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October 2021

Planning Commission Approves Site Plan for Pearl Street Housing | News, Sports, Jobs

By Site plan

Garrett Neese / Daily Mining Gazette Houghton City Manager Eric Waara gives an update to the Planning Commission while President Tom Merz listens.

HOUGHTON – The Houghton Planning Commission approved the site plan review for a new apartment complex on Pearl Street at its meeting on Tuesday.

The new complex is located in a recently rezoned area from R-3 to R-4, which allows for more dense development and allows for tighter setbacks and less parking space.

Intended for students, the new complex will have 120 parking spaces for 153 beds, more than the 76.5 required by the R-4. To encourage students not to bring their own cars, the resort will either offer a carpool service or charge students extra for parking, project architect Barry Polzin said.

“Maybe you’re not going to have all the students, but you’re going to have a few more that say ‘OK I don’t need a car, I’m just going to leave it there'” he said. “… This is happening all over the world, so you might as well do it here too.” “

For bike racks, which have the same required number of 76.5, it will offer 180. Polzin said the space could also include a dedicated area in the garage for recycling.

About 23.3% of the site will be developed, above the 20% requirement, Waara said.

In an email, Planning Commission member Kristine Bradof suggested replacing non-native plants listed in landscaping with comparable native plants that would provide value to pollinators and birds. The Wild Ones Keweenaw Chapter, a local landscaping group, offered to help select the plants, Bradof wrote.

Polzin said the stormwater management plans took into account the sidewalk design changes that will accompany the College Avenue construction project. TL Rentals applied for a stormwater permit in April, but has yet to get approval from the Michigan Department of Transportation. The predominant problem would be runoff from the roofs, Polzin said.

“In fact, it might flow by gravity … a pump might be the easiest way to do it, but we haven’t entered details on that yet.” he said. “We are awaiting confirmation of how much will take.”

The commission approved the site plan, subject to the project receiving permits from MDOT. The vote was 5-0, with Jen Julien, a member of the Planning Committee, abstaining due to possession of a property nearby.

In another action, the commission:

– Heard by Waara, the town was sued by the company that owns the Econo Foods property. The lawsuit concerns the new Kentucky Fried Chicken which is slated to open next year on an outdoor plot in front of the Evangel Community Church building. At a sitemap review hearing in July, a landowner lawyer argued that KFC’s proposal violated an agreement with ShopKo, which was previously on the Evangel site.

– I learned from Waara that the city was looking for a new signpost for the fire station on Sharon Avenue last week, which it said violated several city ordinances. Waara said he and code enforcement officer Jeff Jepsen spent 10 hours between them reviewing the history of the sign, which is on city property. The Michigan Department of Transportation will also review the paper records on the sign, which falls under its definition of a billboard.

“We want to make sure we have all the facts before contacting the dealer, so that we can do it once and do it right” he said.

– Discussed the city’s master plan, which is due to be revised in 2023. President Tom Merz recommended continuing previous practices by asking subcommittees to review different chapters in public meetings before holding open houses . The Commission also discussed how to obtain public comments on the questions to be asked in the survey that will be sent out before the completion of the master plan.

The commission also discussed the advisability of developing a subzone plan for the city center.

Polzin suggested that a cart such as the one the city had considered would be unnecessary, as the city has most of the information it would need. Waara said a cart would be more useful in determining the fate of a particular site, but less so for the city center in general. Vice President Bill Leder asked if the blueprint subcommittee formed earlier this year should continue, as the pace of the review would not allow it to pursue its goal of updating two chapters at a time.

“Everyone will be involved, and those of us who were on the committee will obviously have comments based on our discussions.” he said. “But it’s hard for me to see the need for this committee to continue with this.

– I heard an update from Waara on repairs to the Lakeshore Center, where part of the wharf collapsed. The city, Michigan Technological University and the National Park Service will meet to discuss a long-term solution. Michigan Tech conducted an R / C underwater survey of Dee Stadium and Ranger Pier.

“Fortunately, there was nothing scary” he said.

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Guinness site development is on public consultation

By Site development

A “vision” for a 10-year redevelopment of part of the Guiness site in the city of Dublin is currently under public consultation.

The modernization of the famous 260-year-old brewery freed up 12.5 acres in the James Street factory in The Liberties.

A “Guinness Quarter” proposal was first announced by Diageo in 2017.

After what has been described as a “three year selection process”, Sean Mulryan’s Ballymore Homes was announced as a development partner in September 2020.

However, Ballymore Homes says there are no details available on the plan yet.

When Diageo first announced the project, it announced that there would be room for 500 homes, as well as 63,000 m² of offices, 5,000 m² of shops and 22,000 m² for hotels and businesses. Hobbies.

A company spokesperson said the plan had “started from scratch since then.”

Graphic shows what a redeveloped ‘Guinness Quarter’ could look like

It has been confirmed that there will be mixed tenure for the housing on the site and that the Iveagh Trust will manage the social units.

It will also be the country’s first development to be carbon neutral.

The development, estimated at around € 1 billion, would occupy around 25% of the Guinness site.

According to a statement posted on the Ballymore Homes website, the development in central Dublin will be “one of the most exciting regeneration programs in Europe”.

Mr Mulryan said Guinness has become a symbol for Ireland.

Oliver Loomes (left), CEO of Diageo Ireland and Sean Mulryan (right), CEO of Ballymore

“St James’s Gate has over 260 years of history and therefore we have a unique responsibility to ensure that when this famous gate opens it opens to a place that is synonymous with good times and memorable experiences”, did he declare.

The company says it hopes to have a master plan ready for submission to Dublin City Council next year.

However, local councilor Darragh Moriarty said the lack of details on the delivery of housing, offices and cultural spaces is “disappointing”.

“It’s just a public relations exercise. What do they want people to give their opinion on? They will have to seriously engage with the local population and stakeholders,” said the Labor Party adviser.

The public consultation begins tomorrow in the Digital Hub and is scheduled to continue daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. until November 5.

Site map modified OK for 2 new hotels in Anderson

By Site plan

October 27 — ANDERSON – Plans to build two new hotels in Anderson have moved forward with hopes of opening their doors within the next 18 months.

The Anderson Plan Commission voted unanimously on Tuesday for a modified main platform at the request of Amerilodge Group and New Born Logistics for the property east of the current Fairfield Inn.

The two hotels will have four floors, will have 92 rooms and will have parking for 96 vehicles.

One hotel should be a Tru by Hilton hotel and the second an Avid by IHG hotel.

Steve Aldridge of the Amerilodge Group said Anderson’s location was chosen because of the proximity to Hoosier Park Racing & Casino, the north side of Indianapolis and the potential for future economic development.

He said they hope to innovate by winter; construction normally takes 14-18 months.

Tim Stires, deputy director of Anderson’s municipal development department, said the development will require a special exception approved by Anderson’s board of directors on zoning appeals.

Stires said the modified main platform creates three properties for commercial development, with the two hotels occupying 5.2 of the 45.7 acres available.

Municipal development staff have recommended approval of the modified main property for development to be known as Scatterfield Commons.

Steve Servies of Servies Engineering & Surveying said the properties would drain north into a retention basin near Interstate 69.

The properties were dezoned for commercial use in 1994, with Fairfield Inn built in 2019 and the 64th Street extension east of Scatterfield Road completed about 10 years ago – and dead ends at the east end of the Sherwood Forest Subdivision.

The property was originally intended to be part of the baseball / softball training complex known as “The Farm” which was never developed.

Amerilodge Group is located in Michigan.

Amerilodge has several hotels in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio.

Follow Ken de la Bastide on Twitter @KendelaBastide, or call 765-640-4863.

Site Plan for Clear Lake Hy-Vee Approved by Planning and Zoning Commission | Govt. & Politics

By Site plan

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated to reflect the exact total of Planning and Zoning Commission votes, and to clarify development plans for future lots.

On Tuesday evening, the Clear Lake Planning and Zoning Commission met to review the site plan for the proposed Hy-Vee grocery store in Clear Lake, as well as the larger Emerald Edge preliminary platform.

The preliminary platform proposed by Sukup Ag of Sheffield contains seven commercial lots and a subdivision all of which run along Route 18 between North 14th Street and North 20th Street.






The preliminary platform for the Emerald Edge development at Clear Lake.


The easternmost lot labeled “Commercial Phase 1 Lot 1” along North 20th Street and Highway 18 is where the proposed Hy-Vee and Convenience Store would be located.

The dish would also see the creation of two new streets, Jade Street and Hunter Place. Jade Street would run parallel to North 20th Street, but on the west side of the proposed Hy-Vee lot, connecting Hwy 18 with one entrance and exit to the right.

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Hunter Place is proposed to run east to west parallel to Highway 18, but on the north side of commercial lots three through seven.

Flory noted that there will likely be other projects developed in the other smaller commercial lots, and that the Planning and Zoning Commission may revisit it “soon” to discuss other projects under the development.

Jason Petersburg, project engineer for Veenstra & Kimm Inc., recommended that the Planning and Zoning Commission approve the preliminary platform.

The Planning and Zoning Board approved the preliminary Emerald Edge flat unanimously, 3-0.

The commission then reviewed the site plan specifically for the Hy-Vee grocery store.

The proposed development includes a 47,000 square foot Hy-Vee grocery store, an approximately 4000 square foot convenience store and parking on the 6.5 acre property. Flory noted in a previous meeting that Embree is expected to invest $ 8 million in the project.

Hy-Vee Grocery Comes to Clear Lake

On Monday, Clear Lake City Council met to review and make changes to its city renewal plan. One of those changes was to adapt to a new Hy-Vee grocery store.

Flory noted that the schedule for the Hy-Vee is still pending, but the developers hope to innovate “within the next 30 days” with the goal of opening in the fall of next year.

Petersburg recommended that the Planning and Zoning Commission approve the site plan for the Hy-Vee.

The Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously approved the Hy-Vee site plan, 3-0.

The Embree development group is based in Georgetown, Texas, and the letter of intent stated that the group was interested in building a new retail space in the Willow Creek area of ​​Clear Lake.

Zachary Dupont covers politics and business development for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at 641-421-0533 or [email protected] Follow Zachary on Twitter at @ZachNDupont

Development of the Covington IRS site is back on track with the hiring of a project manager; the dog park is advancing, more

By Site development

By Ryan Clark
NKyTribune journalist

The development of the IRS site is back.

After stopping and starting – and en route replaced the Covington City Manager – on Tuesday evening, the commissioners approved the hiring of JS Held, LLC, for project management services to “implement the master plan strategic for Covington’s central waterfront, ”read in city documents. .

They refer to the management of the 23-acre IRS site.

“This is a very important first step that we are taking in the redevelopment of the IRS site,” Mayor Joseph U. Meyer said at the regular legislative committee meeting.

The deal will result in brownfield redevelopment in the Covington Central Riverfront area, under the direction of the city manager and the director of economic development, the mayor said. The goal is to develop it into usable land that could support a mix of potential uses.

City Manager Ken Smith said he could provide weekly updates on the project to the Commission, if they so wish.

Over the summer, the commissioners chose to stop and completely rethink how they wanted to use the site.

The city bought the site in March for $ 20.5 million, and since then Covington has struggled to manage the project. They first entered into several demolition and design contracts when former general manager David Johnston recommended certain options; the Commission decided not to follow these recommendations.

In June, Johnston and the town went their separate ways. Perhaps it wasn’t a surprise, then, that the city decided to officially start over.

“No project is more important,” said Mayor Meyer at the time. “We only have a bite of an apple to get it right.”

The city received three responses to its call for tenders for management services. The payment of the contract, which runs from November 1 to October 31 of the following year, is illustrated in the agreement as follows:

First year of the contract: $ 371,217
Second year of contract: $ 367,545
Third year of contract: to be determined
Fourth year of contract: to be determined
Fifth year of contract: to be determined

Thus, the contract, which will run in six phases, begins with an initial period of one year, with the possibility of four one-year renewals. The potential term of the contract should not exceed five years or $ 738,762.

Under the contract, JS Held, LLC, “will act as owner trustee and oversee all aspects of real estate development on behalf of the city.”

The project will include scope development, tendering and coordination with the city; the demolition and remediation of the 23-acre brownfield site; and site engineering and construction of new public rights-of-way with utilities, the contract says.

A general description of the services required includes:

• Project development for all phases
• Management of the project and program development of all phases from the start
Upon completion
• Facilitate and manage all required services, activities and communications
necessary for the completion of the project on behalf of the city
• Selection of engineers, consultants and contractors
• Management of the negotiation and creation of contracts
• Supervision and coordination of engineering and design processes and
• Manage all engineering, design and inspection services related to the
redevelopment project

Director of neighborhood services, other employees

Commissioners approved the hiring of Deputy Warden of Neighborhood Services Brandon Holmes as Warden effective October 27, and Keith Bales as Deputy Warden of Ward Services, effective November 8.

The commissioners also approved the appointment of Gregory Paeth to the Covington Motor Vehicle Parking Authority for a four-year term, effective October 27, 2021 and expiring October 26, 2025.

Stormwater maintenance supervisor hired

The commissioners also approved the hiring of Todd Redman for the stormwater maintenance supervisor position, effective October 18.

The role is budgeted from the rainwater operating budget.

Map of the dog park presented

Ben Oldiges, Director of Parks and Recreation, presented the Commission with a plan for the construction of the city’s first dog park.

“This is a really exciting new initiative,” he said. “We’ve made pretty good progress on this project.

Oldiges said the idea had been floating around the city for about a decade, and when he was hired as manager in 2020, he made it one of his top priorities to make it happen.

The project would be hosted in Kenney Shields Park and paid for with CDBG funds and a $ 10,000 grant from the Northern Kentucky Association of Realtors.

Oldiges said they chose to target the location because of its lighting, safety, neighborhood setting, shade and water source.

“It’s a pretty solid foundation for a dog park,” he said, noting that the goal is to develop several in the city.

He said they hope to pave the way for winter 2021 or spring 2022.

Executive session

The commissioners ended Tuesday’s meeting by meeting in executive session to “discuss pending litigation,” the mayor said.

He also said that they would not meet again and that no further action would be taken.

Next meeting (there is no meeting next week because it is election day)

The next regular meeting of the Covington Commission will be a caucus meeting at 6:00 pm on November 9 at the City Building at 20 W. Pike St. in Covington. Meetings can be followed live on Fioptics channel 815, Spectrum channel 203, the Northern Kentucky Telecommunications Council (TBNK) website, TBNK @TBNKonline Facebook page, and TBNK Roku channels.

Propane installation on Kroemer Avenue obtains approval from town planning council after site plan review

By Site plan

A proposal to develop a liquid propane storage and distribution facility on Kroemer Avenue in Riverhead received preliminary site plan approval last week from the Riverhead Planning Board, which initially denied the application.

The planning council voted unanimously on a site plan that had been modified by the applicant, 48 Kroemer LLC, as a divided council rejected it on June 3, with the chairman of the planning council Stan Carey, who opposed the plan, citing objections from the Riverhead Fire District, the volume of LPG proposed for storage at the site, which is adjacent to a large existing propane facility and the orientation and location of the tanks storage offered by request. Carey was joined in opposition by members Richard O’Dea and George Nunnaro.

In July, the plaintiff filed a lawsuit challenging the council’s decision. The trial remains pending before the State Supreme Court.

In September, the applicant submitted another set of revised plans, reducing the number of 30,000 gallon storage tanks from eight to six, increasing tank withdrawals to a proposed industrial building and to the on-site rail branch.

Council decided that the revisions addressed the concerns of the Fire District and the Fire Marshal.

“They reduced the size of the project by about 20%,” Carey said in an interview on Friday. The applicant also accepted a condition in the resolution that no gas can be transferred between the new facility and a neighboring property. It was important to Carey and the others who initially opposed the approval, he said.

The board also received a note from the city attorney clarifying its responsibility to the fire district, as the fire marshal approved the plan, while the district fire commissioners opposed it.

“I’m asking for clarification that the city council, in their special permit, said the fire marshal and firefighters would provide security,” said Carey. Firefighters are still opposed to the project, he said. “So I wanted clarity. What did the city council mean by that?

The city council granted a special permit to 48 Kroemer LLC on September 15, 2020. The special permit allows use on the property. The resolution approving the special permit states: “The review of the site plan by the fire marshal and the fire department will ensure the safety of the LP facility. ”

The town’s lawyer informed the town planning council that “legally they have no say in the site plan”. It is returned to them for contribution, he said. “He basically said there was no legal reason to deny it because of the fire department,” Carey said.

Project architect Martin Sendlewski said yesterday that the claimant was happy to have taken the plunge.

“It is unfortunate that we had to reduce the LPG tanks by 25% even though the project originally met all the requirements,” Sendlewski said.

“What is more troubling is that the Riverhead Fire District has no confidence in the level of professionalism and expertise of Fire Marshal Craig Zitek,” he said. “Craig is very thorough and highly skilled.

He said the fire district should have accepted the fire marshal’s analysis rather than spending money on a third-party engineer to do the same job.

“We don’t understand this at all,” Sendlewski said.

The fire district attorney could not immediately be reached for comment.

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Site map modified OK for 2 new hotels in Anderson | Business

By Site plan

ANDERSON – Plans to build two new hotels in Anderson have moved forward with hopes of opening their doors within the next 18 months.

The Anderson Plan Commission voted unanimously on Tuesday for a modified main platform at the request of Amerilodge Group and New Born Logistics for the property east of the current Fairfield Inn.

The two hotels will have four floors, contain 92 rooms and have parking for 96 vehicles.

One hotel should be a Tru by Hilton hotel and the second an Avid by IHG hotel.

Steve Aldridge of the Amerilodge Group said Anderson’s location was chosen because of the proximity to Hoosier Park Racing & Casino, the north side of Indianapolis and the potential for future economic development.

He said they hope to innovate by winter; construction normally takes 14-18 months.

Tim Stires, deputy director of Anderson’s municipal development department, said the development will require a special exception approved by Anderson’s board of directors on zoning appeals.

Stires said the modified main platform creates three properties for commercial development, with the two hotels occupying 5.2 of the 45.7 acres available.

Municipal development staff have recommended approval of the modified main property for development to be known as Scatterfield Commons.

Steve Servies of Servies Engineering & Surveying said the properties would drain north into a retention basin near Interstate 69.

The properties were dezoned for commercial use in 1994, with Fairfield Inn built in 2019 and the 64th Street extension east of Scatterfield Road completed about 10 years ago – and dead ends at the east end of the Sherwood Forest Subdivision.

The property was originally intended to be part of the baseball / softball training complex known as “The Farm” which was never developed.

Amerilodge Group is located in Michigan.

Amerilodge has several hotels in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio.

To follow Ken de la Bastide on Twitter @KendelaBastide, or call 765-640-4863.

Jackson Zoning Board Approves Site Plan for Townhouses on Harmony Road

By Site plan

JACKSON – Members of the Jackson Zoning Board of Adjustment have granted preliminary and final major site plan approval to an application that proposed the construction of 202 townhouses on Harmony Road.

The Zoning Board approved a use waiver for the applicant, Hyson Estates LLC / Grand Harmony, in February 2020.

The applicant returned this year to seek approval of the site plan. Testimony was provided on August 18, and the request was presented at the October 20 board meeting, when the testimony ended and site plan approval was granted.

Following the conclusion of the testimony, a motion was made to grant preliminary and final approval of the major site plan and council members James Hurley, Toniann Comello, Michelle Russell, Lynne Bradley and Steve Costanzo voted “yes On the motion.

The 202 units will be spread over 10 buildings with 10 townhouses; six buildings with eight row houses; and nine buildings with six row houses. Evidence provided by representatives of the Applicant indicates that there will be 92 two-bedroom townhouses and 110 three-bedroom townhouses. They said 40 units will be designated as affordable housing.

Affordable housing is defined as housing that is sold or rented at below market rates to individuals and families whose income meets certain guidelines. New Jersey municipalities are under court order to provide affordable housing development opportunities within their borders.

Lawyer Adam Pfeffer and Engineer Bill Stevens represented the plaintiff at the October 20 meeting.

Stevens said the parking plan has been revised to ensure there will be sufficient parking in the development. He noted that there had been a discussion on this issue in August.

Initially, the driveway offered for each unit at the market rate was 18 feet wide, and each townhouse had a two-car garage and a two-car driveway.

Each driveway has been widened to 20 feet, so each market rate unit now offers 3.5 off-street parking spaces where 2.5 spaces are needed, Stevens said.

With respect to on-street parking, the applicant proposed 32-foot-wide roads in the development.

“This is done on purpose to allow open space and allow parking on either side of the street where it is available. However, according to the site map… the possibilities for on-street parking are certainly limited. However, we would like to continue to be allowed to have on-street parking where it is available, but it is not included in our parking tables, ”Stevens said.

The project requires 494 parking spaces. The applicant provides 711 parking spaces.

Affordable housing will be at the center of the 10-unit buildings.

“These units each have a parking space in front of the unit itself. The (residents) would then use off-street parking elsewhere on the site for any (other vehicles) they might have.

“The board was concerned with the location of some of the off-street parking that we provided. So we went in and revised the plan to add additional off-street parking near the 10-unit buildings to address that particular concern, ”Stevens said.

There will be a club house in the development with 44 parking spaces.

“The parking provided exceeds what is required for the clubhouse, but frankly it is our hope and our design for this project to be designed to be a walkable project.

“We think this is a special project and we hope that people will use the walking trails that we have added to this project and that the parking lot at the clubhouse will only be used in unusual circumstances,” said Stevens said.

As part of the request, improvements will be made to Harmony Road with regard to sidewalks and curbs, according to the testimony provided.

New apartments in Brighton receive site map extension

By Site plan

20 October 2021

By Mike Kruzman / [email protected]

An extension of the site plan has been granted for an apartment complex project in the city of Brighton.

Vistas at Uptown will be a 200-unit luxury apartment complex on Second Street in Brighton. Developer DTN Management initially received sitemap approval in 2018, then a one-year extension in 2019. In April 2020, DTN presented an amended sitemap with changes that were approved, but the pandemic caused delays. They were again before the Planning Commission last Monday, asking for a further one-year extension.

Brighton Community Development Director Mike Caruso said normally if construction does not start within 12 months the site plan becomes void, but his department believes significant work has been done. DTN demolished 6 houses, cleared the land, relocated utilities and has already invested approximately $ 500,000 in the project. Caruso said that in speaking with the city’s lawyers, they believed construction should continue to the point where it looks like a building will go up to prevent the site plan from being canceled.

John Woods of DTN has said he doesn’t want to make a habit of coming back for extensions, but the pandemic has posed problems. Rising lumber costs initially affected their ability to purchase lumber for wood-frame buildings. As lumber costs have come down, the current supply chain issues affecting the world are affecting them as well. Woods said they own and are engaged in this project, and are just looking for a comfortable window to start it. He expects to be able to begin foundation work in the spring.

The Planning Commission unanimously approved the 12-month extension, with several commissioners thanking Woods and DTN for their commitment to the City.

Savannah City Council approaches votes on Coastal Empire Fairgrounds site map

By Site plan

Savannah City Council could decide the future of the former Coastal Empire Fairgrounds ownership by the end of the month, according to Savannah City Manager Jay Melder.

The land has remained untapped since the 67-acre parcel at 4801 Meding Street was sold for $ 2.9 million in 2016.

Three companies are currently in the running to develop the property, and Melder said he hopes to have a recommendation that the board vote on at the October 28 board meeting.

Following:Project Fairgrounds set to transform community, but city isn’t listening to fears, neighbors say

“I think we are within reach of this, but I will not commit to it, but it is my hope,” said Melder, present an update on the board process at a board workshop on October 14.

The most recent request for proposals (RFP) was released in June 2020, with the board voting a few months later to accept proposals from the Savannah Bridge Development Team, Knott Development and the P3 Joint Venture Group.

The three groups presented their plans to council in July. The property’s potential concepts were also unveiled at open house events, which drew hundreds of residents from across the city.

The concepts encompass a wide variety of uses ranging from retail and commercial to housing, entertainment, and the film and television production space.

In his update to the council last week, Melder said the city is currently evaluating all proposers’ responses on 10 different obligations. These include traffic, parks and recreation, offices, zoning and parking, community plaza and green spaces. A proposal must satisfy all 10 elements in order to proceed to the next phase.

Following:Movie studios, shops, housing: this is what could happen at the Savannah Exhibition Center site

Foremost among these mandatory items is traffic, Melder said.

“We have neighborhood streets that have houses and driveways and we have limited rights of way on many streets that enter the property,” he said.

“We have seen a lot of traffic calming requests historically, especially on Meding Street, but all along this corridor and some challenges and issues historically, with the traffic volumes in the neighborhood.”

According to figures presented at the council workshop, the adjacent streets around the property register just over 8,000 vehicle movements per day. The Knott plan will increase this number to 19,769; P3 at 12,946 and Savannah Bridge at 20,968.

Melder said that with regard to traffic, the assessment plan will examine whether or not the surrounding streets can adequately handle the increase in the number of vehicles per day; whether or not the level of service of the surrounding traffic infrastructure would provide a reasonable level of service; and whether plans for residential and commercial uses are impractical or adversely affect neighborhoods and quality of life.

The P3 Joint Venture Group has a variety of uses for the former Coastal Empire Exhibition Center site.  Uses include sound stages, sports fields, residential and commercial uses.

Flood water and floodplain mitigation as well as zoning are also major concerns. The property has approximately 27 usable acres, of which 40 acres are in the floodplain.

For subscribers:Partnership, policy and projects: City of Savannah director Jay Melder talks about his first month

The site is currently zoned Conservation – Park and will have to go through the rezoning process for a certain amount of zoning change, regardless of which proposal comes to mind.

The next phase for proposals that meet the 10 mandatory elements will be the economic analysis. The economic analysis will be determined by the total increase in the appraised value of the property due to the planned improvements to the developments, plus the sealed purchase price, Melder said.

“If a proposal is found to be unreasonable or has inappropriately inflated its value, it will also be rejected at this point,” he said.

The best proposal will go through a planned development process.

The story

The future of the site, which is one of the city’s largest undeveloped properties, has been the subject of discussion among community members and administrations for several years.

The city first reviewed the property in 2015 under former mayor Eddie DeLoach. At that time, most council members advocated affordable housing for the site, as well as outdoor recreation.

The housing plans were scrapped after neighboring residents and District 5 Alderman Estella Shabazz objected to the idea. The property is located in District 5.

Following:Home for decades, residents of Clearview have had 60 days to move. Affordable options are rare

In 2017, the board unanimously rejected an offer from the private investment group of state representative Craig Gordon, Aerospace Studios, to purchase approximately 15 acres of the property to develop a film and television production studio.

Gordon, who was not a candidate for re-election to the Georgia General Assembly in 2020, is a senior partner of the P3 Joint Venture group currently vying to develop the site.

Billed as a “live, work, play, eat and learn” project, the initial concept of the Savannah Bridge development team is divided into eight sites.  The plan includes housing, a movie studio, retail, and food and drink.

In 2019, city staff recommended that council issue a request for proposals to get a nonprofit to take one to two acres for $ 1 and develop it as a recreation facility. public at the expense of the organization.

This idea met with opposition from locals and Shabazz and did not take shape.

“I understand that I am the sixth city manager to work on this project and I intend to be the last city manager and move this project forward,” Melder told council.

Katie Nussbaum is the city and county government reporter for the Savannah Morning News. Contact her at [email protected] Twitter: KnussSMN

New Civic Campus Site Master Plan Approved by Ottawa City Council

By Site plan

OTTAWA-

City Council approved a master site plan for the new Civic Campus of The Ottawa Hospital, which is scheduled to open in 2028.

The $2.8 billion, 50-acre hospital will be located on federal land between Dows Lake and the Central Experimental Farm. The area of ​​the planned site consists of 44% buildings and landscaping, 22% buildings with green roofs and 34% green spaces and landscaping.

The site plan has already been approved by the planning committee and by the National Capital Commission, which controls the federal territory where the new campus will be built.

The council voted 19 to 4 in favor of the site’s master plan, with councilors Rawlson King, Catherine McKenney, Jeff Leiper and Shawn Menard voting against.

Councilors also approved a plan under which the mayor would write to federal environment and agriculture ministers, area MP Yasir Naqvi and the NCC to ensure the long-term protection of the Central Experimental Farm. .

The site was the source of controversy with area residents protesting the proposed above-ground parking garage and use of green space. The search for a new home for the nearly century-old Civic was turned upside down in 2015 when the newly elected federal Liberal government decided to revise the former Conservative government’s plan to build the new site directly across from the old one. The NCC had recommended building the new campus at Tunney’s Pasture, but The Ottawa Hospital’s Board of Trustees unanimously rejected the idea.

Construction of the new campus is expected to begin in 2024, by which time the current Civic Campus will be 100 years old.

Council greenlights site master plan for new Civic Hospital

By Site plan

The goal is to commission the $2.8 billion facility by 2028.

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City Council approved a site master plan for The Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic Campus, another hurdle now cleared in the hospital’s quest to get the $2.8 billion facility operational for 2028.

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By then, the current Civic on Carling Avenue will be over a century behind its opening date. Hospital officials and affiliates have emphasized the need and benefits of a contemporary, state-of-the-art regional hospital, and there appears to be little disagreement in this regard.

But the journey to Civic 2.0 has not been smooth, with controversy over site selection in the rear-view mirror, some lingering dissatisfaction over elements of the hospital plan, and debates to come over exactly how to link the hospital to the city’s light rail transit system. , and other aspects of the site.

City staff recommended approval of the master plan, concluding that it demonstrated that transportation, parking, LRT access, cycling and pedestrian infrastructure, built heritage and other matters “have been carefully considered and designed”. Some components will still need to be fine-tuned, staff said, as the hospital submits site plan control requests to implement the various phases of the project (the master plan outlines 10 extending to 2048).

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Staff will have delegated authority to approve such requests unless a ward councilor decides to revoke it, planner Sean Moore explained Wednesday. That said, staff have already committed to presenting the site plan control application for the hospital parking garage – part of the first phase of development – ​​to the planning committee for approval.

Council voted 19-4 Wednesday in favor of the master plan, with councilors Jeff Leiper, Shawn Menard, Rawlson King and Catherine McKenney opposing it.

“I think as a city we need to ask for better in this case,” Menard said, sharing his belief that the plan falls short when it comes to SLR integration and parking plans and that there are better alternative designs for the site footprint that would reduce the loss of trees and green space and improve the transit experience.

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Stephen Willis, the city’s general manager of planning, infrastructure and economic development, said the hospital’s architects carried out several iterations of the site layout, taking into account considerations such as the distance needed from to a railway line to avoid interference with medical instruments, geotechnical problems and protection. of trees currently on the site.

“Our staff regularly challenged them, as did the (National Capital Commission) staff, about their setup, and they presented this as the best arrangement for the needs of health care delivery in establishment,” Willis said.

For his part, Mayor Jim Watson refuted nearly every argument against the hospital’s current plan: the significant cost and other hurdles associated with burying the planned parking lot; TOH’s commitments to green and public spaces, tree preservation, and replanting five trees for every tree felled; the need for on-site parking for hospital users; and plan provisions for direct and weather-protected LRT connectivity, transport monitoring and a transport demand management plan.

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“I believe that after 14 years of planning, we are finally in a position to move this file forward and help bring this new world-class hospital to Ottawa,” said Mr. Watson. He told his fellow board members “there are municipalities across Ontario that would be happy to receive these coveted and scarce health care funds to build a hospital in their community.”

Ahead of the Planning Committee’s vote on the site’s master plan earlier this month, Joanne Read, TOH’s Executive Vice President and Chief Planning and Development Officer, was asked what would happen next. it was not immediately approved.

Ms. Read said she thought the project’s construction and completion timelines would be in jeopardy and was also concerned that TOH was the only one “knocking on the province’s door” over funding.

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Committee members tempered their approval of the site’s master plan by asking staff to work with TOH on elements of cycling infrastructure, tree planting and a substantial reduction in surface parking.

Regional Councilor Leiper also obtained approval to require certain conditions of a neighborhood traffic study and that the TOH fund recommended mitigation efforts based on this study.

Staff were also tasked with ensuring that the internal road network proposed for the new Civic could accommodate local transit services and that site lighting met certain conditions.

All board members, including Watson, approved a board proposal. Riley Brockington will ask Watson to write to federal cabinet ministers, new MP for Ottawa Center Yasir Naqvi and National Capital Commission Board Chair calling for federal legislation to ensure long-term land protection remains of the Central Experimental Farm and a new master plan for the farm.

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Naqvi pledged during the election campaign to introduce a law to protect the farm in perpetuity.

Paul Saurette, a member of the Dows Lake Residents Association’s special committee on the new hospital, called the committee members’ motions “very genuine and constructive attempts at problem solving” and said the association is looking forward to it. to partner with the city and the hospital for, for example, the planned neighborhood traffic study.

Karen Wright, president of the Civic Hospital Neighborhood Association, shared a similar mindset on Wednesday and said her association would remain engaged with any upcoming site plans. Already, she and other community association officials have met with the hospital to go over details of planned parking.

The site plan control app will be available on the city’s website in the coming weeks, according to Moore, the planner, and residents will have an opportunity to provide feedback.

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Rezoning, site plan approved for Maplewood Meats

By Site plan

By Kevin Boneske
Editor-in-chief


HOWARD – An application by T-Bone Investments to rezone two parcels along Milltown Road, from R-5 Rural Estate Residential to B-2 Highway Commercial, was approved last month by the Village council.

The Howard Plan Commission recommended the zoning change a week earlier, when it also supported a site plan for Maplewood Meats for the construction of a parking lot and the Evergreen Avenue connection proposed by the Department of Wisconsin Transportation and Milltown Road – part of which will be vacated by DOT and the Village – and reconfigure and expand the main parking lot west of Maplewood Meats.

Community Development Director Dave Wiese said the project is intended to stay ahead of the construction of the State Highway 29 / County VV interchange.

“The village will have to evacuate certain rights-of-way,” he said. “There are going to have to be some improvements. Things are going to have to be, obviously, buttoned up.”

Wiese said the project is consistent with the development of the region.

“Their long term plan was to develop the property,” he said.

Devin Winter of Excel Engineering spoke on behalf of the project last month, when he told the panel that the two parcels under zoning are on the north side of the existing Milltown Road.

“What is happening is that the requester more or less makes the connection from the project, or what is currently under construction as Evergreen (Avenue), by connecting to what is the existing Milltown Road for a connection to their existing parking lot. ” he said.

Winter said the part of Milltown Road vacated will be divided among the landowners.

“The north side would then be a trailer / truck parking lot (zone), with additional vehicle parking to the north – future expansion in the north for future expansion in the east,” he said. “And then, as part of that as well, there would be an extension of the parking lot of their main facility, which they currently have right now, and then resolving the grading and storm water issues as part of the project. . “

Village president Burt McIntyre said he was excited about the project.

“I know (Maplewood Meats) has been trying to grow for a while, and you want to get that cork out of the bottle,” he said.

Redlands Shopping Center’s New Site Plan Reduces Some Building Heights – Redlands Daily Facts

By Site plan

The vision for the mixed-use redevelopment of the Redlands Shopping Center site is becoming clearer, with developers now reducing some proposed building heights.

In a presentation to the Redlands Planning Commission on Tuesday, October 12, developer Village Partners Ventures LLC, shared plans for approximately 700 housing units with all previously offered fifth floor items removed, except for the restaurant on the roof.

Preliminary plans presented to the commission in April and city council in May called for up to 722 housing units and four-story buildings on average, although some parts have grown to five stories, mostly around a public square.

  • Ongoing plans for a mixed-use development on the Redlands Shopping Center site were presented to the Redlands Planning Commission on Tuesday, October 12, 2021. This artist rendering of State Street Village shows what the view is from the corner of Third Street and Redlands Boulevard would appear to be looking east. (Courtesy City of Redlands)

  • Ongoing plans for a mixed-use development on the Redlands Shopping Center site were presented to the Redlands Planning Commission on Tuesday, October 12, 2021. This artist rendering of State Street Village shows what the view is from the corner of Third Street and Redlands Boulevard would appear to face west. (Courtesy City of Redlands)

  • Ongoing plans for a mixed-use development on the Redlands Mall site were presented to the Redlands Planning Commission on Tuesday, October 12, 2021. This artist rendering of State Street Village shows what the view of State would look like Street from Paseo Comme. (Courtesy City of Redlands)

Kaitlin Morris, the builder’s development manager, told commissioners on Tuesday that after conversations with the community, “there is no particularly clear consensus regarding the elements of the fifth floor.”

In response, she added, “we wanted to be respectful and listen to this concern.”

The new plans call for the construction of five buildings, including a 7,500 square foot private amenity building with a swimming pool. In addition, the developers offer:

• 71,500 square feet of commercial floor for retail businesses and restaurants

• 12,500 square feet of office space

• a public square of half an acre

• an above-ground parking structure on five levels with 686 spaces surrounded by offices, shops and apartments

• two underground car parks with a total of 494 spaces

One of the structures would be a 14,500 square foot building at the southeast corner of East Citrus Avenue and Eureka Street for the CVS Pharmacy, which will need to be relocated from its current space to the mall.

The three-story elements of the buildings would be up to about 50 feet high, and the four-story parts would be 50 to 60 feet high, according to a report written to the commission. The tower elements and architectural projections on some of the buildings would rise to around 75 feet.

For reference, a flag pole at the corner of Vine and Cajon streets, the Redlands Liberty Pole, is 120 feet tall, according to the plaque at its base.

John Ellis, one of the architects on the project, told commissioners the plans were inspired by the city’s past and present.

“The architectural journey through this project has been very focused on the history of Redlands and respecting the tradition of most commercial buildings as well as municipal buildings,” he said, highlighting the inspiration found in the Fox Theater, AK Smiley Public Library, Brookside Post Office, Academy of Music building, and the smaller blocks that had been divided by Third and State Streets before the mall was built.

Landmarks welcoming people to the site would include tower elements, such as Third Street and Redlands Boulevard which has large balconies, and an Ellis called the “Lantern Building” on Eureka Street with a multi-story window.

Commission President Conrad Guzkowski questioned the need for large balconies, adding “they are prominent to say the least”.

Guzkowski also said the public square needs more grandeur, like a large water feature, and the CVS building needs more design work on the sides not facing the street.

Guzkowski said he was more than impressed with the team and the project, although they still have a few details to work on.

“It’s a remarkable compilation of work,” he said.

If the project is approved, the development would be built over several years, according to a written report. The first phase would consist of constructing buildings at the west end near Eureka Street and starting work on the new CVS site. A second phase would bring a new building to the northeast corner of the shopping center site. The final phase would be to move CVS and then construct the buildings at the southeast corner of the property.

Preliminary plans were shared in the spring when the developer requested the voter support exemption. U measurement development rules.

The two-decade-old Slow Growth Initiative imposes restrictions on development, including fees to mitigate impacts on infrastructure and services; prohibit the increase in admissible residential densities; and demand projects to make sure they don’t increase traffic.

The proponent requested that the transit-focused shopping center project be removed from the measure under an exemption for “development directly related to proposed Metrolink stations in the City of Redlands.”

The council granted this request in May.

The next step for the project is to go through the environmental review process, which will likely go to public review in November. The project could then return to the committee in December before moving on to the board for final approvals.

Site map for the approved condo development in Grand Oaks

By Site plan

By Alyssa Schnugg

News editor

[email protected]

Despite concerns expressed by several residents of Grand Oaks, the Oxford Planning Commission approved the Sitemap for the new Grand Oaks Village on Augusta Drive Monday.

The new phase of the planned unit development, Grand Oaks, will be a 21 unit common interest development, or condominiums. Each unit will be a three bedroom single family home with a two car garage.

The property is located on 6 acres in the Grand Oaks development between the Rosemont and Grand Ridge subdivisions, west of Augusta Drive.

Condominiums are listed as “special use” for the neighboring residential area in the Land Use Planning Code, which means that additional standards are attached to the use, but no Planning Commission approval is required. to authorize use.

Grand Oaks residents who spoke at the meeting on Monday were primarily concerned about traffic and on-street parking that the addition of 21 new homes could bring to Augusta Drive and Rosemont Loop.

Augusta Drive will be the only road entering and exiting the subdivision.

Kimberly Stewart, who lives on Augusta Drive, said traffic problems would not be an easy solution.

“If that was a simple solution – let’s paint some yellow stripes, let’s say speed bumps – it would have already been solved,” she told the planning committee. “I am pro-Oxford development. But I am also for protecting what we have. If you have infrastructure struggling to support existing development, why add more cars to a road that endangers the safety of residents, workers, and children? “

The planning commission reminded meeting attendees that its job was only to review the site plan for development and ensure it complied with city ordinances.

It was suggested that neighbors bring traffic and parking issues to the council of aldermen.

The site plan was approved by 6 votes to 1.


Chelsea Square final site plan set to be presented to Sylvan Township Council

By Site plan

The project for an 81-unit apartment complex called Chelsea Square is moving forward in the planning process with the Township of Sylvan.

A public hearing was held at the Township Planning Commission meeting on September 23 on the final site plan for the multi-family residential apartment complex. The developer has received recommended approval.

The final site plan will now need to be submitted to City Council for an official decision.

At the Township Board of Directors meeting on October 5, Sylvan Township Supervisor Kathleen Kennedy said the final site plan had been approved by the Planning Commission and the lawyer was currently working on a development agreement for review by the township board of directors.

There is no timeline for the final board review yet, but Kennedy said she expects it to be an upcoming board meeting of the canton.

According to the township staff report on the project, the site plan provides for 81 units of multi-family apartments at market price. The zoning of this new project will use two plots as a multi-family residence according to a consent judgment filed in December 2016.

The report states that the developer’s description indicates that the project is proposed to be built in a single phase and includes the construction of 17 buildings that will have access from Pielemeir Drive, which is a public road. The development would have public services provided by the Sylvan Township water and sewer system, and would also have an internal private road network unless accepted by the Washtenaw County Road Commission. The apartments will be owned and managed by Group 10 Development.

The development is proposed to be located on 16 acres of land. It is expected that there will be 37,800 square feet of open space while each apartment unit is expected to be approximately 1,300 to 1,500 square feet.

Cairn PLC begins development of the Cork site on a 472-unit project near the village of Douglas

By Site development

SITE development work has begun on a £150m+ new home development by developers PLC Cairn, on a valley site on the edge of Douglas village in Cork, close to a new school in being built by BAM.

Called Bayly, the 472-unit scheme on Carrigaline Road in Castletreasure is the first scheme of Cairn PLC founded in 2015 in Cork, having acquired a number of sites in Ireland via a €503 million portfolio sale to the Ulster Bank with Lone Star, Project Clear.

The Castletreasure site acquired by Cairn PLC was re-offered in 2016 for €25 million but is now being developed in 2021 by Cairn PLC for 472 units

Cairn bought around the same time another PLC, Glenveagh, which entered the Cork market; while Glenveagh has steadily expanded its presence and has recorded several hundred sales from Cork to date, notably to Blackrock and Maryborough Hill, Cairn has not, to date, made a move from concrete yards to Munster.

Cairn, which has stated its target of building 2,500 Irish homes by 2021, primarily in Dublin and Leinster, has 16 sites listed on its website, including Dublin, Kilkenny, Kildare and Wicklow, has two backstage sites in Galway and Castletreasure Liege.

After acquiring the sites from The Project Clear, Cairn quickly sought to sell three of its Cork sites, the Good Shepherd Convent in Sunday’s Well (now ravaged by fire and in new hands), a site in Victoria Cross and 52 acres in Castletreasure, Douglas, which had been partnered with Cork developers Frinailla, in a £30million bid.

Left unsold at its 2016 price guide of €25m (obtaining offers of around €18m via Savills agents), was the largest site, Castletreasure of 52-acre land opposite Douglas Golf Club , in a green valley. Frinailla had bought it at the height of the market, in the mid-2000s, to displace the Douglas GAA club from the village and finance the exchange through the sale of houses here as well.

Sisk contractors perform preliminary infrastructure and service work.  No main construction contractor has yet been appointed.
Sisk contractors perform preliminary infrastructure and service work. No main construction contractor has yet been appointed.

Cairn PLC obtained planning approval in October 2019 via a Strategic Housing Development (SHD) application with Meitheal Architects for this Castletreasure site, after an oral hearing covering some particular issues such as stormwater management.

    Site activity at Carr's Hill, Co Cork, where a new school is being delivered.
Site activity at Carr’s Hill, Co Cork, where a new school is being delivered.

The planning grant – one of the largest in the Cork region in recent years – is for 234 semi-detached and terraced houses, 160 flats and 78 duplexes, with 4.4ha of parkland and amenity space.

Giving the green light to construction, Bord Pleanala said the development on the edge of Douglas was a reasonable development and “would not seriously impair the residential or visual amenities of the area or nearby properties, would be acceptable in terms of design urban, height, and quantum of development.

Sisk contractors are on site, doing services, infrastructure, a bridge and a partial realignment of the road.

A sales agent has not yet been appointed, and it is unclear whether Cairn has pre-construction agreements in place for the program tranches.

Last night a spokesperson said: ‘Cairn is looking forward to bringing new homes to the market in Castletreasure in 2022 in what will be a multi-phase, multi-year development.

DETAILS: www.cairnhomes.com

Richmond Heights council committee approves Belle Oaks final site plan – including Meijer

By Site plan

RICHMOND HEIGHTS, Ohio – The City Council Planning and Zoning Committee on Tuesday (October 5) approved a final site plan for the Belle Oaks Market project at the Richmond Town Square shopping center, 700 Richmond Road.

The plan will now be passed for a full council vote next week.

The site plan, which received Planning Commission approval the night before, includes two big changes from the architects of the second phase plan Bialosky Cleveland, working for the California developer. DealPoint Merrill, showed the board last fall.

First, the design was drastically altered to accommodate a company that would become the largest in the $ 200 million development – Meijer, a chain of Midwestern super centers that sells food, fashion, electronics and more.

A stand-alone Meijer building will be constructed just south of the current Life Storage (formerly Macy’s) building, measuring 159,000 square feet, along with a garden center that can be outdoors or indoors.

The second change is the one that eliminates Regal Cinema from Belle Oaks. Regal, which had been part of the old Richmond Town Square for years, was originally to be kept as an entertainment option at Belle Oaks, a mixed-use development that will include shops and 798 luxury apartments, as well as amenities such as as a park, outdoor swimming pool, underground and above ground parking, and more.

The final Belle Oaks site plan, with the phase two buildings in white and the phase one buildings in gray. Wilson Mills Road is at the top left, while Richmond Road is at the top right. (Jeff Piorkowski, special for cleveland.com)

The Regal Cinema building, like the rest of the mall, will be demolished, likely in the first quarter of 2022.

In order to make way for the Meijer Building – which will include a large car park alongside the project which faces Wilson Mills Road – last year’s plan of a street cutting through the center of the development and heading towards Wilson Mills Road was amended.

The street, lined with apartment buildings, will now curve east around the Meijer Building before emptying into the eastern end of the development on Wilson Mills Road. Meijer will have its own separate entrance to Wilson Mills.

There will be two entrances / exits along Richmond Road as indicated on the previous plans. These entrances / exits will be located across from Hillary Lane (leading to and from the first phase of development north) and across from Geraldine Avenue.

The council’s amended plans seen on Tuesday were for the second phase of the project. The Council approved the plans for the first phase last year. On Tuesday, the council committee approved the entire package, consisting of the two phases.

In total, the project will include 24 acres of green space, which represents 35% of the 1.7 million square foot development area. Eight multi-family / commercial buildings will be constructed in the second phase. Other exterior buildings along Richmond Roads and Wilson Mills Roads remain options. The first phase will include five new buildings.

“This is a big hurdle to overcome and there is one more to come: a development deal,” said Ward 4 Councilor Mark Alexander, who chairs the Planning and Zoning Committee.

Besides a development agreement, in which taxes are distributed among the different parties involved, the city’s building commissioner Jim Urankar said developers must also submit lighting plans for council approval, separate landscaping and signage.

In addition, city council must approve every building constructed in Belle Oaks.

Alexander noted that the Meijer building planned for Belle Oaks will be different from those that currently exist, such as the store of Mentor at 9200 Mentor Ave.

“It’s a little different from the stores in Mentor, Avon – the stores that are in that area – where they’re really trying to break down the mass of their buildings, trying to implement different materials, adding glass components. , ”Said Brian Meng, associate director of Bialosky Cleveland.

“This is the prototype they are thinking of here as a reference. “

As part of the approved plan, the mall’s Firestone Complete Auto Care will be relocated to the area along Richmond Road just north of Walgreen’s.

When asked if Planet Fitness – still open at the mall site – would be part of Belle Oaks Marketplace, Meng said, “At the moment there really aren’t any tenants listed outside of Meijer, for phase 2. It could very well be moved indoors, but that’s under negotiation.

To see the sitemap as it was a year ago, visit the website Belle Oaks Marketplace website home page.

Read more of the Messenger of the Sun.

Cairn PLC starts the development of the Cork site on a 472 unit project near the village of Douglas

By Site development

SITE development work has started for a development of over 150 million euros of new homes by PLC developers Cairn, on a valley site on the outskirts of Cork village in Douglas, near a new school under construction by BAM.

Called Bayly, the 472 unit program on Carrigaline Road at Castletreasure is Cairn PLC’s first program founded in 2015 in Cork, having acquired a number of sites in Ireland through a € 503 million portfolio sale to Ulster Bank with Lone Star, Project Clear.

The Castletreasure site acquired by Cairn PLC was reopened in 2016 for 25 million euros but is being developed in 2021 by Cairn PLC for 472 units

Cairn bought around the same time another limited company, Glenveagh, entered the Cork market; While Glenveagh has continued to expand its presence and has recorded several hundred sales to date from Cork, notably to Blackrock and Maryborough Hill, Cairn has so far not made any concrete site relocations to Munster.

Cairn, which has announced its goal of building 2,500 Irish houses in 2021, mainly in Dublin and Leinster, has 16 sites listed on its website including Dublin, Kilkenny, Kildare and Wicklow, has two sites in the wings in Galway and Castletreasure Liege.

After acquiring the sites The Project Clear, Cairn quickly sought to sell three of its Cork sites, the Good Shepherd Convent in Sunday’s Well (now destroyed by fire and in new hands), a site in Victoria Cross and 52 acres to Castletreasure, Douglas, who had been associated with the developers of Cork Frinailla, in a offer of 30 million euros.

Unsold at its £ 25million 2016 price guide (obtaining bids of around £ 18million via Savills agents), was the largest site, the 52-acre Castle Treasure Lands across from the Douglas Golf Club, in a green setting. Frinailla had bought it at the peak of the market in the mid-2000s to move the Douglas GAA club out of the village and finance the exchange through the sale of houses here as well.

Sisk contractors perform preliminary infrastructure and service work.  No main contractor for the constructions has yet been appointed.
Sisk contractors perform preliminary infrastructure and service work. No main contractor for the constructions has yet been appointed.

Cairn PLC obtained planning approval in October 2019 via a Strategic Housing Development (SHD) application with Meitheal Architects for this Castletreasure site, after an oral hearing addressing some specific issues such as stormwater management.

    Construction site activity in Carr's Hill, Co Cork, where a new school is being delivered.
Construction site activity in Carr’s Hill, Co Cork, where a new school is being delivered.

The town planning grant – one of the largest in the Cork region in recent years – covers 234 semi-detached and terraced houses, 160 apartments and 78 duplexes, with 4.4 ha of parkland and amenity space.

In giving the green light for construction, Bord Pleanala said the development of the Douglas Edge was reasonable development and “would not seriously impair the residential or visual amenities of the area or property nearby, would be acceptable in terms of of urban design, height, and quantum of development.

Sisk contractors are on site, performing services, infrastructure, a bridge and partial road realignment.

No sales agent has been named yet, and it is unclear whether Cairn has any pre-construction deals for portions of the program.

A spokesperson said last night that “Cairn looks forward to bringing new homes to Castletreasure in 2022 in what will be a phased, multi-year development.”

DETAILS: www.cairnhomes.com

NCC Approves New Civic Site Plan and Requires LRT Connection

By Site plan

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The National Capital Commission on Tuesday gave its blessing to the Ottawa Hospital’s new Civic Campus site plan, but insists the hospital include a “seamless, intuitive and weather-protected” link to the line. from nearby Trillium LRT.

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This connection for LRT commuters is one of the major unresolved issues with the $2.8 billion hospital development at the corner of Carling Avenue and Preston Street. The city’s planning committee gave its own approval to the site plan on Monday, but left open the question of the LRT connection.

It will be approximately 400 meters or a five minute walk from the Carling LRT station to the main hospital entrance.

City planners say an underground tunnel or an overhead walkway are “feasible” connections, but the decision on which to build is still two or three years away.

“Strong transit connectivity” was one of the top concerns the NCC heard from the public during its consultations at the hospital site, said NCC CEO Tobi Nussbaum.

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“We have identified several areas that will require further work, further elaboration, further discussion with the hospital,” Nussbaum said.

“I think we all recognize that seamless, integrated, weather-protected connections between the hospital and the future transit station are very, very important.”

Any new site design proposal must be submitted to the NCC for approval.

The hospital is slated to open in 2028 and aims to have 35% of its visitors arrive by public transit or active transportation, rising to 65% by its completion in 2048.

“We really want to do everything we can to help the hospital achieve this goal so that the focus on transit integration will be very important in the years to come,” Nussbaum said.

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The NCC is also pushing to improve pedestrian and cycle connections to the hospital.

The hospital site plan includes a four-story, 2,400-space parking garage with total on-site parking for 3,099 cars, two more than the minimum required by city zoning rules. The garage will be built with a green roof, complemented by trees and the NCC also wants to ensure that the roof will be well maintained and that public access will never be restricted. It also requires “the minimization of tree felling and extensive replanting” during construction. The loss of trees is another sore point for opponents of the hospital project.

The NCC’s approval sets the stage for a final vote on the site plan at Ottawa City Council on October 13.

(The NCC held its Annual Public Meeting on Monday evening, but a technical issue prevented it from being livestreamed as scheduled. Audio of the meeting can be found on the NCC’s Youtube channel.)

  1. A July file photo of the area near Carling and Preston, where The Ottawa Hospital's new Civic campus is to be built.

    Planning Committee Approves Site Master Plan for Future Civic Hospital

  2. Development renderings for the new Civic Hospital campus included an entrance for Dow's Lake station on the south side of Carling Avenue, though officials said they were investigating an overpass or underpass to pedestrians leading to the station from the north side of Carling.

    Funding and Transit Service Affect Key Considerations for Civic Hospital Access to the Trillium Line

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Planning committee approves master plan for future Civic hospital site

By Site plan

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A two-day planning committee meeting ended Monday with a 6: 2 vote in favor of a site master plan for the future Civic Hospital at the Central Experimental Farm.

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The committee’s approval is one of many steps the Ottawa Hospital will need to take as it develops the $ 2.8 billion health care center at the east end of the farm near the Dow’s Lake. The new hospital, which will replace the existing Civic campus on Carling Avenue, is expected to open in 2028.

After hearing from dozens of public delegates on Friday, many of whom are still bitter about the site selection process, committee members waited until Monday to vote on the site map.

While the committee overwhelmingly supported the proposed site plan, several advisers predicted that there will be significant work to define the look and feel of the new hospital.

A major unresolved issue is how the hospital will be connected to the expanded Trillium Line, whose renovated Dow’s Lake station will be located on the north side of busy Carling Avenue.

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Stephen Willis, the city’s director general responsible for planning and infrastructure, said an underground pedestrian connection and an overpass are possible options to connect the hospital to the station, but that there might not be any decision before two or three years on which to build.

The hospital’s intention to build a four-story parking lot by 2024 is also of concern near the intersection of Carling Avenue and Preston Street. Willis said the hospital would cover up the Dows Lake scenic area garage.

  1. A June archive photo of The Ottawa Hospital Civic Campus.

    Egan: We “settled” on the new Civic; no wonder long faces

  2. Basic design concept for The Ottawa Hospital's new Civic campus, on land currently part of the Central Experimental Farm.  (Dow's Lake is in the foreground. The current hospital campus can be seen in the background, at the top of the photo.)

    Adam: The hospital will be built. Focus on protecting the rest of the Ottawa Central Experimental Farm

County of the river. Riley Brockington, whose department covers most of the hospital project site, said the Central Experimental Farm was “vulnerable” and that he wanted the federal government to prevent further deterioration of the open space.

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“The farm is not protected from development,” Brockington warned while calling for federal law to protect the farm. The committee unanimously agreed.

The city may already have the ear of the government. New Liberal Ottawa Center MP Yasir Naqvi made the legislative protection of the Central Experimental Farm part of his platform during the recent federal election campaign.

It’s important to integrate the new hospital into the surrounding green space, Rideau-Goulbourn council said. Scott Moffatt, who co-chairs the planning committee.

Moffatt said healthcare workers working under severe stress deserved access to a natural environment, not a “concrete jungle”. The mental health of employees at the new health facility should be part of the decision making that goes into planning for the hospital project, Moffatt said.

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Kitchissippi County. Jeff Leiper and Capital Co. Shawn Menard voted against the site plan, but received unanimous support for motions in amendment related to access to public transit, cycling infrastructure, tree planting and community consultation on transportation issues.

Menard lamented the “undemocratic” way in which the land was chosen for the new hospital. He argued that the site plan falls short of what the board expected to see presented by The Ottawa Hospital.

Committee members voting in favor of the site plan were Glen Gower, Catherine Kitts, Jean Cloutier, Tim Tierney, Brockington and Moffatt. Laura Dudas and Allan Hubley were not present for the vote.

The board will be invited to support the hospital’s sitemap at a meeting on October 13.

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3005 Bloor West Moves Forward with Request for Site Plan Approval

By Site plan

Plans for a 7-storey mixed-use building at 3005 Bloor Street West in the Kingsway area of ​​Etobicoke have moved forward. The development is located southwest of Bloor and Humbervale Boulevard, on the block east of Royal York Road. In November 2017, Bousfields Inc. filed a zoning change request on behalf of One Properties with the City of Toronto to allow for development of the site, and in July of this year, the developers submitted a request for approval of the updated sitemap.

Looking southwest to 3005 Bloor Street West, designed by Turner Fleischer Architects for One Properties

The site is currently occupied by a 2-storey building – a car detailing center on the first floor and commercial uses on the second floor – with surface parking. A 6-storey mixed-use building is located immediately to the west of the site, at the southeast corner of the intersection of Bloor Street West and Royal York Road, while single-storey and two-storey detached houses make up the district to the south. (One Properties also owns a single family home to the south at 14 Humbervale; this is not part of this application.) To the north and east of the site along Bloor Street West are mostly 1 and 2 story buildings. occupied by retailers and restaurants, sometimes with residential rental units above.

Residents can walk to Royal York Tube station in minutes, while several bus lines run north or south of the station.

Context of the 3005 Bloor Street West sector, image of Bousfields Inc.

The proposed 7-story mixed-use building that would replace the current building and parking lot is designed by Turner Fleischer Architects. The total gross floor area is 5,508 m². The mixed-use building faces Bloor with a 4-story podium, consistent with the height of the building immediately to the west, and is set back 2.4 meters from a new north property line (0.4 meters along the northern edge of the property are underway the City for a road widening allowance). Floors 2 to 6 overlook the setback by 1.2 meters, while floor 7 retreats 1.5 meters from the 6th. Approximately 532 m² of retail space in two units will face the sidewalk of Bloor Street.

South to 3005 Bloor Street West, designed by Turner Fleischer Architects for ONE Properties

The proposal includes 51 residential units in total, with a mix of 28 one-bedroom plus units (55%), 17 two-bedroom units (33%) and 6 three-bedroom units (12%).

Looking northwest across Humbervale Boulevard to 3005 Bloor Street West, designed by Turner Fleischer Architects for ONE Properties

Vehicle access to the site is via a private driveway connected to Boulevard Humbervale on the south side of the building. A total of 60 parking spaces – 49 for residents, 6 for visitors and 5 for retail – as well as 37 bicycle parking spaces are included on two underground levels. 6 short-term bicycle spaces are provided at ground level.

You can read more about our database file for the project, linked below. If you wish, you can join the conversation in the discussion thread associated with the project forum or leave a comment in the space provided on this page.

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