their entrepreneurial spirit focused on delivering customer-centric solutions, coupled with their geographic footprint, will allow us to serve our key, blue-chip e-commerce customers across the East Coast with even more offerings than before. Petillo’s capabilities along with our current Plateau capabilities will not only create one of the largest specialty site development companies in the United States, but will also add broader capabilities and service offerings to both end markets.”

The aggregate consideration of $195 million paid on the closing date (the “Base Purchase Price”) consisted of $175 million in cash and 759,447 common shares of Sterling valued at $20 million. In addition, under the purchase agreement, upon satisfaction of meeting specified annual operating profit growth thresholds and certain other conditions, the sellers are entitled to additional payments not to exceed $20 million. over the next five years. The Company also entered into a five-year employment contract with Michael Petillo, which provides for five equal annual retention payments totaling $15 million.

Effective December 29, 2021, Sterling entered into a third amendment to its credit agreement (the “Amendment”) which, among other provisions, increased the Company’s existing term loans with a new additional term of $140 million with the same maturity as the existing term loan. Loans to finance part of the acquisition of Petillo. The amendment was led by BMO Capital Markets Corp, as joint lead arranger and joint bookrunner, and BMO Harris Bank NA, as administrative agent. The balance of the base purchase price, as well as acquisition-related costs, was funded from Sterling’s cash balance.

Stifel acted as exclusive financial advisor and Jones Walker LLP acted as legal advisor to Sterling on this transaction.

Conference call

Sterling management will hold a conference call to discuss this transaction on Thursday, January 6and at 9:00 a.m. ET/8:00 a.m. CT. Interested parties can participate in the call by dialing (201) 493-6744 or (877) 445-9755. Please call ten minutes before the start of the conference call and request the Sterling call. Following the opening remarks from management, there will be a question and answer session. In addition, a slide presentation that will accompany management’s comments will be posted in the Investor Relations section of the Company’s website, which can be viewed at www.strlco.com, where a simultaneous webcast of the call will also be available. If you are unable to listen live, the webcast of the conference call will be archived on the Company’s website for thirty days.

About Sterling

Sterling Construction Company, Inc. operates through a variety of subsidiaries in three segments specializing in heavy civil, specialty service and residential projects in the United States (the “United States”), primarily in the southern United States, the Rocky Mountain States, California and Hawaii. , as well as other areas with strategic construction opportunities. Heavy civil engineering includes infrastructure and rehabilitation projects for highways, roads, bridges, airports, ports, light rail, water, wastewater and storm drainage systems. Specialty service projects include site development activities, multi-family home foundations, parking structures and other commercial concrete projects. Residential projects include concrete foundations for single family homes. From strategy to operations, we are committed to sustainability by operating responsibly to preserve and improve society’s quality of life. Caring for our people and our communities, our customers and our investors – that’s The Sterling Way.

Joe Cutillo, CEO, “We build and maintain the infrastructure that allows our economy to function, our people to move, and our country to grow.”

Important information for investors and shareholders

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains statements that qualify as forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control, which may include statements regarding: our projections or expectations regarding the synergies and other benefits of the transaction; our business strategy; our financial strategy; our industry outlook; and our plans, objectives, expectations, forecasts, outlook and intentions. All of these types of statements, other than statements of historical facts included in this press release, are forward-looking statements. In some cases, forward-looking statements may be identified by words such as “may”, “will”, “could”, “should”, “expect”, “plan”, “project”, “has intention to”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “estimate”, “predict”, “potential”, “pursue”, “target”, “continue”, the negative of these terms or any other comparable terminology. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are based largely on our expectations, which reflect estimates and assumptions made by our management. These estimates and assumptions reflect our best judgment based on currently known market conditions and other factors. In addition, management’s assumptions regarding future events may prove to be inaccurate. Management cautions all readers that the forward-looking statements contained in this press release are not guarantees of future performance, and we cannot assure any reader that such statements will materialize or that forward-looking events and circumstances will occur. Although we believe these estimates and assumptions to be reasonable, they are inherently uncertain and involve a number of risks and uncertainties beyond our control, including the possibility that the expected benefits of the transaction may not be fully realized. or may take longer to materialize than expected, the possibility that the costs or difficulties of integrating Petillo’s business may be greater than anticipated, and our ability to hire and retain Petillo’s employees. Actual results may differ materially from those anticipated or implied by the forward-looking statements due to these and other factors included in the “Risk Factors” section of our filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. States and elsewhere in these documents. Other factors or risks that we currently believe are not material, that are not presently known to us, or that occur in the future could also cause our actual results to differ materially from our expected results. Given these uncertainties, investors are cautioned that many of the assumptions on which our forward-looking statements are based are subject to change after the date on which the forward-looking statements are made. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements for any reason, whether as a result of new information, future events or developments, change in circumstances or otherwise, notwithstanding any change in our assumptions, changes in business plans, actual experience or other changes. These cautionary statements qualify all forward-looking statements attributable to us or to persons acting on our behalf.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220105005969/en/

contacts

Company Contact:
Sterling Construction Company, Inc.
Ron Ballschmiede, Chief Financial Officer
(281) 214-0777

Contact with Investor Relations:
Equity Group Inc.
Jeremy Hellman, CFA
(212) 836-9626

Bryan City Council asks staff to explain site development review process before approving new subdivision rezoning – WTAW

By Site development
Image of the Town of Bryan showing the location of the land that was rezoned during the City Council meeting on December 14, 2021.

Bryan City Council’s approval to rezone the land on the northwest side of town is just the first step for developers looking to build 300 new homes.

At the December board meeting, City Manager Kean Register was among the staff who explained the developer’s role in the site’s development review process.

This is after neighboring homeowners expressed concerns about increased traffic and possible flooding.

Deputy Director of Planning and Development Services Martin Zimmerman said the Planning and Zoning Commission (P&Z) will be seeking public comments following the site review process.

Zimmerman says after the staff review, P&Z will hold another public hearing before considering final action.

Developers who want to build homes generally north of the intersection of Sandy Point and Hilton Road plan to build a retention pond and they would be responsible for extending the water and sewer lines.

Click HERE to read and download background information from the Bryan City Council meeting on December 14, 2021.

Click HERE to read and download the ordinance that has been adopted.

Click below for comments from Kean Register and Martin Zimmerman.


The Farmer’s Rest Hotel in Dundas awaits site plan approval

By Site plan
The 175-year-old Farmer’s Rest Hotel at 207 King St. W. awaits site plan approval in 2022 for renovations planned for more than 15 years — the last two years and four months by its current owner. based in Ancaster.
  • The rear of the 175-year-old Farmer's Rest Hotel at 207 King St. W. awaits site plan approval in 2022 for renovations planned for more than 15 years - the past two years and four month by her current Ancaster-based owner.

Owners of the long-vacant Farmer’s Rest Hotel at 207 King Street West hope the City of Hamilton will approve a nearly two-year-old site plan application this year that is still under review by the municipality.

The proposal for a commercial unit on the ground floor and a residential unit on each of the other two floors of the 175-year-old heritage building was submitted in March 2020. Six different owners attempted to renovate the building over the last 16 years.

Daniel Cheatley, a consultant to the property’s current owner, said the group was awaiting site plan approval.

“We expect the project to move forward in 2022,” Cheatley said. “We may provide more updates once our sitemap is approved.”

A numbered company, including directors Erwin Gerl and Zachary Agnew of Ancaster, bought 207 King in September 2019 for $950,000.

A conditional heritage permit was issued in November 2020 for: the repointing of all masonry; installation of wood panels under large commercial windows; and the installation of new downspouts for stormwater management.

The structure was built in 1847 by Jesse Cooper as the Farmer’s Rest Hotel. It operated as a hotel, known as Cain’s Hotel after it was purchased by Patrick Cain in 1893, until 1910 when the building served as a hospital and later as an apartment building. It was designated under the Ontario Heritage Act in 1981.