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May 2019

Penguins and Developers Reveal New Plans and Timeline for Civic Arena Site Development

By Site development

Pittsburgh Penguins CEO David Morehouse opened a public meeting Wednesday with a brief speech about the new “Centre District” project planned for Lower Hill. “What we’re going to do here is we’re going to build something big and we’re going to do well and do good in the community by doing it,” Morehouse said. The development would sit on the 28 acres formerly hosted by the Civic Arena. Currently, this area is made up of several parking lots and other mostly unused spaces. The development team said they worked closely with the Community Collaboration and Implementation Plan (CCIP) to build something that benefits both downtown Pittsburgh and the Greater Hill District. The new development team announced Wednesday includes Buccini/Pollin Group, which will serve as lead developer, and Intergen, a minority-owned development partner. The project will include a mix of residences, retail, office, entertainment and catering. It will also include retail, parks and green spaces. The project is expected to attract more than $750 million in private investment, more than 4,000 construction jobs and 3,000 permanent jobs, in addition to $25 million a year in tax revenue to benefit the city, schools of the city, county and commonwealth. “It’s not just any type of development. It’s a Hill District – Pittsburgh story,” said architect Vaki Mawema. Penguins general counsel Kevin Acklin, who helped work on previous iterations of the Civic Arena site when he was on staff with the city of Pittsburgh, has high hopes for the development project. “This is the biggest development the city of Pittsburgh has ever seen on this scale, and not just on this scale of development, but trying to make up for the mistakes of the past, trying to reconnect the neighborhood. Trying to create opportunities for African American developers and workers,” Acklin said. But some Lower Hill residents question whether the project provides enough affordable housing. Several people said they feared a repeat of Bakery Square, which they described as a situation in which affordable housing has been promised but not delivered.” We have the Hill District Community Plan which calls for 30% of all billed homes in the Lower Hill District to be affordable to families at a median income of 50% and that no unit offered is at that rent level,” said Carl. Redwood, of the Hill District Consensus Group. Redwood distributed flyers on Wednesday at the s of the event, which stated that the Greater Hill District Master Plan called for making at least 30% of units affordable housing for households earning less than 50% of the region’s median income. But under plans released Wednesday, only 20% of housing will be considered affordable and only at rates of 80%, 70% and 60% of the region’s median income. Developers told skeptical residents that the 20% had been agreed in 2014 by several Lower Hill stakeholders. But Redwood said his group was not invited to the table for those meetings, which followed the original blueprint from previous years. The hill, who may want to afford it, may not and may not be able to stay here, so it seems that you are building to attract, instead of building for the people who are already here, ”asked a wife to a developer. As concerns persist, developers said the number of affordable homes is still negotiable and said this was just the first of many public meetings.

Pittsburgh Penguins CEO David Morehouse opened a public meeting Wednesday with a brief speech about the new “Centre District” project planned for Lower Hill.

“What we’re going to do here is we’re going to build something big and we’re going to do well and do good in the community by doing it,” Morehouse said.

The development would sit on the 28 acres once housed by the Civic Arena. Currently, this area is made up of several parking lots and other mostly unused spaces.

The development team said they worked closely with the Community Collaboration and Implementation Plan (CCIP) to build something that benefits both downtown Pittsburgh and the Greater Hill District.

The new development team announced Wednesday includes Buccini/Pollin Group, which will serve as lead developer, and Intergen, a minority-owned development partner.

The project will include a mix of residential, commercial, office, entertainment and dining venues. It will also include retail, parks and green spaces.

The project is expected to attract more than $750 million in private investment, more than 4,000 construction jobs and 3,000 permanent jobs, in addition to $25 million a year in tax revenue to benefit the city, schools in city, county and commonwealth.

“It’s not just any type of development. It’s a Hill District – Pittsburgh story,” said architect Vaki Mawema.

Penguins general counsel Kevin Acklin, who helped work on previous iterations of the Civic Arena site when he was on staff with the city of Pittsburgh, has high hopes for the development project.

“This is the biggest single development the City of Pittsburgh has ever seen on this scale, and not just on this scale of development, but trying to make up for the mistakes of the past, trying to reconnect the neighborhood. Trying to create opportunities for African American developers and workers,” Acklin said.

But some Lower Hill residents question whether the project provides enough affordable housing. Several people said they feared a repeat of Bakery Square, which they described as a situation in which affordable housing was promised but not delivered.

“We have the Hill District Community Plan which calls for 30% of all billed homes in the Lower Hill District to be affordable to families at a median income of 50% and no proposed unit to be at that level of rent,” Carl said. Redwood, of the Hill District Consensus Group.

Redwood handed out flyers at the event on Wednesday, which said the Greater Hill District Master Plan called for making at least 30% of units affordable housing for households earning less than 50% of the city’s median income. region.

But according to plans released Wednesday, only 20% of housing will be considered affordable and only at rates of 80%, 70% and 60% of the region’s median income.

Developers told skeptical residents that the 20% was agreed upon in 2014 by several Lower Hill stakeholders. But Redwood said his group was not invited to the table for those meetings, which followed the original blueprint from previous years.

“People here on the hill, who may want to afford it, may not be able and will not be able to stay here, so it looks like you are building to attract, instead of building for the people who are already here. , ” a woman asked a developer.

As concerns persist, developers said the number of affordable homes is still negotiable and said this was just the first of many public meetings.