Skip to main content
Monthly Archives

October 2021

Planning Commission Approves Site Plan for Pearl Street Housing | News, Sports, Jobs

By Site plan

Garrett Neese / Daily Mining Gazette Houghton City Manager Eric Waara gives an update to the Planning Commission while President Tom Merz listens.

HOUGHTON – The Houghton Planning Commission approved the site plan review for a new apartment complex on Pearl Street at its meeting on Tuesday.

The new complex is located in a recently rezoned area from R-3 to R-4, which allows for more dense development and allows for tighter setbacks and less parking space.

Intended for students, the new complex will have 120 parking spaces for 153 beds, more than the 76.5 required by the R-4. To encourage students not to bring their own cars, the resort will either offer a carpool service or charge students extra for parking, project architect Barry Polzin said.

“Maybe you’re not going to have all the students, but you’re going to have a few more that say ‘OK I don’t need a car, I’m just going to leave it there'” he said. “… This is happening all over the world, so you might as well do it here too.” “

For bike racks, which have the same required number of 76.5, it will offer 180. Polzin said the space could also include a dedicated area in the garage for recycling.

About 23.3% of the site will be developed, above the 20% requirement, Waara said.

In an email, Planning Commission member Kristine Bradof suggested replacing non-native plants listed in landscaping with comparable native plants that would provide value to pollinators and birds. The Wild Ones Keweenaw Chapter, a local landscaping group, offered to help select the plants, Bradof wrote.

Polzin said the stormwater management plans took into account the sidewalk design changes that will accompany the College Avenue construction project. TL Rentals applied for a stormwater permit in April, but has yet to get approval from the Michigan Department of Transportation. The predominant problem would be runoff from the roofs, Polzin said.

“In fact, it might flow by gravity … a pump might be the easiest way to do it, but we haven’t entered details on that yet.” he said. “We are awaiting confirmation of how much will take.”

The commission approved the site plan, subject to the project receiving permits from MDOT. The vote was 5-0, with Jen Julien, a member of the Planning Committee, abstaining due to possession of a property nearby.

In another action, the commission:

– Heard by Waara, the town was sued by the company that owns the Econo Foods property. The lawsuit concerns the new Kentucky Fried Chicken which is slated to open next year on an outdoor plot in front of the Evangel Community Church building. At a sitemap review hearing in July, a landowner lawyer argued that KFC’s proposal violated an agreement with ShopKo, which was previously on the Evangel site.

– I learned from Waara that the city was looking for a new signpost for the fire station on Sharon Avenue last week, which it said violated several city ordinances. Waara said he and code enforcement officer Jeff Jepsen spent 10 hours between them reviewing the history of the sign, which is on city property. The Michigan Department of Transportation will also review the paper records on the sign, which falls under its definition of a billboard.

“We want to make sure we have all the facts before contacting the dealer, so that we can do it once and do it right” he said.

– Discussed the city’s master plan, which is due to be revised in 2023. President Tom Merz recommended continuing previous practices by asking subcommittees to review different chapters in public meetings before holding open houses . The Commission also discussed how to obtain public comments on the questions to be asked in the survey that will be sent out before the completion of the master plan.

The commission also discussed the advisability of developing a subzone plan for the city center.

Polzin suggested that a cart such as the one the city had considered would be unnecessary, as the city has most of the information it would need. Waara said a cart would be more useful in determining the fate of a particular site, but less so for the city center in general. Vice President Bill Leder asked if the blueprint subcommittee formed earlier this year should continue, as the pace of the review would not allow it to pursue its goal of updating two chapters at a time.

“Everyone will be involved, and those of us who were on the committee will obviously have comments based on our discussions.” he said. “But it’s hard for me to see the need for this committee to continue with this.

– I heard an update from Waara on repairs to the Lakeshore Center, where part of the wharf collapsed. The city, Michigan Technological University and the National Park Service will meet to discuss a long-term solution. Michigan Tech conducted an R / C underwater survey of Dee Stadium and Ranger Pier.

“Fortunately, there was nothing scary” he said.

The latest news today and more in your inbox

Guinness site development is on public consultation

By Site development

A “vision” for a 10-year redevelopment of part of the Guiness site in the city of Dublin is currently under public consultation.

The modernization of the famous 260-year-old brewery freed up 12.5 acres in the James Street factory in The Liberties.

A “Guinness Quarter” proposal was first announced by Diageo in 2017.

After what has been described as a “three year selection process”, Sean Mulryan’s Ballymore Homes was announced as a development partner in September 2020.

However, Ballymore Homes says there are no details available on the plan yet.

When Diageo first announced the project, it announced that there would be room for 500 homes, as well as 63,000 m² of offices, 5,000 m² of shops and 22,000 m² for hotels and businesses. Hobbies.

A company spokesperson said the plan had “started from scratch since then.”

Graphic shows what a redeveloped ‘Guinness Quarter’ could look like

It has been confirmed that there will be mixed tenure for the housing on the site and that the Iveagh Trust will manage the social units.

It will also be the country’s first development to be carbon neutral.

The development, estimated at around € 1 billion, would occupy around 25% of the Guinness site.

According to a statement posted on the Ballymore Homes website, the development in central Dublin will be “one of the most exciting regeneration programs in Europe”.

Mr Mulryan said Guinness has become a symbol for Ireland.

Oliver Loomes (left), CEO of Diageo Ireland and Sean Mulryan (right), CEO of Ballymore

“St James’s Gate has over 260 years of history and therefore we have a unique responsibility to ensure that when this famous gate opens it opens to a place that is synonymous with good times and memorable experiences”, did he declare.

The company says it hopes to have a master plan ready for submission to Dublin City Council next year.

However, local councilor Darragh Moriarty said the lack of details on the delivery of housing, offices and cultural spaces is “disappointing”.

“It’s just a public relations exercise. What do they want people to give their opinion on? They will have to seriously engage with the local population and stakeholders,” said the Labor Party adviser.

The public consultation begins tomorrow in the Digital Hub and is scheduled to continue daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. until November 5.

Site map modified OK for 2 new hotels in Anderson

By Site plan

October 27 — ANDERSON – Plans to build two new hotels in Anderson have moved forward with hopes of opening their doors within the next 18 months.

The Anderson Plan Commission voted unanimously on Tuesday for a modified main platform at the request of Amerilodge Group and New Born Logistics for the property east of the current Fairfield Inn.

The two hotels will have four floors, will have 92 rooms and will have parking for 96 vehicles.

One hotel should be a Tru by Hilton hotel and the second an Avid by IHG hotel.

Steve Aldridge of the Amerilodge Group said Anderson’s location was chosen because of the proximity to Hoosier Park Racing & Casino, the north side of Indianapolis and the potential for future economic development.

He said they hope to innovate by winter; construction normally takes 14-18 months.

Tim Stires, deputy director of Anderson’s municipal development department, said the development will require a special exception approved by Anderson’s board of directors on zoning appeals.

Stires said the modified main platform creates three properties for commercial development, with the two hotels occupying 5.2 of the 45.7 acres available.

Municipal development staff have recommended approval of the modified main property for development to be known as Scatterfield Commons.

Steve Servies of Servies Engineering & Surveying said the properties would drain north into a retention basin near Interstate 69.

The properties were dezoned for commercial use in 1994, with Fairfield Inn built in 2019 and the 64th Street extension east of Scatterfield Road completed about 10 years ago – and dead ends at the east end of the Sherwood Forest Subdivision.

The property was originally intended to be part of the baseball / softball training complex known as “The Farm” which was never developed.

Amerilodge Group is located in Michigan.

Amerilodge has several hotels in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio.

Follow Ken de la Bastide on Twitter @KendelaBastide, or call 765-640-4863.

Site Plan for Clear Lake Hy-Vee Approved by Planning and Zoning Commission | Govt. & Politics

By Site plan

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to reflect the exact total of Planning and Zoning Commission votes, and to clarify development plans for future lots.

On Tuesday evening, the Clear Lake Planning and Zoning Commission met to review the site plan for the proposed Hy-Vee grocery store in Clear Lake, as well as the larger Emerald Edge preliminary platform.

The preliminary platform proposed by Sukup Ag of Sheffield contains seven commercial lots and a subdivision all of which run along Route 18 between North 14th Street and North 20th Street.






The preliminary platform for the Emerald Edge development at Clear Lake.


The easternmost lot labeled “Commercial Phase 1 Lot 1” along North 20th Street and Highway 18 is where the proposed Hy-Vee and Convenience Store would be located.

The dish would also see the creation of two new streets, Jade Street and Hunter Place. Jade Street would run parallel to North 20th Street, but on the west side of the proposed Hy-Vee lot, connecting Hwy 18 with one entrance and exit to the right.

People also read …

Hunter Place is proposed to run east to west parallel to Highway 18, but on the north side of commercial lots three through seven.

Flory noted that there will likely be other projects developed in the other smaller commercial lots, and that the Planning and Zoning Commission may revisit it “soon” to discuss other projects under the development.

Jason Petersburg, project engineer for Veenstra & Kimm Inc., recommended that the Planning and Zoning Commission approve the preliminary platform.

The Planning and Zoning Board approved the preliminary Emerald Edge flat unanimously, 3-0.

The commission then reviewed the site plan specifically for the Hy-Vee grocery store.

The proposed development includes a 47,000 square foot Hy-Vee grocery store, an approximately 4000 square foot convenience store and parking on the 6.5 acre property. Flory noted in a previous meeting that Embree is expected to invest $ 8 million in the project.

Hy-Vee Grocery Comes to Clear Lake

On Monday, Clear Lake City Council met to review and make changes to its city renewal plan. One of those changes was to adapt to a new Hy-Vee grocery store.

Flory noted that the schedule for the Hy-Vee is still pending, but the developers hope to innovate “within the next 30 days” with the goal of opening in the fall of next year.

Petersburg recommended that the Planning and Zoning Commission approve the site plan for the Hy-Vee.

The Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously approved the Hy-Vee site plan, 3-0.

The Embree development group is based in Georgetown, Texas, and the letter of intent stated that the group was interested in building a new retail space in the Willow Creek area of ​​Clear Lake.

Zachary Dupont covers politics and business development for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at 641-421-0533 or [email protected] Follow Zachary on Twitter at @ZachNDupont

Development of the Covington IRS site is back on track with the hiring of a project manager; the dog park is advancing, more

By Site development

By Ryan Clark
NKyTribune journalist

The development of the IRS site is back.

After stopping and starting – and en route replaced the Covington City Manager – on Tuesday evening, the commissioners approved the hiring of JS Held, LLC, for project management services to “implement the master plan strategic for Covington’s central waterfront, ”read in city documents. .

They refer to the management of the 23-acre IRS site.

“This is a very important first step that we are taking in the redevelopment of the IRS site,” Mayor Joseph U. Meyer said at the regular legislative committee meeting.

The deal will result in brownfield redevelopment in the Covington Central Riverfront area, under the direction of the city manager and the director of economic development, the mayor said. The goal is to develop it into usable land that could support a mix of potential uses.

City Manager Ken Smith said he could provide weekly updates on the project to the Commission, if they so wish.

Over the summer, the commissioners chose to stop and completely rethink how they wanted to use the site.

The city bought the site in March for $ 20.5 million, and since then Covington has struggled to manage the project. They first entered into several demolition and design contracts when former general manager David Johnston recommended certain options; the Commission decided not to follow these recommendations.

In June, Johnston and the town went their separate ways. Perhaps it wasn’t a surprise, then, that the city decided to officially start over.

“No project is more important,” said Mayor Meyer at the time. “We only have a bite of an apple to get it right.”

The city received three responses to its call for tenders for management services. The payment of the contract, which runs from November 1 to October 31 of the following year, is illustrated in the agreement as follows:

First year of the contract: $ 371,217
Second year of contract: $ 367,545
Third year of contract: to be determined
Fourth year of contract: to be determined
Fifth year of contract: to be determined

Thus, the contract, which will run in six phases, begins with an initial period of one year, with the possibility of four one-year renewals. The potential term of the contract should not exceed five years or $ 738,762.

Under the contract, JS Held, LLC, “will act as owner trustee and oversee all aspects of real estate development on behalf of the city.”

The project will include scope development, tendering and coordination with the city; the demolition and remediation of the 23-acre brownfield site; and site engineering and construction of new public rights-of-way with utilities, the contract says.

A general description of the services required includes:

• Project development for all phases
• Management of the project and program development of all phases from the start
Upon completion
• Facilitate and manage all required services, activities and communications
necessary for the completion of the project on behalf of the city
• Selection of engineers, consultants and contractors
• Management of the negotiation and creation of contracts
• Supervision and coordination of engineering and design processes and
• Manage all engineering, design and inspection services related to the
redevelopment project

Director of neighborhood services, other employees

Commissioners approved the hiring of Deputy Warden of Neighborhood Services Brandon Holmes as Warden effective October 27, and Keith Bales as Deputy Warden of Ward Services, effective November 8.

The commissioners also approved the appointment of Gregory Paeth to the Covington Motor Vehicle Parking Authority for a four-year term, effective October 27, 2021 and expiring October 26, 2025.

Stormwater maintenance supervisor hired

The commissioners also approved the hiring of Todd Redman for the stormwater maintenance supervisor position, effective October 18.

The role is budgeted from the rainwater operating budget.

Map of the dog park presented

Ben Oldiges, Director of Parks and Recreation, presented the Commission with a plan for the construction of the city’s first dog park.

“This is a really exciting new initiative,” he said. “We’ve made pretty good progress on this project.

Oldiges said the idea had been floating around the city for about a decade, and when he was hired as manager in 2020, he made it one of his top priorities to make it happen.

The project would be hosted in Kenney Shields Park and paid for with CDBG funds and a $ 10,000 grant from the Northern Kentucky Association of Realtors.

Oldiges said they chose to target the location because of its lighting, safety, neighborhood setting, shade and water source.

“It’s a pretty solid foundation for a dog park,” he said, noting that the goal is to develop several in the city.

He said they hope to pave the way for winter 2021 or spring 2022.

Executive session

The commissioners ended Tuesday’s meeting by meeting in executive session to “discuss pending litigation,” the mayor said.

He also said that they would not meet again and that no further action would be taken.

Next meeting (there is no meeting next week because it is election day)

The next regular meeting of the Covington Commission will be a caucus meeting at 6:00 pm on November 9 at the City Building at 20 W. Pike St. in Covington. Meetings can be followed live on Fioptics channel 815, Spectrum channel 203, the Northern Kentucky Telecommunications Council (TBNK) website, TBNK @TBNKonline Facebook page, and TBNK Roku channels.

Propane installation on Kroemer Avenue obtains approval from town planning council after site plan review

By Site plan

A proposal to develop a liquid propane storage and distribution facility on Kroemer Avenue in Riverhead received preliminary site plan approval last week from the Riverhead Planning Board, which initially denied the application.

The planning council voted unanimously on a site plan that had been modified by the applicant, 48 Kroemer LLC, as a divided council rejected it on June 3, with the chairman of the planning council Stan Carey, who opposed the plan, citing objections from the Riverhead Fire District, the volume of LPG proposed for storage at the site, which is adjacent to a large existing propane facility and the orientation and location of the tanks storage offered by request. Carey was joined in opposition by members Richard O’Dea and George Nunnaro.

In July, the plaintiff filed a lawsuit challenging the council’s decision. The trial remains pending before the State Supreme Court.

In September, the applicant submitted another set of revised plans, reducing the number of 30,000 gallon storage tanks from eight to six, increasing tank withdrawals to a proposed industrial building and to the on-site rail branch.

Council decided that the revisions addressed the concerns of the Fire District and the Fire Marshal.

“They reduced the size of the project by about 20%,” Carey said in an interview on Friday. The applicant also accepted a condition in the resolution that no gas can be transferred between the new facility and a neighboring property. It was important to Carey and the others who initially opposed the approval, he said.

The board also received a note from the city attorney clarifying its responsibility to the fire district, as the fire marshal approved the plan, while the district fire commissioners opposed it.

“I’m asking for clarification that the city council, in their special permit, said the fire marshal and firefighters would provide security,” said Carey. Firefighters are still opposed to the project, he said. “So I wanted clarity. What did the city council mean by that?

The city council granted a special permit to 48 Kroemer LLC on September 15, 2020. The special permit allows use on the property. The resolution approving the special permit states: “The review of the site plan by the fire marshal and the fire department will ensure the safety of the LP facility. ”

The town’s lawyer informed the town planning council that “legally they have no say in the site plan”. It is returned to them for contribution, he said. “He basically said there was no legal reason to deny it because of the fire department,” Carey said.

Project architect Martin Sendlewski said yesterday that the claimant was happy to have taken the plunge.

“It is unfortunate that we had to reduce the LPG tanks by 25% even though the project originally met all the requirements,” Sendlewski said.

“What is more troubling is that the Riverhead Fire District has no confidence in the level of professionalism and expertise of Fire Marshal Craig Zitek,” he said. “Craig is very thorough and highly skilled.

He said the fire district should have accepted the fire marshal’s analysis rather than spending money on a third-party engineer to do the same job.

“We don’t understand this at all,” Sendlewski said.

The fire district attorney could not immediately be reached for comment.

Support local journalism.
More than ever, the survival of quality local journalism depends on your support. Our community is facing unprecedented economic disruption and the future of many small businesses is threatened, including our own. It takes time and resources to provide this service. We are a small family business and we will do everything in our power to keep it going. But now more than ever, we will depend on your support to keep going. Support RiverheadLOCAL today. You depend on us to stay informed and we depend on you to make our work possible.

Site map modified OK for 2 new hotels in Anderson | Business

By Site plan

ANDERSON – Plans to build two new hotels in Anderson have moved forward with hopes of opening their doors within the next 18 months.

The Anderson Plan Commission voted unanimously on Tuesday for a modified main platform at the request of Amerilodge Group and New Born Logistics for the property east of the current Fairfield Inn.

The two hotels will have four floors, contain 92 rooms and have parking for 96 vehicles.

One hotel should be a Tru by Hilton hotel and the second an Avid by IHG hotel.

Steve Aldridge of the Amerilodge Group said Anderson’s location was chosen because of the proximity to Hoosier Park Racing & Casino, the north side of Indianapolis and the potential for future economic development.

He said they hope to innovate by winter; construction normally takes 14-18 months.

Tim Stires, deputy director of Anderson’s municipal development department, said the development will require a special exception approved by Anderson’s board of directors on zoning appeals.

Stires said the modified main platform creates three properties for commercial development, with the two hotels occupying 5.2 of the 45.7 acres available.

Municipal development staff have recommended approval of the modified main property for development to be known as Scatterfield Commons.

Steve Servies of Servies Engineering & Surveying said the properties would drain north into a retention basin near Interstate 69.

The properties were dezoned for commercial use in 1994, with Fairfield Inn built in 2019 and the 64th Street extension east of Scatterfield Road completed about 10 years ago – and dead ends at the east end of the Sherwood Forest Subdivision.

The property was originally intended to be part of the baseball / softball training complex known as “The Farm” which was never developed.

Amerilodge Group is located in Michigan.

Amerilodge has several hotels in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio.

To follow Ken de la Bastide on Twitter @KendelaBastide, or call 765-640-4863.

Jackson Zoning Board Approves Site Plan for Townhouses on Harmony Road

By Site plan

JACKSON – Members of the Jackson Zoning Board of Adjustment have granted preliminary and final major site plan approval to an application that proposed the construction of 202 townhouses on Harmony Road.

The Zoning Board approved a use waiver for the applicant, Hyson Estates LLC / Grand Harmony, in February 2020.

The applicant returned this year to seek approval of the site plan. Testimony was provided on August 18, and the request was presented at the October 20 board meeting, when the testimony ended and site plan approval was granted.

Following the conclusion of the testimony, a motion was made to grant preliminary and final approval of the major site plan and council members James Hurley, Toniann Comello, Michelle Russell, Lynne Bradley and Steve Costanzo voted “yes On the motion.

The 202 units will be spread over 10 buildings with 10 townhouses; six buildings with eight row houses; and nine buildings with six row houses. Evidence provided by representatives of the Applicant indicates that there will be 92 two-bedroom townhouses and 110 three-bedroom townhouses. They said 40 units will be designated as affordable housing.

Affordable housing is defined as housing that is sold or rented at below market rates to individuals and families whose income meets certain guidelines. New Jersey municipalities are under court order to provide affordable housing development opportunities within their borders.

Lawyer Adam Pfeffer and Engineer Bill Stevens represented the plaintiff at the October 20 meeting.

Stevens said the parking plan has been revised to ensure there will be sufficient parking in the development. He noted that there had been a discussion on this issue in August.

Initially, the driveway offered for each unit at the market rate was 18 feet wide, and each townhouse had a two-car garage and a two-car driveway.

Each driveway has been widened to 20 feet, so each market rate unit now offers 3.5 off-street parking spaces where 2.5 spaces are needed, Stevens said.

With respect to on-street parking, the applicant proposed 32-foot-wide roads in the development.

“This is done on purpose to allow open space and allow parking on either side of the street where it is available. However, according to the site map… the possibilities for on-street parking are certainly limited. However, we would like to continue to be allowed to have on-street parking where it is available, but it is not included in our parking tables, ”Stevens said.

The project requires 494 parking spaces. The applicant provides 711 parking spaces.

Affordable housing will be at the center of the 10-unit buildings.

“These units each have a parking space in front of the unit itself. The (residents) would then use off-street parking elsewhere on the site for any (other vehicles) they might have.

“The board was concerned with the location of some of the off-street parking that we provided. So we went in and revised the plan to add additional off-street parking near the 10-unit buildings to address that particular concern, ”Stevens said.

There will be a club house in the development with 44 parking spaces.

“The parking provided exceeds what is required for the clubhouse, but frankly it is our hope and our design for this project to be designed to be a walkable project.

“We think this is a special project and we hope that people will use the walking trails that we have added to this project and that the parking lot at the clubhouse will only be used in unusual circumstances,” said Stevens said.

As part of the request, improvements will be made to Harmony Road with regard to sidewalks and curbs, according to the testimony provided.

New apartments in Brighton receive site map extension

By Site plan

20 October 2021

By Mike Kruzman / [email protected]

An extension of the site plan has been granted for an apartment complex project in the city of Brighton.

Vistas at Uptown will be a 200-unit luxury apartment complex on Second Street in Brighton. Developer DTN Management initially received sitemap approval in 2018, then a one-year extension in 2019. In April 2020, DTN presented an amended sitemap with changes that were approved, but the pandemic caused delays. They were again before the Planning Commission last Monday, asking for a further one-year extension.

Brighton Community Development Director Mike Caruso said normally if construction does not start within 12 months the site plan becomes void, but his department believes significant work has been done. DTN demolished 6 houses, cleared the land, relocated utilities and has already invested approximately $ 500,000 in the project. Caruso said that in speaking with the city’s lawyers, they believed construction should continue to the point where it looks like a building will go up to prevent the site plan from being canceled.

John Woods of DTN has said he doesn’t want to make a habit of coming back for extensions, but the pandemic has posed problems. Rising lumber costs initially affected their ability to purchase lumber for wood-frame buildings. As lumber costs have come down, the current supply chain issues affecting the world are affecting them as well. Woods said they own and are engaged in this project, and are just looking for a comfortable window to start it. He expects to be able to begin foundation work in the spring.

The Planning Commission unanimously approved the 12-month extension, with several commissioners thanking Woods and DTN for their commitment to the City.

Savannah City Council approaches votes on Coastal Empire Fairgrounds site map

By Site plan

Savannah City Council could decide the future of the former Coastal Empire Fairgrounds ownership by the end of the month, according to Savannah City Manager Jay Melder.

The land has remained untapped since the 67-acre parcel at 4801 Meding Street was sold for $ 2.9 million in 2016.

Three companies are currently in the running to develop the property, and Melder said he hopes to have a recommendation that the board vote on at the October 28 board meeting.

Following:Project Fairgrounds set to transform community, but city isn’t listening to fears, neighbors say

“I think we are within reach of this, but I will not commit to it, but it is my hope,” said Melder, present an update on the board process at a board workshop on October 14.

The most recent request for proposals (RFP) was released in June 2020, with the board voting a few months later to accept proposals from the Savannah Bridge Development Team, Knott Development and the P3 Joint Venture Group.

The three groups presented their plans to council in July. The property’s potential concepts were also unveiled at open house events, which drew hundreds of residents from across the city.

The concepts encompass a wide variety of uses ranging from retail and commercial to housing, entertainment, and the film and television production space.

In his update to the council last week, Melder said the city is currently evaluating all proposers’ responses on 10 different obligations. These include traffic, parks and recreation, offices, zoning and parking, community plaza and green spaces. A proposal must satisfy all 10 elements in order to proceed to the next phase.

Following:Movie studios, shops, housing: this is what could happen at the Savannah Exhibition Center site

Foremost among these mandatory items is traffic, Melder said.

“We have neighborhood streets that have houses and driveways and we have limited rights of way on many streets that enter the property,” he said.

“We have seen a lot of traffic calming requests historically, especially on Meding Street, but all along this corridor and some challenges and issues historically, with the traffic volumes in the neighborhood.”

According to figures presented at the council workshop, the adjacent streets around the property register just over 8,000 vehicle movements per day. The Knott plan will increase this number to 19,769; P3 at 12,946 and Savannah Bridge at 20,968.

Melder said that with regard to traffic, the assessment plan will examine whether or not the surrounding streets can adequately handle the increase in the number of vehicles per day; whether or not the level of service of the surrounding traffic infrastructure would provide a reasonable level of service; and whether plans for residential and commercial uses are impractical or adversely affect neighborhoods and quality of life.

The P3 Joint Venture Group has a variety of uses for the former Coastal Empire Exhibition Center site.  Uses include sound stages, sports fields, residential and commercial uses.

Flood water and floodplain mitigation as well as zoning are also major concerns. The property has approximately 27 usable acres, of which 40 acres are in the floodplain.

For subscribers:Partnership, policy and projects: City of Savannah director Jay Melder talks about his first month

The site is currently zoned Conservation – Park and will have to go through the rezoning process for a certain amount of zoning change, regardless of which proposal comes to mind.

The next phase for proposals that meet the 10 mandatory elements will be the economic analysis. The economic analysis will be determined by the total increase in the appraised value of the property due to the planned improvements to the developments, plus the sealed purchase price, Melder said.

“If a proposal is found to be unreasonable or has inappropriately inflated its value, it will also be rejected at this point,” he said.

The best proposal will go through a planned development process.

The story

The future of the site, which is one of the city’s largest undeveloped properties, has been the subject of discussion among community members and administrations for several years.

The city first reviewed the property in 2015 under former mayor Eddie DeLoach. At that time, most council members advocated affordable housing for the site, as well as outdoor recreation.

The housing plans were scrapped after neighboring residents and District 5 Alderman Estella Shabazz objected to the idea. The property is located in District 5.

Following:Home for decades, residents of Clearview have had 60 days to move. Affordable options are rare

In 2017, the board unanimously rejected an offer from the private investment group of state representative Craig Gordon, Aerospace Studios, to purchase approximately 15 acres of the property to develop a film and television production studio.

Gordon, who was not a candidate for re-election to the Georgia General Assembly in 2020, is a senior partner of the P3 Joint Venture group currently vying to develop the site.

Billed as a “live, work, play, eat and learn” project, the initial concept of the Savannah Bridge development team is divided into eight sites.  The plan includes housing, a movie studio, retail, and food and drink.

In 2019, city staff recommended that council issue a request for proposals to get a nonprofit to take one to two acres for $ 1 and develop it as a recreation facility. public at the expense of the organization.

This idea met with opposition from locals and Shabazz and did not take shape.

“I understand that I am the sixth city manager to work on this project and I intend to be the last city manager and move this project forward,” Melder told council.

Katie Nussbaum is the city and county government reporter for the Savannah Morning News. Contact her at [email protected] Twitter: KnussSMN